Podcasts about Oregonian

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Latest podcast episodes about Oregonian

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#1,444 - Portland breaks all time record number of murders in a year at 93 with a month left to go

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 10:49


On Wednesday, in Southeast Portland's Cora Park Apartments, a man died in a shooting and one hour later a second person was killed in a shooting in Northeast Portland's Parkrose neighborhood.Police said that on Thursday a third shooting outside a bar in St. Johns left a man in critical condition.Mayor Ted Wheeler told the Oregonian that his priority for the remainder of his time in office is to address homelessness and crime. In a statement issued to the outlet, Wheeler pledged to increase the staffing of sworn officers and unarmed public safety specialists.Wheeler also cited the Police Bureau's Focused Intervention Team and Enhanced Community Safety Team, which concentrates on gun violence and community outreach."At the same time, we will redouble our ongoing street-level outreach efforts, revamp the work of the Office of Violence Prevention, and expand our community partnerships to offer actionable options to those now engaged in gun murders to step away from their violent lifestyle and make sustainable change," Wheeler said.Support the showSign Up For Exclusive Episodes At: https://reasonabletv.com/LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos every day. https://www.youtube.com/c/NewsForReasonablePeople

Nite Callers Bigfoot Radio
Ep. 332, Tobe Johnson & Brett Eichenberger - A Flash of Beauty: Bigfoot Revealed

Nite Callers Bigfoot Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 82:02


Join me as I chat live with Tobe Johnson and Brett Eichenberger, co-producers of the film "Flash of Beauty: Bigfoot Revealed".    The Owl Moon Lab: A Paranormal Experiment author Tobe Johnson has been deeply involved as a co-producer of this amazing breakthrough documentary.   A Flash of Beauty: Bigfoot Revealed presents interviews from researchers and eyewitnesses. The film covers historical accounts of Bigfoot, the significance within the indigenous cultures, and the emotional impact of a Bigfoot experience.   Brett Eichenberger is an award-winning filmmaker with over twenty-five years of experience working in the film and video production industry. His work includes the feature films Light of Mine and Pretty Broken, commercials, short films, music videos, and documentary shorts. Filmmaking has taken Brett around the world, but he feels most at home in the outdoors of the Pacific Northwest. As a native Oregonian, Brett's been intrigued by Bigfoot since his childhood years, and this documentary has given him the opportunity to explore the topic in depth.   Visit the link below for more info!www.theowlmoonlab.com    

Coffee with Cascade
QP: Education Group Works to Put School Choice on the Ballot in Oregon

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 2:08


Full Text: This year, Arizona became the first state to expand eligibility for its Education Savings Account program to all K-12 children. Parents who choose to opt out of their zoned public schools now can receive 90 percent of the state-level, per-student base funding in an ESA for their child (about $7,000 per student in 2022). The ESA may be used for tuition, homeschooling, tutoring, online education, education therapy, or other services. It's time Oregon parents had similar opportunities to match their students with teachers, schools, and resources who will help them learn best. Education Freedom for Oregon, a school choice advocacy group, is making that its goal. The group has received certified ballot titles from the Oregon Attorney General for two separate education ballot measures. One would create an Education Savings Account program for Oregon families. The other would offer statewide public school open enrollment. If enough voter signatures are received, Oregonians may be able to vote on these measures in 2024. Families increasingly believe one-size-fits-all schools don't work for all children, and polls show a majority of Oregon voters support school choice. Educational choice programs, like those already operating in other states, would increase students' opportunities, improve outcomes, and help make schools accountable to the parents and students they serve. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

News Updates from The Oregonian
Portland breaks homicide record for second year in a row

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 4:39


First indigenous leader will help Columbia River commission. Oregonians will see paid leave pay come out of paychecks come January. Ski areas are opening across Oregon this week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

News Updates from The Oregonian
A second chance for Oregonians convicted of crimes

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 6:19


Oregon lawmakers consider removing restrictions on one state senator. Oregon's paid leave program with start collecting money in January. The Beavers upset the Ducks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beat Check with The Oregonian
Rebroadcast: The man behind Darcelle XV, Portland's iconic drag queen

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 30:19


Walter Cole is perhaps the most prominent living Portlander, but many people likely don't know him by that name. Instead, they know him by his stage name, Darcelle XV. The Oregonian's Beth Nakamura and Brooke Herbert talked about Cole's life and legacy and about their contributions to a recent video and profile. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you get your podcasts [This episode first aired in December, 2019] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cutting For Sign with Ron Cecil and Daniel Penner Cline
79 John Silvestri - Painter and Musician

Cutting For Sign with Ron Cecil and Daniel Penner Cline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 99:22


John Silvestri is a musician and painter. His artistic ability was noticed at the age of eight when he had his first public showing in the St. Louis Art Museum. After studying art in college, he apprenticed in Italy under modern painter and sculptor, Salvatore Leto. His art has been reviewed on international art talk radio as well as in several editorials, including the Herald Tribune, USF Oracle, and The Oregonian. At the age of 12, John began to discover a musical talent as well and in 2011, his original music scored the movie Prime of Your Life which was selected to Cannes Film Festival. Currently, his rock band Audio Orchid is based in Sarasota Florida. For many years, he drew on the synergy, and at times conflict, between his life as an artist and his devotion to music. The two passions have come to fuel each other and at times harmonize. Ideally, he plays music like he paints, and when he paints, he uses realizations arrived at through music. John values laughing his ass off, enjoying life every day, and at the same time, not delaying, procrastinating, or beating around the bush of one's dreams. He believes in doing what he is passionate about, doing it now, as much as possible, as well as he can, and not bullshiting himself along the way. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cutting-for-sign/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cutting-for-sign/support

Beat Check with The Oregonian
A neighborhood 'doused' by diesel

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:19


A massive new warehouse is coming to Northeast Portland in an area that is already choked with diesel pollution. It also happens to just across a major street from a high school with one of the most diverse student populations in the state. On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with Gosia Wozniacka, environmental justice reporter for The Oregonian and OregonLive. Gosia joined the paper in recent weeks – but you may recognize her byline. She covered immigration and latino affairs for the paper from 2006 to 2010, and has worked for a number of outlets since then. We talked about environmental justice, why she focused on one project in northeast Portland and what it says about the broader effort in Portland to focus on equity and just how far we have to go. Got a story tip for Gosia? You can reach here at gwozniacka@oregonian.com Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DJ & PK
James Crepea, Oregon Ducks Beat Writer & Pac-12 Reporter for The Oregonian

DJ & PK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 23:26


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PDX Executive Podcast
Oregon Business News Update with Mike Rogoway, Reporter for The Oregonian

PDX Executive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 24:57


Mike Rogoway is the business reporter for The Oregonian/OregonLive.com. Read Mike's business coverage at: https://www.oregonlive.com/user/MikeRogoway/ Connect with Mike on Twitter @https://twitter.com/rogoway and LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/rogoway/

Bill Oram talking Pac-12 football, Utah @ Oregon, Bo Nix, Dan Lanning, Jazz/Blazers + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 22:22


The Oregonian's Bill Oram joins The Drive to talk Pac-12 football, Utah's trip to Autzen, Bo Nix in or out(?), Dan Lanning in Eugene, Jazz/Blazers strong starts + more 

Think Out Loud
Majority of Oregon counties vote against psilocybin therapy

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 11:09


Oregonians voted in 2020 to legalize psilocybin therapy in supervised facilities. The hallucinogenic drug has gained traction in recent years as a viable treatment for PTSD, severe depression and substance use disorder. But the majority of the state's 36 counties have reservations about the therapy — 25 counties voted against allowing psilocybin use last week, along with several municipalities. Jefferson Public Radio reporter Jane Vaughan joins us to talk about those bans and what they could mean for the future of psilocybin in Oregon

The Jefferson Exchange
The Oregonian issues apology for racist editorials and journalism of the past

The Jefferson Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 22:01


The Oregonian recently apologized, with an editorial offering the current management's regrets about past behavior. And the editorial was accompanied by a special section, "Publishing Prejudice," which lays out in great detail the many ways in which the journalism of The Oregonian was slanted toward the white side. Rob Davis, the reporter on the project, gives some detail on practices that are simply not acceptable in a mainstream news organization today.

Hard Factor
Tragic News Stories and Affordable Real Estate on the Eve of the Macho Man's Birthday | 11.14.22

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 66:57


On today's episode…FTX declared bankruptcy over the weekend and everyone is rightfully upset (00:06:02). Dallas airshow tragedy when two historic planes collided (0020:50). Top 10 most affordable zip codes (00:41:40). Oregonians want to secede to Idaho in the Greater Idaho Movement (00:52:57). Governor elect Joe Lombardo's greatest appearance on the tv show Cops as Officer Lombardo (00:55:10). Watch Full Podcasts on Spotify and YouTube + Get Bonus Podcasts via Anchor and Patreon NEW “CREAM OF THE CROP” & “CUP OF COFFEE IN THE BIG TIME” MERCH IS OUT AT STORE.HARDFACTOR.COM (00:03:15) - Macho Man's birthday is tomorrow 11.15 ☕ Cup of Coffee in the Big Time ☕ (00:03:55) - Joke of the day: Pizza and Pu$$y (00:06:02) - FTX declares for bankruptcy (00:15:40) - UFC 281 was awesome and Drake lost a 2 million dollar bet (0018:20) - RIPS: Anthony Johnson, the real life Terminal man and Gallagher (0020:50) - Dallas airshow tragedy as two historic planes collide and six die (0023:33) - The tale of the Buffer brothers (0025:33) - Yellowstone and new spin off is back

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management
VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: Rethinking Agency Organizational Structure- Ideas that work with Dacia Johnson-Oregon Blind

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 23:58


Today, Dacia Johnson, Executive Director of the Oregon Commission for the Blind, chats with Carol Pankow, about some of the really innovative practices that the Oregon Commission for the Blind has implemented to improve organizational effectiveness and benefit the VR community.   Dacia and her team did a lot of work preparing for monitoring and restructuring some critical elements of the organizational structure that has the VR community talking.    Join Dacia and Carol in the Manager Minute studio for this timely conversation on championing innovation and high performance in a climate where so many agencies are looking for ways to spend VR funds effectively.   Listen Here   Full Transcript   VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: Rethinking Agency Organizational Structure- Ideas that Work with Dacia Johnson-Oregon Blind   {Music} Speaker1: Manager Minute brought to you by the VRTAC for Quality Management, Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time. Here is your host Carol Pankow.   Carol: Well, welcome to the manager minute. Joining me in the studio today is Dacia Johnson, executive director of the Oregon Commission for the Blind. She has been the executive director since 2013 and was the director of the agency's rehabilitation services program prior to that. So Dacia was so good to see you at the VR conference last week. How are things going in Oregon?   Dacia: It was great to see you as well, Carol. And things are going well here. I mean, I think like every agency, we have our challenges and opportunities, but certainly we're focused on providing the best services we can to Oregonians who experience vision, loss and just getting at it every day.   Carol: Awesome to hear. Well, full disclosure to our listeners, Dacia and I have worked together in both NCSAB and CSVAR and we were new director buddies. Back in 2013, right before the world changed with WIOA in 2014, and I had the good fortune to participate in the Oregon Commission for the Blind Monitoring visit this year and learned a ton of interesting things about the agency. Dacia's undertaken some really cutting edge organizational improvements that will be a benefit to the VR community, and I knew I needed to get her on the program to talk about this. And I think it's also fitting and timely with the state of the national VR program and agencies are looking for ways to effectively spend funds. So let's dig in. So Dacia, can you tell our listeners a little bit about yourself and the agency? Like what's your background and how did you land at the commission?   Dacia: Sure. I started my undergraduate degrees in psychology and so like every undergraduate with a psychology major, I didn't know what I was going to do. And I moved back to a small town in southern Oregon and I got a job with at the time it was a GPA workforce training program, and I loved that job. I did that for a couple of years and what I realized was my favorite part of it was working with at Risk Youth and what that was with youth with disabilities, right? They were kids with significant learning disabilities, kids with psychiatric disabilities. And I just love the work. That job ended and I moved myself to the big city and I started in private rehabilitation. And I realized quickly that the work of private rehabilitation just didn't really fit my values. And so I started working in public vocational rehabilitation while I simultaneously pursued my graduate degree in rehabilitation counseling. I did that at the general agency in Oregon. There's two agencies here, there's the general agency, and then there's the services for the individuals who are blind under what's called the Commission for the Blind, where I currently work. And I was recruited to come here in 2000 and I immediately fell in love with the work. Carol, you know this, but blindness rehabilitation is very holistic. You really have to address the needs of the entire person, starting with skills and adjustment and just helping them kind of redirect their existing skills and new and innovative ways. And I just loved it. I also love the fact that with the blindness organization are oftentimes closer to the work. I love policy, I love meetings. I'm a nerd that way. I love thinking about new programs. But with our agency, you actually get to see people who are going through the rehabilitation process. You get to interact with them. And so it was just the right elevation for me. And I've been here ever since.   Carol: I love that. I didn't know that about you. That's a cool way to start. And you're like an old timer now. You've been there, what, 20 going on? 23.   Dacia: Been here? Yep, 22 years in August. And for a long time I was the newbie. And so now it is a little bit interesting to be one of the most senior staff people. I will say that I have never not wanted to come to work and to me that's an incredible gift to be able to work doing things that you're passionate about with incredibly committed, passionate rehabilitation professionals, not unlike yourself, Carol, but we just have just a wonderful, service oriented mission. And I love coming to work and I feel incredibly grateful for that opportunity every day.   Carol: Yeah, you have a fantastic team. Now, I know a commission is a little bit of a different structure than most people are maybe used to. Can you give us just a few high points and what's different about that? And then also, like, how many people do you guys serve?   Dacia: All right. So we have a commission structure. We're grandfathered under the Rehabilitation Act, so we don't have a state rehabilitation council. We have a seven member board that reports directly to the governor. And that board has appointing authority over the executive director. Myself and the majority of those commissioners in Oregon have to be legally blind. And so our structure really ensures that we're focusing in and have crystal clear priorities around the best services possible to Oregonians who are blind or blindness organization. So we provide a combination of vocational rehabilitation services and independent living. Services to individuals with the largest independent living program being the older independent living program. For individuals who are blind. We serve anywhere from 1300 to 1600 folks a year in our vocational rehabilitation program. Last year, I think we served around 650 folks.   Carol: Yeah, it gives me a good perspective because I think back at SSB when I left, we were around 800 folks in the VR, and OIB program we were serving about 5000 people.   Dacia: Wow. It's incredible.   Carol: It's pretty cool. But I'm like you, I love that work and I love being close to the people and seeing what's going on. So I know you and your team did a just a ton of work preparing for that monitoring, but you also did a lot of work in restructuring some critical elements of your organizational structure. Can you tell our listeners what prompted you to think about doing something different with your structure and what are the specific things that you've done.   Dacia: On the monitoring piece, I think what I will say about preparing for monitoring is use the tools that are available to us that you, Carol, have developed. So I think that basically you use the checklists that the TAC has created for agencies. It makes a difference, right? So we actually thought we were on the short list for a long time. So we actually had been preparing, I would say, on a quarterly basis, going through the monitoring guide for that particular year and just trying to think through some of the questions. The monitoring guide doesn't change radically year to year. So we just kind of made sure that we were not starting from ground zero once they notified the states that were monitored. And I encourage everyone to do that because it really makes you think about kind of your structure. The other thing is I've been here a long time, and so I think that some of the skills that we all developed in vocational rehabilitation counseling, in terms of assessing skills and abilities and capabilities, I feel like I've applied that to our organization over time. And then I've looked for opportunities to be able to strategically invest in the organization. One of the things in which we're unique is that we actually employed an internal auditor and folks are like, How can a small agency benefit from an internal auditor? Well, I'll tell you, one of the first things that that position did when we hired them was to create some infrastructure around our quality assurance manual auditors, because we wanted that position to be able to actually audit the work they own the process of making sure things were documented in terms of internal controls, policies and procedures, but they actually didn't create the internal control, if that makes sense. They didn't create the policies and procedures. So that position had enough distance that over time they can actually do the internal auditing and testing of the processes to make sure they're in place. But really having one position that directly reports to me that had that full responsibility of making sure that things were clear documented in one place and kind of reflected the organization, I think was critical to us. That position is constantly having activities going on to make sure that our organization is running effectively and efficiently. They also were the lead on the monitoring preparation. It is a massive lift to get prepared for monitoring and go through the process. But we had one point of contact that doesn't do the work of the service delivery and they were able to objectively kind of track our progress and leading up to the monitoring and then led the work for the onsite monitoring itself. And it felt like it ran pretty smoothly to have that structure. So even if you don't have a separate position like we have, I would encourage folks to use that central point of contact ownership model because I think it made our monitoring run fairly smoothly.   Carol: Yeah, I thought it was pretty cool because that's Clay's position, correct?   Dacia: Yes. Yes.   Carol: So if anybody out there, you can't have Clay, But Clay is really awesome. And we were able to get into contact with him before you all went through the monitoring. He had reached out about a couple of things and I was like, What? Like what is this position? And that's why I just want you to say, what did your monitoring team say about this position?   Dacia: They were really pleased to see it, particularly on the fiscal side and looking at the way we have that separation and the ability to objectively review information, they were very favorable about the position for sure.   Carol: Yeah. In fact, I think they said we've never seen this anywhere else. You are the only agency that has had a position that was developed quite like that, and I thought that was pretty cool. So I guess I didn't realize that Clay had not developed that whole extensive manual that you had. There is a lot of work that went into that. Who did that? Who did all of that?   Dacia: He helped kind of with the lift of getting things documented. But each of the programs actually did the identification of the issues because we wanted him to have that autonomy and independence and not creating the actual documentation itself. Before we had dedicated resources, we started the process of creating a quality assurance manual. And what we realize is without dedicated resources to focus on it, it never happened. So the other thing I would encourage folks to do, if you don't have that position to help with the documentation is I basically said and I gave I think three months and I just said, you have to do it by this date.   Carol: Oh my gosh, yeah, that's quick.   Dacia: And I just said, it's never going to be a good time. And I just set a deadline. I think it was three months. People freaked out a little bit, but the reality is it got done right? And then we built from the foundation. We added once we kind of did a gap analysis of what was missing from that initial documentation list, then Clay helped kind of figure out where we needed to create documentation beyond what that initial lift was.   Carol: Well, and I know with the blind agency, it's always unique because we're typically smaller. We don't have a lot of resources. So kind of carving out these sort of positions and making investments in a particular piece of infrastructure like that. You know, it's kind of a deal. It's a big deal to do it. And so taking the funds and kind of making that happen. So had you had that kind of swirling around in your mind for a while?   Dacia: I had I mean, like every agency you go through the single audit act experience where you have external auditors. When I first became executive director, there was a significant push to try to make sure that the agency was running effectively and efficiently. And what I quickly realized is you don't know what you don't know, you know, especially like in on the service delivery side, but you have gaps and you're just not going to see them unless you have a focused attention on actually looking for your gaps. And so once I realized the pressure and the expectation to have this particular element be like running the best it could be, then I thought, well, then give me the resources. Right? I advocated for the resources to make sure that we could actually maintain that level of expectations.   Carol: Good for you. That's awesome. You also made some investment, though, in your fiscal team. I remember because did you not structure some things in a different way with your fiscal unit as well?   Dacia: We did. We actually had some turnover at our chief financial officer level and as I did the exit interview with the candidate that left who loved working for the agency, they indicated like this is impossible work, like you have like the CFO as a small agency wearing all of these hats. But there were so many hats that they were running from one fire to another fire to another fire to another fire. So then we hire a new CFO, and within a couple of months, the new person was like, I feel like I'm running from one fire to another fire to another fire like, All right. So either I listen to these very different professionals with different backgrounds and expertise and say there's too much work, right? So we advocated to add a grant accountant position that had just started actually last December. So not quite a year yet. And the grant accountant position in part is going to be focusing on preparing all of the grant reports and all of that tracking. And then that gives the CFO the opportunity to be able to review that work with some separation to make sure that that work is accurate, that it has all of the required elements in it. We had some very small but annoying financial reporting errors that were recurring that came up on the Single Audit Act audits. And the major barrier for us was the CFO was preparing the report, reviewing their own work and then submitting the report. And there were keying errors, you know, silly things that you just can't double check your own work. It's impossible.   Carol: Right? Good for you. Yeah. Because you know, all those single audit act, when you get on that list, there's always a lot of follow up. And I remember back in the day, like our governor's office, I'd have to send quarterly reports like how we're going to resolve this particular finding. They don't like you to have any. So good for you for doing that. So how do you think things are working out since you've made those changes? And have you had any kind of lessons learned along the way so far?   Dacia: Yeah, I think that they're working out well. One of the things we're working on now that's still in development is, as we know, our financial management is super complex. So we have to at any one time look at state level appropriations and budgets. At the same time, we need to be managing our match and our maintenance of effort and our Pre-ETS and we have to look at our cash on hand and tracking that and making sure that we don't have federal cash around too long and all of these pieces. And so we're creating with the lead work, being of that new grant account position, some kind of a dashboard that can kind of help us make those types of decisions, like when to switch from one year of Pre-ETS to the next year of Pre-ETS, and when we've met our match and maintenance of effort. And how does that compare with our state appropriation year and making sure that we expend all of our state funds that we have available during that period? And what I'm hoping that will be able to do is as we're trying to make decisions in terms of budget appropriation, grant management decisions around re allotment and all of that stuff, that we have kind of some data intelligence to help us kind of drive those decisions and track it over time.   Carol: Well, imagine that data driven decision making, Dacia.   Dacia: I know, right?   Carol: I think you did a little presentation on that a few years ago somewhere. I kind of seem to remember that was one of your big things you like to think about.   Dacia: Yeah, the piece that I would in terms of lessons learned, we're a small agency and we have passionate staff, right? Sometimes I think that I could have probably engaged staff and more often. And as to why are we adding these positions that aren't in the direct service bucket, I think that's a question that still comes up periodically, even though they see the value, but still sometimes they're like, Oh, did we add this? And why didn't we add a counselor or a teacher? No, I don't think you can over communicate the why to staff, even though, again, I think they intellectually see the benefit. But when you add FTE, they really want it to be in the service bucket, the admin stuff. I think they feel like you always have enough, you know. And the truth is, I think that agencies, particularly small agencies under resourced the administrative tasks because there's a certain amount of work that has to happen and it has to happen well, and at the end of the day, if you aren't running your organization well, they're not going to give you extra credit because you've been putting all your resources in the direct service area. They're just going to say that you're not running your organization well.   Carol: Yeah, and then that doesn't bode well. I came in too, to that. And if we aren't shipshape financially and we don't have all of that together, then we can't really run the program.   Dacia: Yeah.   Carol: Don't know what we're doing. So it is always that fine balance because like you say, we're small typically, and when you add that resource over here, people immediately look at that, Oh, sure, you're making, you know, the central office. People are bloated, There's too many people. But boy, in a blind agency, when you're wearing 15 hats, it gets tough. And there has to be that separation for sure.   Dacia: Yeah. And Carol, you and Sara have kind of reinforced directors need to know the financial matters. And I think I can't reinforce that enough, like the whole vision of having a grant account and then figuring out this dashboard stuff that came out of me not sleeping right and trying to think like, gosh darn it, I need to have this kind of information available because I'm the one that's worrying about this at the end of the day.   Carol: So I hope we didn't make you not sleep.   Dacia: Oh, no, not at all.   Carol: I know we talk about it a lot, though. So how far away do you think you are from this dashboard? Because I'm sure people are probably pretty interested.   Dacia: It's probably about 70% there.   Carol: Oh, wow.   Dacia: Yeah, we've been working on it for a while. Like right now we're having to try to make some decisions. Do we have enough spending authority for the remainder of our budget cycle, which is through June 30th? We're going to meet in a couple of weeks. And this is the first test. It's like, is this dashboard going to give us the data that we need to make that budget decision? So we're trying to apply the concepts now to say, where are we at with periods? That's the other test that we have is working with our sister agency, the general agency, on the 22 projects. Are we good? Can we move on to 23 periods? Those kinds of Things.   Carol: Yeah. I definitely want to take a look at that. When you get that done. I'm super interested. I'm sure other people would be as well. So I know your mind is always thinking, Do you have other things you're cooking up there that you're thinking about doing?   Dacia: Well, right now we're preparing and Oregon has a biennial budget, so we've been looking at a specific focus on outreach. We feel like the pandemic was a particular time where folks were kind of hunkered in, especially individuals who are blind, as oftentimes they had other secondary health conditions that made them nervous about acquiring COVID. And so we're wanting to do a pretty aggressive outreach effort and we're hoping to get the resources on that. The other thing that we're excited about is we're asking for some dedicated resources. That would be in house expertise with state funds. That would be like technology gurus to help with kind of the statewide enterprise technology projects to lean in on the accessibility and usability of any type of statewide projects. So in the event that a job seeker or candidate who is blind was thinking about working in some case management system or whatever, that we would at least be able to influence the accessibility usability of some of those statewide systems. So we're pretty excited about that as well.   Carol: Oh, that is very cool. I'm going to give you a tip on that outreach campaign. Check out David D'Angelo. He's from Mass Commission for the Blind. He did this big PSA initiative about a year or so ago with some real admin dollars. And it was very clever, very well done. And I know it's impacted his numbers, so I always like pitching that to everybody. Check out Mass Commission for the Blind as well, because there's not a lot of people. Everybody's talking about this right now, but there's not a lot of examples of ways that people have done that that are out there. So it is always nice to kind of go, Oh, what's somebody else done?   Dacia: That's great. Yeah, we'll definitely check them out.   Carol: So do you have any advice for our listeners as they contemplate looking inward at their own organizational structure, any kind of words of wisdom for them as folks are struggling with this right now?   Dacia: Well, I was inspired by our colleague from California, Joe Xavier, during the course of our leadership forum when he was like, be bold. Right? So I think that would be my first thing. I'm going to just quote Joe and say, be bold. I think that this is a time to just lean in and just think big and just try to apply the same skills that we learned. Many of us grew up through the ranks of counselors and just think about your organization the way you would think about a client, like what are the strengths, what are the resources and what are those opportunities to improve? The other thing I would say to folks is even if you have constraints around FTE and you can't build out a grant account and look for an intergovernmental agreement and grab some resources from another agency that might be able to loan you the expertise. The same with auditing. Before it had a position, we contract it out for auditing work. What I realized from that is the ownership piece is different, right? And you're just not controlling and directing a consultant the way you do a staff. So it just didn't have exactly what I wanted, but it was better than nothing. So know what you can do within your constraints of your systems that you have to work with and then just go for it.   Carol: That's well said. And you've given a little commercial for next month because next month I'm talking to Brent McNeal from Florida General and they've had this contract. They lost FTEs and they weren't able to get them, but they had the dollars, so they were allowed to contract for positions. So we're going to talk to him about how he did that so that that is timely, too. Well said to lead into that. Well, I appreciate your time today, Dacia. I think it's super cool. I'm really excited about what's going on at Oregon and please do share that dashboard when you get that done.   Dacia: Absolutely.   Carol: Thanks for being on the show and best of luck to you and happy holidays. Coming up, Happy Thanksgiving and all that good stuff.   Dacia: Yes. Well, thanks for the opportunity, Carol. It's always fun to visit with you.   {Music} Speaker1: Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time, brought to you by the VR TAC for Quality Management. Catch all of our podcast episodes by subscribing on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanks for listening!

KGW’s Straight Talk with Laural Porter
KGW election night analysts reflect on Decision 2022 in Oregon

KGW’s Straight Talk with Laural Porter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 24:55


It was a historic election night in Oregon on Tuesday, with three women running for governor and more women candidates running for office up and down the ballot than ever before.  KGW's election night analysts, Democrat Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal and Republican strategist Rebecca Tweed, reflected on the midterm election in Oregon during this week's episode of "Straight Talk." Jayapal said that leading up to election night, the 2022 midterms were popularly described as a referendum on both the party in power in the White House and in the Oregon governor's office.  But rather than being a referendum, Jayapal said voters took a more nuanced approach for specific candidates. Democrats like Tina Kotek, who won the Oregon governor's race, were successful because they ran nuanced campaigns that touched on both issues and values, she said. Republican strategist Rebecca Tweed said that while it's disappointing that GOP candidate for governor Christine Drazan came up just short of winning the race, Republicans in Oregon can still point to some meaningful wins.  It wasn't a runaway race for Democrats, she said, who have been in power in the Oregon governor's office for nearly 40 years, and Drazan brought a lot of energy to her campaign and messaging that resonated with a lot of Oregonians.

Dirt & Sprague
Dirt & Sprague Thursday Nov. 10th, 2022 Hour 3

Dirt & Sprague

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 42:35


The guys start the hour with their weekly visit from Ken Barkley of BetQL looking at NFL awards parlays, then they dive into the Oregon St.-Cal match up this weekend in Corvallis. BIll Oram of The Oregonian joins the Daily Ticker with his thoughts on what the Ducks and Beavers are accomplishing this season, and Dame vs CJ for the first time, who ya got?

Dennis Prager podcasts
Truth and Beauty

Dennis Prager podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 78:02


The existential threat to America does not come from fossil fuel, it comes from the Left. The only way to save the country is to make a persuasive case for Judeo-Christian values of truth, justice, goodness, and beauty… Dennis talks to Elaine Parker, Chief Communications Officer for Jobs Creators Network… The more data we have, the more it appears Sweden had the best Covid policy.  Dennis talks to Steve Cortes, former CNN political analyst and advisor to President Trump. Where did Republicans go wrong on Tuesday? Why did they underperform? What do they need to do to regain their momentum?  Michael Walsh, screenwriter, best-selling author and political commentator. Former music critic for Time. His new book is Against the Great Reset: Eighteen Theses Contra the New World Order… Why did abortion play such a big role in Tuesday's election? How did the polls miss it? Oregonians and New Yorkers had a chance to make a statement against soft-on-crime Democrats. They blew it. Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squawk Pod
Nike Founder Phil Knight, Crypto's Collapse, & Blue Checks, Be Gone! 11/10/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 44:45


In a supersized episode, Becky Quick sits down with Nike co-founder Phil Knight for a rare interview. For the first time, Knight comments on Nike's decision to cut ties with NBA star Kyrie Irving. The Oregon gubernatorial race is still too close to call; a proud Oregonian himself, Knight explains why he's donated nearly $5 million combined to the Republican and Independent candidates, while Nike has publicly backed the Democrat candidate Tina Kotek. Once worth $32 billion, crypto exchange FTX is struggling to survive. SEC Chair Gary Gensler discusses regulators' roles in protecting investors against the crypto collapse. Plus, an election update in Georgia: Senate candidates Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and Republican Herschel Walker are heading to a runoff in December. And, at the helm of Twitter, Elon Musk has nixed the blue check mark!  In this episode: Gary Gensler, @GaryGenslerBecky Quick @BeckyQuickJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

Growing Up Christian
Ep. 102 – Let's Just Pray That She Repents and Immediately Croaks... w/ Casey Parks of The Washington Post

Growing Up Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 115:32


This week we're joined by author and journalist Casey Parks! Casey is a Washington Post reporter who covers gender and family issues. She spent a decade at The Oregonian, where she wrote about race and LGBTQ+ issues and was a finalist for the Livingston Award. Her articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Oxford American, ESPN, USA Today, and The Nation. In this episode, Casey recounts her childhood as a charismatic youth, winning a trip to Alabama for leading so many people to the Lord (that's right, soul-winning champion!), coming to grips with her sexuality, and all the ways that her family, friends, and fellow church-goers coped with that reality. Casey also has a new book out called “Diary of a Misfit,” which is about her long, difficult quest to learn about a man named Roy from her grandmother's town that was supposedly kidnapped as a little girl but grew up live as a man. At its core, the book is a family saga about forging connections across the gulfs that divide us. Find out more about Casey and her work on her website (www.caseyparks.com), follow her on Twitter (@caseyparks) and Instagram (@caseyparksauthor), and buy “Diary of a Misfit” wherever books are sold!

Inclusive Collective - DEI in Business
The All-DEETS Episode! Twitter Gets Worse, The Oregonian's Reckoning, Election Predictions and More!

Inclusive Collective - DEI in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 41:44


This week, Rob and Nadia react to the latest DEI workplace news including the Twitter Takeover and Mattel's efforts to be more inclusive, and other news! Tune in for all your latest news centered around DEI in the business world.  The Oregonian letter to the editor: https://projects.oregonlive.com/publishing-prejudice/editor-apology Hosted by Nadia Butt and Rob Hadley. Produced by Rifelion Media. Contact us: inclusivecollective@rifelion.com For advertising opportunities please email PodcastPartnerships@Studio71us.com    Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: https://bit.ly/InclusiveCollective If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be amazing! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: https://bit.ly/InclusiveCollective Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Coffee with Cascade
QP: Oregon Needs a Free-Market Makeover

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 2:06


Full text: “What's the one thing you'd do to fix Oregon?” That's a tough question, because there's no single fix for all of Oregon's problems. Every single issue the government touches in Oregon is in need of free-market reform. Despite spending more than the national average, our schools have some of the worst achievement and graduation rates in the country. Oregon has some of the worst housing affordability in the country because we make it so hard to build new housing. We have a homelessness crisis because we have some of the highest rates of untreated mental illness and substance abuse. We have a shortage of hospital beds because state law makes it virtually impossible to build new hospitals or add to existing ones. We have some of the worst roads in the country because state and local leaders have waged a decades-long war on cars. We're facing a 30% chance of widespread power outages because state policy is focused on reducing the state's carbon footprint at the expense of grid reliability. Each of these crises affects the day-to-day lives of most Oregonians, and none of them can be solved with one quick fix. We need long-haul, top-to-bottom free-market reforms to bounce back to being the Most Livable Place in the Country. As you're filling out your ballot this week, cast your vote for the candidates who are willing and able to carry this off. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

Right At The Fork
#330 Ron Khormaei - Founder, Steelport Knife Co. & Finex Cookware

Right At The Fork

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 95:42


Ron Khormaei doesn't sit still.  From an early age when he left oppressive Iran for Switzerland and then Oregon, to his noteworthy academic pursuits in engineering, to navigating the corporate world to round out his skillsets.   We talk to Ron about his journey to Oregon and his eventual stamping the best aspects of Portland into his cookware and knife products.   There's a lot of food for thought in so much Ron says in this interview.  Any entrepreneur or fellow Oregonian would appreciate the wisdom and spirit Mr. Khormaei imparts in this hour-plus talk.    See his products at www.steelportknife.com   Right at the Fork is supported by: Zupan's Markets: www.Zupans.com RingSide Steakhouse: www.RingSideSteakhouse.com Portland Food Adventures: www.PortlandFoodAdventures.com

Something Positive for Positive People
Spfpp 258: OHA Series - WORK WITH US

Something Positive for Positive People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022


Elle (she/her) is a 27 year old sex positive Oregonian. She's heterosexual and monogamous and ironically our talk led to this statement of mutual non monogamy which you'll hear more about here. Diagnosed with HSV-1 genitally just a few months ago, I was really shocked at how cool she was with talking about it so soon. We talk about how her self education led her to discovering the most useful information she received was learning how others navigate discussions about HSV, disclose and just overall talk about it. It's odd that health organizations don't want to work with those of us who are being sought out for sexual health information at all. My resistance was that I'm not credible because I'm a dude with a podcast. Now, as a non profit, I'm still just unable to get connected to anyone at the CDC for what's a no brainer collaboration to minimize new STI transmissions. We'll get there soon though, with or without the support of major institutions.

EpochTV
NTD Evening News (Nov. 2): North Korea Is Secretly Sending Weapons to Russia: US; Life-Long Oregon Dems to Vote Red: Journalist

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 23:51


The Biden administration on Nov. 2 accused the North Korean regime of secretly supplying Russia with military equipment to support its war in Ukraine. Documentary filmmaker Leighton Woodhouse tells NTD about the sentiment among Oregonians amid a homelessness crisis in the state, ahead of what could be a historic governor's race. ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

SPYCRAFT 101
A CIA Traitor's Last Asset with Bryan Denson

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 87:14


This week, Justin chats with investigative reporter and author Bryan Denson. Focusing on true crime, scandals, and government corruption, Bryan has spent his career reporting for publications like The House Post, Reader's Digest, Newsweek, The Los Angeles Tomes, and the Oregonian. He's also written three nonfiction book series on infamous criminals like Aldrich Ames and the Unibomber, as well as other historical nonfiction. Today, Bryan and Justin discuss the story of notorious CIA traitor Jim Nicholson--and how he trained his son Nathan from  behind bars to finish his work. Connect with Bryan:bryandenson.comCheck out Bryan's book, The Spy's Son, here.https://www.amazon.com/Spys-Son-Highest-Ranking-Convicted-Espionage/dp/0802125190/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=Connect with Spycraft 101:Check out Justin's latest release, Covert Arms, here.spycraft101.comIG: @spycraft101Shop: spycraft-101.myshopify.comPatreon: Spycraft 101Find Justin's first book, Spyshots: Volume One, here.Download the free eBook, The Clandestine Operative's Sidearm of Choice, here.Support the show

Beat Check with The Oregonian
Rob Davis talks with Vicki Nakashima, Zachary Stocks about the Publishing Prejudice project

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 49:50


From its first days publishing as a daily in 1861 until well into the 20th century, The Oregonian existed as a newspaper by white men, for white men. The consequences were profound. Its white supremacist worldviews — excusing lynching, supporting segregation, stigmatizing people of color — helped shape the state today. This is Beat Check with The Oregonian. Last week we heard from editor and vice president of content for the Oregonian and OregonLive, Therese Bottomly. This week we turn to a family that was directly affected by The Oregonian's racism. This week, investigative reporter Rob Davis takes the mic. In the second half of the show, Rob interviews Zachary Stocks, the executive director of the Oregon Black Pioneers. But first, Rob chats with Vicki Nakashima. Vicki's dad Ted, wrote a searing piece for The New Republic in 1942 about his experience in a prison camp during World War II. Ted Nakashima was a second-generation Japanese American who was imprisoned without due process, one of 120,000 people nationwide, two thirds of whom were U.S. citizens like Ted. Shortly after his magazine piece, the Oregonian sent a young reporter to an Oregon prison camp. The story downplayed the horrors, saying “a vast majority seemed to consider their detention a vacation.”  On October 6th, Bottomly apologized to Vicki Nakashima for the xenophobic article. Related: See the JAMO Exhibit entitled, "Resilience - A Sensei Sense of Legacy" until Dec. 22nd See the Pittock Mansion's exhibit on Black Oregon from 1840-1970 until Nov. 13. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts to hear new episodes each week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Ted Lemon: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 97:36


This interview is with Ted Lemon of Littorai Wines. Ted describes his wine journey, beginning in 1981 in France at the Université de Dijon where he studied enology. He talks about his experience working for a Burgundian estate and goes on to explain why he later moved to California. Even though Ted currently resides at his Sonoma Coast winery, he consults for wineries across California, Oregon, and even New Zealand. In fact, he was the original consulting winemaker for Gary Andrus at Archery Summit, and has also worked with Weber Vineyard and Fuqua Vineyard. Ted compares the French, Californian, and Oregonian wine communities and also goes over what it is like running his own winery. Later, Ted talks about his winemaking philosophy and his passion for biodynamic viticulture. He also speaks about generative agriculture and his vineyard management style when it comes to growing his own Pinot Noir and Chardonnay varieties. At the end, Ted talks about the future of Littorai Wines and what plans are in the works. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt over Zoom on June 6th, 2022.

News Updates from The Oregonian
Oregonian editorials from World War II supported incarceration of Japanese descendents

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 4:37


Republicans may have edge in 5th district Congressional race. Portland-area schools deploy new efforts as math test scores show Oregon as one of the worst in the nation. Free mobile clinics expand access to medical and dental care in Oregon and Washington. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

News Updates from The Oregonian
The Oregonian's two leading men for decades promoted racist policies

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 4:31


22-year-old homeless man charged with murder in Portland, moving body. Vacasa fires 280 in most recent layoffs in Oregon. Mt. Hood Meadows may open soon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Think Out Loud
Two coastal counties practice emergency response to disasters

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 11:25


Earlier this month, Coos and Curry County came together to plan for the worst-case disaster scenario. They underwent a series of exercises to solidify roles for each county and get familiar with what to do in the case of a tsunami, earthquake or other emergency situation. Debbie Mueller is the Coos County Emergency Coordinator. She joins us to share how these trainings went and how Oregonians can be prepared for the worst.

The Unrefined Sophisticates Podcast
EPISODE 173: WILD TIMES

The Unrefined Sophisticates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 88:58


Announcement: We will be recording LIVE at #AlbertaAbbey on Sunday, Nov 6th at the PDX Black Podcast Fest presented by @thenumberzpodcastnetwork and you're all invited! Pull up, bring us a fine bottle of Anejo tequila, and pop it with us in person *wink* A record-setting listener is on their way to making Unrefined history (!!!) keep your eyes on our stories this week to help us decide how to thank them, and maybe you'll be next! This week we go over #Trump getting subpoenaed to testify before the January 6th committee, just as Mucinex Man, #SteveBannon gets a 4-month prison sentence for ignoring the same committee- oop! The hero in Massachusetts that pulled up to her homie's house who was getting evicted, and unleashed a few bee hives at the cops- absolutely iconic! Election fraud arrests in #Florida are starting to be thrown out and the reason is equally as hilarious as the existence of the elected fraud department. Speaking of elections, all you voting #Oregonians out there now is our time! Ballots and voter pamphlets have dropped *reggae horns* Give yourself enough to sit with the issues important to you, learn who's responsible for what, and make sure the candidate's claims match the job description. Now is not the time to listen to polls, extra loud “people” with brand-new Twitter accounts, or folks that can't tell the difference between political parties. And y'all know we get to cussin in the #UnrefinedTime, so grab your red cup and listen up! #UnrefinedSophisticates #Podcast #RedCupSiblings #TrappinByYappin

Coast Range Radio
Oregon's Wild 2022 Election, and its Impact on Climate, Forests, and More

Coast Range Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 29:00


Ballots are out for the 2022 general election, and it is no exaggeration to say that this is the most consequential election for Oregonians in years if not decades.Three out of six of Oregon's seats for the US house of representatives are considered tossups where either the Democrat or Republican could win, and the race for Governor is anyone's game.  To put that into perspective, Republicans haven't held the Governor's seat since 1986, and our federal delegation to the US House could swing from a 4-1 Democratic majority to a 4-2 Republican majority.We at the Coast Range Association don't make candidate endorsements, but I want to help listeners understand the choices we have and the stakes of this election.  Whether we are looking at climate action, forest management, environmental and wildlife protections, women's rights to control their bodies, investments in our rural communities, or any other issues you care about, the choices we make in this election will have real, tangible impacts.There is a lot of great reporting and trustworthy organizations out there to help you understand your choices, and though we'll mainly be talking about the governor's race today, our local elections are deeply impactful to our lives as well.However you vote, your choice really matters.  That's true with every election, buy more so this year than in a long time here in Oregon.So with that in mind, I reached out to Hillary Borrud from The Oregonian to learn more about the Governor's race, and then I spoke with Sidra Pierson from the Rural Organizing Project about their non-partisan voter guide.I hope you enjoy the show, and if you know folks that don't plan to vote or are undecided about who to vote for, talk with them! As always, I love hearing feedback and show ideas.  My email is michael@coastrange.org.Official State Voter Pamphlet: https://oregonvotes.gov/voters-guide/english/votersguide.htmlHillary Borrud Articles: https://www.oregonlive.com/staff/hborrud/posts.htmlGovernor Candidates on Climate Action: https://www.opb.org/article/2022/09/16/oregon-governor-race-candidates-elections-2022-climate-change-crisis/https://www.oregonlive.com/politics/2022/10/oregon-governor-candidates-what-would-they-do-to-tackle-climate-change.htmlRural Organizing Project STAND Election Guide: https://rop.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/2022-STAND-election-guide-English.pdfRepublican Money in Statehouse Races: https://www.oregonlive.com/politics/2022/10/republicans-pour-astounding-money-into-races-for-oregon-legislature-hoping-to-flip-state-senate-to-gop-for-1st-time-in-20-years.htmlMeasure 113: https://ballotpedia.org/Oregon_Measure_113,_Exclusion_from_Re-election_for_Legislative_Absenteeism_Initiative_(2022)VoteSmart- Non-partisan website showing candidate funding, positions, endorsements, and more: https://justfacts.votesmart.org/election/2022/G/OR/?stageId=GSupport the show

Beat Check with The Oregonian
The Oregonian's racist legacy: Editor Therese Bottomly on the story, her apology and the future

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 28:27


Prompted by the 2020 murder of George Floyd and the nationwide protests that followed, The Oregonian/OregonLive chose to examine this newspaper's racist history. The first installment of the new series looks at the two white men primarily responsible for The Oregonian throughout its first 60 years as a daily paper: Henry Pittock, the publisher and majority owner, and Harvey Scott, the editor and minority owner. “The Oregonian was a racist newspaper,” said Darrell Millner, an emeritus professor at Portland State University and authority on Black history in Oregon, calling the paper both a reflection of a racist society and a force helping to perpetuate it. The overtly racist words Pittock and Scott printed from 1861 to 1919 made Oregon a more hostile place for people of color to live, excusing lynching, supporting segregation, opposing equal rights. They are still honored throughout Portland today as the namesakes for a mountain, mansion, city park, university building, downtown building and two elementary schools. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, editor Therese Bottomly discusses the series, her apology and the future. Bottomly outlines how the newspaper plans to better engage with communities of color going forward. Learn about some of the modern impacts of the newspaper's historically racist coverage, which included supporting segregation and advocating for a discriminatory jury system. Read it all here. The Oregonian/OregonLive would like to hear from you. Please share your comments about this project, provide ideas for future stories or tell us about your experience with racism in Oregon. Contact us at equity@oregonian.com or leave a voicemail at 503-221-8055. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MFI Leaders Podcast
A People of the Spirit: Leading a Youth Ministry for Revival - Johnny Schmelzer

MFI Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 47:36


We are called to be a people of the Holy Spirit! The book of Acts provides our template and model for Holy Spirit-led and empowered youth ministry. We must make space for His presence, power, anointing, and leadership in our lives and leadership. In this app session, we will focus on biblical principles and practical methods for youth ministry and leadership for revival!Johnny serves as the youth and discipleship pastor at Joy Church Medford. He is currently a Ph.D. student at Liberty University majoring in Bible Exposition, Greek, and Hebrew. He has 3 master's degrees in biblical studies and biblical languages and a postgraduate ThM degree in theology. Like many Oregonians, he loves to run, compete in marathons and triathlons, travel the world, and any kind of adventure! Most importantly, he is passionate about evangelism, world missions, prayer, and the local church (Rom 1:5). We hope that this teaching left you more encouraged and equipped today. Ministers Fellowship International exists to help leaders build healthy, strong, impacting churches and to do so in a way that makes for a healthy leader. Join the MFI family or learn more at mfileader.org, and find hundreds of resources to help you grow at mfiresource.comFollow along on ...

KGW’s Straight Talk with Laural Porter
With Election Day looming, candidates for Oregon governor meet for final debate

KGW’s Straight Talk with Laural Porter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 24:54


Wednesday night on KGW, the three candidates for Oregon governor met for their fourth and final debate before Election Day. Republican Christine Drazan, Democrat Tina Kotek and unaffiliated candidate Betsy Johnson got one last chance to make their case to Oregon voters. The candidates had an hour to tackle some of the biggest issues facing Oregonians: homelessness, mental health, addiction services, abortion rights, education and campaign funding, among others. "Straight Talk" host Laurel Porter moderated the debate, and now she explores some of the key takeaways as we quickly approach Election Day.

Think Out Loud
Measure 114 proposes stricter gun laws for Oregon

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 20:10


Measure 114 will be on the ballot for voters this November. If passed, it would require Oregonians to purchase a permit to own a firearm and attend a mandatory safety firearm training. The measure would also ban the sale or transfer of gun magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. Overall, Measure 114 would slow down the timeline for buying and obtaining a gun. Paul Donheffner is the legislative committee chairman for the Oregon Hunters Association. Anthony Broadman is the Bend mayor pro tem. They join us to make their case for why voters should or should not pass Measure 114.

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

Ted Koppel hosts our special broadcast exploring the ways in which America has drifted apart, and how we can still come together. Stories include: Why some Oregonians want to move the border to become part of Idaho; a visit to Teton County, Wyoming, home to the widest income divide in America; conversations with musician-activist John Legend, and TV producer Norman Lear; a look back on our country's violent political history; the polarization generated by talk radio, and the corrosive effects of social media; an examination of why blue collar jobs are stigmatized; and a workshop held by Braver Angels, a non-profit aimed at bring Red and Blue Americans together.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beat Check with The Oregonian
Who will be Oregon's next governor?

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:41


It's finally time. Ballots will start arriving in mailboxes across Oregon in the coming days and weeks. On the latest episode of Beat Check with The Oregonian, we chat with state politics reporter Hillary Borrud, who is covering the unprecedented three-woman governor's race. We talked about Hillary's profiles of each candidate, what their final pitches are to voters, why Tina Kotek is trying to distance herself from Governor Kate Brown and much more. Related Reading: -Betsy Johnson profile -Tina Kotek profile -Christine Drazan profile -Campaign finance records smashed -Race is super close, poll says ** Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Judging Freedom
Oregonians force vote to SECEDE from Oregon

Judging Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 4:24


Oregonians force vote to SECEDE from the woke state and become part of Idaho: Two counties are set to vote on measure - after nine backed it - due to defund the police, CRT in schools and bail laws www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11313419/Rural-Oregon-conservatives-fed-liberal-politics-want-secede-state.html #Oregon #secede #wokeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 265: How did U of Portland get a 13.4 million dollar shortfall

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 93:57 Very Popular


In this episode you will hear:   (25:24) Mark and Vince discuss an article by Sami Edge that appeared on August 31, 2022 in Oregonian entitled: “Record number of 1st year students withdraw from the University of Portland, contributing to 13.4 million shortfall.   Vince and Mark discuss how could this happen and what are the implications of this budget shortfall; what implications does this have for other colleges.   (41:35) Mark discusses with Lisa several of the reasons why a college will admit a student with a lower GPA and a lower test score over a kid with a higher GPA and a higher test score.   (01:04:50) Our interview is with Jon Boeckenstedt, the Vice Provost of Oregon State University . John discusses a range of topics in this final part 4 of 4: Jon gives his opinion on whether it is ethical for a college admission officer to tell a student that they are admissible if they will withhold their test score Jon talks about what he would like to see changed in admissions Jon talks about what he thinks about using Student Search as the starting point for colleges Jon talks about the access vs selectivity Jon goes on the hotseat   (01:18:18) The first recommended resource is the quick reference guide for Counselors for admissions to the nine University of California universities. Here is the link:   The second recommended resource is the book Jon Bockenstedt says is the best admissions book on college admissions of how college admissions should work: Alden B Thresher's classic “College Admissions and the common good”. The book was written in 1966 and it looked at MIT's admission perspective but Chris Peterson of MIT ( an MIT admissions officer we have had on our podcast) reissued this classic book with the 2018 version. MIT is making it available for free. Here is the link: https://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/college-admissions-in-the-public-interest/     .   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 28 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Wisconsin-Andre Phillips University of Illinois-Andy Borst Purdue University-Mitch Warren University of Minnesota-Keri Risic Cornell University-Jonathon Burdick Akil Bello of Akilbello.com Bard College Baylor University Butler University California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Cornell College Creighton University     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email , just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons” We are revamping YCBK PLUS and we will have shorter more frequent blog articles that will launch later this fall.   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Policy for the People
How Measure 113 aims to end legislative walkouts

Policy for the People

Play Episode Play 19 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 28:37


In recent years, some lawmakers have failed to show up for work as a tactic to derail legislation. We speak with Tan Perkins, campaign manager for Measure 113, about the harm that legislative walkouts inflicts on Oregonians, and how the measure would deter walkouts.In the second segment of the show, Audrey Mechling of the Oregon Center for Public Policy explains the good, the bad, and the ugly in the latest poverty figures.

Coffee with Cascade
QP: Walk Away from Measure 113

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 2:05


Full Text: In just a few weeks, Oregon voters will be getting their ballots in the mail. In addition to voting for a new governor, legislators, and members of Congress, Oregonians will face several ballot measures. There are always a bunch of bad ones, and Measure 113 is one of the worst. Measure 113 amends the state constitution to punish legislators for 10 or more unexcused absences from floor sessions. Any legislator with 10 or more unexcused absences would be banned from holding office in the next term. Measure 113 is designed to put an end to the legislative walkouts that have succeeded in stopping odious bills from passing. The majority party gets mad when the minority party stands in the way of ramming through their agenda and Measure 113 is seen as a way to clear the path. This measure should offend anyone who cares about the exercise of freedom of expression and election integrity. A walkout is one of the clearest forms of expression, and should be protected under the state's constitution. Perhaps more importantly, many constituents want their legislators to walk out if doing so serves those constituents. The legislators who walked out were serving their constituents effectively and were rewarded by being re-elected. Measure 113 doesn't just punish legislators, it punishes the voters of their districts. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

The FOX News Rundown
From Washington: Third-Party Candidate Shakes Up Oregon Governor's Race

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 33:30 Very Popular


A tight governor's race in Oregon leaves many wondering if independent candidate Betsy Johnson could lead the state to elect a Republican governor for the first time in forty years. Politics and Government Reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting Dirk VanderHart joins to break down the rise of Betsy Johnson as a candidate, how Republican candidate Christine Drazan has found herself in a favorable position to win the governorship and the issues that influence Oregonians' vote. Between the last presidential election and recent midterm polling data, Republicans believe they're gaining momentum among Latino voters. RNC Communications Director Danielle Alvarez explains how issues regarding the economy, crime, and abortion resonate among conservative Latino voters. She also discusses efforts the party has made to better minority outreach, and the potential for the Hispanic vote to shift key races in Republicans' favor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Think Out Loud
Clackamas County clinic helps Oregonians expunge records

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 18:26


An Oregon law went into effect this year that helps remove barriers for some Oregonians who want to expunge their records. During a background check, criminal charges will show up on a person's record which can affect things like housing and employment. The Clean Slate Clackamas Project helps Oregonians with the expungement process. We hear more from Amanda Wall, community relations manager for the Clackamas Workforce Partnership and program manager for the Clean Slate Clackamas Project. Jayme is working on getting her records expunged with the project. They join us with details on how the project is going and how it affects Oregonians.

The Takeaway
SHElection!: The Oregon Governor's Race

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 24:14


Two women have served as governor of Oregon: Democrat Barbara Roberts, who served from 1991 to 1995 and current Democratic Governor Kate Brown, who has held the office since 2015. Today, women hold the majority of statewide elective executive offices in Oregon. In a little more than a month, voters will determine the next governor of Oregon; Democrat Kate Brown is term-limited. Oregon voters made history in 2016, when they elected Brown, who's openly bisexual, making her the first openly LGBT person elected governor in any state. Now, Oregon is the site of another historic gubernatorial contest. Three women are vying for the state's top office: Tina Kotek (D), Christine Drazan (R), and Betsy Johnson (I). All 3 women served in the Oregon state legislature. Democrat Tina Kotek, the first openly Lesbian woman to serve as Speaker of the Oregon House, served from 2013 to 2022. Republican Christine Drazan served as the Minority Leader of the Oregon House from 2019 to 2021. In that role, she was in direct conflict with then-Speaker Kotek. Betsy Johnson is a former member of both the Oregon House (2001-2005) and Senate (2005-2021). During the entirety of her tenure, she ran and served as a Democrat, but she is now running in the gubernatorial election as an Independent. Notably, Johnson's successful petition drive to qualify for the ballot was bolstered by cash from Nike founder Phil Knight and several timber and construction companies and groups. The race has attracted over $30 million in campaign contributions, with national party groups backing Kotek and Drazan. Already, the three candidates have differed sharply on their stances on issues like guns, law enforcement, housing, and education. The urban-rural divide in American politics is a factor shaping each candidates stance. And in a year where abortion is on the ballot, the issue remains a point of contention in the race where Republican Christine Drazan maintains a "pro-life" stance as abortion access becomes "increasingly important" for Oregonians. We sat down with Alison Gash, an associate professor of Political Science at the University of Oregon and Hillary Borrud, State Government and Politics Reporter for The Oregonian, for more on this unique 3-way, SHElection!    

DAYS GONE PODCAST
046 ~ Oregon

DAYS GONE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 51:37


Oregonian outsdoorsman Tom Moose joins the show to talk about the terrain of Oregon and how the Days Gone environment affects the characters, story, and player experience.

Beat Check with The Oregonian
How a high school soccer refereeing memo unearthed a longstanding problem

Beat Check with The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 25:55


A good rule of thumb – it's probably not great when a memo from a state high school soccer official makes headlines. But a letter with sexist language directing high school referees to treat girls soccer players differently than boys sent last month did just that. The memo infuriated coaches across the state. On the latest episode of Beat Check, we chat with Nik Streng, high school sports coordinator for The Oregonian and OregonLive. We talked about the Oregon School Activities Association's letter, what it says about the broader inequities in high school sports, what may happen from here – and some of the broader societal issues that have spilled over into youth sports in recent years. Subscribe to Beat Check anywhere you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Weekly Review With Clay and Buck H2 - Sep 24 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 36:50


The Atlantic writes a crazy story arguing for the end of the separation of men's and women's sports. Buck says, "Destroying women's sports. That is the new feminism for the left." Clay says it means many women will not compete. The story rocking the chess world. Christine Drazan, GOP candidate for governor of Oregon, joins Clay and Buck to talk about how she can win in a deep blue state because Oregonians are fed up with insane liberal policies. We're in a recession and it's just getting started.Follow Clay & Buck on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clayandbuckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 – Sep 20 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:50 Very Popular


The Atlantic writes a crazy story arguing for the end of the separation of men's and women's sports. Buck says, "Destroying women's sports. That is the new feminism for the left." Clay says it means many women will not compete. The story rocking the chess world. Christine Drazan, GOP candidate for governor of Oregon, joins Clay and Buck to talk about how she can win in a deep blue state because Oregonians are fed up with insane liberal policies. We're in a recession and it's just getting started.Follow Clay & Buck on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clayandbuckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.