Podcasts about Obvious

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  • 1,617PODCASTS
  • 2,231EPISODES
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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Obvious

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Latest podcast episodes about Obvious

Bom dia, Obvious
#116/ fracassando com gosto, com Silvio Rodrigues

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:06


Se você não for ao baile, nunca será rejeitado, mas também nunca poderá dançar. É com uma das minhas frases favoritas da escritora Maeve Binchy que abro o programa de hoje lembrando que só não fracassa quem não se arrisca. E quem não arrisca, também não se diverte. Mas para além de danças e decepções que nos tornam quem somos tanto quanto sonhos que se realizam, muitas vezes os fracassos ensinam mais que as vitórias. Assim como críticas podem dar mais vontade de evoluir que elogios. A positividade tóxica é persistente em nos fazer acreditar que tudo vai dar certo sempre. "Basta querer" - Será mesmo? Até porque as vezes o melhor que pode acontecer é dar errado mesmo. Muitos ganhos vêm fantasiados de perdas porque não raras vezes as grandes lições são fruto de dores que podem até parecer o fim da linha. Seja um relacionamento que deu errado, um projeto que não foi pra frente, uma apresentação que foi um desastre: será que a temperatura de sucesso está sendo medida pelo quanto você está feliz ou pelo quanto você está aparentando estar ganhando no jogo da vida para os outros? Como diz o meu convidado de hoje: fracasse, a vida não é um portfólio. Bom Dia, Obvious! Hoje, Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious conversa com Silvio Rodrigues, idealizador e estilista da Fracasse.

Elevating Motherhood
128. Going Grey: The Ups & Downs of Growing Out My Natural Hair at 40

Elevating Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 38:42


My hair may be changing, but so am I. Growing out my grey is about soooooooo much more than hair. A year in, I'm more genuinely confident –that doesn't mean I love every day, but my gosh, I see the growth literally and figuratively. I see the beauty and the potential. Maybe it's because I'm a mom, but I know how quickly this transition will fly by, even if it takes years. In this episode I talk about: · Why I'm growing out my grey · Shout out to my hairdresser Tiana · How it all started · How it's going · Vanity · Non-toxic shift · Primally Pure · The ups & downs of growing out my grey · Reflection · Self acceptance · Slowing down · The slow process of growing out my grey · Detachment · Understanding my whys behind my choice · Other people's reactions to my decision · Feeling “old” or looking “old” with grey hair · The disbelief of others that I'm actually doing it · Obvious disapproval of others · Insults—intentional or not · The people who love it · Authenticity · How others have inspired me · How I've kept that ripple of inspiration going · Deep, instant connections · “You know you could just dye it” reactions · Why others choose to grow their grey · Months of unfolding · Endless support of Silver Sisters · #silversisters · #grombre · #growingoutmygrey · #greyhair · #grayhair · #silverhair · #greyhairmovement · Two funny stories about growing out my grey · Brad Paisley's song “Then” · Fertility = youth · Different perspectives on aging

Dynamic Independence
The Obvious Begins To Become Clear

Dynamic Independence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:52


We discuss the latest in what appears to be actions that are obviously clear at this point about the intentions of the elite. What other conclusions could it be? What will be the backlash for places such as businesses and others who are complicit in what is taking place? Also, we talk the latest on what this will mean to the coming supply chain disruptions, and upcoming energy crisis. And, the domestic problems of China are very little known. What are the issues that they are facing financially and economically, and what does this mean for you? We ask the questions.

Get Him Keep Him Podcast
How to Turn a Guy on Over Text Without Being Obvious

Get Him Keep Him Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:30


Do you want to know how to turn a guy on over text without being obvious? Then you will love THIS VIDEO in which you'll discover an incredible "love text message": http://www.gethimkeephim.com/text  (This is an affiliate link. If you click through and make a purchase, I'll earn a commission, at no additional cost to you) Is there anything you want to discuss with me? I'll do everything in my power to make sure that you get and keep him: http://gethimkeephim.com/skype 

Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life
The Obvious Is Never The Whole Truth

Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:08


Most humans are run by illusions and you and I are no exception! However, the truth is living silently inside us, waiting for us to take a journey and discover our own awesomeness. I'll share what the journey is and ask you to evaluate where you are in it and what you can do next. Enjoy! Michelle@GrowBy1.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/michelle-burkhard/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michelle-burkhard/support

Motoring Podcast - News Show
How Obvious - 12 October 2021

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:52


FOLLOW UP: HYPER-MILING A MIRAI AGAINIn the United States a Toyota Mirai has driven 845 miles, on a single tank, to break the official record. The journey, which took two days, was carried out by Wayne Gerdes and Bob Winger in California at the end of August. TO find out more, click here for the Top Gear article. GENEVA MOTOR SHOW POSTPONED AGAINGeneva Motor Show has again been postponed, this time due to “industry wide issues”. To find out more, click the Autocar article here. FUNDING DROPS FOR ROAD MAINTENANCE The Local Government Association has stated that the Department of Transport (DoT) has reduced the funding for local road maintenance by about £400 million in the last year. The calculations for making the roads truly fit for purpose is an eye-water 10 billion, so to lose this amount is a huge dent in keeping the infrastructure of Britain fit for purpose. To read more, click here for the YesAuto article. BMW M DIVISION GETS A NEW OLD BOSSThe previous head of the M division, Frank van Meel, returns to his position as Markus Flasch moves to the position of overall vehicle development for luxury, upper and mid-range cars in BMW. To read more, click the EVO article here. MCLAREN GROUP'S CASH INJECTION COMES WITH CONDITIONSMcLaren Group is having to appoint five new board members as part of the conditions for the latest £550 million injection of funding. To find out more, click here for the EVO article. THOUSANDS VOTE TO BAN CARS FROM BERLINOver 50,000 people have signed a petition to ban all private cars from approximately 34 square miles of Berlin. There are stages to go through, but this radical plan could be made law. To find out more, click the Autocar story here. PUBLIC WIRELESS EV CHARGING TRIAL BEGINChar.gy has started public trials in Bedfordshire, with modified Renault Zoes and their induction wireless charging pads. Their plan is to make EV charging without cables and especially for those without off-street parking, viable. To read more, click here for the Autocar article. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-NEW NEW CAR NEWSMG ZS EV MG has updated their SUV EV, called the ZS. Now with a refreshed exterior design and a longer range up to 273 miles, an increase of 110 on the previous version. Further details on the specifications as well as pricing is expected next month. To find out more, click the YesAuto article here. Piëch GTPiëch Automotive will be launching the Piëch GT, a 595hp grand tourer, in 2024, with a range in the region of 311 miles. This sticks quite closely to the original concept revealed a couple of years ago. TO find out more, click the EVO article here. WRC: DRIVER CONFIRMATIONSThe WRC driver swap season has now ended, with the three teams confirming who will be driving for them next year. The big news, for M-Sport, is that Craig Breen has a two year contract to drive the Puma. Find out more about that by clicking the DirtFish article here. Hyundai announced that Soldberg and Sordo will share the seat of the third car, to find out more about that, click here for the DirtFish article. Ending all speculation, Ogier has confirmed he will race next season, but his co-driver of many years will retire. Ogier is going to share the third car with Lappi, who has been in the rallying wilderness since Citroen left. To read more about that, click the DirtFish article here. LUNCHTIME READ: THE HANDBOOK OF SLOANE RANGER CARS - PEUGEOT 504 & 505 ESTATESGiles Chapman, writing for Hagerty, takes us through why the Sloan Ranger would go for the Peugeot 504 and 505 estates. Click the link here, to understand why these cars are so special even though they did not go for flamboyant engineering like the Citroens and Renaults of the same era. LIST OF THE WEEK: 10 JAPANESE KEI CARS WE'D LOVE TO OWNKei cars are a quirk of the Japanese market due to legislation, but that doesn't mean we don't look fondly on from afar. YesAuot has suggested the best ten that we wish we could get hold of. Click the link here to run through the options, then tell Alan and Andrew if you agree with their choice and tell them what you would have. AND FINALLY: RENAULT TWIZZY SELLS FOR £27,500A Renault Twizzy, with design cues inspired by F1 racing, has sold for £27,500. The car is one of five made by Oakley Design. For those whom the Twizzy didn't quite stand out enough. To find out more, click the Motoring Research article here.

The Tim Black At Night Show
Jon Gruden's Demise, Petito Update, Obvious Use of Force, More!

The Tim Black At Night Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 124:00


Jon Gruden's Demise, Petito Update, Obvious Use of Force, More!

Bom dia, Obvious
#115/ encontrando uma atividade para amar, com Juliana Costa Pereira e Olivia Amsler

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 42:24


Algumas chamam de meditação ativa, outras de chapar de endorfina. O que importa é que, quando você realmente encontra uma atividade para amar, a última coisa que você vai chamar é de sacrifício. "Socorro, então eu vim com defeito de fábrica, Marcela!". Calma, te peço por um voto de confiança aqui: nem sempre é um caminho fácil encontrar um exercício para chamar de seu, ainda mais com todas as barreiras que existem para as mulheres no esporte. Mas o corpo e, mais importante, a mente, agradecem se você insistir na busca implacável por esse ritual de autoamor. Falando em amor, nem sempre o esporte pára quando enfim tiramos o top: muitas vezes ressignificamos nossa relação com o trabalho, conhecemos pessoas que mudam nossas vidas e percebemos que dali saiu bem mais que suor. Se permitir ter momentos em que a sua saúde é prioridade número um e ousar não ser produtiva profissionalmente por algumas horas, é gritar de volta para uma sociedade que nos faz acreditar que somos apenas o nosso trabalho. Hoje, eu escolho cuidar de mim. Nem que seja por 30 minutinhos. Bom Dia, Obvious! Hoje, Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, conversa com as ciclistas e também publicitária, Juliana Costa Pereirae a também arquiteta Olivia Amsler.

Ted Jones World
176. PAY ATTENTION TO OBVIOUS SHIT

Ted Jones World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:11


0:30- MAJOR F' UP! 2:30- COMEDY SHOW NEXT WEEK! 3:30- Spilling MADNESS Episode 97 5:15- Coffee Water Addiction 7:05- Sneaky Starbux 9:30- Drinking Bubbly 10:45- Young Generation and Crypto 14:55- Mr. Olympia Health 21:00- Steroid Ready? 22:30- TED JONES COMEDY SHOW MERCH! OCT SHOW DATES: https://thestandnyc.com/comedians/ted-jones

The Zach Gelb Show
Stating The Obvious (Hour 3)

The Zach Gelb Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 40:33


How do Rams respond coming off a loss? l Howard Griffith, Big Ten Network analyst l  Is Ohio State a legitimate College Football Playoff contender? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Things Digital Assets
NFTs - Beyond the Obvious - with Anthony Day from IBM

All Things Digital Assets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 45:48


Clearly identifiable, unique digital representations of identities on the Blockchain. Non Fungible Tokens have the potential to revolutionize the digital world as we know it.  From passports to concert tickets, from identities in supply chains to the screws in 150m dollar machines that make semiconductors, NFT's hold the power to unlock their true potential. If that is the case, then why are we mainly seeing them used to sell pixelated images for millions of dollars? Find out in this episode of the Untitled Investment Talk with IBM's very own blockchain and NFT expert Anthony Day.

Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Lies Are Obvious Now

Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:57


A so-called Facebook whistleblower testified in front of Congress on Tuesday and pushed for more censorship. Jesse Kelly did some investigating and discovered a not-so-surprising truth about this person that proves there was an agenda involved. Speaking of agenda, Congressman Kevin Brady joins the show to break down the left's spending plans and has a warning about the IRS seeking your personal information. Plus, RedState's Jeff Charles weighs in on the DOJ targeting everyday Americans as domestic terrorists.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Lies Are Obvious Now

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:57


A so-called Facebook whistleblower testified in front of Congress on Tuesday and pushed for more censorship. Jesse Kelly did some investigating and discovered a not-so-surprising truth about this person that proves there was an agenda involved. Speaking of agenda, Congressman Kevin Brady joins the show to break down the left's spending plans and has a warning about the IRS seeking your personal information. Plus, RedState's Jeff Charles weighs in on the DOJ targeting everyday Americans as domestic terrorists.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bom dia, Obvious
#114/ tá todo mundo exausto, com Patrick Hanser e Andrea Giusti

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 42:50


Para o coreano Byung-chul Han, excesso de positividade e produtividade são causas para o cansaço geral da população. Em seu livro A Sociedade do Cansaço, ele explora como nesse cenário estamos sempre fadadas a estar em falta. Se não for com a família, com o trabalho. Se não for com projetos pessoais, com os relacionamentos. Na tentativa de equilibrar esses pratos enquanto caímos nas falácias de produtividade tóxica, transformamos as 24h no dia em momentos possíveis de monetização, nos proibindo de tempos que poderiam ser considerados como inúteis. O caminho do trabalho precisa ser para aprender algo novo, o almoço precisa ser junto a responder emails e, para aqueles que caíram na violência da crença de "trabalhe enquanto eles dormem", até as necessidades básicas entraram em jogo. Mas no final do dia, estamos otimizando o tempo para o que? O que fazemos com o tempo que sobra? Sobra algum tempo? O ócio, o tédio, a solidão e a contemplação se tornaram crimes. O descanso, que deveria ser direito, uma recompensa. Será que realmente não dá tempo de fazer tudo ou esse "tudo" que você quer cumprir apenas não cabe nas horas disponíveis em um dia? Talvez o problema não seja a falta de tempo, e sim, a dinâmica de autoexploração e performance. Você também está exausta? Acho que todo mundo está exausto. Bom Dia, Obvious! Hoje, Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, conversa com a equipe do documentário A Sociedade do Cansaço: o diretor Patrick Hanser e a produtora Andrea Giusti.

The Tom Short Show
The Not-So-Obvious Consequence of Idolatry

The Tom Short Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 10:32


As Christians, we have the wonderful privilege of worshipping the one true God.Everyone worships something, even if they won't worship God Himself. This is known as idolatry.While there are many problems with idolatry, our Scripture today tells us a consequence of this sin that most people don't realize.Join me for today's Daily Word & Prayer to discover that consequence and make sure you avoid it yourself.Scripture Used TodayPsalm 135:13-18Ephesians 5:1-2**************Do you want to have all your sins forgiven and know God in a personal way?  Check out my video "The Bridge Diagram" at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0Kjwrlind8&t=1sCheck out my website, www.TomthePreacher.com, to learn more about my ministry and sign up for my daily email. And make sure to request a copy of my book, Takin' it to Their Turf when you visit my website.Check out my videos on this channel to learn how to answer tough questions that challenge our faith.Have you ever wanted to visit the Holy Land?Join me next February (2022) as I lead a tour of Israel!We'll study the life of Jesus at the very places He taught, performed His mighty miracles, was crucified, and resurrected! We'll also have plenty of worship, fellowship, and fun!For more info, check out my web page www.TomthePreacher.com

Underscore_
Le pire fail dans Popcorn - avec Théo Kleman, Hardisk & Obvious

Underscore_

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 85:27


Underscore_ est de retour ! Et pour cette nouvelle saison, on reçoit le producteur du plus gros talk-show de twitch, Popcorn ! On revient sur son parcours, ses anecdotes, Micode nous raconte comment il aurait pu finir en prison et Obvious nous présente le pont qu'il créé entre l'art et l'IA. Enjoy ! Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Fitness & Sushi
T28. You don't need anymore obvious health and fitness advice

Fitness & Sushi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 11:17


We don't need any more people telling us the obvious - we need help understanding WHY we're struggling to implement the goals we want to achieve. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In today's solo episode Tony explains what you need to focus on in order to start consistently doing the behaviors you know are good for you. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If the episode was helpful, consider leaving a 5 star rating and review ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You can connect with Tony on Instagram - @tony.schober ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You can explore options for working together here - builtdaily.com

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Kav Helmets - Custom 3D printed helmets with Whitman Kwok

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 36:34


This week we sit down with Kav Helmet CEO and Founder, Whitman Kwok to discuss the companies' innovative 3D printing technology that can produce a custom fitted helmet for every rider.   Kav Helmets  The Ridership Support the Podcast   Automated Transcription (please excuse the typos)   Kav Helmets [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel ride. Podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton.  [00:00:08] This week on the show, we've got Whitman Kwok the founder and CEO of Kav Helmets.  [00:00:14] Kav Helmets may yet to be a household name in the cycling industry. But you'll learn. The team has a rich history in the cycling helmet market. They're innovative approach to manufacturing. Using 3d printing technology is a novel approach. And creates a uniquely custom helmet for each rider. I'll let Whitman get into the ins and the outs of the technology but i'm a big fan of the approach as additive technology just opens up a lot of possibilities for where material is laid in the helmet. [00:00:45] If you're planning on attending this year, sea Otter classic in Monterrey, California, the Kav team will be showing off their 3d printing technology. There they'll even be 3d printing, some key chains, which I think will showcase how the process actually works. If you're not in the area or not attending seawater, be sure to visit the Kav website as they're opening up orders for all.  [00:01:08] Before we jump into this week show, I need. To thank our sponsor. Today's program is brought to you by Athletic Greens, the health and wellness. Wellness company that makes comprehensive daily nutrition really, really. Simple. [00:01:19] With so many stressors in life, it's difficult to maintain effective nutritional habits and give our bodies the nutrients it needs to survive. Our busy schedules, poor sleep, massive gravel rides. The environment works dress or simply. Not eating enough of the right foods can leave us deficient and key nutritional.  [00:01:38] Areas. by athletic greens is a category leading superfood product. That brings comprehensive and convenient daily nutrition to everybody. Keeping up with the research, knowing what to do and taking a bunch of pills and capsules is hard on the stomach and hard to keep up with. To help each of us be at our best. They simply provide a better path to nutrition by giving you the one thing. With all the best things. [00:02:03] One tasty scoop of AG1 contained 75 vitamins minerals, and whole food sourced ingredients, including a multivitamin multimineral probiotic, green superfood blend [00:02:13] And more in one convenient daily serving.  [00:02:16] The special blend of high quality bioavailable ingredients in a scoop of AIG one work together to fill the nutritional gaps in your diet, support, energy, and focus aid with gut health and digestion and support a healthy immune system. Effectively replacing multiple products or pills with one healthy delicious Drink . [00:02:36] As many of you know, I've been an athletic greens subscriber for about the last five years. So I truly appreciate their support of the podcast. If you're interested in learning more, just visit athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. The team at athletic greens, we'll throw in a free one-year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs with your purchase.  [00:02:59] Again, simply visit athleticgreens.com/thegravelride to take control of your health and give AG1 a try today. [00:03:08] With that said let's dive right into my conversation with Whitman from Kav Helmets. It's. [00:03:13] Whitman. Welcome to the show.  [00:03:16] Whitman Kwok: That is correct. Really looking forward to our discussion. Yeah, me too.  [00:03:20] Craig Dalton: The manufacturing and additive tech geek in me is really looking forward to this conversation. [00:03:26] Definitely want to learn how calf helmets came about and what your journey is to creating this bike helmets. And more importantly, what the benefits are for riders in the gravel scene. So let's jump in and let's just in your own words, let us know about cab helmets, how it started and what the vision is. [00:03:46] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, absolutely. There's a lot of impact, even in that simple question. I think fundamentally the vision was. Oh, providing a concierge service to athletes. I had always, as a competitor cycles in college, tweak my gear, adjusted everything from crank buy-ins to handlebar lengths and all, everything to get the most performance and also just make the bike an extension of myself. [00:04:10] And I don't think anything has changed in the intervening years. And I think in all the sports that we talked to, whether it's a hockey players or something the gears are really important part of the athletic experience. And so for cab it was obvious to us that the helmet market is really large. [00:04:26] It is a largely at this point a undifferentiated product where there isn't a dominant player per se. There isn't a apple or a Tesla or a Peloton where people just all grab it gravitate to. And as long as you. For the last 30 years, there's been a lot of tweaking and incremental improvements on injection molded foam helmets. [00:04:46] And I think what we bring with Kav is this generational leap like Tesla's done with electric cars to a whole new mode of thinking around making a helmet or anything for that matter. That's completely custom to the individual. And the moment you do that there's a whole bunch of benefits that we're able to realize. [00:05:06] There's the obvious ones around comfort that there's 8 billion sizes that we can provide one for every man, woman, child on the planet. And but there's a huge number of performance. Benefits and protection is always top of mind when you're talking about helmets. And the fact that we can tailor the protective characteristics to. [00:05:23] And individual and how they ride, how fast they're riding the weight profiles, things like that gives a massive potential improvement in protection over just a standard kind of one or two or three size fits all. I'm fortunate. I have a number of co-founders and colleagues that we found in the company together. [00:05:42] And I think we all had different experiences, but the same. Echo and voice in the back of our head, that there's just a lot better way to do this. And so I'll do a quick shout out to there. And obviously there's a lot of different areas that we can talk through. But Mike Lowe is our VP of products and he was the VP of events, concepts at Euro bell. [00:06:03] He also worked closely with Ridell. He did early work with Lance Armstrong's time trial helmet, and worked on all the iconic bike helmets. Since. He's been just fantastic to learn from that whole industry or the homicide. There's a lot of honest, non-obvious quirks and things in the industry. [00:06:20] And it's a very close knit industry. And so there's a lot of great people that we've been able to meet and work through Mike. And on the technology side, they started migrating. Amazing technologists from Google small company called Google and relatively early employee there, I'm working on search quality and YouTube, one of their, two of their smaller products. [00:06:39] And and he brings this immense knowledge, not just in software, which ironically is where 78% of our IP is. But also a really great understanding of hardware and kind of physics and mechanical engineering. You really have to. That kind of polymath approach in order to build something like a superior helmet. [00:06:58] So anyway, it's a long-winded way of talking. It's on the people we work with our early vision and some of the high level benefits and can let you pick and choose your own adventure from there.  [00:07:08] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So I alluded a little bit to it in the intro, but just so we don't lose this concept right off the jump, because it's easy for the listener to think about this as a traditional helmet, but let's talk about how it's manufactured because you didn't specifically mention that. [00:07:24] And I think it's one of the most fascinating parts of the process.  [00:07:28] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, no I do that a lot because I think we always think of it from the N and consumer's perspective. What did they get? And how we get there is really intriguing from an engineering perspective. And I often gloss over it. [00:07:42] Yeah, we we blended a bunch of material sciences additive manufacturing and software in order to develop the helmets. And I'll speak a little bit more of the additive manufacturing sites since you asked about it, but yes, each of these helmets is 3d printed here in Redwood city, California for the individual. [00:08:00] And so everything is made to order that has huge implications to everything. Not just manufacturing, but the whole customer. That's alluding to and being kind of concert servers are giving people exactly what they want. And so when an order comes in, we're taking measurements and we dynamically generate actually all the engineering terms, all the CAD files, the dimensions and everything for the helmet. [00:08:25] And it's not the case that we're just taking three or six or even 12, like shells and then like carving something. We are literally building the helmet from the inside out. So I think, whereas the current concept, the off the shelf is you get two or three sizes and you've got the shell that defines the helmet. [00:08:46] And then you got to force fit your head into that use foam padding, or several lock things to just sense your head loosely in this kind of bucket idea. And for us you're actually taking the meds. We dynamic create that we define all the offsets that we need to generate and ensure the level of protection than we want for that rider. [00:09:06] Then we send it through our own what we call printer management software. So we actually have a farm of these 3d printers. So you can imagine it being like analogous to like a data center except of having all these servers slotted in these racks. We've got 3d printers slotted in the. And it basically just creates like all the different parts that you need for your helmet. [00:09:26] And we have a QA process throughout to measure and make sure what we're printing is exactly meets specs of what we want. And we have to build a lot of that in dynamically because each helmet is custom. And then we do a kind of final finishing process that's done by hand. So you get the best of both worlds of this precision 3d printed. [00:09:47] But hand-finished and lovingly made here in our shop in Redwood city.  [00:09:51] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I imagine for some of the listeners, this might be a mind-bending discussion because a lot of people haven't seen 3d printing inaction, no one way to visualize it. And this may or may not be a great way, but since I have a seven-year-old in the house if you imagine sort of building from Legos and you're building from the ground, And you keep building successfully on top of each other. [00:10:15] It's in my mind how 3d printing works, right? You've got the material that's in this printer and it's being laid out layer by layer. And this is based on the very customized measurements that you've received from the future owner of the helmet. So again, the, in the interest of helping to visualize it's being built from the ground up around your individual, Once you've placed the order. [00:10:43] Whitman Kwok: That's right. And the analogy I like to use is making a soft cone right. Or going into the yogurt machine. And yeah we basically, it can imagine we're taking our proprietary polymers and it's coming out of this very high-tech yogurt machine. But rather than having, it dumped like eight ounces of yogurt into the cup. [00:11:00] We're a precision layering, at a fraction of a millimeter at a time. These very intricate engineered what we call energy management system and your helmet. And and so it's a little bit like growing the part on this bed. And we're, as you say, we're creating a slice at a time. [00:11:17] That's a fraction of a millimeter and kind of building up. And each layer is being laid down by this very sophisticated yogurt machine. And and at the end of the. Yeah, exactly. You have a helmet. That's not on a custom fit, but it's not solid. Like it's not like an injection molded part where you're just dumping a bunch of plastic into a mold or or foam where you're like exploding blowing up the foam into a mold we're actually creating like this really complicated, polygon and hex structure within the helmet which is designed to Trumbull really efficiently to provide good. [00:11:51] But also takes up the fraction of the weight because most of your helmet actually turns out to be air in this case.  [00:11:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's an interesting, you hear the phrase fits like a glove, but this is even the next level of that it's like fits like a glove that has been specifically designed for your personal hand. [00:12:08] Whitman Kwok: That's why it would be like an iron man glove, right? Like it's one thing to have a fabric that you stretched over your head. It's quite an honor to have this in case structure that still has the same sensation of a security right. And being fit like glove, but it's hard right on the outside to protect you. [00:12:25] And so it is a next level sensation.  [00:12:28] Craig Dalton: So when I think about, the helmet I have in the garage, I think about, it's got some internal kind of frame and a dial that helps it fit. I understand from your earlier discussion, I can throw that piece out because I don't need that piece anymore because the helmet is built to order to the shape of my personal head. [00:12:46] I then, if I think about the exterior of the helmet, I often have a hard plastic layer and then not knowing a ton about the interior, but it sounds like we're injecting molding. We're injecting foam. Into a Kavity that kind of creates that if you, if that's accurate and feel free to fill in any details there, but why don't you juxtapose what the outside and the inside of the cab helmet effectively, how that differs and how it changes? [00:13:15] Whitman Kwok: Yeah. I think the cycling analogy would be it's almost like a monocoque structure, right? If you have a psych, a carbon fiber cycling frame, where for all practical purposes, Like all the tubing and lugs and everything joined in a way where it just behaves as one monolithic well-balanced, machine in terms of and in the traditional process, like you said that in the higher end helmets, you have a, typically like a polycarbonate shell, that's a couple of mils thick and they injection mold, some EPS foam into that have some type of density or multiple densities and The nice thing. [00:13:49] And so each of those things play a part and they're trying to compensate for different deficiencies in the foam. And so is not it sticks to cement, right? And so you don't want that because it's going to cause bad rotational energies on impact. It's also not very durable and gets eaten up. [00:14:05] So you have to then create this one millimeter shell to protect it. With all the venting that you put in, it's pretty common now to put like a plastic interior chassis to keep the helmet together on impact. And so I just suppose that with additive manufacturing or 3d printing, because what we're doing is integrating everything into one coherent design, right? [00:14:26] And so when we're laying down each layer of plastic, we are actually. Integrating the shell with the crumple zone with the chassis, so to speak. And by integrating it just like a well-made carbon fiber frame, we can reduce all the interfaces. And so the helmet's more compact. You don't have air gaps, so to speak. [00:14:46] It's a lot lighter because we're only putting material where it's needed. It's like the old steel frames, or living on frames where they're double butted or triple butted. We can reinforce it in the right areas. And and it gives us a lot of ability to fine tune each aspect of the helmet. [00:15:01] So that instead of saying, having a universally, a universal density of foam across the helmet for different impact zones and we learned a lot of this actually from our experience in hockey we can tailor the impact behaviors, of the based on location of the helmet as well, It just gives us just like carbon fiber and forensic gives us a lot. [00:15:20] The analogy is like the layup, right? The carbon fiber. And what carbon fiber is you use and the residence. We have just a lot more control than just pumping a bunch of foam beets into a mold.  [00:15:31] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's interesting. And maybe it goes back to some earlier podcasts I've had in discussion around carbon fiber frames and just talking about, how you. [00:15:40] Layer something differently where it needs more protection, maybe under the bottom bracket, whereas you don't need to use those same layers elsewhere in the frame where you want to have a little bit more compliance. So I imagine given the team's experience in helmet design, it was really liberating to just freely. [00:15:57] Think about how, and where do we want to put material, because really the sky's the limit, right? You can optimize around. What's going to be best. For impact protection, both on the, hard impacts like hard and fast as well as slower impacts. I imagine you can, you're free to really design something that performs well across a couple of different factors. [00:16:21] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, no, that's exactly right. Like we have a lot more control in the general use case. And I think in the future as we've done a little bit of this on hockey and we'll bring it into the bike market. What the individual characteristics actually matter a lot, because at the end of the day for a cycling helmet, we have, twenty-five maybe 30 millimeters of offset we can work with. [00:16:42] If we make it much larger than that people balk at what they look like, there's certain brands that are known for safety. But they're also known for making your head look like a mushroom, right? We don't want that. We want people to love, frankly, we're in the homeless. [00:16:53] We want to attract people who, frankly, don't wear helmets into the market. I'm gonna do that. We need a thinner profile. And so the way to actually make a safer helmet is have information about what they're riding, right? A commuter, ride with I commute every day and finish going like 1230 miles an hour. [00:17:09] That's a very different profile than. A road sort of groundwater going downhill at 30, 40 miles an hour. There, that's a factor of three difference in velocity. And if you think about kinetic energy, the velocity is a square root, right? So that's like a, that's a nine, almost an order of magnitude difference in impactful file. [00:17:27] So there is gain and exactly what we just talked about, but there's an even bigger gain because we know the athlete and we have that relationship like moving forward. Knowing that their commuter or their downhill racer and their weight, their mass makes a big difference to a kid who weighs a hundred pounds. [00:17:44] It's just going to be way different than someone who's 220. And again, you have a two X factor there that isn't something, that's a comedy for an issue where it's one size fits. All right.  [00:17:55] Craig Dalton: Now the business has been selling helmets for over a year and a half. Primarily in hockey and most recently in bike, do you want to talk about why hockey was the entry point and maybe some of the things you've learned across the customers you've been serving in that space? [00:18:11] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, no, absolutely. So there are a couple of factors that came into play. So one was frankly, what w what could get it to market the quickest. We just wanted to provide value to people as quickly as possible. The second, where was where's the biggest need? And between those two, and there was a little bit of a personal reason as well. [00:18:29] But the first two were clearly the overriding. From a technical perspective, it turns out making a hockey helmet is just easier than making a bike helmet. One of the characteristic reasons just wait is not quite as big of a factor in the hockey. And so we wanted to basically use the hockey market as our Tesla Roadster, right? [00:18:48] Knowing that it's a limited market, it's smaller, but people are willing to pay for the equipment. They're willing to pay the premium. And and we can launch quicker. The second piece of why they pay a premium is that as you can imagine, the concussion rate per activity hour in hockey is almost parallel or equal to. [00:19:03] And meeting quite high, whereas in cycling, it's somewhat incidental, right? If you get in a crash and get an, a concussion in hockey, 3, 5, 10 times a game, you're taking impacts to the head and getting pinned against the board and falling on the ice. And so we thought that the market would benefit significantly from our protective technologies in that space. [00:19:25] And. The third reason, which just made me very cognizant of it was my son plays hockey. And when we started the company, his team had six concussions on it. And they were only 12 years old at the time. And there was just an outcry, I think with the parents and all the clubs that I talked to did not feel like there was enough being done. [00:19:42] And the. Equipment manufacturers and hockey are generally about two to three generations on behind any of the other helmet markets as well. So the need was greater. The products were even further inferior and and we thought we could help people sooner in that market than any other market. [00:20:01] Craig Dalton: You talked about how as a company and the way you're producing the helmets, that you can evolve with the market and you're understanding. Yeah. Within the hockey market, since you've been there the longest, are you doing things differently for a child's size helmet versus the NHL players that you work with? [00:20:20] Whitman Kwok: Yeah yes. Besides the fit we've actually made modifications to, I should, I would draw the analogy that it's a case that a surprisingly large number of the benefits for either of those extremes helps. And so they now Joel users in the late nineties, early two thousands car manufacturers are realizing like women had difficulty like getting their groceries in the trunk. [00:20:40] And because the trunk actually came all the way up to the top of the back and they now if you open the trunk of a car, it, the trunk dips down past the lights right down to the bumper. There's this carve-out. And so you don't have to lift your groceries, like over a wall, so to speak, you can just slide it in. [00:20:53] Watching. Buy groceries at the time was like a motivating factor for that. But we found that obviously that benefited everyone. Like I don't, I'm lazy. I don't want to list the groceries I don't have to. And so I'll give a kind of example that, which is kids wears glasses, a lot. [00:21:06] And so we ended up putting in little cutouts for people wear glasses so that it actually just slides in. So a hockey helmet actually comes down further than a. And traditionally, there are pads that go up against your temple. And so you can imagine if you wear glasses, you're literally shoving these glasses into these temples and that the pads are forcing your, the sidearms or your glasses into your temples for an hour and a half while you play hockey really uncomfortable situation. [00:21:35] And we did that and that ended up bending, benefiting a bunch of adults rests and things that. It turns out like the ice rinks are really dry. So like wearing contacts, it's not always actually comfortable. So say, and vice versa, like there's been a bunch of benefits because obviously the professional levels that impact are taking it's just an extreme example and it really drives some of the protective technologies. [00:21:58] And even if they No, the squirts and mites don't necessarily have the same level of impact there. There's still a deeper understanding. I think of the types of checking that goes on that informed our products for the kids.  [00:22:11] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. Obviously, given your pedigree as a cyclist and your co founders coming to the bike market was something that you were eager to do. [00:22:19] Can you talk about the introduction of the first bike helmet and what the goals were there and how for the list of. They should think about whether a cab helmet is right for them.  [00:22:32] Whitman Kwok: Yeah. It's interesting because the engineering side of me and product matter one, be very specific about the goals. [00:22:38] Oh, we want to hit this weight target and this usability. But what we ended up doing is taking a step back and asking the conceptually what do we want to, what's our mission, right? A reminder, what's our mission of the company on this build the best protective gear on. And as a very important corollary that the best gear is no use of no one wants to wear it. [00:22:54] So it's got adjust look and feel fantastic. And when we're doing these new technologies, I think it was important for us to blue sky it and not bound herself by certain things. So our goal is just make the best helmet possible. And this. An all road category, right? So with a focus really on gravel and road cyclist, but with the knowledge of knowing that, a lot of cross-country mountain bikers use road helmets, and a lot of commuters would ultimately use it. [00:23:24] But if we looking at personas and interviewing people, we focus on the road and gravel side of things. And then from there we really just built around it. And I think honestly I'm glad we've done it that way, because we found a lot of surprising things that I think if we constrain ourselves early on, we would not have done. [00:23:39] One of them being, for example our interior fit pad system is just radically different from a traditional fabric fit pack. And it would not have come if we said yeah, we just want sweat management, whatever way moisture at this level or thermal capabilities. [00:23:56] But anyway, I happy to go into the details of that, but what we ended up coming out with, I think is we've focused on fit and the protective qualities, what we ended up with was the ability to make something that as least as dynamic as other helmets out there is significantly cooler. Riding. [00:24:15] And has all the protective qualities. And again, it has some of these comfort features built in on the inside. That, again, we didn't necessarily envision, but the advantage of having a new prototype every week, that we're all riding is you tend to iterate quite quickly through, and I think we're on version 32 right now. [00:24:30] And 33 is like on the printing press. It's going quick.  [00:24:33] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think that's one of those really cool things about doing both additive manufacturing and domestic manufacturing is that you can continue tweaking the product to optimize it based on consumer feedback which is really powerful.  [00:24:50] Whitman Kwok: Yeah. [00:24:50] Know that's right. We we have the benefit now that we're far enough along and we're starting to include like a larger and larger swath of people into the kind of the test. And so we had our Kickstarter about a month ago and we had a 20 plus like early adopters sign up through that. [00:25:05] And we were shipping out shipping helmets out to them and looking forward to get the next wave of feedback and and just improving. And in real time, before we ship out our production ones at the end of the year,  [00:25:16] Craig Dalton: yes. At the process of ordering is a little bit different than, traditionally you might use. [00:25:21] No your size, small, medium, or large, and put an order in, or go to your local bicycle retailer for the cab helmets. You're sending out a kind of measurement fit kit and actually working at a concierge level with the purchaser, right?  [00:25:38] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, that's right. We the fit process has been really interesting for us. [00:25:42] I think we're on our third version of the process. Fundamentally, I'm you sign up, we send you this fit kit and it's a caliper and a tape measure. And that allows us we take six points off of your head. And with those six points, we actually map it to a database of 3000 head scans that we've accumulated and basically a little bit of like machine learning type of thing. [00:26:07] Where we're then extrapolating footnote 16. Other aspects of your head in terms of, the curvature and more details and maybe those six points would initially seem to provide. And we then send out basically we call it like a fit cap and just fun looking, little cap that we 3d print. [00:26:24] And you can just literally stick it on and wear around the house and slept getting a fine suit, where you get your initial measurement, you put on that. And then you use just some minor tweaks oh, you know what the arm hole just a little bit bigger. Or for me personally, like I like it a little more snug, around the waist. [00:26:39] And so that, that fit cap gives us some of the subjective feedback, that, that individuals tend to have in terms of how they liked their helmets and fit. And then from there, yeah we generate the the helmet for them and send it to them and ride straight their doorstep conveniently. [00:26:52] And and then they can enjoy it. And. We've actually found quite a few hockey players. I'm surprisingly, I've gotten multiple helmets because they liked it so much. And it's not a common thing actually in hockey to do that. But they've gotten like different colors and versions of the helmet. [00:27:06] Craig Dalton: Interesting. Interesting. And then this sort of manufacturing geek in me asked to ask, so the, each helmet presumably comes out of one machine is built in one single process.  [00:27:19] Whitman Kwok: So we actually do you want to in parallel, so we break up the helmet into sub segments and that allows us to print individual pieces. [00:27:27] It also turns out it gives us some additional engineering design flexibility that you don't get when you print them all as a monolithic structure. And then we basically bond them together. Again, carbon fiber resident type of analogy, holds true here that there's a little bit of. Attachment mechanism and then we adhere everything together. [00:27:44] And the effectively the joints end up being, stronger than the sub-components and and then, yeah, and then we attach on the straps and do some final QA checks and literally sign off on the box and and then send it on its way.  [00:27:57] Craig Dalton: Nice. One of the sort of visual elements that you'll see for the listener when they go over to the website, which I can include in the show notes is there's a. [00:28:06] Honeycomb look across the sort of front and middle of the helmet. Is there a sort of design rationale behind the honeycomb?  [00:28:16] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, it is. It's it's an engineer circles. It's w it's known as one of the most efficient energy absorbing structures. It crumbles really well. Which is what you want, obviously in something like that. [00:28:28] And even better than foam because in foam, what you tend to have is what's called a densification phase where after the foam, if you've got, let's just say 20 millimeters of foam or 20 millimeters from once you start getting past about a third if you've ever been in an accident, looked at your home and you'll see this it'll crack. [00:28:46] And the foam doesn't compress any further. And so you can think of it like suspension on your mountain bike or your gravel bike. If you have suspension on it it's all about the travel, right? At the end of the day, to absorb the impact you want the most travel without bottoming out. So when you hit a bump, you want to utilize whatever the 30, 45 millimeters of travel that you got. And do you use the full 45 millimeters? You will have had the best ride that you could possibly have had, for that circumstance if you bought them out, obviously not good. Particularly we're talking about your head and if you only do 10 minutes, 10 millimeters of that trial, Then you're not fully utilizing your equipment. [00:29:19] And so foam has that issue where once it densifies at some point it doesn't compress any further. And so you tend to only get a fraction of that travel. The nice thing about the hacks is that you get nearly the full travel. So the full offset of the helmet can be used to compress it and protect you. [00:29:39] It also turns out to be quite. And has this other really important ancillary benefit, which is you may not necessarily always be able to see it when someone's riding, but the honeycomb structure extends into, on the interior as well, which means you have an open face structure on your head. And so he can dissipate really easily away from your head as opposed to foam, which is obviously known for beer coolers and other things that has insulating properties, that trap heat. [00:30:05] So we actually had early versus the helmet that didn't even have venting on it. And the helmet was actually quite cool. I wouldn't say it's the coolest, but it was comparable to the other eight helmets. I have sitting in my shed that I used for testing purposes. And then in the moment we opened it up and added the actual venting, like it's a game changer total game. [00:30:25] And particularly these last like week or two where we've had some hundred, a hundred degree days, you really feel.  [00:30:31] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. Yeah. The the sort of follower of me on Instagram, might've seen me Dawn, one of these helmets a few months back when we were able to meet face to face. It is really, you can definitely feel the weight difference. [00:30:46] It's marginal, but it's absolutely there and our conversation around crumple zones and that idea of. Protection travel in a helmet is super fascinating via the honeycomb design for those listeners and may fall in this camp. What's the guidance by the industry in terms of how frequently you should replace a helmet? [00:31:09] Whitman Kwok: You know what I do think that varies. The most common I hear is somewhere in the range of three to five years. I think the challenge though, is it's like how often you need to change your bike. It varies so much by your circumstances, meaning if you're like me and somewhat klutzy and you're pulling your bike out and you're dropping your helmet and the process, or my helmet, I don't know how many times my helmet has fallen off my handlebars. [00:31:31] Every time it's fallen, like you could have, imagine that impact just compresses the foam just a little bit, right in that one area. And honestly, one or two times it isn't going to be the be all end, all. For me, it's a little unsettling to not know, it's not like my toothbrush that has a wear indicator. [00:31:47] It says, okay. Time to change those bristles. And so the nice thing with the 3d printing, the polymers that we're using, the design that helmet is that there's a step function aspect of it. Like we've designed it so that if you're dropping it casually, it doesn't activate any of that travel. [00:32:02] Like it, it stays rigid. And it's going to Maintain that performance indefinitely. And so you don't really have to worry about it. We offer a five-year warranty on our helmets and and because we're confident around that which I think is an industry leading whatever warranty. [00:32:20] So I think, again, I think that the. Wisdom is three to five years, but I think it varies really significantly and it, and I think it's tough to provide  [00:32:29] Craig Dalton: that, that makes sense. Yeah, that makes sense. I think, there's a lot of us maybe who have been fortunate to, to not have crashed and you don't see the. [00:32:38] Obvious bits of damage to your helmet, but I'm definitely one of those who, whenever I have a conversation about how much and how much the technology, I think to myself, gosh, almost everything in my garage is a PR is probably a pretty long in the tooth in terms of when I should be considering making a replacement. [00:32:58] Whitman Kwok: Yeah, that's right. It's it's one of those pieces of equipment that's easy to ignore, right? Cause it's not like your bike bond brackets squeaking. Your rim brakes rubbing. It's not going to do that and tell you right. That it needs maintenance or help. Yet obviously it protects the most important part of your body. [00:33:13] And so it is pretty critical to have at least inspect it and have some regular interval that you swap it out.  [00:33:20] Craig Dalton: Yeah, absolutely. It's a good reminder to everybody and women. I really appreciate you joining us on the podcast and talking us through this technology. I think the. The tech geek in all of us can really appreciate from listening to you how different the 3d printing technology enables you to think as a helmet manufacturer. [00:33:41] And it's very comforting to know that you've got smart people around you, including yourself and veterans of the industry who have just been thinking about this helmet from the ground. And how to make the best possible experience for consumers. So I know you I'll send people over to the website where they can find more information about the helmet. [00:34:02] Are these available for new orders at this point?  [00:34:05] Whitman Kwok: We will be taking new orders in about two or three weeks. I'm not sure when this is airing. We wanted to make sure that all the early backers on our Kickstarter were well taken care of. And so we've, we're in a good shape there. And then we'll begin opening up borders. [00:34:20] We'll be at the Seattle classic. So for anyone who's there it'd be great drop by our booth. Look out for us. You can see that the helmets firsthand and we'll be definitely taking orders at that point.  [00:34:31] Craig Dalton: Amazing. Yeah. I've seen that. I've seen a couple of people in my Instagram feed who were clearly some of your earliest supporters. [00:34:37] Who've gotten their helmets in already. So that's exciting to see. So once again, Whitman, thanks a ton for this overview. I really appreciated it. And I hope everybody listening got a lot out of this conversation.  [00:34:51] Whitman Kwok: Yeah. Thanks. Thanks Dan and Craig, I'm always happy to talk helmets or anything related to the cycling. [00:34:56] So thanks for having me.  [00:34:58] Craig Dalton: So that's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Thank you very much to Whitman and the cab helmets team for joining us and talking all about 3d printing helmets. I think it was a fascinating discussion. Definitely check out their website. They're over at calves, sports.com to see a little bit of behind the scenes about the process.  [00:35:18] The guarantees. Auntie's around the helmet and just what a custom fitted helmet could do for. You're cycling enjoyment. As always, if you're interested in giving us feedback and encourage you to join us over at the ridership. Our ship, just visit www.theridership.com.  [00:35:35] That is our free global cycling community for gravel and adventure, cyclists, to talk about the products and experiences and trails and events. We all love. If you're interested in supporting the podcast, ratings and reviews are hugely helpful in the podcast game, our read everything that. You put out there and appreciate it very much.  [00:35:57] If you're able to financially support the show, simply visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. I've put a number of options out there. From one-time support as well as a monthly subscription that simply. Helps underwrite this broadcast. [00:36:13] So that's going to do it for us. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under To your wheels

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo
Our Ride or Die Politics

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 28:39


SPECIAL BONUS EDITION:  When you remove all the filters, all the lenses, all the allegiances, you can  just see what's obvious: whether applied to the pandemic, the debt ceiling showdown, the infrastructure in-fighting among Dems and even Title 42 as applied to immigration. The common denominator is the poison of our politics. When the messaging changes but it doesn't fit with our Ride or Die politics, criticism is wrong and it's the critic who sucks, instead of new information leading to an evolving understanding.Politics is poison right now and "don't trust" is pervasive. PLUS:A Deeper Look: at a WP opinion piece from columnist Michele Norris who coined "Covertigo": the sense of never ending uncertainty in this pandemic, and the toll the stress of consistent inconsistency takes on our lives. We are all going to need a little help from our friends to get past not only this moment, but  as we re-enter society.

Money You Should Ask
Stacked Benjamins. Joe Saul-Sehy

Money You Should Ask

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 40:45


Our next guest Joe Saul-Sehy, has gone from 16 years as a financial advisor to being the creator and co-host of The Stacking Benjamins Show and Money With Friends podcasts, creator of a network of five podcasts, and monthly contributor to another! He represented American Express and Ameriprise in the media and was the "Money Man" at Detroit's television channel WXYZ-TV. From receiving top awards for The Stacking Benjamins Show and hosting the FinCon Expo Main Stage multiple times to being a current board member at large of The Plutus Foundation, Joe has proven himself as a household name in the finance arena. He is also the recipient of the FinCon 2021 Plutus Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award.   Recorded live at FinCon 2021, Austin, Texas. Bob and Joe trade war stories and bromance the day away. [1:53] Leaving the world of financial advising to climb other mountains. [8:21] Feel the fear and do it anyway. [10:50] Crying about money. Most of us have all done it. [16:33] Why surround sound is so important. [18:55] Timelining your goals. [25:29] Obvious quote by Sherlock Holmes. [27:52] Tricking yourself to succeed. [37:41] His book "Stacked," 15 years in the making. "Stacked: Your Super Serious Guide to Modern Money Management," Joe's new book is available for preorder now!   Connect With Joe Saul-Sehy: Website: https://joesaulsehy.com/ Podcast: https://www.stackingbenjamins.com/ Book: https://www.stackingbenjamins.com/stacked/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IStackBenjamins Twitter: @SBenjaminsCast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stackingbenjaminspodcast/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-saul-sehy-b3426b31/   FinCon Live Podcast Sponsor: NEFE: https://www.nefe.org/   Links to FinTech Mentioned in the Show: FinCon: https://finconexpo.com/ Qube: https://qubemoney.com/ Acorns: https://get.acorns.com/bonus10 Public: https://public.com/

Essah's Way
Episode 105 | Delving Beyond the Obvious

Essah's Way

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 27:58


Episode 105. Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa reveals the importance of honoring her ancestors by writing about African roots and realities of Puerto Ricans. Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa was born in Puerto Rico and raised in New York City. She is a product of the Puerto Rican communities on the island and in the South Bronx. She attended the New York City public school system and received her academic degrees from SUNY at Buffalo and CUNY Queens College. As a child she was sent to live with her grandparents in Puerto Rico where she was introduced to the culture of rural Puerto Rico, including the storytelling that came naturally to the women in her family, especially the older women. Much of her work is based on her experiences during this time. The trade paperback edition of Daughters of the Stone was released in March 2019. The hardcover edition was shortlisted as a 2010 Finalist for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. In 2020 the self-published paperback edition won the 16th Annual National Indie Excellence® Awards for Multicultural Fiction. Awarded the 2021 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellow in Fiction, Dahlma's short stories have appeared in various anthologies and literary journals throughout the United States, Africa, and Brazil. The English and Spanish language editions of Dahlma's second novel, A Woman of Endurance will be released in March 2022. Since her retirement, Dahlma continues to dedicate herself to her writing, speaking engagements, and workshops. She resides in the Bronx with her husband, photographer Jonathan Lessuck. www.DahlmaLlanosFigueroa.com  Please consider donating to support the Essah's Way podcast. https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/essahsway

Bom dia, Obvious
#113/ burnout empático: o que é meu e o que é do outro? Com Carolina Nalon

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 43:47


Você acorda e, com o olho ainda semiaberto, olha palavras que formam frases no Twitter. É inacreditável que isso esteja acontecendo. Tem gente que realmente não vai se vacinar???? Talvez as notícias ocupem a tela enquanto você toma o café da manhã, ou talvez o feed do instagram sirva como seu despertador. Na sequência, o café é digerido junto com sua central de problemas particular. Afinal, como não ser a amiga que está sempre disponível, a filha que está sempre disposta, a parceira que nunca nega ajuda? A recompensa vem ao ouvir que você é generosa, que está sempre por perto, que tem o melhor dos ombros. Caramba, como ela sabe se colocar no lugar dos outros. Caramba, não são nem 9 da manhã, você já está emocionalmente exausta e lá no fundo se pergunta se uma soneca resolveria essa sensação. Sem dúvida, a empatia é das qualidades mais admiráveis e é essencial para relações saudáveis. Porém se cada um de nós carrega uma mochila emocional, cada problema do outro que se torna seu ocupa um espaço e, eventualmente, essa bagagem pode passar do limite permitido pelo corpo. Você sabe dizer qual é seu o limite? Será que já passou dele? Bom dia, Obvious! Hoje, Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, conversa sobre burnout empático com a especialista em Comunicação Não Violenta Carolina Nalon.// link para o podcast: Fala, Emancipade

Those Who Aunt
Obvious and Sad with Robyn Lynne Norris

Those Who Aunt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 68:29


Aunt RoRo schemes with us this week to tackle keeping Kelly Clarkson's mouth out of your mouth, watching out for pyramids, international insults, changes in aptitudes, and reformed carnies. TW: more Mentalist Aunt Pat - Colleen Doyle Auntie Mags - Dana Quercioli Aunt RoRo - Robyn Lynne Norris Artwork - Jordan Stafford Mauntras - Carol Doyle Editor - Colleen Doyle Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-babymakers/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-babymakers/support

Hop Nation USA - A Craft Beer Podcast
Episode 220: Glarusingly Obvious Pun

Hop Nation USA - A Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 100:18


After weeks on the road, the crew is back at Hop Nation USA studios. Kelsey joins Adam and Steve to enjoy some of Wisconsin, and only Wisconsin's favorite brau, New Glarus Brewing. First they do some clean up on the news with talking about the upcoming Three Rivers Beer Week in Pittsburgh, New Guinness location in Chicago, new Doordash beer delivery, and a bunch of beer winners. Then it's onto the history and stylings of New Glarus brewery itself and what makes it so successful. Finally a fun little state line, border crossing fun where they figure the kind of strippers Texas has and how big the cream puffs are in Wisconsin.   BEERS: New Glarus Brewing Co Staghorn Oktoberfest New Glarus Brewing Co Spotted Cow Farmhouse Ale New Glarus Brewing Wisconsin Belgian Red

AdamCast
254 - Community, Mental Health, and BasketWeavers w/ Not So Obvious

AdamCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 88:01


Follow Mark here: https://unpopular.academy/basketweaving/ Twitter: @Not__So_Obvious Patreon: http://patreon.com/NotSoObvious YT: http://youtube.com/channel/UCkPE2CEtR... SubStar: http://subscribestar.com/notsoobvious https://www.adamcrigler.com

TorahAnytime Daily Dose
Daily Dose #993: Not So Obvious - R' David Ashear

TorahAnytime Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 2:46


Full TorahAnytime LectureVideo or AudioMore classes from R' David Ashear⭐ Not So Obvious

Silver Screen & Roll: for Los Angeles Lakers fans
Lakers Lowdown: Carmelo Anthony points out the obvious

Silver Screen & Roll: for Los Angeles Lakers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 11:49


Carmelo Anthony joked that LeBron James is the Lakers General Manager. As evidenced by some other eroding relationships between superstar and franchise, so long as James and Rob Pelinka are getting along, that should be all that really matters. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Messages - Church on the Rock
Randy Ruiz : The Obvious Does Not Obligate God

Messages - Church on the Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 54:25


A special measure from Randy Ruiz on the Raw Power of Expectation. From Revive Service 2

Bom dia, Obvious
#112/ saudável online, doente offline? com Jojoca

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 43:45


Afirmar que a nossa saúde mental está sendo diretamente prejudicada pela relação com as redes chega a ser tão óbvio e batido que como bons brasileiros que somos já transformamos em meme. Fora dos stories ninguém está tão bem mesmo, mas não é sobre isso. Pelo menos não apenas sobre isso que vamos debater hoje. Quando falamos sobre vida ativa, saudável, fitness, como você preferir chamar, existe um enorme abismo entre o que é apresentado nas redes versus aquilo que verdadeiramente importa fora delas. E antes que pareça aqui uma revolta pessoal com as influenciadoras fitness, apesar de que poderia também ser, te trago dados da Universidade de Glasgow. Após analisar perfis com foco em dieta e condicionamento físico populares no Reino Unido, concluiu-se que oito em cada nove deles dão maus conselhos a seus seguidores. Os critérios de avaliação eram se as informações passadas por cada um deles eram transparentes, confiáveis, nutricionalmente sólidas e se possuíam referências baseadas em evidências. Fake news low carb, poderíamos dizer. Mas a consequência disso não tem nada de "low": entramos em um efeito paradoxal em que apesar de vivermos a ilusão de termos muitas escolhas, a corrida pela relevância e um algoritmo que aparenta ter uma agenda própri nos deixam com poucas opções viáveis do que acreditar. Entre jejuns de comida, detox das telas e publi shows, quem está verdadeiramente bem nos stories e fora deles? Bom Dia, Obvious! Hoje, @marcelaceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, conversa com a criadora de conteúdo @jojoca ❤ Link para o podcast: Prazer, Renata

Thoughts on the Market
Special Encore: A Good Time to Borrow?

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 3:56


Original Release on August 13th, 2021: Across numerous metrics, the current environment may be an unusually good time to borrow money. What does this mean for equities, credit and government bonds? Chief Cross-Asset Strategist Andrew Sheets explains.----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets, Chief Cross-Asset Strategist for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about trends across the global investment landscape and how we put those ideas together. It's Friday, August 13th, at 4:00 p.m. in London.Obvious things can still matter. Across a number of metrics, this is an unusually good moment to borrow money. And while the idea that interest rates are low is also something we heard a lot about over the prior decade, today we're seeing borrowing cost, ability, and need align in a pretty unique way. For investors, it supports Equities over Credit and caution on government bonds.Let's start with those borrowing costs, which are pretty easy. Corporate bond yields in Europe are at all-time lows, while U.S. companies haven't been able to borrow this cheaply since the early 1950s. Mortgage rates from the U.S. to the Netherlands are at historic lows, and it's a similar story of cheap funding for government bonds.But even more important is the fact that these costs are low relative to growth and inflation. If you borrow to pay for an asset—like equipment or infrastructure or a house—it's value is probably going to be tied to the price levels and strength of the overall economy. This is why deflation and weak growth can be self-fulfilling: if the value of things falls every year, you should never borrow to buy anything, leading to less lending activity and even more deflationary pressure.That was a fear for a lot of the last decade, when austerity and concerns around secular stagnation ruled the land. And that may have been the fear as recently as 15 months ago with the initial shock of covid. But today it looks different. Expected inflation for the next decade is now above the 20-year average in the US, and Morgan Stanley's global growth forecasts remain optimistic.What about the ability to borrow? After all, low interest rates don't really matter if borrowers can't access or afford them. Here again, we see some encouraging signs. Bond markets are wide open for issuance, with strong year to date trends. Banks are easing lending standards in both the U.S. and Europe. And low yields mean that governments can borrow without risking debt sustainability.So borrowing costs are low even relative to the prior decade, and the ability to borrow has improved. But is there any need? Again, we see encouraging signs and some key differences from recent history.First, our economists see a red-hot capital expenditure cycle with a big uptick in investment spending across the public and private sector. Higher wages are another catalyst here, as they often drive a pretty normal pattern where companies invest more to improve the productivity of the workers they already have.But another big one is the planet. If the weather this summer hasn't convinced you of a shift in the climate, the latest report from the IPCC, the UN's authority on climate change, should. Since 1970, global surface temperatures have risen faster than in any other 50-year period over the last two millennia.Combating climate change is going to require enormous investment - perhaps $10 Trillion by 2030, according to an estimate from the IEA. But there's good news. The economics of these investments have improved dramatically, with the cost of wind and solar power declining 70-90% or more in the last decade. The cost of financing these projects has never been lower or more economical.An attractive borrowing environment is good news for the issuers of debt - companies and governments. It's not so good for those holding these obligations. More supply means, well, more supply, one of several factors we think will push bond yields higher.Thanks for listening. Subscribe to Thoughts on the Market on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen and leave us a review. We'd love to hear from you.

A to Z Sports Nashville
PRIMETIME: The Balance Of Power In The NFL Is Clear And Obvious After Only One Week

A to Z Sports Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 33:04


The balance of power in the NFL is clear and obvious after only one week Presented by TwoRiversFord.com, TennHC.com, DraftKings.com & GaryAshton.com

Sexoterapia
#60: Descompasso sexual: quando um casal perde o ritmo

Sexoterapia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 56:18


A psicóloga e sexóloga Ana Canosa e a jornalista e editora de Universa Bárbara dos Anjos recebem Marcela Ceribelli, apresentadora do podcast "Bom Dia, Obvious". Elas discutem se há um número mágico para a vida sexual de casais. A frequência de sexo ideal depende de cada um. Mas, quando estamos em um relacionamento, é necessário lidar com os desejos de duas pessoas. E quando as vontades não batem, existe alguma maneira de entrar no mesmo ritmo? Para saber mais: *Livros: "Três mulheres", da Lisa Taddeo (2019; Harper Collins)"Henry e June", de Anaïs Nin (1986; L&PM Pocket) *Série: "Sex/Life" (2021; Netflix)

WhatCulture Gaming
Sony Are Making Too Many Obvious Mistakes With PS5

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 36:06


The Wind Up begins as Josh and Scott delve into all-things Sony history, Jim Ryan and the PS5's current trajectory. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bom dia, Obvious
#110/ amor ou dependência emocional, com Dandara Pagu

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 42:16


Se a simples ideia de uma vida sem o outro faz parar o coração e sente que todas suas necessidades emocionais dependem dos esforços desse par, estamos encarando sintomas de dependência emocional. Há quem diga inclusive que o maior problema dos relacionamentos é que não podemos ser vulneráveis e realmente nós mesmas até que esse medo de perder o outro tenha desaparecido. Claro, a ideia de um término pode sim vir acompanhada de tristeza, mas o que estamos falando aqui é a visão de que se o outro deixar de existir, a sua vida deixará de fazer sentido. A dependência emocional é também um prato cheio para cair em chantagens emocionais que podem nos fazer acreditar que nunca mais seremos amadas. O fantasma da solidão assombra tanto que podemos até esquecer que existia uma vida antes daquela relação. Como disse a gigante Nina Simone, "você tem de aprender a sair da mesa quando o amor já não está sendo servido". Mas como perceber que o amor migrou de um lugar saudável para um formato de dependência? O medo do abandono é um dos grandes fatores aqui? Como se libertar e, uma vez liberta, como tomar coragem e ter esperança para ter uma nova relação saudável? Aprender a encontrar forças para nos mantermos em pé sozinhas, bem como a plenitude dentro de nós, independente de uma outra pessoa, é um dos atos mais importantes e corajosos que podemos fazer por nós mesmas. Talvez o grande passo que devemos dar aqui seja nos tornarmos a pessoa que desejamos que o outro seja para nós. Bom Dia, Obvious, eu sou Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, e hoje converso com a comunicadora Dandara Pagu.

First Baptist Church of Shallotte
Part 4, “God's Greatest Sign” - Relentless Love

First Baptist Church of Shallotte

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021


I. God's Greatest Sign is Obvious to Everyone II. God Holds Everyone Accountable for This Sign

Gup's Corner Podcast Network
Cup w/Gup - Not so obvious, NFL Fantasy Season Long Targets

Gup's Corner Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Gup goes through some under the radar players as you look forward to your season long fantasy football leagues! Google – https://goo.gl/JgkDZL Spotify – https://goo.gl/afhcFh Stitcher – https://goo.gl/KnQwUc TuneIn – http://tun.in/piScm PodBean – https://goo.gl/F1EvXv YouTube – https://goo.gl/j6nirG Itunes – https://goo.gl/GjVWNu Deezer – https://www.deezer.com/show/507322 Amazon – https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/4f8380e2-c560-4579-9390-22781174d6b3/Gups-Corner-Podcast-Netwo

Creepy Conversations with Kalai and Gabby
True Crime. Setagaya Family Murders - Obviously Not Obvious

Creepy Conversations with Kalai and Gabby

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 60:07


Nikki and Kalai cover Japan's most famous and most baffling unsolved case, the Setagaya family murder. Was the murderer just a reckless man or did he leave all those clues on purpose because he knew he could get away with it? Subscribe on Patreon for uncut videos and exclusive bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/creepyconvos

The Obvious
Episode 121

The Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 64:07


Fantasy Football, Jake Paul vs Woodley, and more this week on The Obvious.

Bull & Fox
Albert Breer says Browns' stability key in providing opportunity to Malik McDowell; talent has been obvious for a long time

Bull & Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 19:31


Albert Breer talks about additional factors in roster cuts around the league, where Cam Newton could land after being released by the Patriots, Malik McDowell's comeback attempt with the Browns, the impact of J.K. Dobbins' injury for the Ravens and the latest on the Texans' approach with Deshaun Watson. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Quick Slants - A New England Patriots Podcast
It's obvious to everyone. Cam is the Patriots' starter. Unless he isn't.

Quick Slants - A New England Patriots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 35:29


Does Cam Newton's experience trump Mac Jones' dynamite summer? Tom Curran and Phil Perry debate who will start against the Dolphins. 1:30-All the signs point to _________ starting at QB against the Dolphins10:30-Is it fair to question Bill Belichick's ability to evaluate the QB position?20:00-Tom attempts to explain the QB conundrum with a little league analogy27:30-What did we learn from the preseason finale?Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/NPCbyAdYLacSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bom dia, Obvious
#109/ masturbação: o último tabú? com Lasciva Lua

Bom dia, Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 33:55


Você já ouviu o absurdo de que se você se masturbar, vai crescer cabelo nas palmas das mãos? Ou que vai dar espinhas, e até cegueira? Desde muito novas, muitas de nós somos ensinadas a não nos tocarmos. "Tira a mão daí, menina!". Existe ainda muita vergonha e culpa associada a conhecer o próprio corpo, seja por questões religiosas ou por repressões sociais. Mas essa mesma sociedade trata a masturbação masculina com naturalidade: desde educação formal, pela mídia e até pela cultura pop. Inclusive, pode ter até tom cômico quando entra uma torta americana em cena. Enquanto isso, o prazer feminino raramente é reconhecido e representado fora uma possível atração hipersexualizada voltada para olhares masculinos. Afinal, a masturbação feminina é um dos últimos tabus reais em nossa sociedade? Mesmo aquelas que já se sentem confortáveis, podem encontrar obstáculos no meio do caminho: se masturbar estando em uma relação, é traição? Se eu comprar um vibrador, vou mexer com a autoestima do meu parceiro ou parceira? Vamos combinar que beira o irracional pensar que o outro seria um mágico capaz de satisfazer absolutamente todas as nossas necessidades sexuais em todos os momentos da vida. Se tocar, além de ser um desejo natural, é uma bela maneira de amar e de honrar a si mesma. Bom Dia, Obvious! Hoje, Marcela Ceribelli, CEO e diretora criativa na Obvious, conversa com a Terapeuta sexual Lua Menezes

Masters of the Obvious
Obviously, Hot Takes

Masters of the Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 78:27


On this episode of Masters of the Obvious, Kirsten & Cyn discuss new MCU trailers, Kanye West, celebrities who don't bathe their children, and the movie White Lotus. Then Kirsten sits down with writer Kari Zander to play a game of Under/Over that devolves into a political debate.Brought to you by FierceUnicorns.com Use code "OBVIOUS" at checkout for 15% off!Support the show (https://paypal.me/MOTOpod)

Kate Dalley Radio
082721 Question The Obvious- Afghan & Epoch Times Nan Su What China Gaines

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 44:50


082721 Question The Obvious- Afghan & Epoch Times Nan Su What China Gaines by Kate Dalley

SOUTHRIDGE CHURCH with Micaiah Irmler
Don't Be Oblivious to What is Obvious

SOUTHRIDGE CHURCH with Micaiah Irmler

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 43:23


Why is it that we are always the last ones to notice that we have mustard on our chin, a stain on our shirt, kale in our teeth, or that our fly is down? What is obvious to others is usually something that we are oblivious to. Jesus corrects the church at Laodicea because He cares for them and wants them to see what is so obvious to everyone but them. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Has Price Discipline Disappeared? Is it Possible to Build Ownership Over Time? Why Venture Is Less Collaborative Now Than Ever? How fast Do Breakout Companies Become Obvious? How To Construct an Optimised and Repeatable Investment Decision-Making Pr

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 54:45


Frank Rotman is a founding partner of QED Investors, one of the leading fintech-focused venture firms investing today with a portfolio including the likes of Klarna, Kavak, Quinto Andar, Credit Karma and more. As for Frank, prior to QED, Frank was one of the earliest analysts hired into Capital One and spent almost 13 years there helping build many of the company's business units and operational areas. Post Capital One, Frank went on to found a student lending company before joining up again with Nigel Morris to co-found QED. In Today's Episode with Frank Rotman You Will Learn: 1.) How Frank made his way into the world of venture having spent 13 years scaling Capital One? What was the founding moment for Nigel and Frank with QED? How does Nigel compare to poker to venture capital? Where are they similar? Where are they different? 2.) Does Frank feel that price discipline has disappeared in the venture market today? What have been some of Frank's biggest lessons on price? Is Frank concerned by the compression in deployment timelines for funds? How does Frank feel on the rise of pre-emptive rounds? In what way does Frank advise his founders when they are offered pre-emptive rounds? 3.) How important does Frank believe sizing your initial position is, from an ownership perspective? Is it possible to build ownership in your winners? What have been some lessons for Frank with regards to the speed of which breakout companies are clear? How does Frank assess and analyse bridge rounds and whether to participate or not? 4.) Why does Frank believe that the VC world is less collaborative than ever today? What has caused this? What can VCs do to change this? How do we solve the structural problem of VCs needing ownership for their business and founders not wanting excessive dilution? What does Frank believe is the most dangerous trend in the VC market today? 5.) How does Frank think about what he can do to improve his investment decision-making process? What repeatable process has Frank landed on that works? Where do many make mistakes here? How does Frank view the relationship between process and outcome? Item's Mentioned In Today's Episode with Frank Rotman Frank's Favourite Book: Tom Robbins Frank's Most Recent Investment: Hello Alice

BuddyWalk with Jesus
Why Isn't The Kingdom Obvious?

BuddyWalk with Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 39:34


Join us this week as we continue our conversation series this time discussing the distractions of the world and what can come from engaging with the older generations. If you have questions you want us to talk about, reach out. If you need prayer, don't hesitate the reach out. Prayer@buddywalkwithjesus.com Please consider supporting the BuddyWalk with Jesus ministry by either checking out our Patreon or Store so that we may continue creating content that encourages closeness to God through the discussions of His Word. Thank you for being an important listener. May God richly bless you with His presence in your everyday life. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/buddywalkwithjesus Website: buddywalkwithjesus.com Check out our new Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/buddywalkwithjesus Check out our new Store! https://my-store-11506966.creator-spring.com Connect with the Community on Discord! https://discord.gg/Th2zYzg --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buddywalkwithjesus/support

The Dental Practice Fixers Podcast by the Madow Brothers
The Obvious Secrets to Case Acceptance?

The Dental Practice Fixers Podcast by the Madow Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 23:40


Successful case acceptance in dentistry can be so mysterious but in this episode of The Dental Practice Fixers, Dr. Rich reveals two secrets.

Brock and Salk
Hawks Preseason Opener Exposes Obvious Area of Concern

Brock and Salk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 66:03


After a lackluster opening game to the 2021 preseason, Brock and Salk are left wondering what's real and what's pretend out the 20-6 loss. While two young defensive players stood out on the bright side, one position group has Brock looking on the trade market for answers. The Mariners remain in a postseason race, but if they miss the Wildcard, should the Mariners wait another year before spending big in free agency? Salk looks at some recent MLB dynasties for answers. The opening weekend of the NFL showcased a handful of interesting young QBs--did any stand out as the next Russell Wilson or Patrick Mahomes? Brock has some interesting insight on one rookie he believes is poised to rise above the rest. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
95. The beauty of emphasizing the obvious, w/Birchbox's Katia Beauchamp

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 31:48


Unconventional ideas define entrepreneurship: They fuel dreams but also spur naysayers and obstacles. Katia Beauchamp, co-founder and CEO of Birchbox, has repeatedly found ways to recast the unconventional as something obvious, enabling ongoing growth through repeated challenges. When Katia and her co-founder introduced Birchbox, its novel business model went against many beauty-industry norms. Then, as it caught on, competitors from Amazon to Sephora took direct aim by copying Birchbox's approach – and crushing margins in the process. To navigate the ups and downs, wooing investors, suppliers, and customers, Katia discovered how describing an industry-flipping idea in conventional terms could both accelerate and extend Birchbox's appeal. The road to differentiating the brand, it turned out, required emphasizing the obvious.Read a transcript of this episode: https://mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.