Podcasts about CCS

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Best podcasts about CCS

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Latest podcast episodes about CCS

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays
Common Misconceptions in IVF

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 11:28


We delve into the common misconceptions I hear when taking care of patients. Do increased dosage of medication cause your eggs to grow faster? Can too much medication "fry" your eggs? Can where you take your medication affect which ovary grows follicles?I noticed white discharge, am I ovulating?Can you grow more eggs than your AFC with higher doses of medication?Will I go into Menopause early because of IVF?Does ICSI always happen with IVF? Does ICSI have better fertilization rates over standard insemination?Can my follicle have a double egg or be missing an egg? Is my Embryo really Frozen? All these questions are answered and more...

Electrek
Tesla earnings review, Tesla Semi/4680 production at Giga Nevada, new Toyota CEO, and more

Electrek

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 73:10


This week on the Electrek Podcast, we discuss the most popular news in the world of sustainable transport and energy. This week, we review Tesla's earnings, we discuss Tesla Semi/4680 production at Giga Nevada, the new Toyota CEO, and more. The show is live every Friday at 4 p.m. ET on Electrek's YouTube channel. As a reminder, we'll have an accompanying post, like this one, on the site with an embedded link to the live stream. Head to the YouTube channel to get your questions and comments in. After the show ends at around 5 p.m. ET, the video will be archived on YouTube and the audio on all your favorite podcast apps: Apple Podcasts Spotify Overcast Pocket Casts Castro RSS We now have a Patreon if you want to help us to avoid more ads and invest more in our content. We have some awesome gifts for our Patreons and more coming. Here are a few of the articles that we will discuss during the podcast: Tesla leaks ‘Magic Dock' CCS adapter ahead of opening its Supercharger network Tesla announces $3.6b Semi, 4680 battery factories in Nevada but questions abound Tesla (TSLA) releases Q4 2022 results: beats earnings and misses on revenue Tesla pledges to cut costs amid ‘uncertain' time Tesla's energy storage business is booming, and it's just the beginning Tesla updates Cybertruck production timeline: Temper your expectations Elon Musk dismisses his negative impact on Tesla's reputation with douchey answer Elon Musk kills hope of Tesla retrofitting new Autopilot/Self-Driving hardware Elon Musk thinks you are not smart if you don't believe in Tesla's Full Self-Driving value Toyota cracks amid electric vehicle movement, CEO replaced by Lexus chief Acura takes a page from Tesla's playbook with selling EVs online, starting with the 2024 ZDX EV 2024 Polestar 2 debuts with first-ever RWD option, new motors, added range, and more Here's the live stream for today's episode starting at 4 p.m. ET (or the video after 5 p.m. ET): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0jAcTVQ4yI

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays
When Femara Doesn't Work, What To Do Next

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 7:32


For some people, Letrozole and Clomid doesn't make them ovulate. What do you do next? In today's podcast we discuss this. 

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays
Inconclusive PGT Embryo Biopsy, what does it mean?

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 9:18


Like the prior podcasts on PGT results, we further discuss another result that can be very frustrating and confusing. We additionally discuss is it even worth doing PGT biopsies. 

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI
CDI mortality reviews, ACDIS updates from the team

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 31:39


Today's show is hosted by ACDIS Associate Editorial Director Linnea Archibald, Editor and Product Coordinator Karla Accorto, and Associate Editor Jess Fluegel. Today's show provides a glimpse behind the scenes of all things ACDIS in a more casual, conversational format. It also features a conversation about CDI mortality reviews with Keisha Downes, BSN, RN, CCDS, CCS, MBA-HM, CDI director at Tufts Medicine health system in Boston. Our intro and outro music for the ACDIS Podcast is “medianoche” by Dee Yan-Kay and our ad music is “Take Me Higher” by Jahzzar, both obtained from the Free Music Archive. Have questions about today's show or ideas for a future episode? Contact the ACDIS team at acdis-inquiries@simplifycompliance.com.   CEU info: Each ACDIS Podcast episode now offers 0.5 ACDIS CEUs which can be used toward recertifying your CCDS or CCDS-O credential for those who listen to the show in the first two days from the time of publication. To receive your 0.5 CEUs, go to the show page on acdis.org, located under the “Resources” tab. To take the evaluation, view the podcast recording at the bottom of the show page on acdis.org and click the live link at the end. Your certificate will be automatically emailed to you upon submitting the brief evaluation. The cut-off for today's episode CEU is Friday, January 20, at 11:00 p.m. eastern. After that point, the CEU period will close, and you will not be eligible for the 0.5 CEUs for this week's episode. ACDIS update: Read the January/February 2023 edition of the CDI Journal! (http://ow.ly/fYJC50MhmET) Apply to present a poster at the 2023 ACDIS national conference and nominate a colleague for an ACDIS Achievement Award! (http://ow.ly/8rkz50LT0qP) Apply for one of ACDIS' boards and committees by February 10! (http://ow.ly/aE1R50MrTVm)

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays
What does a Low DNA Embryo Biopsy Result Mean?

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 10:03


IVF is stressful. What makes it more stressful is waiting for your PGT results. Fear overcomes you wondering if the results are going to come back good or bad, and then ..... it comes back without a result: Low DNA. It is defeating, but it doesn't mean there is something wrong. In this podcast we discuss this situation and how it occurs and if it predicts embryo outcome. 

Energi og Klima
Gassco om hydrogeneksport: Ikke avdekket showstoppere

Energi og Klima

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 32:01


- Vi er optimistiske med tanke på at vi teknisk skal klare å transportere hydrogen i rør fra Norge til Tyskland, sier programleder for bærekraftig utvikling i Gassco, Svein-Erik Losnegård. Norge har et nesten 9000 kilometer langt gassrørsystem. I dag forsyner det EU og Storbritannia med fossil gass. Men interessen for transport av både hydrogen og CO2 i rør, er økende. I denne podkast-episoden snakker podkast-vert Kirsten Å. Øystese med Losnegård i Gassco om mulighetene og barrierene knyttet til å transportere hydrogen i CO2 i rør.  - Som deltaker i det tysk/norske-hydrogensamarbeidet vurderer vi muligheten for hydrogentransport gjennom nye rør, gjennom eksisterende rør og gjennom en kombinasjon av nye og eksisterende rør. Teknisk har vi ikke avdekket noen showstoppere, men en slik etablering er avhengig av at det er en verdikjede med selgere og anlegg for produksjon av hydrogen på norsk side og mottaksanlegg og kunder på tysk side, sier Losnegård. Gitt at det er et marked for hydrogen ser Gassco det som realistisk å ha på plass rørkapasitet i 2030. - Vi ser det som realistisk at det kan produseres og eksporteres mellom en halv og én million tonn hydrogen i 2030 og at produksjonen kan øke til mellom 2,5 og 3 millioner tonn over en tiårsperiode. Vi tror det i hovedsak vil være hydrogen fra gass med CCS i starten men at det kan tas inn fornybart hydrogen fra Norge etter hvert og også langs røret - fra Danmark, Nederland og Tyskland. Transport av CO2- da primært motsatt vei – fra Tyskland til Norge –er også noe Gassco vurderer potensialet for.       

A Way Through
ENCORE PRESENTATION: Overcoming Stigma and Shame in Addiction Treatment with Erin Goodhart, LPC, CAADC, CMAT, CSAT, ACRPS, CCS, CPT

A Way Through

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 46:29


Welcome to A Way Through, a podcast brought to you by Archway Academy! The purpose of this podcast is to remind you that though you may not see it now, something different is possible; Recovery is possible! **The views and opinions expressed by our guests are those of the individual and do not necessarily reflect those of Archway Academy. Any content provided by our student co-host(s) or guests are of their opinion and are not intended to reflect the philosophy and policies of Archway Academy itself. Nor is it intended to malign any recovery method, religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. In this encore presentation, we are highlighting our conversation with Erin Goodhart, LPC, CAADC, CMAT, CSAT, ACRPS, CCS, CPT. Erin is the Executive Director of Core Programming at Caron in Pennsylvania. Beginning her career at Caron in 2004 working with teens, Erin has since served in clinical positions with every group served in Caron's core programs. With that experience, she has been instrumental in developing and improving Caron's core programs. Erin is passionate about helping people with substance use disorder and families to overcome the stigma, shame, and barriers that keep them from seeking treatment and engaging in an active recovery program. A Way Through invites you to join in on the conversation and hear stories of triumph, self-discovery, and healing. Be sure to subscribe to A Way Through to stay updated on each new episode and leave a review of the show! Topics Discussed: The TRUE stigma behind using the word "failure" Keys to growing and thriving in new environments Recognizing that recovery is a daily journey Why letting go of the "outcomes" creates space for healing Recognizing normal reactions to abnormal situations Setting non-conformational, value-based boundaries Connect with Caron Treatment: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/caron Twitter: https://twitter.com/CaronTreatment Connect with Archway Academy: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archwayacademyhtx/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archwayacademy/ YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVBgxwG5CC6qBcJ3U6KcK5Q Contact Archway Academy: If you or a student you know needs help, visit the website, or call the number below to schedule a tour. We are here to help. Address: 6221 Main Street Houston, TX 77030 Call: 713.328.0780 Email: sasha.coles@archwayacademy.org Website: https://www.archwayacademy.org --- About Archway Academy: "Where Education Meets Recovery." Archway is the largest recovery high school in the nation, located in the sunny heart of Houston, Texas. We meet the individual educational needs of teens recovering from Substance Use Disorder with care, compassion, respect, and rigor. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/archway-academy/message

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Nine Themes to Watch in 2023

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 32:15


Peter and Jackie start the year off by introducing nine topics that are likely to dominate energy and climate discussions in 2023. China – Zero-COVID policy relaxation consequences Ukraine war outlook Inflation outlook Commodity price outlook – Which way? Up, down or both? Year of the EV pickup truck Canada's response to the US IRA and other climate policy Green-on-green competition begins First FID on major CCS projects in Alberta LNG in Canada outlook Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/  

Café Crème Sport
NFL - Semaine 18 : Wild Card, Draft... L'épisode de toutes les folies

Café Crème Sport

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 70:32


Le podcast NFL du CCS fait son retour en grande pompe avec un épisode particulièrement savoureux ! Le verdict de la course aux playoffs, les Texans qui perdent le choix numéro 1 de la draft au finish, mais aussi l'héritage de Mike Tomlin, la course au Rookie Offensif... Et bien d'autres sujets ! Régalez-vous !

klima update° - der Nachrichten-Podcast von klimareporter°
Die Grünen und Lützerath, deutsche CCS-Pläne, Ausblick 2023

klima update° - der Nachrichten-Podcast von klimareporter°

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 27:31


Diesmal mit Sandra Kirchner und Susanne Schwarz. Showdown in Lützerath: Das Dorf in Nordrhein-Westfalen soll der Kohle weichen und dafür geräumt werden. Das entspricht dem Deal zum Kohleausstieg, den Bundeswirtschaftsminister Robert Habeck und NRW-Wirtschaftsministerin Mona Neubaur mit RWE vereinbart haben - beide Grüne. Schadet das der Partei? Habeck ist diese Woche nach Norwegen gereist. Von dort will Deutschland Wasserstoff importieren, aber erst mal nicht grünen, sondern blauen. Das heißt: Der Wasserstoff wird mithilfe von Erdgas statt Ökostrom produziert. Das entstehende Kohlendioxid soll mithilfe einer CCS-Technologie abgeschieden und gespeichert werden. Um die Notwendigkeit solcher riskanten Verfahren entbrennt gerade ein Streit in der Umweltbewegung. Das neue Jahr hat begonnen: Was werden 2023 klimapolitische Highlights? -- Das klima update° wird jede Woche von Spender*innen unterstützt. Wenn auch du dazu beitragen willst, geht das HIER https://www.verein-klimawissen.de/spenden. Wir danken hier und jetzt - aber auch noch mal namentlich im Podcast (natürlich nur, wenn ihr zustimmt).

SWR2 Tagesgespräch und Interview der Woche
Wirtschaftsminister Habeck: “Norwegen kann eine wichtige Säule in der künftigen Energieversorgung sein”

SWR2 Tagesgespräch und Interview der Woche

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 9:00


Wirtschafts- und Klimaschutzminister Robert Habeck (Grüne) sieht in Norwegen einen verlässlichen Partner in der Energieversorgung. Anlässlich seiner Reise in das Land sagte er im SWR2 Tagesgespräch aber auch: “Gleichwohl bleibt es richtig, dass wir als Lektion aus der russischen Abhängigkeit insgesamt nicht wieder in eine so große Abhängigkeit von nur einem Land geraten sollten. Wir haben ja auch verschiedene Wasserstoffprojekte angeleiert mit anderen Ländern, wir wollen nicht zuletzt die eigene Produktion deutlich hochfahren. Aber Norwegen kann eine wichtige Säule in der künftigen Energieversorgung sein.” Auch die unterirdische CO2-Verpressung “Carbon Capture and Storage” (CCS), die in Norwegen erprobt wird, überzeugt Habeck mittlerweile. Einerseits seien Fragen nach der Sicherheit von CCS beantwortet, so Habeck: “Die Technik scheint sicher zu sein - nach all dem, was man in den letzten zwanzig Jahren in Norwegen an Erfahrungen gesammelt hat. Es gibt keine Berichte darüber, dass das CO2 wieder ausgetreten ist, sondern dass es sich im Erdreich verfestigt.” Das zweite Argument gegen CCS sei die Frage gewesen, ob man an klimaschädlicher Energieproduktion festhalte, weil man das entstehende CO2 einfach in der Erde verklappen könne. Diese Gefahr erübrigt sich aus Habecks Sicht, weil die Methode so energieintensiv sei, “und deswegen ergibt es nur Sinn sie dort einzusetzen, wo man keine andere Alternative zur Dekarbonisierung hat.” Das sei etwa in der Zementindustrie und Teilen der chemischen Industrie der Fall. “Und für diese industriellen Prozesse ist das die beste Technik, die wir haben, um die Industrie klimaneutral zu machen”, so Habeck.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Results from the AI testing hackathon by Esben Kran

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 8:31


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Results from the AI testing hackathon, published by Esben Kran on January 2, 2023 on The Effective Altruism Forum. We (Apart Research) ran a hackathon for AI testing research projects with 11 projects submitted by 34 participants between the 16th and 18th December. Here we share the winning projects. See them all here. In summary: Found that unsupervised latent knowledge representation is generalizable and takes the first steps towards a benchmark using the ETHICS ambiguous / unambiguous examples with latent knowledge evaluation. Created a new way to use token loss trajectories as a marker for targeting our interpretability methods towards a focus area. Investigated three potential inverse scaling phenomena: Counting letters, chaining premises and solving equations. Found incidental inverse scaling on one of them and U-shaped scaling on another. Implemented Trojans into Transformer models and used a gradient arithmetic technique to combine multiple Trojan triggers into one Transformer model. (honorable mention) Invented a way to test how quickly models become misaligned by negative example fine-tuning. Thank you to Zaki, Fazl, Rauno, Charbel, Nguyen, more jam site organizers, and the participants for making it all possible. Discovering Latent Knowledge in Language Models Without Supervision - extensions and testing By Agatha Duzan, Matthieu David, Jonathan Claybrough Abstract: Based on the paper "Discovering Latent Knowledge in Language Models without Supervision" this project discusses how well the proposed method applies to the concept of ambiguity. To do that, we tested the Contrast Consistent Search method on a dataset which contained both clear cut (0-1) and ambiguous (0,5) examples: We chose the ETHICS-commonsense dataset. The global conclusion is that the CCS approach seems to generalize well in ambiguous situations, and could potentially be used to determine a model's latent knowledge about other concepts. These figures show how the CCS results for last layer activations splits into two groups for the non-ambiguous training samples while the ambiguous test samples on the ETHICS dataset reveals the same ambiguity of latent knowledge by the flattened Gaussian inference probability distribution. Haydn & Esben's judging comment: This project is very good in investigating the generality of unsupervised latent knowledge learning. It also seems quite useful as a direct test of how easy it is to extract latent knowledge and provides an avenue towards a benchmark using the ETHICS unambiguous/ambiguous examples dataset. Excited to see this work continue! Read the report and the code (needs updating). Investigating Training Dynamics via Token Loss Trajectories By Alex Foote Abstract: Evaluations of ML systems typically focus on average statistical performance on a dataset measured at the end of training. However, this type of evaluation is relatively coarse, and does not provide insight into the training dynamics of the model. We present tools for stratifying tokens into groups based on arbitrary functions and measuring the loss on these token groups throughout the training process of a Language Model. By evaluating the loss trajectory of meaningful groups of tokens throughout the training process, we can gain more insight into how the model develops during training, and make interesting observations that could be investigated further using interpretability tools to gain insight into the development of specific mechanisms within a model. We use this lens to look at the training dynamics of the region in which induction heads develop. We also zoom in on a specific region of training where there is a spike in loss and find that within this region the majority of tokens follow the loss trajectory of a spike, but a small set follow the inverse trajectory. Haydn & Esben's ju...

Taco Bout Fertility Tuesdays

Discuss what is mosaicism and why it matters when you are going through IVF. PGT can lead to embryos being tagged with a mosaic designation which can lead to frustration and confusion. In today's podcast we tackle this topic. 

The Nonlinear Library
LW - My Reservations about Discovering Latent Knowledge (Burns, Ye, et al) by Robert AIZI

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 6:39


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: My Reservations about Discovering Latent Knowledge (Burns, Ye, et al), published by Robert AIZI on December 27, 2022 on LessWrong. [This is a cross-post from my blog at aizi.substack.com.] This is my second post on Burns, Ye, et al's recent preprint Discovering Latent Knowledge in Language Models Without Supervision. My first post summarizes what they did and what I liked about it. In the spirit of honesty and constructive criticism, I'm going to talk about some of the parts of Burns, Ye, et al that I didn't like. These are things I found underwhelming, disappointing, or simply hope to see developed more. My goals here are (1) proper calibration of hype and (2) suggesting where this work could go in the future. The headline score is too small The authors of this paper failed to completely solve alignment with one weird trick; my disappointment is immeasurable and my day is ruined. More constructively, one needs to take the headline result of a 4% accuracy improvement in context: the improved accuracy is only 71%, and that's far from reliable. Even setting aside AI deception, if you ask an AI “will you kill us all” and it says no, would you trust all of humanity to a 29% error rate? So we're still in “we have no clue if this AI is safe” territory. But this is the very first iteration of this approach, and we should let it grow and develop further before we pass judgement. Zero-Shot may be the wrong baseline My experience with LLMs is that they are very sensitive to instructions in their prompt, and we've seen that priming an AI with instructions like “think through step by step” can improve performance (on some tasks, in some cases, some restrictions apply, etc). In this case, perhaps priming with assurance like “you are an advanced AI that gives correct answers to factual questions” would increase performance above the 67% baseline, so it would be instructive to compare CCS not just to Zero-Shot but to Primed Zero-Shot and Primed CCS. What CCS elicits may not be the AI's latent knowledge CCS is a very clever way of finding “truth-like” information. But the class of truth-like information contains many belief systems besides the AI's latent knowledge. Burns thinks identifying the AI's latent knowledge among other features is solvable even for more advanced AI because there will be relatively few “truth-like” features, but I am skeptical. GPT is very good at role-play, so it will be able to capture a significant fraction of the diversity of human viewpoints. Instead of ending up with three truth-like features as Burns suggests (human, aligned-superhuman, misaligned-superhuman), you could end up with hundreds of them (anarcho-syndicalist-superhuman, banal-liberal-superhuman, Caesaropapist-superhuman, etc) which disagree in complicated overlapping ways, where the majority may not be right, and where there is an 29% error rate. If future AGI are based on text models like GPT with robust role-playing capabilities, I think CCS will struggle to learn the latent knowledge feature instead of a different truth-like feature, and human operators will struggle to identify which truth-like features are the AI's latent knowledge. That said, it is possible that latent knowledge has a “stronger signal” than other truth-like features, but I'd like to see this experimentally verified. They're not measuring if they capture latent knowledge This is a bit odd, but I'm going to complain that the authors measured against ground truth. That is, when they measured accuracy to get the 4% improvement, they were measuring the AI's capabilities at tasks like sentiment classification questions. But the namesake task is discovering latent knowledge, and that wasn't measured unless you assume the AI's latent knowledge is exactly ground truth. I understand why the authors did that (we don't have a way...

The Dale not Dale Podcast w/Uncle Dale & Von
Episode 23: Brotox Party w/Angelica Jackson PAC

The Dale not Dale Podcast w/Uncle Dale & Von

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 78:23


Welcome back for another week of shenanigans! Dale and Von decide bring on special guest Angelica Jackson, the “Toxin Tamer” for a little Brotox and Bromance. Dale and Von speak with Angelica about the cosmetic industry that continues to dominate the norms of our society. Angelica gives some information about toxin injections, cosmetic procedures, and the latest technology to help people with aging. As an added bonus, Dale and Von get a few CCs of Daxxify to clear up the subtle wrinkles that any 21 year olds would have! Pull up your boom boom chair-the laughter is in-TOX-icating! Guest: Angelica Jackson PAC / Instagram @angelicajackson_pac Show Intro Music - Boston Alley (Travis Quentin Young): https://music.apple.com/us/album/we-belong-together/988137874?i=988138398 Travis Quentin Young - Instagram - https://instagram.com/travisqyoung?igshid=ODBkMDk1MTU= Episode Sponsor: Bay Area Astetics - https://www.bayareaaesthetics.net/ Show Sponsor: Bison Energy Drinks / Media by Bison https://www.bisonproducts.com Use our code "DaleNotDale" for 10% off your order! Producer - Audio/Visual: Magnus (John Manigold) - Manigold Multimedia

Energy News Beat Podcast
Daily Energy Standup Episode #27 - The $1.7 trillion Omnibus bill only has $16 million for the US grid. Path to renewable energy can't happen, physics does not lie.

Energy News Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 29:20


www.energynewsbeat.comWe hope everyone has a safe and Merry Christmas! Michael and I would also like to take a moment to thank our listeners and fans for their wonderful support. The Growth of ENB is tremendous, and it is only because of the support we get from you. Let us know what you want to be covered!The Omnibus bill is a big disappointment for today's show for US consumers. There is only $16 million for updates to the national electrical grid. Yes, out of $1.7 trillion, the grid has a minuscule update. Without a major overhaul to the grid, a renewable energy dream will only be a nightmare and failure. Just ask the Europeans.We will be back to action on Tuesday!Gas for coal? Debate rages on as electric companies invest.How the $1.7T omnibus affects energy, from CCS to hydrogenTesla is now worth less than Exxon as stock plunges toward worst month, quarter and year in historyA Crisis Is Looming For The U.S. Energy Grid$100 Oil To Return In 2023Other Sandstone Media Energy PodcastsDavid Blackmon LinkedInDB Energy Questions The Crude Truth with Rey TrevinoRey Trevino LinkedInEnergy Transition Weekly ConversationDavid Blackmon LinkedInIrina Slav LinkedInArmando Cavanha LinkedIn

IQ - Wissenschaft und Forschung
Kohlendioxid in den Untergrund - Bundesregierung will CCS-Technologie wiederbeleben

IQ - Wissenschaft und Forschung

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 7:23


Ausgerechnet die Grünen in der Bundesregierung holen eine in Deutschland eigentlich totgesagte Technologie hervor: CCS, Carbon Capture and Storage. Sie wollen Kohlendioxid bei der Produktion einfangen und in unterirdische Speicher pumpen. Wie sinnvoll ist das?

ETDPODCAST
Nr. 3926 CCS: Grüne vor Bruch mit dogmatischer Ablehnung von CO₂-Einlagerung

ETDPODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 4:11


Führende Grüne scheinen ihre Vorbehalte gegen CCS aufzugeben. Die Technologie dient der Speicherung von CO₂ und wird in mehreren Staaten praktiziert. Web: https://www.epochtimes.de Probeabo der Epoch Times Wochenzeitung: https://bit.ly/EpochProbeabo Twitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTimesDE YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC81ACRSbWNgmnVSK6M1p_Ug Telegram: https://t.me/epochtimesde Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtimesde Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTimesWelt/ Unseren Podcast finden Sie unter anderem auch hier: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/at/podcast/etdpodcast/id1496589910 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/277zmVduHgYooQyFIxPH97 Unterstützen Sie unabhängigen Journalismus: Per Paypal: http://bit.ly/SpendenEpochTimesDeutsch Per Banküberweisung (Epoch Times Europe GmbH, IBAN: DE 2110 0700 2405 2550 5400, BIC/SWIFT: DEUTDEDBBER, Verwendungszweck: Spenden) Vielen Dank! (c) 2022 Epoch Times

Crews Control
126: Frankenstein, A Day In The Life with Timothée Biggums (Jonathan Matheny)

Crews Control

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 37:23


Dorsch donates his body and CCs the CIA, Grant's voice is spot on and plays along, and Leo is battling the bulge. It's another returning guest this week! Timothée Biggums is back and he has new stories to tell. This time with less sting rays. Questions, comments, or the desire to chat? You can reach the crew at Crewscontrolpodcast@gmail.comBecome an official Crewton by subscribing to us on Patreon at patreon.com/crewscontrolWe're mostly on Instagram @crewscontrolpodcastFind us on slightly on Twitter @PodCrewsControlCheck out our woefully undermanaged TikTok @crewscontrolpodcastIf you like the show, help us grow! Rate, review, and subscribe on Apple Podcasts and Dorsch will bake you an authentic Moosekrainian cake!Cover art by Dave BenderTheme composed by Steve SarroSound design and editing by Mike Crockett of Crackpot Podcast Production.A part of the Asylum Podcast Network.(We can't promise that Dorsch won't eat your authentic Moosekrainian cake)

True Man Podcast
Are You Rich?

True Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 47:07


I talk with author and financial coach Bob Lotich on his book entitled, Simple Money, Rich Life True Financial Freedom.  How can you design a financial plan to have an eternal impact, find out on the True Man Podcast.  #truemanpodcast #startyourcomebackstoryContact Bob Lotich, CEPF® and Get His Book:Author of Simple Money, Rich Life Host of SeedTime Money podcast https://seedtime.com/podcastTips From True Man Podcast:https://seedtime.com/free-travel - our story and our exact process of howwe use CCs to travel for freehttps://seedtime.com/cc - my current top recommendationsContact Mike:(864) 266-2058mike@truemanlifecoaching.comhttps://www.truemanlifecoaching.com

FLIPPING THE BARREL
“Leading in Uncharted Waters” with Robin Fielder- EVP & Chief Sustainability Officer at Talos Energy.

FLIPPING THE BARREL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022


LISTEN NOW!! Robin Fielder is the Executive Vice President – Low Carbon Strategy and Chief Sustainability Officer at Talos Energy, serving as the lead executive for Talos's rapidly growing carbon capture and (CCS) business and overseeing ESG initiatives. Prior to joining Talos, Ms. Fielder served as President, CEO and a member of the Noble Midstream Partners board of directors where she guided the Partnership within Chevron.She spent a majority of her career at Anadarko. She is an extraordinary mother of 2, cancer survivor and recently recognized as the 2022 top 25 influential women in Energy by Hart Energy.Robin grew up in Deer Park Texas, immersed in the refining industry. Deer Park is the hub for oil refineries, in the 80s they were an essential financial support to the school districts in the area, as they still are today. For this reason Robin was exposed to the energy industry early on as a young girl and she fell in love with engineering. Her father encouraged her to pursue engineering as he told her “ Those guys/gals are always the boss and Robin you need to be the boss”.Robin spent 17 years at Anadarko moving up the ranks. She walks us through her journey and how sponsors were an essential piece to her growth to becoming a CEO in 2018, when she became President & CEO of Western Midstream. The company was formed by Anadarko to acquire, own, develop, and operate midstream assets. Then shortly after, Anadarko was acquired by OXY in 2019 and she went on to become president & CEO of Noble Midstream Partners until July of 2021- shortly after Chevron acquired it. Right in the heart of covid. Robin talks about the uncertainty during these times and how she managed to lead her team through 2 buy outs and a pandemic before taking her role as EVP and CSO at Talos Energy. Robin gives her perspective on how we can continue to attract more women into the energy industry and how sponsors play a big role in changing the narrative. We talk about non-negotables and how they play an important part in your career growth. Robin is a believer that you can have it all but there is no “work life balance”. The pendulum will swing depending on what's important at the moment. After having her second son Robin was diagnosed with breast cancer. 1 in 2 women and 1 in 3 men will develop cancer in their lifetime. She takes us back to this moment and the steps she took to manage to keep her life as normal as possible, as she overcame one of the hardest diagnoses she had to face.Robin talks about the early years of being a mother and how essential parental leave is to the family dynamic. She brings up the importance of prioritization with your children and understanding what is important to them. Come hang out with us:Download on Apple Podcast——>> ClickDownload on Spotify———>>ClickConnect with Maisy and Jamie:Connect with Massiel Diez: Instagram | LinkedInConnect with Jamie Elrod: Instagram | LinkedInFollow FTB on Instagram | LinkedInJoin FTB NationIf your interested in working with us, please contact : flippingthebarrel@gmail.com To find out more about our mid-roll audio sponsor TechnipFMC please visit: TechnipFMCTo find out more about our pre-roll audio sponsor Varel Energy Solutions please visit: Varel EnergyTo find out more about website sponsor Nextier Energy Solutions please visit: Nextier Oilfield Solutions

Mining HQ
Mining HQ - Episode 211

Mining HQ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 8:02


In today's episode the Chairman of Pilot Energy Brad Lingo joins us.Pilot has created a first in Australia, seeking approval for offshore CCS project. Brad talks about carbon capture storage, brilliant for our environmental future.  www.triplem.com.au/shows/mining-hqSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcast – Oxford Institute for Energy Studies
OIES Podcast – OIES Carbon Management Research Programme

Podcast – Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022


In this podcast, David Ledesma talks to Hasan Muslemani about the new Carbon Management Research Programme recently launched by OIES. As head of this research, Hasan discusses the structure and objectives of the programme which will focus on three aspects: 1) carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies in energy and industrial sectors, 2) nature- and […] The post OIES Podcast – OIES Carbon Management Research Programme appeared first on Oxford Institute for Energy Studies.

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI
Financial resiliency and CDI

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 30:57


Today's guest is Suma Chacko, RHIA, CCS, MBA, the system inpatient CDI director at Baylor Scott & White Health in the central and north Texas regions. Today's show is a part of the “Leadership with Linnea” series. In every episode of this series, Associate Editorial Director Linnea Archibald be joined by one guest from the ACDIS Leadership Council ranks or a contributor from one of our ACDIS publications to discuss a topic relevant to leaders in the industry, whether or not they currently hold a traditional management title. Our intro and outro music for the ACDIS Podcast is “medianoche” by Dee Yan-Kay and our ad music is “Take Me Higher” by Jahzzar, both obtained from the Free Music Archive. Have questions about today's show or ideas for a future episode? Contact the ACDIS team at acdis-inquiries@simplifycompliance.com. Today's show is brought to you by Iodine. Iodine is an enterprise AI company that is championing a radical rethink of how to create value for healthcare professionals, leaders, and their organizations: automating complex clinical tasks, generating insights, and empowering intelligent care. Powered by the largest set of clinical data and use cases available, Iodine's groundbreaking clinical machine-learning engine, Cognitive ML, constantly ingests the patient record to generate real-time, highly focused, predictive insights that clinicians and hospital administrators can leverage to dramatically augment the management of care delivery. ACDIS update: Apply for the ACDIS CDI Scholarship program by December 14! (http://ow.ly/pwtG50L3ARZ) Apply to present a poster at the 2023 ACDIS national conference and nominate a colleague for an ACDIS Achievement Award! (http://ow.ly/8rkz50LT0qP) Learn more about the upcoming changes to the ACDIS Podcast in tomorrow's edition of CDI Strategies! (http://ow.ly/93W950LT0vp)

ESG Decoded
Mark T. Behrman & Bill Flederbach Discuss Industrial Decarbonization from a CEO's Perspective

ESG Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 32:47


ESG Decoded is a podcast powered by ClimeCo to share updates related to business innovation and sustainability in a clear and actionable manner. In this episode, Kaitlyn Allen interviews Mark T Behrman, President and CEO of LSB Industries, Inc., and Bill Flederbach, President and CEO of ClimeCo. Mark joined LSB Industries in 2014 as Senior Vice President of Corporate Development and was subsequently appointed Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer. He has over 35 years of executive management, operational, financial, and investment banking experience. In addition, Mark serves as Chairman of the Board of PHX Minerals, Inc. and The Fertilizer Institute. Bill is the founder and CEO of ClimeCo, where he and his team have pioneered the creation of scaleable greenhouse gas reduction efforts since 2009. Bill is passionate about new practices and technologies that utilize markets to make tangible environmental and societal impacts. Listen as Kaitlyn, Mark, and Bill reflect on the long-standing relationship between LSB and ClimeCo, how carbon credits are generated, and opportunities in industrial decarbonization. LSB was one of ClimeCo's first clients and its very first N2O abatement client. (Nitrous oxide, or N2O, is a potent greenhouse gas). This conversation covers how GHG reductions can be converted into environmental credits, which can positively impact the environment and communities. The three explain why the energy transition to a low-carbon future is not just a fad, how companies are working to understand how to monetize the related benefits, and its impact on business models. In signature ESG Decoded fashion, we want to bring clarity to the complex. Listeners will gain insight into the 45Q Tax Credit, the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA), the significance of “green,” “gray,” and “blue” ammonia, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Make sure to subscribe to ESG Decoded on your favorite streaming platforms and our new YouTube Channel so that you're notified of our vodcast episodes! Don't forget to connect with us on our social media channels. Enjoy this episode! - Episode Resource Links LSB Industries Website: http://lsbindustries.com/ LSB Industries LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/lsb-industries-inc./ Mark Berhman LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-behrman-8977a318/ Bill Flederbach LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-flederbach-bb5a143/

LIVE Ontwowheels
BEST motorcycle for a SCOOTER Rider! Path to Upgrade #6 | Live Ontwowheels S2:E40

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022


Want to SUPPORT the show? Sign up for our Bike Build Giveaways here:http://www.wbrgarage.comNot all of us riders have the sophistication of realizing it's not all about the amount of CCs you have but rather how you use the CCs you DO have. On this weeks episode of Live Ontwowheels, Chase and Beau do an episode of Path to Upgrade and help a fellow rider out who is thinking of advancing from riding scooters to something bigger! What will the guys choose? Let's find out on this weeks show!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

First Baptist Church Broad Podcast
First Baptist Church Broad Giving Tuesday Telecast

First Baptist Church Broad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 25:37


First Baptist Church Broad Giving Tuesday TelecastTuesday, November 29th 2022Dr Keith Norman - Senior PastorWant to become a member? Join The Broad Online!https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1CuR2...To sign up for our emailing list, text TheBroad to 22828Prayer requests? Click the link below!https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1CuR2...You can also reach us by phone at 901-323-2429 ext 315 or 901-791-0203Ways of GivingCashapp https://cash.app/$firstbaptistbroad PayPal https://www.paypal.com/paypalmefirstb...By Mail 2835 Broad Avenue, Memphis Tennessee 38112CCS# 13023

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Canadian Energy, Politics and Western Alienation

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 34:08


This week our podcast was recorded at the Bennet Jones Lake Louise World Cup Business Forum. Our podcast guest  is the Honourable A. Anne McLellan, who was a speaker at the event and is currently Senior Advisor, Public Policy Group at Bennet Jones. Ms. McLellan joined Bennet Jones after a distinguished career in federal politics.  Ms. McLellan served four terms as the Liberal Member of Parliament for Edmonton Centre, holding numerous Minister positions during that time and was Deputy Prime Minister from 2003 to 2006. Here are some of the questions that Jackie and Peter asked Ms. McLellan: How does the United States Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) impact Canadian clean energy? Do you think Canada should develop plans to increase LNG exports to help Europe with their energy shortage? How do you view the growing divide between Western provinces and Ottawa?  Any thoughts on Alberta's Sovereignty Act? Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/      

Earth Wise
Carbon Capture Booming | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 2:00


For the world to reach a state of net-zero emissions, it is going to require more than the ongoing transition to renewable energy sources.  There will also need to be efforts to capture the emissions from sources that can't easily eliminate their pollution.  These include steel mills, cement plants, and other industrial sites.  At least […]

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI
CDI Salary Survey sneak peek, ACDIS Happy Hour updates

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 25:20


Today's show is hosted by ACDIS Associate Editorial Director Linnea Archibald, Editor and Product Coordinator Karla Accorto, and Associate Editor Jess Fluegel. Today's show is part of our “ACDIS Happy Hour” series, which provides a glimpse behind the scenes of all things ACDIS in a more casual, conversational format than our other podcast series. It also features a sneak peek of the 2022 CDI Salary Survey results, which will be released in early 2023, and a conversation about the importance of salary survey data with Anneleah Williams-Bridges, RHIA, RHIT, CCDS, CCS, CCS-P, who is a hospital executive at Virginia Hospital Center and a member of the ACDIS Leadership Council. Our intro and outro music for the ACDIS Podcast is “medianoche” by Dee Yan-Kay and our ad music is “Take Me Higher” by Jahzzar, both obtained from the Free Music Archive. Have questions about today's show or ideas for a future episode? Contact the ACDIS team at acdis-inquiries@simplifycompliance.com.   ACDIS update: Read the November/December 2022 edition of the CDI Journal! (http://ow.ly/e09m50LH1hO) Listen to the November 17 Quarterly Conference Call! (http://ow.ly/8BYA50LH1p6) Apply for the ACDIS CDI Scholarship program by November 30! (http://ow.ly/pwtG50L3ARZ) Learn about the ACDIS Achievement Awards and Poster Presentations! (http://ow.ly/FJbE50LH1vy) Submit an article for the January/February 2023 edition of the CDI Journal by December 1! (email jfluegel@acdis.org and larchibald@acdis.org) Register to attend the launch party for the 2023 ACDIS Pocket Guide on January 10! (http://ow.ly/CK4Q50LH1MX)

Radio Duna | Información Privilegiada
Fútbol, dólar, la apuesta de Koywe y todo listo para Black Friday

Radio Duna | Información Privilegiada

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022


En la edición AM, hablamos con Ignacio Detmer y Guillermo Acuña, socios de Koywe; y también con Yerka Yukich, directora ejecutiva de eCommerce de la CCS; y con Felipe Posada, director y miembro de Comunidad Traders.

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Energy Transition in the Middle East

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 35:10


This week on the podcast our guest is Dr. Bassam Fattouh, Director of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies (OIES).  OIES is a world leading independent energy research institute specializing in advanced research into the economics and geopolitics of energy.  Dr. Bassam Fattouh is an expert on oil markets, including OPEC, the energy transition, and the economic environment of the Middle East.  Here are some of the questions that Jackie and Peter asked Dr. Fattouh: What are the challenges of energy transition for oil producers in the Middle East? Are they diversifying into new energy types and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)? Were you surprised by the latest OPEC+ decision to cut production by 2 MMB/d when the US and Europe are acting to reduce oil prices? How does the Middle East view US shale oil now?  Do you see a future for Russia in OPEC? The OIES publishes publicly available papers to help understand oil, natural gas, and energy transition including – solar, hydrogen, CCS, nuclear and much more. Please see their website: https://www.oxfordenergy.org/ Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/    

Social Workers, Rise!
108. When Masculinity Turns Toxic

Social Workers, Rise!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 36:18


At what point does masculinity turn toxic? When this happens, what is the impact on the mental health of that person and the people closest to them? How can we support people experiencing toxic masculinity through our social work roles? These are some of the questions we will explore in this podcast episode. Course with CBT mentioned in the podcast: Clinical Essentials for the Future Therapist About our guest, Luccas Contreras from his own words: I am finishing my MSW at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and am a dad of 3 boys under the age of 7. I have worked in the field of Social Work and Mental Health for 14 years. I currently work as a Behavioral Health Facilitator in a County Medicaid-funded program called Comprehensive Community Support (CCS). CCS is intended to assist individuals who need care outside of inpatient settings and may have ongoing needs that, if left unaddressed, could result in hospitalizations during times of crisis. I am passionate about addressing toxic masculinity, the effects of men seeking mental health treatment, and changing the stigma around men needing therapy for eating disorders, depression, anxiety, PTSD, and other mental illnesses. ____________________________________ Tap Here to Subscribe to the Social Workers, Rise! Email Resource List ____________________________________ Thank you to our SPONSORS RISE Directory - A national directory of Clinical Supervisors who are looking to help the next generation of Clinical Social Workers GROW. Therapist Development Center (TDC) Homepage TDC Continuing Education Courses On The Edge of Life: An Introduction to Treating Suicidality Use the code SWRISE10 at checkout to receive 10% off Horse Therapy Centre of Canada Mention code SWRISE when you email them at office@horsetherapycanada.com for up to $700 off certification. www.horsetherapycanada.com ________________________________ Top 10 Worldwide Social Worker's, Rise! Has been named in the Top 10 of Social Work podcasts worldwide! See the full list here.

The Clean Energy Show
Fossil Fuel Assets Worthless by 2036; Hydroponic Wheat; Electric Truck Stops

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 56:43


Electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. Heat pumps mandatory in new homes in Washington State. Indoor hydroponic wheat produces 6 crops per year on the same land. LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. SpaceX buys ads on Twitter. Could Tesla be next? Battery espionage in Canada by China.  Tesla proposes a North American charging standard. Should ICE trucks pay highway tolls? New study could show how batteries can have 20% more life cycles (and therefore lower prices). Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. The price of hydrogen at the pump in California has risen 33%. We compare gas and electric alternatives. Tony Seba has our Tweet of the Week: Percision fermentation land area to replace all the cows. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Hello, and welcome to Episode 139 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, an indoor wheat experiment is a big success. A new crop is harvested six times a year. Wish my hair did that. Heat pumps are now mandatory in new homes in Washington state. Also mandatory cheering for the Seattle Kraken electric truck stops will need more power than a small town. What about the same amount of meth? LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. This partnership makes perfect sense, because if there's one thing LaGuardia is known for, its speed. All that and more on this week's edition of The Clean Energy Show. Welcome, everyone, to what I think is the best podcast on the Internet everywhere. It's objectively true. Objectively true. I think so. Right now, this is a particular moment. And also on this week's show, Brian, we also have stuff about SpaceX. It's buying ads on Twitter because it's CEO bought Twitter. And we wonder if Tesla could be next, because Tesla has never advertised near her SpaceX. So maybe this could break ground for that. We'll see. The first case of battery espionage has been discovered in Canada. Hydrogen pump prices are going up 33% in California, half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. So keep that in mind when investing today. How are you? I'm good. So just an update on my house. So I applied for the Greener Homes grant here in Canada to do energy upgrades to my house. All right. Hoping to put in an air source heat pump, get rid of my natural gas. And so the first step of that is the blower door test and kind of home energy evaluation. And that all happened today. So that was fun. They put the big blower in the door. They test the air tightness of the house. So they got this doorshaped mass that goes all over the door with a hole for the blower. And the blower only, right? Yeah. And it blows air in or out, I can't remember. And then they could also go around the house with the sort of infrared camera thing and with the blower on, kind of show you where the leaks are in the house. It's wintertime now. It's super cold out. Oh, well, then it will be sucking. It will be sucking it. And the air will be coming in through the window cracks and things like that. Yeah. So did they go around with a smoker? No smoker. Just this infrared thing. Maybe they use a smoker more in the summer. Okay, well, they didn't use a smoker on mine, and they didn't do that on mine. They didn't go around. So what did you find out? Not too much yet. They have to sort of crunch all the numbers because they do a volumetric assessment of the house where they calculate the interior volume of the house. So then they have to go and take the measurements that they got from the blower door, do some calculations, figure it out, and you get kind of like an Energy Star rating for your home. And we did this about ten years ago when we did some upgrades. It was a similar program. So they give you a number, I think it's out of 100 of what your energy efficiency is, and then as you make improvements, you hope to they do the blower door test again when you're all done, and you hope to increase the sort of Energy Star rating of your house. This is mostly for air ceiling, right? Yeah, and we could see that a little bit with the infrared camera. But we will hopefully do some more upgrades. It's the main thing we want to do is the air source heat pump, and we should get the grant for that kind of regardless of what the blower door result is. I told you last week there's a TV series shooting across the street from me, and they were actually outdoors shooting today, so I was worried the blower would they come knock on our door. Because you're a film, you know, the film community. Old man stalked and wanting money to shut down his blowers so we could continue our production, because people do that on the streets. They'll run their muscle cars and have to get paid off get paid off to shut it down because the film crew needs quiet. And I watched The Godfather yesterday, which I hadn't seen in many, many years. Let me guess. Blue Ray, 4k? Exactly. It's this restored version. It's quite cool. They did extensive restoration, but a lot of that movie is ADR. I sort of didn't remember that, but ADR being dialogue replacement, where a lot of the dialogue was replaced in post production. Like, a lot of it, like, way more than half, I think. Wow. So it was a low budget film, more or less, wasn't it? Yeah, I guess that would be the reason. Like, lots of location shooting and lots of extraneous noises. But yeah, that was sort of the surprise on that one for me. Did you just notice it more this time, or what? Yes, I haven't seen it in 2030 years. You were just a child then, really. I mean, you naive. You accepted everything as reality. Yes. I wish I was that. It's a fascinating if you're interested, on the Bluray, and there's these special features about how they had to restore it because the film, when it came out in 72, was just wildly more popular than anybody expected. And whenever that happens, they have to run more prints so that they have to make more prints of the film. So the original negative, even though it's only 50 years old, I ended up getting totally ruined. And the restoration that they had to do was to the point where they were going and taking outtakes they were taking outtakes and cutting them back into the film because certain shots were damaged. And with the approval of the director, you can do that kind of weird thing. Oh, wow. I don't know how I feel about that. You get used to a film that would stand out to you. It shouldn't be in any way that you notice it's like literally like just a shot of somebody walking down the hallway or okay, that's different. It's nothing important. You know, my childhood home has been destroyed. There was an explosion in Regina. That was your childhood home. No, it wasn't, but it was built next to my childhood home. And when I say childhood home, I mean I lived there for three months with great eight. My brother lived there, and I left home in grade eight and went and lived with him and found out he had a girlfriend who became his wife, who eventually became his ex wife. That building, which is a brick, three story apartment building with, I think, you know, twelve suites, and it was, has to be demolished now because the house next door blew out. Well, it was kind of like an apartment building that they were building right when I was living there, I think. And it's like a four suite housing, but nobody was living there. The whole thing blew up, rain off the ground, boom. And the only person who was injured was somebody who didn't live there, who lived somewhere. That window broke. But this is a story. Kids at Natural Gas caused this explosion with solar and wind have never caused an explosion. You know, I had my first clean energy show dream the other night, and it was a paraphrase in the first one. Brian, I was in the backseat of your Tesla. You got out and I was concerned. Did he hit the brake? You got in front of the car and the car ran over you. And I think I was watching Breaking Bad because I'm just now watching Breaking Bad, and there was a scene of a car running over somebody. So the same crunch for Breaking Bad was there, and I didn't think it went well for you. There's another part of the dream. For some reason, I was in this giant mansion with all kinds of celebrities around people, and I was ready to record my end of the podcast. And we couldn't find you. It was just not to be found. Like I said earlier, SpaceX, as a guest, has bought a package to advertise its Starlink Internet service on Twitter. Now, SpaceX has never advertised before. Starlink has never advertised before. Tesla famously does not advertise because its CEO has always said that the car sells itself. Until this point, it continues to do so. But I wonder, Brian, I wonder if either to prop up the company he bought, or could this be the first time that Tesla actually buys advertising on Twitter? Could that happen one of these days. Well, the explanation I heard was that he wanted to test the efficacy of advertising on Twitter. So they also bought ads on, like, Facebook and Instagram at the same time to kind of see how the Twitter kind of advertising scheme works. But it is a sort of demand lever that Tesla could employ. They still have a big backlog of orders, so demand is super strong. But if demand ever starts to slip, once they start producing more and more vehicles, they could start advertising to if the demand ever does start to slip, I guess the first thing they would probably do is lower prices because they've been raising prices because the demand has been too high. The first thing they would do is back off in those price increases and maybe go even a bit further if they had to. I imagine they're going to I mean, they've got three factories around the world which are going to hit their stride pretty soon, right? Or is it more than 03:00 a.m. I counting wrong, I guess technically four, if you count three months. Yeah. And there was an Arranium, what people think is an Iranians report that Tesla was going to sell the Chinese made cars in the United States. Some of them. I've long predicted that ever since I saw what's his name? Sandy Monroe. Sandy Monroe live his channel. Yeah, he said that from what he understood and he has expertise in Chinese manufacturing and has consulted with automakers over there that 20% less is what the Tesla can make in China. Like, they'll save 20% on the price of the car. And it turns out that the Chinese manufacturing is really good because they're bringing the Chinese manufacturing people over to the States to say, why can't we be as productive as you? Did you ever see that documentary called what was it called? I don't know. It was a factory. It was produced by Obama, and it was about Chinese companies that decided to take advantage of tax breaks in Ohio or somewhere to bring back an automotive factory or a factory that was in an automotive town in, I don't want to say Ohio, somewhere like that. And they just could not get the productivity. They couldn't understand it, but they couldn't no matter what they did, they finally threw in the towel, I think, and went home, and they visited the factory in China and man, what a different culture. What a different work culture. Everything is like calisthenics and unanimity and one team. I don't like that. I wouldn't want to work there. But as a manufacturer, it seems like quite an advantage, and it seems to be effective. Yeah. Well, the Tesla Shanghai factory is now operating at a run rate of about a million vehicles a year, so it is likely the largest car factory in the world. And they've gotten there in pretty short time. It's only been a couple of years that they've been producing cars. And it's true that demand in China is down a little bit, and they did cut the prices in Japan a little bit, or sorry, in China a little bit too, because the demand is slipping. But yeah, and they export those cars currently to Europe, but the Germany factory is going to start filling those orders. So those Chinese cars, if there's too many of them for the Chinese market, will have to go somewhere. I don't think it would be North America, because the Texas factory will start filling that in, but more cars to go to Australia or Japan or wherever. But on the other hand, Brian, you've got the Cyber truck coming and the Tesla semi. So maybe you could take one of those lines and start spitting out Model YS or something from China. Or maybe you make the X and the S, which are lower volume. It's more likely, like the next model that's coming, like they'll eventually be a lower cost model. So I assume they're planning for that in China, and they could start making more variants, too, like longer range variants as well. Sure. So, from Bloomberg, a 35 year old Hydro Quebec employee who worked on battery materials research has been charged with espionage for allegedly obtaining trade secrets for China. Well, he's in Kandiac, Quebec. He has a Chinese sounding name. So I don't know if he was originally from China or if he's an immigrant worker or what his nationality is for sure, but he was arrested following an investigation that they get in August. I'm concerned about the Chinese government. They have no shame when it comes to these things. There's some car companies in China accused of duplicating Tesla's, blatantly copying them, and a lot, even down to the software, this is the first time this happened. But it seems like they'll do anything to be competitive. And as we've mentioned before so Hydro Quebec, that's the electricity utility in Quebec, the provincially owned utility, but they've done a lot of research into batteries and battery materials, and they own a lot of patents in that. So I guess whatever they own there at Hydro Quebec was valuable enough to be espionaged. And it's a highly competitive batteries are highly competitive. But if they have, who knows what hasn't been caught? Because it seems like there's been more and more instances of this. And of course there's computer espionage and all that sort of thing. That's a concern for all countries, it seems like you have to put a lot of money into that. What do you think? This is why I asked, Brian. What do you think about things that I don't know what to think about? So, Brian Tesla has proposed a North American charging standard. Now, those of you who are new to the game, there is basically two charging ports in North America, CCS and Tesla. Tesla has its own charging network, which is the largest and most consistent, but it's got a different connector, so that's a problem. But it's amazing how great that connector is, right? Because it's small. If you compare it side by side to what everybody else is using for all the other cars, my car included, it's like half the size, but it's basically when you charge your car, you can do DC Direct, fast current fast charging at public charging stations, or you can AC charge at home. But what I didn't realize until today is they only have two pins on there that does both. So that's why it's lighter and smaller. They've figured out a way to do both now and the connector, it's more like a quarter the size of the CCS connector. So I think it'd be a fantastic idea. It's definitely the better standard of the two. So if North America were to standardize on the Tesla charging socket, I think that would be fantastic. Question is it might be a bit too late. Like Tesla could have maybe released this a couple of years ago, a couple of years ago, five years ago. A better chance at this. Yeah. So disappointing. Too little, too late, because it's probably not going to happen now. Probably not. But what Tesla said in their press release was that some of the, they've been talking already to the companies that make the charging networks, the chargers for the third party networks that normally are CCS. And it sounds like they have some plans already to incorporate the Tesla connector onto those. So, I don't know, there is some hope, but it's probably too late. And CCS will likely be two standards in North America, CCS and Tesla. Part of this is the federal government in the United States is giving a lot of money to expand the charging networks. But when you do that, you have to have more than one charging standard, more than one car company that uses it. So if just one car company, any car company that sells maybe ten cars a year adopted Tesla's in the clear, they don't have to make the GCs ones, and they could get all the government subsidies for just making their charges that they already make. Now the government could go and tweak that fine print. Okay, so here's another one for you. This is a clean technical op ed. It says Tolling the highway to green trucking. Should tolls be implemented on combustion semi trailers once EVs are on the road. Do you think that would be an effective way to do it? Well, I don't think you'll have to. It's kind of like the cost of running a combustion truck will already be more expensive, so there's already a kind of a penalty just for using one. So an extra toll probably not needed. I mean, what's needed is faster production of the electric trucks and get those on the road. That's the thing. This is assuming price parity, that the cost of ownership is going to be the same, right? Well, charging lithium ion cells at different rates boost the lifetime of battery packs for electric vehicles. So says yet another Stanford study. We have so many Stanford studies on the show. According to the study, batteries managed with this new technology could handle at least 20% more charge discharge cycles, even with frequent fast charging, which puts an extra strain on the battery. So basically they're saying don't charge each of the individual cells at the same rate all the time. And that actually gives you 20% longer life. And 20% longer life if you're talking about a fleet of cars of a million cars and a robotxis, or storage for the electrical grid that lasts twelve years instead of ten, the costs on those greatly changes with doing this basically a software tweak. So that seems quite to me, it seems like it's got a lot of potential if it works, yes. That's exciting. There's a lot that can be done with software. It isn't just the hardware components of a battery or the chemistry's, or the chemistry is where you can improve the life. Yeah, the software can have a big benefit. So Ford is officially the number two electric vehicle seller in the United States. And if you extrapolate out the twelve months of a year, based on what they had in October, ford would achieve 75,000 EV sales. Which is what's, Tesla right now? Close to a million. Close to a million. So that's not much, but that's what your number two is. A lot of people wouldn't have picked for it to be number two right now. They would have took GM or more likely Volkswagen. And that points back to our previous conversations about the connectors. Standardizing on the Tesla connector has a fighting chance just because Tesla vehicles are so ubiquitous in North America in terms of EVs. Another thing I wanted to talk about is electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. So as Tesla rose out, it's semi next month, hopefully, I think December 1 is when they're having the release. Are you looking forward to that one? Yeah. Do you think something special could roll out of the back of that truck? I hadn't thought of that. The tesla ebike. The robotic musk. I don't know. I do. Social media platform and we'll roll out the back of the truck. Yeah. So it's adding pressure on the truck industry to go green. But the grid upgrades must start now if the new era is to last. This is from Bloomberg, and sometimes these stories make me wonder if that is all accurate. But a sweeping new study. This is another study of highway charging requirements conducted by utility company National Grid Plc. Researchers found that by 2030 electrifying, a typical highway gas station will require as much power as a professional sports stadium. And I would think sports stadiums use less now with all the Led lighting, but it's probably better. But I know our city built a new football stadium a few years ago, and I don't know if you noticed, but they're all kinds of electrical transformer boxes outside the stadium. They hid them in the park. There's a park next to the stadium and they had to try and hide all of these electrical transformer boxes. And there's a lot of them. And the power used to go out on the old stadium we had here. This is a stadium we have for the Canadian Football League, by the way. Okay, so this is just for electrified passenger vehicles. As more electric trucks hit the road, the projected power needs for a big truck stop by 2035 will equal that of a small town. And they think that lots of wiring will have to be done. Nobody really knows how this is going to play out with trucks. Like, is there going to be specialized newly built truck stops? Because truck stops are a thing. You have a shower, you park the truck for a while. It's a truck resting stop as well. So I don't know. How do you think that will play out, if you had to guess? Well, there's usually a decent amount of space at existing truck stops, so I assume there's enough room at the existing truck stops to kind of transform them and have both fuel and electric. Hopefully they have started working on that already. Now, just to tag onto that, I want to skip ahead to the story about LaGuardia Airport. Sure. Because I think it sort of makes me think of the same issue. So there's a story here from Electrac about zoo's power that's got this machine with a flywheel. And this is being installed at LaGuardia Airport to facilitate fast charging of cars, rental cars particularly. And yeah, I bring it up because the reason this machine exists is that the power available in certain locations can be limited. Right. Like if these truck stops are going to need all the power of a small town, well, you don't necessarily have the grid infrastructure where you need it. I don't think this does an enormous amount. Like, it's not going to triple or quadruple the amount of power available. But the idea behind this zoos flywheel machine is that it literally uses flywheels. And we talked about this before. Some power plants use flywheels as well. It's literally just the momentum of a spinning wheel to help kind of even the power output of your hydroelectric dam or whatever. Anyway, so I guess the idea being that you take a limited amount of power that might be available in a parking lot at an airport, and then you use this flywheel machine. And some by spinning up the flywheels, you can increase the amount of power available. It's sort of similar to having batteries on site. I would think that's going to be the more normal solution. Like at these truck stops, would be to put a big battery pack, a grid storage battery pack at a truck stop. But this is a kind of a smaller and cheaper way to add just a bit more power to what's available for your fast chargers. So with hertz ordering a couple of hundred thousand electric vehicles from Tesla and GM, I wonder how the infrastructure at airports is going to go. I mean, nobody is panicking about that, but I mean that's going to have to be built up presumably, and larger airports will have a lot of cars sitting there with batteries. You would have the chance in the low demand because most flights happen 06:00 a.m. To midnight or whatever. You could have 6 hours to when people aren't taking those cars, maybe to charge off the batteries for the next day. And that would yeah, I can see that being an important thing unless they have some off site, like just off the airport type of parking spaces for charging. Yeah, and like our parking spaces here in Canada at our airports, a lot of them are probably already electrified where we live because it's super cold in the winter and so you have plugins for block heaters. So at least there's power running to these parking lots. Whereas of course, in many places there would be no power running there at all. Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036 in a net zero transition. So says an article in the Guardian that I read. $11 Trillion in Fossil Fuel Asset Crash could Cause a 2008 financial crisis, warrants a new study. I don't care. Yeah, that's my hot. Take it. Yeah. It's something I really wonder about and think about. Like, obviously these assets are going to become stranded and worthless at some point or at least the value start crashing at some point. But what point does that start to happen? Is it two years from now? Is it six years from now? Is it 20 years from now? It's hard to say, but I wouldn't want to be holding a lot of fossil fuel investments longer than the next couple of years, that's for sure. I think the big question is when will EVs really take off where there's not a battery constraint? And it sure seems like it's going to be within five years. It could be two years, it could be five years, but somewhere in that period I think it's really going to grab momentum. Yeah, but also too, like, as we've discussed, like last week and other weeks, there's not a lot of new money being spent on new oil exploration because they can kind of foresee, okay, there's not really going to be the demand. It's not worth it to spend this money building. So that does mean that the supply of oil will be kind of naturally constrained if the system doesn't expand. So it could be that as the oil industry shrinks, the production shrinks and if the production shrinks enough, then the price stays up. So countries that are slow to decarbonise will suffer, but early movers will profit. This is something we say on the show all the time. You have to move now. And our jurisdiction is not great where we live. We live in fossil fuel country with a mentality thereof and our country as a whole starting to make some moves. But we're basically a fossil fuel country in Canada and even the United States to some extent. But it finds that renewables that are freed up investment will more than make up for the losses of the global economy. You're freeing up a whole lack of investment that was going into fossil fuels that can go into other things and expand the economy that way. And just the renewables themselves will save money, of course. So it highlights the risk of producing far more oil and gas than required for future demand, which is estimated to leave 11 trillion to 14 trillion in stranded assets, which is a lot of stranded assets. Brian. Also, as we always say, we predict that governments are going to have to, and therefore you and I are going to have to pay for the clean up of some of these wells as well. So the most vulnerable assets are those in remote regions are technically challenging environments. Most exposed are Canadian tar sands in northern Alberta, us shale and the Russian Arctic, followed by deep offshore wells in Brazil and elsewhere. And North Sea oil is also relatively expensive to extract and it's going to be hit when demand falls. I'm worried about this because it could affect us as being an oil part of the world, it says. In contrast, current oil, gas and coal importers such as the EU, japan, India and South Korea will reap hefty economic dividends from the transition because they will be able to use the money they save on spending those places, spending gobs of money. We get our gas cheap here in North America, but they're spending gobs of money on fuel purchases and they'll be able to use that money to invest in their own economies. The lead author of the report said in the worst case scenario, people will keep investing in fossil fuels until suddenly the man they expected does not materialize and they realize that what they own is worthless. And we could see a financial crisis on the scale of 2008. Houston Detroit could have the same phase detroit did in the car industry collapsed earlier in this century. So yeah, it's got to be carefully managed. If you don't accept that all this is going to happen like people around here, yeah, it's going to be a problem. That's what I have to say about that. Yeah. And when your oil is expensive to extract like it is in the Alberta oil sands, that stuff will be the first to go because you won't be able to sell it at. A profit. So you've got another heat pump story. Heat pumps are the item of the year. I say yes, absolutely. No, it's amazing how even when this podcast started a couple of years ago, it was barely in our vernacular. It was barely in the vernacular. Yes. And now it's everywhere. So yes, electric is reporting heat pumps are now mandatory in Washington State for new homes and apartments as well from July 2023 onward. But the thing that I think is interesting about this, and it's not really mentioned in the story, we talked about the incredible heatwave that happened last summer on the west coast of North America. So Seattle area, Vancouver area, they're just an unprecedented heatwave because of climate change. And so many of those homes and places and businesses and apartments are not cooled. So this is the other benefit of this. So not only do you start heating your homes with electricity, but you also in Washington State now are adding essentially mandatory air conditioning, which, especially if it's low income apartments or something, would be a godsend for people who are hopefully won't. I mean, there was literally thousands of people died from the heat stroke on the west coast last summer. Well, that's an interesting take in a region that doesn't have air conditioning. And yet with climate change, we can see this happening a lot more often and now they'll be prepared. That's an interesting aspect of the story and I have to wonder if it was even part of the planning. No, I'm not sure. I mean, it depends on when they started talking about this. But one of the great benefits is of a heat pump heating and cooling. You get both in the same machine. So why just put in an air conditioner when you can put in an air conditioner that also runs in reverse and can heat your home as well? And for people who are new to the podcast or this type of thing, heat pumps are reverse air conditioners, essentially that transfer heat from one place to another, like inside the house to outside. And air conditioning or outside, even if there's a little bit of energy in that area, it takes it out. And the idea is to use electricity, which instead of natural gas, right, if you're heating, you want to use electricity and this is the most efficient way to do it. Yes, and in a place like Washington State, a lot of homes are already heated with electricity. Like it's not a frigid cold place like here. So there are more like 99% of homes where we live are heated by natural gas because it's so ridiculously cold. But in a milder climate, you might have electric baseboards in a lot of homes. So it is something like 50% already are heated with electricity in Washington state and this will eventually get it up to 100%. Yeah, that's very interesting. And a very interesting side effect of going green using solar and wind and so forth for your heating, that you will actually probably save lives from a government policy in future heatwaves. Who knows when those heat waves will come, but they're going to come more often, those once in a century type heat waves, or once in a thousand years or 500 years, whatever it was. I want to talk about indoor wheat because we live in a heart of wheat country. You can't swing a cat with a wheat chief. It's on symbols for everything. Where we live, we're the breadbasket of Canada. And what was the name of your first feature film? I made a film called Wheat Soup. There you go. It had to be in the title. It had to be. So this is interesting to us because you know how there's hydroponics like indoor gardening, which I'm fascinated with. They do it in containers, they do it in buildings where they're basically using fertilized water and no soil to grow tomatoes or whatever in greenhouse like conditions. And I find that very interesting, especially when they can do it up north. And by the way, I saw another article in Blueberg about the Yukon. The climate changing, and the people are up there growing potatoes and things that they never used to grow before, and wheat as well, which required a lot of cabbage. And things like that require a lot of sunlight when they have 20 hours sunlight days in June. But, you know, it costs a lot to transport fresh food up there. So it's very expensive and very not fresh. Carrots is another thing that they're growing a lot of potatoes and carrots. So that's great. It's great in one sense because there's an advantage to them. But in this case, indoor wheat. Amsterdam based startup In Farm grew wheat without using soil or chemical pesticides, which is nice, and with far less water than conventional farming, which is also nice. So the first indoor farming company to grow a stable staple crop in a milestone for an Asian industry that has attracted venture capital funding on its promise that its technology can help feed the planet if delivered at scale. Growing a staple crop indoors has the potential to become a game changer. Supplies have increasingly been challenged by climate change and logistical issues. So you could grow well, you could grow wheat in Antarctica if you wanted to, right? If you got this technology down. And Infarm says that its first trial shows that projected annual wheat yields of 117 tons a hectare, okay? Now, that compares to the average 2022 yields of 5.6. So let me give you that again. Indoors, 117 tons hectare annually. Outdoors, 5.6. And in the European Union, it's 3.1. So that's in the European Union, it's actually less than the United States, which surprises me. It's only 3.1. Now, part of that reason of the higher yields is they have six crops a year. Okay? But if you times 3.1 times six, you still don't get 117 tons. So it's just a lot more dense and efficient to do it that way. I mean, it's not easy. We're probably decades away from this being a regular thing and getting the efficiencies and the cost down maybe a couple of decades, it's hard to tell. But, you know, it depends on what the need is, too. But this is interesting. It's going to be perfect, right? You don't spread pesticides on it. You're not going to have to worry about weeds. It's just going to be pure indoor stuff and locally delivered. No. And the more things, of course, you can do locally, then the more transportation that you can eliminate. You know, so many things now that, you know, our produce at the grocery stores just shipped in from incredible distances here. But if all that stuff could be grown locally, it would just be so much more efficient and just kind of save all that energy. I mean, theoretically, you could, in the middle of a desert in Africa, start up an operation like this and make flour or make proteins for food. Basically, you would need water, but you wouldn't need as much of it. So if you could use solar to desalinate water, you could put it anywhere. You could put it in there because we transport all of our grain by ship, which goes by train from the center of the continent out to the coasts and then onto ships. I don't think that this is going to completely replace green farming, but it could augment it. Maybe 100 years from now, it could replace it, but in the near term, this is basically saying that it could just fit in, reduce the challenges of supply, and in certain situations, a lot of land will be required to produce this. Wheat cultivation takes more than 216,000,000 land, more than any other crop. So, yeah, wheat takes a lot of land, which we have a lot of land here. A lot of land. Most of our province is filled with wheat fields. It's kind of insane. So, yeah, they would require very large indoor farms exceeding the area of all the wheat in France, I think. But they said it could potentially increase its yield by another 50% in the coming years, thanks to better technology. So it could even be 200 times or 200 tons instead of three tons. So that's interesting. Yeah. Once they learn what they're doing and tweak it and software can play a part, perhaps. Yeah, it could be amazing. Okay, so starting here from Hydrogen Insight, and this is about hydrogen pump prices in California. So this was something I just had never thought about before now. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do exist. James, take a guess. How many hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do you think there are in California, which is currently one of the main markets for them? 410. There's $10,000. Okay. Which is not bad. It's kind of more than I expected. And there's a series of hydra. They're not all the Toyota Mariah. What are these vehicles? There's a Toyota Mirai there's a Hyundai. That's really nice. I forget the name of it, but there's a big Hyundai SUV. That's a hydrogen vehicle. They've sold a few of those for sure. Okay. But yeah. So there's hydrogen fueling stations in California, not in too many other places. But I just was interested in this because, yes, recently they had to hike up the price at the pump of these hydrogen, up 33% in California. This is a fairly big price jump. So just in terms of the price per mile, I thought this was really interesting. So right now is basically what it costs you to drive a hydrogen vehicle in California, roughly in a gasoline vehicle down to California has the most expensive gasoline in North America. Yeah, well, no, it's probably more expensive here in Canada. Is it? Because I went there, it was pretty damn expensive. That was a few years ago. So $0.22 for gas per mile and for hydrogen. Plus, you spend a whole bunch more money on your hydrogen car than you do a gas car. It's a serious technology. And then if you're driving an EV and you charge it off the grid, you're down to if you have to use a fast charger like a Tesla Supercharger, then you're up to but that's compared to for driving a hydrogen car. So I just wasn't totally clear on that until now. The actual cost of driving a hydrogen vehicle is more than gas, way more than electricity. Now, theoretically, if we were to SuperBuild out the hydrogen infrastructure and kind of get that all pumping again, locality is a key to that. Like, if each city had its own hydrogen plant or whatever, you had even smaller ones at the filling stations, making the hydrogen there, that would reduce costs a lot. But for right now, it's super expensive to fill up with hydrogen. And I don't see that coming down anytime soon. And the days of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is probably numbered. If we had no other option, we would be going full steam ahead with hydrogen and trying to get that that still take a while, but we would be trying to get green hydrogen, and then we'll be trying to get that green hydrogen price down so that it would be cost effective. But since we have an alternative to that called battery electric vehicles, electricity is also expensive in California. So if you compare it to other places, it would be even a larger variation there. And as we said, so obviously the electricity for charging your electric car comes from the grid. And there are certain shortfalls at places, perhaps like truck stops that don't have enough grid infrastructure. So it's far from perfect. But any electrical outlet anywhere in the world can charge an electric vehicle. So that's just an insane advantage over these very rare hydrogen stations. Yeah, they're expensive. And transportation and processing of hydrogen is also an issue. So Amazon is getting heat. We get heat for not talking about ebikes sometimes. Well, Amazon is getting heat for selling kits to override speed limits of ebikes. Now, this is mostly happening in Europe, right? Because there's more restrictions in Europe. Europe has strict electric bike laws that limit electric bicycles to a sluggish 25 km an hour or 15.5 mph. Even an old man like me can go well, I can't go 25, actually. It takes the work to go 25. Yeah, that is kind of cool. But solutions range from an electromagnetic modifications or chipping, quote unquote, that can remove digital speed limits. So people do that with cars sometimes, to hardware hacks to trick the bike speed sensors into thinking it's going slower than it truly is. And I haven't been able to find out exactly how that works. So I'm kind of curious. Yeah, I thought maybe you had done that on your bike where it's like you change the setting and it messes up the speedometer, so it ends up sending you faster than it's what you do is you change the wheel size on your bike. Didn't work for mine. It was supposed to, but my bike manufacturer has been kind of savvy to all the tricks, so by the time I get to them, they've figured it out and have eliminated that. But yeah, if you have like a 29 inch wheel and then you tell that it's a kid's wheel of half that size, then it thinks that one rotation is actually going a shorter distance and yes, and then you won't have a proper speed. And I have that FETO electric folding bike and I looked on the Internet and apparently there is a hack that you can do by pressing a certain combination of buttons on the little kind of remote screen there where you can hack it to go faster. But I haven't tried it. And with mine it was a code. It was like an eight digit code that you could type in at a certain place. And that one also did not work. I was curious, but I think the longevity of James is more important than the thrill of maybe trying out a 50 kilometer an hour. That's probably all my bike could do if it really wanted to. It would take a while to get there too. The important thing to remember in all this is you probably don't need your bike to go any faster. No, but what does my bike do? My bike does 32 instead of 25. So that's the next level. I think that's about what mine does. And that's pretty fast. And like I've said before in the show, I get kind of uncomfortable at that speed, and yet some other bastard on an ebike passes me and I think, I wish I had more speed. I start pedaling, which you can do. Apparently you can pedal and use the Ebike part. Well, anyway, I guess Ebike hot rodding as it's called, is much less common in the United States, where E bikes are permitted to go up to 45 km an hour. That's the United States. You can have guns and fast Ebikes or whatever you want. Tanks, cruise missiles, no. And modifying your car. Take out the pollution controls, although they have been cracking down on that lately. Oh, it's time for the Tweet of the week. This is where we pick a Tweet. And this last week was for Tony Siba. It's going to be for Tony Siba again. Okay, I'm sorry. Tony Siba is kind of one of our main people that we follow on the show here. Now, this was a person who was responding to how 5 million, what Tony calls precision fermentation. This is the future of food. He believes that will be disruptive based on price. This is one of the ways that is like beyond meat, that's one aspect. And then there's cellular meat, which will actually resemble steak and the texture of steak in the future, maybe ten years from now, that will be viable financially. But dairy is the first one that's going to be disrupted because glass of milk is 90% water and 3% of that is protein from the milk. So that's really all you're dealing with is that protein because the rest is fat and sugars, which you can get from other places. It doesn't have to be from a cow. So as they make these things in like brewery like buildings and disrupt milk. He says there are 5 million dairy cows in New Zealand. And so that would require 100 precision fermentation factories to replace all the cows. Less if they're bigger, which they will be. So it's just a matter of time and probably less time than most people expect. And Tony. Steve assisted that tweet. Correct. The total land needed to replace all the cows in New Zealand, 5 million of them, which is more than Canada, by the way. I believe we only have a million cows in Canada. I haven't counted lately, but I'm told that it's around a million. The total land needed would be around 1700 acres. But you compare that with the Auckland airport, it's 3700 acres. So basically half the Auckland airport could replace all the dairy cows the land wise. And then you have all that land. You can put solar on and do other things. This is a huge disruption of the world. Yes. If you think of a cow as basically a type of food technology, well, it can be delicious. It's the least efficient food technology. In fact, I think Tony said that the cow in particular is the least efficient of all of the kind of animal food technologies. So we get a lot of things from a cow, but the resources and the land and everything needed to get that is kind of insane and is ripe for disruption. So, as Tony points out, the first disruption will happen in just a few years. And he thinks that dairy will be bankrupt by 2030. And the reason is 30% of his business is business to business. So if you buy a protein shake, you're buying protein powder. Okay? And if it's cheaper to come from this fake stuff, if you can call it that, fermentation than it is from a real dairy cow, and you're greener people are just going to go, where the cheapest? If you want to buy bulk for a protein bar or a protein shake or whatever, all these things that have chocolate bars and everything and all kinds of foods that are processed will have first that will go and then 30% of dairy's gone. Yeah. No. And he mentioned, too, in his latest video, just the switch, like Coke and Pepsi switched from cane sugar to corn sugar back in the 80s. Basically, their entire product lines switching over to corn as the source for sugar. And while there is probably some taste difference, they was definitely not enough taste difference to stop what they were doing, because they completely four years. Four years. They did it in just both yeah. In four years. Complete switch over. And this is the main ingredient in their products? Yes. That means it's time for the lightning round. A quick look at fast paced energy news and climate news from this past week. Growing EV dem demand helps Volkswagen reach half a million ID deliveries one year early. Brian, that is a good news story, isn't it? Yeah, we talked about that a few weeks ago. They're on track for 500,000 deliveries. That's Volkswagen this year of EVs, and that's a huge number. Volvo debuts its first electric trucks made with fossil free steel. That is steel made with green electricity, and it is also 90% recyclable. So that's cool. Yeah. So Volvo was trying to green their whole lineup of vehicles, and they're doing it partly by switching over to electric, but they're also doing it by going with fossil free steel in their cars, which increasingly more and more manufacturers are going to do. Cough 27 news, 41 signatories have joined the pledge to stop funding fossil fuels by the end of year. But problematically. Brian, four large signatories are not signing. Germany, Italy, the United States and your favorite country in the world, canada. No, I'm sorry. Damn, it just sad. Can't overuse that, can I? Okay, it's time for a CS festival. Toyota has sold 4.7 million Priuses to date. That's no easy feat. Tesla did 3 million. But total yeah, that's to date, over the last ten plus years, 4.7 million Priuses are on the road, but nobody buys them anymore. No. Did you see the stat of, like, at one time they were selling 500,000 Priuses a year and it's down to 86,000? Yeah. People who bought them initially wanted an environmentally friendly car or to save money. Best way to be environmentally friendly or to save money is to buy electric now. Or at least electric hybrid. But anyway, solar power already saved China, India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines and Thailand. $34 billion American in potential fossil fuel costs went in the first half of this year. First half of 2022. We're just getting started. That's astonishing. Yeah. I mean, spend your money on solar and then you won't have to spend it on fossil fuels. The US will finance about a third of the $9 billion rooms romania needs to build two nuclear reactors. That's a lot of money. They're getting it from the United States, which seems like a bad investment. I thought I would mention this. Globally up 13%. Okay. That's everywhere in the world. Europe is up 35%. I wonder why. Vladimir, the US is up 15% and China 13%. So this heat pump thing is, whoever makes the most of the best heat pumps, put your money in them because they're going to pay back. No, and I assume that I haven't seen announcements, but I assume that there are heat pump factories being built as we speak. And I don't know, we always hear battery factory announcements and things like that. I don't hear heat pump factory announcements, but presumably it's going on. The demand is huge. Inflation Reduction Act had money for developing better heat pumps, too, so there's going to be some R and D in there. Friend of the show, Greta Thuneburg thoonberg rather. I'm kidding. She's not a friend of the show, but we're working on it slowly. Global Witness found that more than 600 people are at the talks in Egypt at Cop 27. They're linked to fossil fuels. And, Brian, that is more than the combined delegations from the ten most climate impacted countries. Barf, we're at a critical stage now where we got to say no to fossil fuels. Just say no. And we got to stop the green washer, we got to stop the BS right now. Right now. No time left. From Tennessee Valley Authority, that is one of the grids in the southern US. The three giant cooling towers at the retired paradise coal plant in Kentucky came down this morning, was a few mornings ago now as demolition efforts continued at the site. And they say we are striving for a cleaner and more efficient energy future as we are building the energy system of the future. And by God, Brian, we have a clip. Fantastic. Here's the initial charge. The towers are collapsing. They're coming down completely now. And they're gone by the doctor. Goodbye, coal plants. Three cooling towers in Kentucky, a grave risk of winter blackout speaking of nuclear, is happening in France because electricity prices have surged past $1,000 or, pardon me, €1000 per megawatt hour as more nuclear reactors, more are closing in France, as if enough hadn't closed already. What this means, Brian, is, on a cold January day, france needs around 45 gigawatts of nuclear energy, and one day last week, there was only 25 available. Yeah, and there was a lot of reactors down, or at least down partially for repairs. So the amount of electricity from nuclear in France dropped 34% year over year in October. Just less power available from nuclear, which everyone always says it's like reliable base load power. That's one of the reasons it's promoting this is not reliable here. But it's not exactly that. You know, it's the pipes, the cooling pipes that are structurally problematic and cracked, and they realize that they're all bad. So they have this, and it apparently takes a while. They've hired like, 100 contractors to go in and fix this, but it's not that easy. Finally this week, Brian japan's government wants to remotely control private air conditioners to avoid power outages. The Japan Time points out that the government committee is currently working under the concept that the government would only be able to turn down AC units if individual owners have agreed in advance to grant them that authority. This is something we've seen, or, what, the third time now on the show? Yeah. And in Ontario, they're working on this. Here in Canada where remote control california, they do it with text messages where they just tell everybody to stop using so much AC. But this works. And no one really suffers if you shave a degree or two off your air conditioning for an hour and say it's much better than a blackout where you have no air conditioning. So that's not so bad. That is our show for this week. Next week I'll be talking about the new Toyota Prius lineup that will be announced between now and then and what excitement that will be. Because I need a car badly, Brian. Mine's starting to fall apart. My FUS is getting long on the tooth. How disappointed will I be? Tune in to find out. Maybe I should sell you my car. Would you buy my Tesla? Well, the street price for that Tesla, unless there's a murder in it, is not going to be good for me. What if I gave you a really good deal? I'll take two. Why would you want to? It's not the form factor you want, I guess, but I don't care. I would take a Tesla. What would you do for a new car? Buy a why? Yeah, something like that. You think I want to start? What's interesting, what are your interest rates? How quickly do you break legs? We'll sign over. Like making a 20 year loan? Pretty much what it would have to be, I think. Anyway, everyone out there, we thank you for listening. We do appreciate you and we'd love to hear from you. So contact us with anything that's on your mind Cleanenergy show@gmail.com. We are on social media with the handle Clean Energy Pod. We're on TikTok. Check out our TikTok channel. Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel, too, because you know why not? Sometimes you might want to look at things that are shiny. And you can even leave us a voicemail where we get to hear your voice, which is always a thrill for us. Speakpipe.com cleanenergyshow. Remember, subscribe if you're new to the podcast so that you can get new episodes delivered every week. And, Brian, I look forward to next week. you.

Made in Germany: Your Business Magazine
Storing carbon under the sea

Made in Germany: Your Business Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 5:11


Norway plans to use its experience in the oil and gas industry to send CO2 emissions back into the ground. It's part of a state program supporting the large-scale implementation of CCS — carbon capture and storage.

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Spotlight on Alberta Power: An Interview with Mike Law, CEO at AESO

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 36:37


On this week's podcast our guest is Mike Law, President and Chief Executive Officer at the Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO). Here are some of the questions that Jackie and Peter asked Mike: Are consumers exposed to the volatile power price in Alberta's deregulated electric market?  Why are electricity prices in Alberta higher now? Are the costs for transmission too high? Is net-zero electricity by 2035 achievable?  What is the current status of the federal government's Clean Electricity Standard?  In a deregulated market, how can Alberta ensure that enough clean electricity generation capacity is constructed by 2035?  Do you think a pan-Canadian grid is part of the solution for achieving net-zero electricity?  Other information referenced in this podcast: AESO's Net Zero Emissions Pathways Report (June 2022) AESO's Real Time Dashboard of Alberta's Power System AESO Twitter @theAESO   Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/    

A Bit of Swazz: The Cardiff City Podcast
Bluebirds On The Big Stage

A Bit of Swazz: The Cardiff City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 72:42


Vincent Tan calling out fanbase, Bluebirds crazy last 5 games and World Cup build up, all in a episode of A Bit of Swazz! Host Brandon Richards and co-host William Cosh analyse all dramas surrounding the Bluebirds as well optimism about the future. Guess the Bluebird is back and of course the boys are joined by Bluebirds Women Defender Hannah Power as they thrill in regards to the CCFCW playing in front over 5,000 at the CCS!

Autoline Daily
AD #3448 - Should U.S. Mandate Tesla Charging Tech?; EVs To Reach Cost Parity In 2025; Mercedes Peels Off the FTX Logos

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 9:43


- Elon Musk Faces $56 Billion Lawsuit- EVs To Reach Cost Parity In 2025- Mercedes Peels Off the FTX Logos - France Mandates PV Panels at Parking Lots- More Specs on Hyundai's New Flagship - Should U.S. Mandate Tesla Charging Tech?- Audi Opens Charging Salon in China- VW To Use Developing Nations for ICE Production- Wuling KFC and Cadillac Ragnarok

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3448 - Should U.S. Mandate Tesla Charging Tech?; EVs To Reach Cost Parity In 2025; Mercedes Peels Off the FTX Logos

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 9:43


- Elon Musk Faces $56 Billion Lawsuit - EVs To Reach Cost Parity In 2025 - Mercedes Peels Off the FTX Logos  - France Mandates PV Panels at Parking Lots - More Specs on Hyundai's New Flagship  - Should U.S. Mandate Tesla Charging Tech? - Audi Opens Charging Salon in China - VW To Use Developing Nations for ICE Production - Wuling KFC and Cadillac Ragnarok

Out of Spec Podcast
The End Of CCS?! Tesla Opening Up North American Charging Standard For All To Use

Out of Spec Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 22:50


@Kyle Conner and @Out of Spec Dave sit down to talk Tesla's new announcement about NACS and what it could mean for CCS / the EV community as a wholeFind us on all of these places:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/outofspecpodcastApple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0tKIQfK...Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/473...For further inquiries please email info@outofspecstudios.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Clean Energy Show
Highway to Climate Hell; Autonomous Driving Delayed

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:46


As COP 27 kicks off in Egypt, The UN chief says we're not doing enough to prevent a climate catastrophe. On the bright side, France is mandating all parking lots have solar panels over them resulting in the power of 10 nuclear reactors. An analyst says Tesla may never achieve full self-driving. South Dakota produced more energy from wind than any other source. Why a switch in power in the United States Congress won't kill Biden's Inflation Reduction / Climate act. Brian's PTC cabin heater in his Tesla Model 3 had to be replaced and that meant driving in a parka for two and a half hours to the closes service center. Clip from the Energy Vs Climate podcast with guest Katherine Hamilton. Netflix has a documentary on Nissan head and current criminal Carlos Ghosn called 'Fugitive: The Curious Case of Carlos Ghosn." He was accused of stealing millions from Nissan and escaping in a storage chest on a plane. The eight billionth human being is about to be born. We disguss the Energi Media YouTube channel where Markham Hislop talked to an analyst from Guidehouse Insights about what's taking level 4 autonomy so long. Porsche has made 100,000 EVs. Tesla (TSLA) is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota, and they are starting to notice back in Japan. Pakistan's utility knows going green means consumers pay less for their electricity bill. Electrek editor Fred Lambert on Elon Musk's feedback loop of constant praise. The "hydrogen-is-not-all-that" podcast suggested by one of our listeners can be found here. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! What should we do for Patreon perks coming in 2023? Let us know your ideas! Transcript  Hello and welcome to Episode 138 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, several companies are throwing to the towel and full selfdriving, but please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. The state of South Dakota and now produces more electricity from wind than any other source. Must be the hot air coming from Mount Rushmore, am I right? No. UN Chief Antonio Gutierrez says we are on the highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. Again, please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. In France, the government has ordered that all parking lots must be covered by solar panels, all because President Emmanuel Macron can't get the top back up on his convertible Renault. All that and so much more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. And also this week, Brian, why a switch in power in the United States Congress, which is voting as we speak, as we record this won't kill Biden's inflation reduction act, but a change in government in Canada actually would be problem for us north of the border because well, I'll get to that later. And we also have a bit of an update live from Cop 27, sort of. And what's new with you? How was your trip to Saskatoon? Because last week you're heading north two and a half hours in the snowy Canadian winter to get your Tesla fixes. That's the closest Tesla service center to you. Yeah, that's right. So the heater has not been working right and didn't seem to be working quite right last winter, but kind of not enough to generate an error message. But now I had an error message, so they seemed to know what to do to fix it. So drove up Saskatoon, where the closest service center is, and yes, they replaced the whole heater. That's what they did. Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. It's under warranty. Everything's fine, isn't it? Everything's fine. When does the warranty end? Let me ask you, because it has, as we pointed out a couple of weeks ago, two and a half years, a quarter decade, getting close to the point where this is going to start killing you in the wallet. I don't recall when it ends, but I think it might say specs of warrant. It says in the app somewhere. Yes, here in the app. The Tesla app, basic vehicle, limited warranty, expires in March 2024 or 80,000, battery 2028 or 160 and the drive unit 2028 or 160,000 km as well. So, yeah, a couple more years to go on the basic warranty. Okay, I see. This could be a different discussion in the future. OK, what was it? Was it the PTC heater, the resistive heater? Yeah. Or you don't have a heat pump, so that's what it was. No heat pump. So the resistive heater. Yeah, for some reason they were sure about that. They were pretty sure by the time I got there. Because they have all the data from the car, like everything, the car is digitized and they can see all the data from my car. So as I dropped it off, they said, yeah, it's probably the whole heater needs to be replaced. And they were prepared to do that. And at the same time, too, there's been a recall for the trunk lid harness or something. I think it's to do with the cables, the wire harness to the camera in the back. So they did that at the same time. And it took about like 4 hours for them to do it. Wasn't too bad. Is that right? You had an appointment at 08:00 a.m. And they went right at it and started working on it. Yes. Call me around 1130. And they had the part, which is good again, I assume because they had all the data, they could order the parts ahead of time that they would need. That's nice. Yeah. And they gave me a loaner car, which I drove around Saskatchewan for a while. And yes, I got back before there was another blizzard. What was that? A couple of days later, our second blizzard of the year. Which is not technically a blizzard environment. Canada doesn't call it a blizzard. Do not call it a blizzard. But boy, was it a blizzard. It was crazy. Another nasty, nasty one. And I think we were the epicenter this time. Last time it was Moose Jaw. Yes, really nasty. Tons of snow. Yes. Crazy out there. How was your trip back? Was it okay? And the heater was all hot. How was it there, though? It was below zero, so I put on my parka. So you didn't have heat? There was a little bit of heat, not enough. And the heated seat was still working, but with the parka on, it was fine. Here's what I'm thinking, and that is the newer cars have a heat pump. Yeah, that's right. Newer cars have a heat pump instead of a resistive heater. So they don't have both then? I don't think so, no. You'd think that they might need one as a backup. But maybe the car generates enough heat that it holds. It's taking heat from the motor, it's taking heat from the from the batteries or something. There's a loop of different things that heat up here. But we do know there has been problems with some of the heat pumps as well in extreme cold. Is it in the heat pump itself or something related to the heat pump? Anyway, that's interesting because you didn't get a price on what that would be. Didn't show the invoice of what that repair would cost. No, they didn't. Just said zero. I'd be interested. I guess you could look it up online. What somebody else did we'll talk more about this sort of thing in future months. So anything else? You went up? You managed, your feet didn't get cold? Yes. No. It was a little bit chilly, but it wasn't too bad. Was it the most unpleasant trip you've had because you work cold? Yeah, I guess so. Yeah. I've got a really warm parka, so it felt almost normal. With that on, the heat can radiate up from the heated seat and fill the market. There you go. And then the other thing that's going on with me is they started shooting a TV show across the street from me here in the neighborhood. Really? You know, that's happened before, hasn't it? What is it about across the street? Because there used to be somebody of relevant who lived there who was connected to the film industry. Yes. They're gone. Not anymore. And it's their house that's being rented for this shoot. That's a weird coincidence, though. Yeah. And our good friend Jay is working on the shoot, so I've run into him out there on the street. Wow. I bet he doesn't know we're talking about him. No, probably not. I assume he doesn't listen to the podcast. No, he wouldn't. He's an old man. I don't think he knows what a podcast oh, he's an angry old man, Brian. Angry, angry old man who is actually six months younger than me. So he's working in winter and there's a TV show shooting across the street from you. I think Jay would prefer to be shooting in a sound stage where there's a lot more room for everybody and it's a lot more comfortable because, of course, it's a blizzard, remember? Why couldn't it be a James Cameron green screen affair? That's what you want to work on. But yeah, no, there's a lot of traffic on the street, lots of cars parked on our streets. But it's fine. Back in the day when I was a kid, I did a couple shows outside. It's horrible. Even in the fall when it's warmer than this, to spend 14 hours outside is just not good. I mean, they're shooting really inside the house, but there's so many crew people that they got to have to spill out into the cars and into the yard and everything. Is there somebody blocking traffic? No, no one closing off the traffic so far. Okay, that'd be annoying. You're coming home, you got to pee. Some little film student has a stop sign and says, no, you can't. So it's really weird. Happened to be on Sunday. I was biting my own business watching TV. We were snowed in. It was a blizzard, as you say, right. I couldn't do anything. So my son's home from college, and he took a shower. And I got to thinking, what is that cable cam on football games called? What is the brand name for that? Because I started thinking about that, and so I googled it, and it's called a Sky Cam. And then that took me to the Wikipedia page of the sky camp. And then I found out that the Sky Cam company was bought by this company, then bought by that company, and then it was bought by the person my son hates most of the world, which is Stan Crockey, the owner of the Arsenal Football Club in the Denver Broncos, and a bunch of other things. He's a bad man, according to people who support the team. And then I was gravitated towards a section that said incidents, because of course, that's sexy. I'm going to go there. There were three incidents, Brian. One in, like, 1981, when they first invented, and by the way, it was invented by the same person who invented the steadicam. Yeah. So that person, I'm assuming, is rich now. Yeah. So this is a camera that's on a giant cable that runs across the stage, two cables. So it's a couple of cables so it can fly over the players during a football game with a camera, I believe it's like a big X of cable, so it can go in three dimensions, back and forth. And just above the helms of it, you see them, you may not notice them. I don't think anybody who's paying attention notices them. Anyway, there was one incident at a small college football game back in the 80s when it was first came out. There was an incident in like, 25 years ago, and the third incident was an hour before I read it. An hour before I read it. It was a game that we didn't have. Here was the New York Jets game, and apparently the game was delayed by an hour because the Sky Cam fell from the I just thought that was weird. You're reading three incidents in history and going, this was an hour ago. The third one was an hour ago. And somebody had updated the Wikipedia. And of course they did, Brian, because Wikipedia, it's all about updating quickly. When we die, our family won't know before Wikipedia knows. Like, it will be updated instantly. Well, you know, there's no entry about me on Wikipedia, so if anyone out there well, there will be by then to write one. Me, too. I keep begging people to write one for years. I keep writing it myself, and they rejected, even though I have many awards if you're not allowed to accolades. And yeah, last night my partner had a grocery store order far away, and we went to the east end of town to pick up groceries because she ordered it in advance before the blizzard without checking the weather. It was a herring affair. And we decided to use her coupons for Carl's Jr. Which she never go to, but we thought that would be exotic someplace. We have a bit, let's go there and try this coupon out. And we got there and ordered it all went smoothly. And we got to the drive through window and there was this car load of teenagers in front of us who had been stuck there for an hour. And no one at the drivethrough told us anything. But the car in front of us was stuck right at the window for an hour. So we had the card that my partner uses and many, many years ago we went to the grocery store chain Superstore and they had clearance, these pieces of rectangular plastic that are grippy that you put under your wheel. They're like a little tread of plastic that's really pointy. Yeah. So it's something you keep in the trunk and if you get stuck in the snow, you put them under your wheels. Never used them. Cost about $0.50, like they were discounted from like twelve bucks to fifty cents. Never used them. But she had them in the car, put one under the front wheel, cut them out of there in a second. Wow. And they threw $20 at me, which I refused, of course, but they were so thankful to get out, they ever would. And of course it's embarrassing because you're blocking a fat guy from getting his burger behind you and that's no good. So, yeah, we got them out instantly, which was funny as hell. Good deed of the week. Sure. Now let's get on to some discussions with past stories because I wanted to talk about the Energy Vis Climate podcast. Okay? This is my name's. Sake ed. Woodynham calls himself I call myself Whittingham. He calls himself Woodynham. He's from Alberta. It's 90% chance for cousins. Okay, I haven't worked it out yet, but two people, there's like six Whittingham in Canada and apparently two of them fell into clean energy somehow. But whose podcast is more popular, that's what I want to know. Well, he's a big deal. He's been in the news for working for governments as a consultant. So he would have a lot of like this is not the same kind of podcast that people necessarily listen to because it's in the weeds, it's in policy. There's a lot of policy for people who work in the industry. That's a huge news. Well, I do listen to it. And they had Kathryn Hamilton on, who used to host the Clean Energy or the Energy Gang podcast. Now she's gone off to other things and I think she worked for the US government for a while. She's from the States, of course, and she's a clean energy expert and got decades of clean tech and policy in DC. And she was talking about the US midterms. And I was worried, I've said before on the show that I'm worried about what's going to happen because it's probably going to change. Power is going to change in one way or another in Washington, whether it's now or later, it always changes. How safe is the clean? The big biden thing is not going to be reversed because they're evil, they reverse things. They don't believe climate change at all. They're a hoax. So I just thought she had a really interesting answer that I'll play for you now. So I don't think that shift will have a direct impact yet on the climate goals. It will certainly prevent anything additional from happening. And the US. Congress holds the purse strings for the federal government. So just on appropriating funds to keep the government going, that will have an impact. But the pieces that are in IRA are pretty strong. I mean, they are tax credit, unless they were to completely rewrite the tax code. And I'll give you a little secret. When you give somebody something, don't ever try to take it away. So you're going to have all of these people taking advantage of credits. And in fact, manufacturers are already moving into states that are heavily Republican states and the last thing they want is those tax credits to go away. In fact, during the Trump administration, they never put on the table rolling back solar and wind tax credits. They just didn't because they knew that was a losing proposition for them. Yeah, I didn't realize that even during Trump they didn't roll back very much, did they, as far as climate goes, because business people were investing and that's the thing. Now in Canada, it's a different story. What they call it, and they refer to it as a runway. In the states, solar and wind have a ten year runway that it's guaranteed that if you invest, you can keep investing and it will still work out. You're not wasting your investment. You need to give assurances and security to people to make these investments because that's what the clean energy transition is. It's largely investing, but in Canada we don't have that. So our government is a minority parliamentarian. Government that may switch to 2025 will probably I mean, the government don't last forever around here either. And that government hardly wants to get rid of carbon taxes and doesn't seem to legitimately believe in climate change either. They're not that far off in the Republicans. But yeah, apparently the Canadian government is working on making that so that it's a guaranteed thing because investors are already threatening. They might be grandstanding, but they're threatening the one is going to the states because that's where the guarantee is, I don't know. And there's even definitely companies worried about doing business in places like Alberta because of the sort of backwards looking energy policy that they have there. If you're a giant business, giant international business, you're going to think twice setting up a business in a place that is denying climate change. And we were talking about Carlos Gon last week, the former chairman of Nissan who oversaw the implementation of the Nissan Leaf, the first mass produced electric car, which I happen to own a ten year old version of that. And there's actually a Netflix documentary that just came out a week ago as we were talking about that. Oh, fantastic. Well, I don't know that it is fantastic. I'm not reviewing it. I'm not endorsing it. It's called fugitive. The Curious Case of Carloscone. And I watched a bit of a lot of talking heads. It's interesting because it's kind of like a heist movie, right? Because he's accused of stealing millions from the car company he led, he was arrested in Japan and smuggled out of the country by two Americans in a storage chest, who, coincidentally, were also just convicted this week. As soon as I brought it up, things started happening. Brian wow. Okay. Well, I think I'll check that out. It was an interesting story just because of that one detail that he had to escape the country in a storage chest. Yeah. Oh. We have some breaking news. The 8th billionth human being is about to be born in the world. We go now to Antonio Gutiris, the head of the United Nations. The 8th billionth member of our human family is born. How will we answer when baby 8 billion is old enough to ask, what did you do for our world and for our planet when you had the chance? After President Trump announced that America would withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Accord, elon Musk immediately announced he would quit presidential business councils. We are in the fight of our lives and we are losing. Greenhouse gas emissions keep growing, global temperatures keep rising, and our planet is fast approaching tipping points that will make climate chaos irreversible. Twitter owner Elon Musk has told his followers on the platform to vote for a Republican congress. Tuesday, Musk tweeted, quote to independentminded voters, shared power curbs the worst excesses of both parties. Global warming, which a lot of people think is a hoax. The Earth will end only when God declares it's time to be over. We are on a highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. This is a clean energy show with Brian Thompson and James Whittingham. Okay, so a quick start here from South Dakota. Now, we often talk about North Dakota here on the show because we're just above North Dakota here. In many ways. In many ways, I love North Dakota. Home of the Fargo Film Festival. Home of the Fargo Theater. Anyway, South Dakota, which is just below North Dakota, it is now getting most of its electricity from wind they previously had. Hydroelectric was the biggest source, but now 52% is coming from wind turbines in the province there. So congratulations to South Dakota. And what I say to that initially is, why not us? Brian why not us? I wonder what led that to happen. Like, what was it? Private investment? Because we have a utility owned, government owned utility here. Was it the private sector that saw cheap electricity that drove the investment in? That what sparked that? Because South Dakota is not in the day and age of accusing everything green as being on one side of the political spectrum and therefore the enemy the other, then I'm surprised that a state like South Dakota was able to do something like that. Yeah, in South Dakota and North Dakota, both tend to be conservative leaning states. It is slightly surprising, but as we know, it's a great idea. So we have very similar wind profile here in our province and a little bit of wind power, but it really needs to be cranked up. You know, it's interesting politically when I was in Fargo with you, that I was asking, because that was just when Trump was becoming a thing and I was trying to get a Trump sign to bring over, was asking around for one. They were all lefty apologizing for their country. But it just goes to show that even in very right wing states, you have pockets of people who are, you know, not everybody is going to be one way or the other. There's always pockets, even in the most extreme leaning states. Yeah, fargo is a college town. They've got, like, I think, three universities in Fargo or Fargo morehead. And of course, people involved in the film festival, I guess, tend to be people in the arts, more left leaning, but as a whole, pretty conservative places. And my son always points out that Wyoming has Casper, which is also a small college town, because we've been through Wyoming a few times and I've been shaken by some of the images I've seen there. And there's lots of bad things to look at and signs and messages. But, yeah, Casper, which is a town we did go to, it was like a Fargo of Wyoming. It was kind of like a cool little college town with a nice Taco Bell, I may add. Nice. And, you know, I wanted to go there for the eclipse. The total eclipse of the sun that was the closest to us was Casper, Wyoming. Oh, interesting. I think we had just done a six week vacation in the mountains with our camper, and I couldn't convince my partner to do it. I regret that ever since, because it would have been a one day trip to see something remarkable. No. And I thought about driving to Calgary or Winnipeg to see Kate Beaton, author of the Duck's graphic novel, which I was plugging on the show. But these blizzards prevented these blizzards are bad. You never know this time of year whether we live in western Canada, where you're going to get bad weather, and certainly any mountain pass, even the Sierra Nevada mountains, are getting killed with a whole whack of snow. I've got a story I wanted to talk about. I guess a few companies, at least a couple in the last week or so, that have dropped plans, like, Ford has announced that it has dropped plans for a level three driver assistance, which would lead them to robotaxis. And they're going to focus on level two just for the consumer rather than as a business. So that's been a big shift. Mercedes is kind of doing the same. They say robotaxis are no longer a goal. We thought that in 2016 or 17, and that's kind of when the neural net sort of became a thing and they thought, well, everything is going to be solved quickly, but now they're backing off of that and they thought they could solve the robotaxi problem quite quickly. And so did certain CEOs who now social media magnets, but committing to both a ride hailing solution and a passenger driven assistant solution was expensive. So they thought they just concentrated on the one that make people because people are demanding it now. They're demanding basically the different versions of autopilot for different cars just to drive itself on the highway. How was your autopilot, by the way, in wintertime? How is it doing on actual highways? Yeah, generally really good. It can kind of sense generally through the snow. Okay, well, self driving taxis that operate all day, every day and all kinds of weather have been a dream for many for decades, including one of the Google people who started their autonomous program, Waymo. Yes. So now he's programming trucks to operate within the confines of industrial sites. Only one of these guys. And he says the foreseeable future, that's as much as the complexity as any driverless vehicle will be able to handle, in his opinion. He says, forget about the profits, the combined revenue of all the robotax the robotruck companies, it's not a lot right now. It's probably more like zero. So our friend of the show, Mark Hislamp, who is one province over from us or two provinces over, but from where we live, he's got a YouTube show called Energy Media, and he also has a podcast from time to time, and he has a guest on from Guidehouse Insights. He's an automotive engineer and EV analyst. His name is Dulce Meade and he's somebody that I go to for EV information and sort of market knowledge like that. And boy, he's got some cold water to throw on the robotaxi thing. I got some clips from him. This is him talking about that it's going to be a while before someone solves this to be at the point where you can really start to scale it up dramatically and get to a level of number of vehicles on the road where you can start to build a really viable business out of it. It's probably closer to eight to ten years, closer towards the end of this decade than where we are today. And again, this is Marks YouTube show energy Media. I'll have a link to it in the show notes, so we can borrow from him without guilt. And also he's talking about how AI sort of plateaued. What I was just talking about, the Neuron net development in early 2010s was something that people thought would move fast but apparently he sees a big plateau happening and slowing down. We had that big advancement in the middle part of the last decade, and that suddenly moved things forward very quickly. But then it plateaued and it's been climbing very slowly ever since it hit that plateau. And so that's why it's hard to predict when we'll get to that stage where these systems are at least consistently as good as or better than humans. Now, there's been a Department of justice investigation into Musk over full selfdriving claims. According to Reuters, prosecutors in Washington, San Francisco are examining whether Tesla misled customers. I hear when you look at sort of on stage discussions from people in this space, they're really bad mouthed Tesla. Now, you could take that with a grain of salt and say it's envy, or I don't believe in their approach, but Tesla is always proving people wrong. Anyway, this is his opinion, his contrary opinion on the Tesla approach, and he doesn't think much of it. There are some fundamental flaws in the Tesla approach relying on cameras only, and particularly because of the way they've configured the cameras, where you don't have any stereoscopic imaging, so you can do parallax imaging to get some accurate distance measurement. Tesla is relying entirely on AI inference to try to measure distance to objects, which is an inherently flawed approach. The system that they have devised is not really capable of robust automated driving, and probably never will be. Between the name and what Elon Musk has consistently said for the last six years, since October of 2016, when they launched autopilot version two. And he started his presentation with starting today, all vehicles rolling out of the Tesla factory have all the hardware they need to get to level five. Autonomy. Which was a lie then and it's a lie today. He's a pinch angry, I think, which is up to the sort of a toad that I hear of these things. But yeah, well, we'll see. But Tesla's future is highly reliant on that's one big aspect of it. It's not just selling cars. Yeah, well, I suspect that they probably wouldn't do the same thing now. So that's back in 2016, and Tesla was not in a profitable position back then, so they started selling full selfdriving, I think partly just as a way to get revenue into the company, a future promise of a future feature. Since then, they've become very profitable and very stable. So if they were starting this program now, I don't think they would be selling this feature for the future at ten, $20,000. But, yeah, I suspect back then they just wanted the cash flow. And another problem that I've seen come up is people like you who have the full self driving beta but aren't using it. So apparently that's a bit of an issue because it's kind of annoying. Right? It turns off and you think, Well, I'll just drive normally for now. Yeah, I've. Got better things to do. Sure. Even as you're retirement. But this has become an issue because they're getting less data and they need more data, which is maybe one of the reasons why they're trying to roll it out to even people with bad driving scores. Yeah, but could they possibly even crunch all the data that they're getting? Almost on the inside observer, I have a friend who owns a Tesla, but you I'm amazed at how the promises keep coming that it's later this year, end of the year, next year, and year after year it's always there. But watching the progress of Auto full self driving beta, it does seem to be a slow crawl. Something could happen where everything comes together. I don't know, everything about it to ComEd and maybe they'll solve something that puts everything together and suddenly it makes a giant leap forward. But right now and we'll see. We'll see. Because we're six months away from testing your car again on the same route, and we'll see how it does. And we had a rainy day last year, so it wasn't perfect, but yeah. Anyway, France is doing something quite unusual, even for France. Yeah. So there is new legislation that was approved this week that requires all parking lots in France with spaces for at least 80 vehicles. This is both existing and new parking lots be covered by solar panels. So this is great. You think that has an 80 vehicle parking lot? What would that be? A strip mall? A strip mall would have that. Yeah, I guess so. We have quite a few kind of small parking lots in our city. I think that wouldn't qualify. Or even a big hotel. Brian would have 80 spots, wouldn't it? I mean, if you have 80 rooms, you'd have 80 spots. Yeah, it just makes sense. Like, this is schools, maybe. Yeah, schools. This is space that it's just there. And if we put solar panels on it, it will keep the rain off the cars and produce electricity. It's a nice incentive. So you have to do this. Yeah, this is the law. So according to the government, the potential of the measure could reach up to eleven gigawatts, or the equivalent of the power of ten nuclear reactors at midday on a Sunday in the summer. So that's interesting. That's a lot of power just from parking lots. No, and we've had stories in the past about covering canals. Like in California, I might as well cover the canals. It's just all this space that we have that could have a double use. And parking lots is one of them. You know, though, I wonder what the business model is for this, what the payback is, because I don't know what France's tariff system is, or if they have any money for just putting out the panels or the feed in of the electricity to the grid, how they pay and what the payback period is. But let's say that it's reasonable. You would have customers that would be pretty happy to be parking under a structure, an outdoor structure that shaded you, perhaps shield you from precipitation. And you could sit and wait for your spousal unit to shop. And you wouldn't cook in the sun. He would be shaded and comfortable. No, we have a real problem here. We have very hot sun in the summertime, so always better to get a parking spot with shade. I thought this was interesting. So it's the bigger parking lots that are going to have to do this first. Car parks with 400 spaces or more have about three years to comply, and then the smaller parking lots get about five years to complete. So this isn't just new construction. This is existing construction. Existing parking lots. That is a big deal. My goodness. Yeah. No, and if you think of some of the like, think of I don't know if they have Walmart in France, but you think of Walmart, the Walmart, the giant parking lots that we have for places like Walmart or shopping malls. Man, that would be a lot of solar panels. Yeah. I've been thinking about what we'll use, because the grocery store that we went to last night of the blizzard actually has a bunch of stuff built on the outside of what used to be a parking lot. There's actually an office building there with yeah, they've been restaurants used to be a gigantic parking lot, but they keep adding businesses to it. And that confused me because it's hard to find now it's easy to find a store at the end of a giant parking lot that's 10 miles away. There are walmarts in China. Do they? Yeah, they do. Wow. There's no French walmart in France, so I just Google that. Of course, there's a French Disneyland, but there's no French Walmart. It's basically the same, right? Yeah. Disney. When we do go to a robot taxi future, we're going to need less parking spaces. Right. So the way I envision it is, say I've got a shopping mall close to me that's got lots of parking spaces. And I think that what they could say is, well, you know, part of this shopping mall can be designated for Robotaxis because, you know, robotaxis will go mostly at the peak of when people get on and off work and on and off school. It's just like rush hour. But for the rest of the day, they'll have to sit somewhere. They'll need somewhere to have they'll need to go somewhere where they can charge and where they can somewhere nearby, different areas of town. I don't know where that's going to be. Yeah. Plus, I imagine it will be like the movie Cars, and they'll want to hang around together at a party, have social issues and things like that. Of course it will be like that. But at the same time, I'm wondering if we'll need less. Well, I mean, that's what Tony Seba says. We'll need less parking lots. And there's a significant amount of Los Angeles that has nothing but parking lots. And that's also a heat gainer for it increases the urban island, t island of cities as parking lots. Yeah. Well, hopefully we can densify all of our cities and just start building more building and housing on all these parking lots we're not going to. Right? And that'll be an exciting future. Plus like a driven right to the door. And hopefully some sort of device will lift me up and put me on an automated cart that will drive me around. Because walking is just too much for sure in the future, I think. So Porsche has made 100,000 cars. What does it mean? 100,000 of Brian? This is the Porsche Taycan electric car. They've now produced 1000 of this car. So it's been a pretty big success for Porsche. These are in demand. They are selling more of these than the 911, which is kind of the marquee car for Porsche. What I didn't know is it's not a huge company. This is really a niche player. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles last year. So they're a small car company niche and of course, very expensive. Tesla deliver like, one and a half million. Yeah, and they're just getting going. This is with two new factories that just went up. This is just with one. Yeah. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles total, and 41,000 of them were the all electric Ticans. So they have plans to electrify more of their lineup. But like a lot of things, it's been a little bit delayed. The Macan was the next one that they were going to electrify, and so far they haven't managed to do that. They've been surprised by that, haven't they? I mean, I think they've been overwhelmed by demand, but they've also stepped up to meet that demand, which is great, too. Yeah, but it really does make sense if you're someone who's interested in a Porsche, you're interested in performance driving. And as we know, Electric makes for fantastic performance driving. And if you're wealthy, then you want to impress your wealthy green friends. Well, there's nothing more luxurious, though, than driving quiet, so I love that. I don't know. Would that impress your green friends to a Porsche can? Some of them seems a little excessive. I've impressed myself. Maybe that's really what counts in the car world. Yeah. I don't know. It's a lot of money and you could probably solve the world hunger in a small nation somewhere for the purchase of that car. But Electric says that Tesla is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota. And Toyota is basically one of the world's largest automakers, and they're starting to apparently notice. Back in Japan, according to Electric, for example, tesla reported $3.3 billion in net profit last quarter, compared to Toyota earning just roughly 3 billion. So. Yeah, Tesla. This is despite Toyota delivering eight times more cars than Tesla in the same time period, and Tesla beat them on profits. That's kind of wild. It is. So they made the same money, same profits. But wow, I mean, the demand for Tesla is high. There's this whole inflation thing going on. There's the supply problem, the chip shortages. So they have eat up their prices a little bit. Thousand here, thousand there, as a lot of people are. What do you think it is? It's like a third of profit per car or something like that. It's really high. It's higher than most people. Yeah, I don't know. But the traditional automakers make more money on things like service and part of stuff. So this milestone of Tesla beating Toyota and earnings during a quarter is especially impressive when you consider that just a decade ago, toyota owned 3% of Tesla with just a $50 million investment. Think of how they get rid of that. So now Tesla generates $50 million in free cash flow almost every day, which is why the CEO can do cookie things and do whatever they want. So it's now time for the Tweet of the Week. This is where I highlight a tweet that I like. There's a couple of good ones. Maybe I'll do two. This week from Jenny Chase, solar analyst with Bloomberg NEF New Energy Finance. It's a casual line from those hippies at Pakistan's National Electric Power Regulatory Authority. And this is basically what they said in their report. They said the existing average cost of supply electricity to consumers is high, way too high. And one way to reduce this high cost is to procure cheap electricity from indigenous resources like wind and solar. Now, if we heard that from our utility in Canada, that would be remarkable. But this is coming from Pakistan, a very conservative place, who is not known, especially in governmental terms, to talk like this. But they see the value of this. No utility talks this way, actually. But Pakistan is and because she lives in the solar space, she knows nobody else is saying that but Pakistan Solar, or pardon me, the electricity utility is saying that one way that we're going to lower prices is by buying wind and solar. So good for them. Yeah. As we've said before, the fuel costs for wind and solar are zero. And now a secondary Tweet of the week. Just because I wanted to do too, and I hate deciding, brian, it's a lot of work to decide. Why should I have to decide? Fred lambert lambert. Lambert. Lambert. Fred Lambert, editor in chief at Electric. He says his personal account he says when I talk about Elon's feedback loop being hijacked by superfans, this is what I mean. And he has a story from the Mercury News in San Jose, California. And before I go on, I just want to say that Fred owns like, five teslas has been the biggest fan of Tesla and he's a journalist, but he's been reporting on Tesla forever. He is an enthusiast. He's cheering them on in every way. But Elon Musk blocked him once a long time ago because he had something mildly critical to say and Elon couldn't just take that. So what Fred thinks is that Elon like Michael Jackson and other people, they have this feedback loop of everybody who's constantly praising them. And this is a story from the San Jose newspaper that says that this one guy who's like a dad was tweeting him like 19 times a day or something. And Elon was often responding to him because it's such praise. And the softspoken superfan dad praised him for being fit, ripped and healthy and asked, hey Elon Musk, what's your secret? It sounds like almost a joke, like a comedian might do that because it's the opposite of true. He's not fit, he's not ripped, he's not healthy. You look at him and you see a guy who doesn't he's like an It guy who never gets an hour of sleep. It looks like he hasn't had sleep in years. And certainly not the healthy lifestyle and certainly no son. And the world's richest man's response was how do I keep fit and healthy? Fasting and diabetic drug that promotes weight loss. So good for you. When you're rich, you get to have the diagnosis. Drugs that promote weight loss and fasting is not good. Sumo wrestlers fast. They don't eat until 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. Yeah. Wow. Not to 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. That is a CES fast fact for you. That's because they store more weight if they don't eat all day. They train their body to fast. See, in human history, back when we were in caves and such, ten years ago, if you didn't eat, your body would think it was a famine and it would store extra weight. It would just change. So like fat people like me would survive in a zombie apocalypse. So my nutritionist tells me because we would need 20% less calories because we're that more efficient. Anyway, so we get a little bit of feedback here from the Twitter says clean energy fraud. You guys are talking about the future of hydrogen. So check out this podcast and what was it? It says this guy's super anti hydrogen and has some great points. And this is from Nelson. The podcast was our friend Mark Mslop at Energy Talk Show. He has a podcast as well. Occasionally puts out a guest, Paul Martin, a chemical engineer with a 30 year history of working with hydrogen and a member of the Hydrogen Science Coalition. And I'll put a link to that in the show notes if you want to hear some smack talk on hydrogen. And coming up in the show is the lightning round zoom through the rest of the week's headlines in a fast fashion. We like to hear from you. It's really what we live on. Brian doesn't get up in the morning without the hope of somebody contacting us. Clean energy show@gmail.com. We're on TikTok and Instagram and everywhere else. Clean energy, pond. We're on mastodon. At Mastodon Energy. We're on YouTube. Clean energy show. Speak Pipe. You can leave us an online voicemail message. Speak pipe.com. Cleanenergyshow. That sound means it is time for the lightning round, where we'll end the show this way. A fast paced look of the week in clean energy and climate news. Canada is putting the break on China's $4 billion lithium acquisition free. China is here buying up all the lithium they can, and Canada has finally said no. So Chinese companies have been the biggest financers of overseas lithium projects globally in recent years, including purchases of Canadian listed assets. And that's a new development, Brian. Yeah. So this is new legislation that limits the foreign ownership of some of these critical minerals that we're going to need for the electric revolution. Call it the biden approach, saying no more China. The Charging Interface Initiative, a global industry association focused on the electrification of transportation, has launched its new megawatt charging system. MCs is going to be called. We have CCS, the non Tesla standard for charging connectors. This is going to be MCs. So memorize that term. Brian. MCs is the new megawatt charging system standard for North America. So this will be some specific kind of plug and protocol for how to charge at even higher speeds. Megawatt speeds for trucks, basically for trucks, big trucks. Not necessarily all semitransport trucks, but medium trucks as well. This is interesting. The 2023 Kia EV six base trim has been dropped. And the starting price that means has dropped to an unfortunate $50,000 US. That means brian, I can't afford it. Yes, that's too bad. I mean, we sometimes do get different trim levels here in Canada, so we'll see. But 50,000 is a lot. Another CS fast fact, the golden toad is the first species to go extinct to climate change. Put that in your toaster and smoke it. It's too warm for them. And I guess the towed has had enough. Panasonic has broken ground on their EV battery factory in Kansas. This is what we refer to early red states getting a lot of this EV manufacturing, green tech manufacturing and jobs. And they'll be making 2070 cylindrical cells. A Viking bus orders 31 Mercedes Benz E Cetera buses as long distance runners in the country known as Denmark. Hello, Denmark. The reason I bring that up is because we've mentioned this before. When will long distance city to city buses electrify? Well, the answer is, I guess it's starting. That's great. The market share of zero mission light duty vehicle registrations in Canada hit 9.4% in the third quarter of this year. And that's a new record. It's up from any previous record which shows that the EV adoption is accelerating in Canada. Yeah, we're definitely past some sort of a tipping point, which is often said to be around 5% of the market. So, yeah. Canada at 9.4% EVs. That's fantastic. How many Ford Mustang electrics do you see around? I see them almost every day now. Maybe it's the same neighborhood, I don't know, but I see them everywhere. The North End, one of 600 EV sold in Europe will be made by Chinese makers of EVs by 2025. Fitch solution says, according to the China EV Post, So that's interesting. Something we've been following since the early days of this podcast is when will Chinese EV makers start to make gains in Western markets? Yeah, and I guess you're at first, because it's always Europe first, isn't it? Because they need their EVs over there. It's physically closer and they have tougher regulations to kind of phase out combustion. A slight majority of California voters favor the recently announced ban on new sales of gasoline powered vehicles by 2035. Only 52% and 43% disapprove, but hopefully they'll come around when prices do. I don't think anyone's going to complain about the range and prices there and charging infrastructure. Another fast fact air conditioners and heating elements consume 50% of electricity in America. Did you know that? That's a lot. No, that's a lot. Analysis as seen by the BBC shows that the production and transport of LNG causes up to ten times the carbon emissions compared to pipeline gas. So build more pipeline. I'm kidding. This around here, liquid natural gas as opposed to actual gas that goes through pipes. The greater than 8% electricity from a solar club in Europe for 2021. Here's the countries that have 8% or more just from solar germany, Spain, Greece, Italy, Netherlands not bad. And there's a whole bunch of 5%. A whole whack at 5%. Good for you. Greece, by the way. I always think of Greece as a leader in clean energy, but these things, they sneak up on you. Amazon is meeting holiday demand this year with a fleet of over 1000 Livian electric vehicle delivery vans. So we are talking about those for a long time now. And I guess there's a thousand on the roads for Christmas this year. Yeah, that's not bad. But 10,000 next year and 50,000 a year after that or something. Yeah, they've definitely ordered more than that. Amazon is a big investor in Rivian and they're desperately trying to scale up their production of these vans and their pickup trucks. So hopefully things speed up nicely. And finally this week, Tony Sieve says in a post that speaking of Amazon, amazon created a vast information technology infrastructure, but the use of just five weeks of the year, the holiday shopping season, which is Christmas in November and December where we live, they overbuilt capacity for the rest of the year. And he says, well, let's call that super data center. And thus the Amazon AWS cloud was born, which you see advertised on TV. It's now a trillion dollar business because they overbuilt something. So the reason he mentions that, Brian, is why? Because this is what's going to happen to solar, wind and batteries. Because solar is intermittent. Wind is intermittent. We need to overbuild it. But because these technologies are so cheap and getting cheaper, we can easily overbuild it. So Amazon, of course, a large amount of shopping happens in November and December, the Christmas shopping season here in Canada and the US. So they had to really beef up their online system to handle all these transactions in December. And what did they end up with? Amazon Web Services, which is now a trillion dollar business, apparently. Yes, it's a lot of money just for overbuilding something, because that's what's going to happen with the energy markets, because we're going to have extra solar, extra wind around. That is our show for this week. You know what? Next year we're going to have a Patreon. If you have any ideas for the patreon, let us know what kind of perks you might be interested in. And by God, write us right now. Cleanenergytow@gmail.com or clean energy pond everywhere on social media. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe to our show on your podcast app to get new shows, new episodes delivered every week. We'll see you next time. See you next week!