Podcasts about Pearl Harbor

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Harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii

  • 2,151PODCASTS
  • 3,233EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 13, 2022LATEST
Pearl Harbor

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Best podcasts about Pearl Harbor

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Latest podcast episodes about Pearl Harbor

Of Course You Realize THIS Means Podcast - A Looney Tunes Discussion
This Means War Propaganda! With Mike Manalo and Stephanie Sandmeier

Of Course You Realize THIS Means Podcast - A Looney Tunes Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:18


The long running Looney Tunes Franchise ran into some problematic shorts during war time and we're here to break it all down in this podcast with pop culture writer Mike Manolo and producer Stephanie Sandmeier!   The Looney Tunes created shorts from 1941-1944 that focused on selling a specific image to the US public in movie theaters, that would persuade men and women to support the war for the Allies. America was pushed into the war with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and that's when the Japanese soldier became an image subjugated to awful steroetypes that not only effected kids' perceptions of asians abroad, but here in the States as well. This was a terrible time of insensitive depictions of asians and pacific islanders. Films Discussed: Yellowface: Asian Whitewashing and Racism in Hollywood - Directed by Clara and Julia Kuperberg. The film is now available on HboMax. Shorts Discussed: Daffy Duck and the Dinosaur - (1939) Chuck Jones Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips - (1944) Friz Freleng Tokio Jokio - (1943) Norman McCabe Looney Tunes News: Casper Caveman and Fido from Daffy Duck and the Dinosaur have entered the World of Mayhem in all their time traveling glory! These shorts are all in the public domain and it's important that we don't forget what was created before so that we may learn from this mistakes.   Follow The Guests: Stephanie Sandmiere: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stephaniesandmeier/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NomTalkNetwork Twitter: https://twitter.com/RisuKim   Mike Manalo: Instagram: @Tidybowlboy182 Twitter: https://twitter.com/tidybowlboy182 Work: https://thenerdsofcolor.org/author/mmanalo182/   Follow the Podcast: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thismeanspodcast @ThisMeansPod. Rate, Review, Subscribe & Like on iTunes and follow on all socials because That's NOT All Folks!

What It Takes
Best of - Daniel Inouye and Norman Mineta: In Defense of Liberty

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 61:21


Norman Mineta spent three years in a internment  camp for Japanese-Americans when he was a child. But this shameful period in American history did not deter him from becoming a celebrated civil servant, one who broke racial barriers to become a 10-term U.S. Congressman from California and the first Asian-American member of the Cabinet.  In honor of Norm Mineta, who died last week at the age of 90,  and in celebration of Asian-American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we invite you to take a second listen to our episode from 2020. It also features  the story of long-serving U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, a veteran of the most decorated regiment in US history, the 442nd. The 442nd was a segregated Japanese-American unit that fought in Europe after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  These two stories stand in stark contrast, and reflect some of the worst - and best - impulses in America. And they are a testament to the triumph of the human spirit.

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent
Kansas City Profiles Presented by Easton Roofing-Decades of Airwaves and Airways-Johnny Rowlands

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:14


Fascinated by weather and aviation from the youngest age, Johnny turned childhood passions into a lifetime of entertaining and informing Kansas Citians as a disc jockey and traffic reporter on the ground and in the air.

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls
There's a band of Huns re-enacting Top Gun (Replay!)

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:41


We feel the need...the need for beach volleyball! We're going back to the ‘80s again for a closer look at Top Gun, the fighter jet blockbuster that launched Tom Cruise to stardom. How does this movie compare with the real Top Gun in the Navy? What other pop culture has used this same pop culture ref? Why does all beach volleyball attire seem so uncomfortable? And why doesn't Paris feel the need for beach volleyball? We do our best to answer all those questions and get the scoop on the long-awaited sequel, Top Gun: Maverick.Other pop culture we ref: The Outsiders, Footloose, Marathon Man, 30 Rock, Pirates of the Caribbean, Hot Shots!, Planes, Independence Day, Pearl Harbor, Hamilton, Transformers, A Few Good Men, Law & Order, Harry Potter, Airplane!, Serena WilliamsCheck us out on Instagram!Subscribe to our email list!So it's a show? TwitterSo it's a show? Tumblr

Macroaggressions
FLASHBACK FRIDAY | #19: Project for a New American Century (PNAC)

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 68:43


What if a group of psychopathic politicians wrote a paper calling for a “catastrophic and catalyzing event - like a new Pearl Harbor” in order to launch multi-theater wars in the Middle East, and then got exactly that only 12 months later, would that be alarming to you? It should be, and that is just the start. It used to be that those that talked about 9/11 being an inside job were ridiculed and mocked, but the more you dig into the Project for a New American Century, the more it appears that one is looking at a suspect list of those responsible for the planning of the actual attack. Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold True Hemp Science: https://truehempscience.com/ Haelan: https://haelan951.com/pages/macro Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: HYPOCRAZY: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/macroaggressions_podcast/ Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com

Sit Back with Uncle Yak
SBWUY Episode 107 The Battle of Los Angeles

Sit Back with Uncle Yak

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 62:55


This episode I look into the strangest military conflict in U.S. history simply known as the Battle of Los Angeles. After the attack on Pear Harbor by Japan, the U.S. was on high alert pending another attack by the Empire of Japan. Two months after Pearl Harbor, multiple unidentified aircraft were seen on radar appraching the Los Angeles area. A firefight ensued, and after the smoke cleared there was no sign of any enemy attack. What were the military fighting against if it wasnt Japanese aircraft? Declassified documents point towards an invasion by aircraft not of this world! Join me as I try to make sense of all this and come to a logical explanation.

Warfare
Hitler's American Gamble

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 22:53


The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7 1941 remains etched in public memory as the turning point of WW2. But in fact, it was Hitler's declaration of war on the United States – four days later on December 11, 1941 – that changed everything.In this episode, Professor of International Relations at Cambridge University Brendan Simms tells Dan the story of those five unsettling days. Churchill did not sleep “the sleep of the saved and thankful” after the attack, as he later claimed. Japan's leaders were unsure whether Hitler would honour a private commitment to declare war. Roosevelt knew that many Americans didn't want their country to entangle itself in a conflict with the Third Reich as well as Japan. In the end, it was Hitler's decision that ended the uncertainty, bringing the US into the European war and transforming world history. You can read more in 'Hitler's American Gamble' by Brendan Simms and Charlie Laderman.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store./g See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conversations That Matter
Putin's Long Game Guest: Vice-Admiral US Navy, (Ret) John Stufflebeem

Conversations That Matter

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 23:06


Ep 398 - Putin's Long Game Guest: Vice-Admiral US Navy, (Ret) John Stufflebeem By Stuart McNish   The war in the Ukraine has revealed that Russia is ruthless in its tactics, that it is willing to kill noncombatants.  And it has also demonstrated that despite a coalescing of NATO nations, Ukraine is on its own. As retired U.S. Navy Vice-Admiral John Stufflebeem points out. Putin calculated the world's political and economic powers have fractured. He noted they did nothing after he annexed Crimea and devastated Aleppo.   So he feels, who's going to stop me? Who would dare? And that is at the core of his thuggish mindset.    Putin has been unabashed in his openness about taking Ukraine under the direct influence of Moscow. He's worked to align Iran, China, North Korea and he's also deepening his relationship with Indian Prime Minister Modi. Stufflebeem says, “Putin has a much larger strategy than the Ukraine and the countries of the former Soviet bloc.”   Stufflebeem believes,  “Putin wants to break up the global power grip of the U.S. and believes a multi-front assault in Europe, the Pacific and the Middle East will overwhelm U.S. and allied resources.”    According to Stufflebeem, “Putin has shown he is willing to twitch his finger on nuclear weapons, and he's preparing to or has already launched cyber attacks that will grow in magnitude.” He asks, “Will those cyber attacks be a Pearl Harbor moment that launches a larger global conflict?”    Stuart McNish invited retired Vice-Admiral of the U.S. Navy, John Stufflebeem, to join him for a conversation that matters about the implications of allowing Russia to go unopposed in Ukraine.  Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

The Daily Gardener
May 3, 2022 Garden Meditation Day, Thomas Tusser, Martha Crone, Japanese Internment Gardens, Frida Kahlo, Understanding Orchids by William Cullina, and May Sarton

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 14:51


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Happy National Garden Meditation Day! 1580 Thomas Tusser (English poet and farmer) died. In 1573, Thomas wrote his Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, where he advised: In January, the housewife should be busy planting peas and beans and setting young rose roots.  During March and April, she will work 'from morning to night, sowing and setting her garden or plot,' to produce the crops of parsnip, beans, and melons which will 'winnest the heart of a laboring man for her later in the year.  Her strawberry plants will be obtained from the best roots which she has gathered from the woods, and these are to be set in a plot in the garden.  Berries from these plants will be harvested later the same year, perhaps a useful back-up if the parsnips have failed to win the man of her dreams.   1941 During this week, Martha Crone, American botanist and horticulturist, wrote some entries in her Minneapolis diary that reflect the wild swings in temperatures that can be so frustrating to gardeners in the shoulder seasons. At the start of May: [The weather is] still very warm (81 hi 59 lo) and flowers coming out everywhere, everything at least 2 weeks in advance, like midsummer, many insects and flies out. Violets - never so beautiful - as well as Trillium and other flowers. On the 3rd of May: Bitter cold all day [49-41] stove going continuously... but no mosquitoes. On the 8th: Heat unbearable [88-60]  On the 19th: Hottest so far...   1942 On this day, Charles Kikuchi wrote in his Japanese Tanforan Internment camp journal: These industrious Japanese!  They just don't seem to know how to take it easy. They've worked so hard all their lives that they just can't stand idleness or waste . Two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were mandated to relocate to one of the ten relocation camps in the “exclusion zone” of Oregon, California, western Washington, and southern Arizona by order of the president.  Ken Helphand's fantastic 2006 book, Defiant Gardens: Making Gardens in Wartime, tells the story of the gardens that were created in the camps. The gardens were part of the effort to make the camps more bearable. In addition to gardens, there were orchards, parks, baseball diamonds, playgrounds, and farms. In Defiant Gardens, Ken wrote, Entry gardens were part of the Japanese tradition of dooryard gardens, linking household to community, and functioning as entry and marker, displaying the craft and skill of the resident and embellishing both the barracks and the community space....Many persons inscribed their names in cement at the doorstep.  Barracks gardens displayed great variety, using gathered cacti and rocks, transplanted plants, and plants propagated in the camp nursery.  While people waited daily for the communally served meals, they enjoyed the elaborate displays of great artistry and effort that characterized the mess-hall gardens. Created with rocks and water as well as plants, these gardens were most closely identified with the Japanese American garden tradition.  All these gardens brought beauty to the camps and reinforced the internees' sense of cultural identity…   1946 On this day, Frida Kahlo (books about this person) gave a painting called Weeping Coconuts to her friends Lina and Arcady Boitler as a wedding gift. Frida used two weeping coconuts to represent her pain and deteriorating health in the painting.  Frida was mixing prescription painkillers and alcohol by this point in her life. The coconuts were one of fifty-five self-portraits. Her best-known self-portrait is ‘Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird.' Kahlo said, I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best.   Four years later, Frida's pain became unmanageable. In 1953, her right foot - and later right leg - were amputated.  Frida died shortly after her 47th birthday in the summer of 1954. Before she died, she wrote in her journal: I hope the exit is joyful — and I hope never to return — Frida.   Coconuts are an ancient plant that initially hailed from the South Pacific, and because of their buoyancy, coconuts can travel the world on the ocean's waves. Plant Explorers found the coconut growingng throughout the Pacific, the Indian Ocean regions, and Africa. Like mangoes, cashews, and cherries, the coconut is actually a drupe and not a nut. The drupe is an item that has a fleshy outer around a pit. Coconuts are anti-viral, fungal, bacterial, and anti-parasite. There are more than twenty billion coconuts produced each year. The coconut palm is actually the national tree of The Maldives. Before the dominance of soybean oil in the 1960s, Coconut oil was the world's leading vegetable oil. May 8th is National Coconut Creme Pie Day. Falling coconuts kill 150 people every year – 10 times the number of people killed by sharks.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Understanding Orchids by William Cullina This book came out in 2004, and the subtitle is An Uncomplicated Guide to Growing the World's Most Exotic Plants. Well, I myself have become an orchid lover and an orchid fan. They're my favorite plant to send to a family member for a birthday or an anniversary because they last so long, and now because orchids cost as much as the bouquet. I often opt to send an orchid instead of a bouquet of fresh-cut flowers. As a little bonus for me, some of my family members will actually bring me the orchid after it's bloomed. And then I get the honor of taking care of repotting it and getting it healthy and ready to go again so that it will bloom again - hopefully on their next birthday or anniversary. And so that's what I love to do - take care of orchids after they've bloomed. But you know, orchids are a little bit of a mystery to many, many gardeners. So if you haven't gone down the orchid path yet, but you're on the edge, and you want to become more skilled in the area of orchids will, then William Cullina's book is the perfect guide for you. William knows what it's like to be in your shoes. He writes at the end of his introduction, I still get that spine-tingling toe-tickling feeling of, wow that hooked me at the beginning. And if you're just starting out with orchids, you are in for quite an adventure. Learning to grow orchids and understand their idiosyncrasies is a true journey. The sheer number of orchid species estimates range between 25 and 40,000, including hybrids means that there will always be something new to learn something new to explore.   And then he writes this incredible fact. You could start acquiring an orchid a day when you were 20 years old and still not have grown them all when you turned 80 and there is no other family of plants that offers such incredible diversity.   Before I close out this review, I'll just say that the first part of William's book covers all the basics of orchids. Next, William gives an excellent overview of an area that people often struggle with:  how to care for orchids. How do they like to be watered? What should you do about fertilization? How should you pot them? If you're going to Mount them? How does that happen? Then William talks about what to do if you have a pest or disease issue with your orchid. Then, if you are getting into next-level orchid growing, William will be your guy to introduce you to reproduction. He'll tell you how to hand-pollinate and propagate and hybridize orchids. And there will be no mystery to any of this. William is very clear through every page of his book. Finally, William wraps things up with a look at over a hundred of the most popular orchids to get you on your way and to get you thinking about what you want on your orchid wishlist. This book is 272 pages of orchids by an orchid lover - for orchid lovers - or for people thinking about becoming orchid lovers. You can get a copy of Understanding Orchids by William Cullina and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $20.   Botanic Spark 1912 Birth of May Sarton (books by this author), Belgian-American writer and poet.  In Nelson, New Hampshire, May's tiny home was her happy place. She had a garden that she loved and cared for many houseplants. She once wrote these relatable garden witticisms: I am not a greedy person except about flowers and plants, and then I become fanatically greedy.   In her seventies, May reflected, A garden is always a series of losses set against a few triumphs, like life itself.   Still, May could not help striving for the glory of success when it came to her garden. Living a mostly simple life, May's garden was the one place she dreamed big. What a relief it was to me when I read that Vita Sackville-West kept a pile of metal labels in a shack at Sissinghurst as proof of all the experiments that had failed!   Finally, some of May's thoughts on gardening are prayerlike: Help us to be ever faithful gardeners of the spirit, who know that without darkness nothing comes to birth, and without light nothing flowers. and Everything that slows us down and forces patience, everything that sets us back into the slow circles of nature, is a help.  Gardening is an instrument of grace.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

MacArthur Memorial Podcast
Such Splendid Prisons: Diplomatic Detainment in America during WWII

MacArthur Memorial Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 30:28


After the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent declarations of war against Japan, Germany and Italy, the Roosevelt Administration had to figure out what to do with hundreds of Axis diplomats in the United States. Repatriation was the goal but working that out between the warring powers would take time. While this was worked out, the detainees, their families, and staffs would have to be held somewhere secure. They were ultimately sent to remote luxury hotels in the United States, in the hope that this would encourage reciprocity in the treatment of American diplomats detained abroad. To further explore this fascinating episode in diplomatic/WWII history, the MacArthur Memorial Podcast interviewed Harvey Solomon, author of Such Splendid Prisons: Diplomatic Detainment in America during World War II. 

Short History Of...
Pearl Harbor, Part 3 of 3

Short History Of...

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 59:26


As the smoke clears after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the blame game begins. President Roosevelt knows that military and intelligence heads must roll, but questions remain about who should be held to account. So what were the longer term consequences of the attack? How did life change for Japanese-Americans, and what fates awaited the Japanese servicemen on their return? And as the memory of Pearl Harbor fades, what lessons were learned?  This is the last episode in this special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O'Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melba, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Behind The Shield
Cliff Walker - Episode 608

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 104:03


Cliff Walker is a Navy Veteran, retired Federal firefighter and the founder of USS Battle Series. We discuss lifeguarding, his journey into the fire service, firefighter fitness, the combat challenge, Pearl Harbor and so much more.

MPR News Update
Deal struck for unemployment insurance and pandemic worker pay at Capitol

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 5:32


Deal struck for unemployment insurance and pandemic worker pay at Capitol, and a Minnesota sailor lost on the U.S.S. Oklahoma during the attack on Pearl Harbor has at long last been identified and will be buried in June in his home town. This is an evening update from MPR News, hosted by Tim Nelson.

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast
HOST JACKIE TANTILLO - Proud And Passionate About Her Nursing Profession With Guest Chef Dennis Littley

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 33:18


Eunice was a confident hard working woman, that loved God, her country and her family. She was proud of her accomplishments and rightfully so.  Chef Dennis is a successful classically trained chef, now retired and a very popular travel and food blogger. He prefers to cook for others rather than cook a meal for himself. His grandmother taught him a lot about food and cooking and she passed down "the joy of cooking." And now Dennis is sharing the 'joy of it' with all of his readers. You can find out more at https://www.askchefdennis.com/ Dennis's maternal grandparents were originally from Mexico and both were highly educated. His grandmother was a  teacher and his grandfather  a minister.  Eunice and her nine siblings were also all educated starting at a young age. All the children were born and raised in Texas and bilingual from an early age. Littley says of his mother's family "they were an all American family-all my uncles served in the Armed Forces and an uncle was at Pearl Harbor."  Because Eunice was always studying and/or working, she never really had too much time to cook.  She often worked nights so she could be home to see  Dennis before and after school. Chef Dennis says that his mom, who he adored dearly, "influenced him and his love for cooking in an offhanded way." "Her lack of cooking skills and my love of food and her encouragement really helped push me in the right direction.  She was the reason I really started cooking and went int this field." says Littley.  Dennis loved to cook for his mom and says  "I was never pressured into being a doctor or lawyer, my mother just wanted me to be happy."  But he took care of his mom as well. At a young age, he would collect recyclable bottles and cans, ride his bike to the supermarket and buy food with the money he made to cook for his mom because she didn't have time to cook for herself.  Dennis agrees that he gave his parents a hard time, a bit rambunctious, but he was named after the  'Dennis the Menace' tv character, after all.My guest, got his first full time job at 12 years old and became manager of a burger place, flipping burgers at 13 in Atlantic City, New Jersey right on the ocean.When asked what meal he'd cook for his mom if she were here today, Dennis reminisces about the rice, pepper, onion, bacon and cheddar cheese casserole his mom and he loved to eat till the dish was empty and everyone was happy.  Later on in life, once Eunice had retired from nursing, she was able to embrace her time in the kitchen with her friends and found the ‘joy of cooking'.

Short History Of...
Pearl Harbor, Part 2 of 3

Short History Of...

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 54:06


Chaos reigns in the immediate aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. While the true extent of the damage to personnel and fleet is still uncertain, those on the ground work tirelessly to help the wounded. But what is the response of those in charge? What are the stories of servicemen who face incredible odds to save their vessels, retaliate, or flee? And who were the people who risked their lives to save others?  This is episode 2 of a special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O'Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melba, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Veterans Chronicles
Harry Isabel, Jr., U.S. Army, WWII

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 35:54


Harry Isabel, Jr. was 16 years old when when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, By mid-1944, he was trained and on a ship to fight in the Pacific theater of World War II. He did not know it at the time, but Isabel and his unit, the "Fighting 69th," were on their way to the Battle of Saipan.In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles," Isabel walks us through the many challenges of the amphibious landing on Saipan and what he saw when he finally got to the beach. He also describes an early close encounter with a Japanese soldier and how he responded. And Isabel explains what he saw and did following a vicious mortar attack against his position - actions that would result in him receiving the Bronze Star.

Contextual Deviants
76 - Porco Rosso

Contextual Deviants

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 68:21


Fire up your seaplanes! Contextual Deviants is talking about an anime for the first time, and we've chosen the strange Studio Ghibli classic Porco Rosso! A movie that preaches the always-relevant point: It's better to be a pig than a fascist. Highlights Include: Lie Daddy, John McPlane, he flies a red plane, Sit and Spin, reinventing the squeal, David's favorite movie Pearl Harbor, and much more!

Evolving w/ Cory Kastle
EWCK 267 w/ Andrew Bryniarski "How Are People Winning?"

Evolving w/ Cory Kastle

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 100:56


Look at the impressive resume of my pal and Philly kid like me Andrew Bryniarski. Iconic roles like Leatherface (Only guy to play the role twice), Chip Shreck from Batman Returns, Butterfinger from Hudson Hawk, Joe the Boxer from Pearl Harbor, Zangief from Street Fighter, Very Important roles in 3 of the most popular Football movies of all time!

Short History Of...
Pearl Harbor, Part 1 of 3

Short History Of...

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 49:56


On December 7th 1941, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, changed the course of the Second World War. Forcing the United States into a conflict they were reluctant to enter, the attack killed over 2,500 people. But was it an act of aggression, or desperation? How did the Japanese pull off such an audacious stealth attack? And how were the Americans so unprepared? This is episode 1 of a special 3-part Short History of Pearl Harbor. Written by Jo Furniss. With thanks to Professor Phillips O'Brien, author of How The War Was Won; Dr Takuma Melba, author of Pearl Harbor; and Steve Twomey, author of Countdown to Pearl Harbor.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crude Conversations
Chatter Marks EP 037 A life of activism with Cal Williams

Crude Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 91:54


Cal Williams is an activist and community archivist. He sees his involvement in activism as more of a pull than a draw. He didn't plan it, it just happened. Seven days after he was born, Pearl Harbor was bombed and most of the men in his life went to war. So, the influences he had at those early ages came from the women in his life. He saw how they did what they could to help the war effort. He's 80 now, and his list of achievements are extensive. They include the president of the NAACP of Alaska, the recipient of the St. Francis of Assisi Award and working with HistoryMakers, an organization that collects and preserves the well-known and unsung stories of African Americans. Considering his current work with HistoryMakers and the Anchorage Museum, Cal says that he chases the dead — he reads obituaries and attends funerals in order to collect the stories that would otherwise be lost forever.  Photo by Jovell Rennie Chatter Marks is a podcast of the Anchorage Museum, and is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music and Google Podcasts. Just search "Chatter Marks."

Chatter Marks
EP 037 A life of activism with Cal Williams

Chatter Marks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 91:54


Cal Williams is an activist and community archivist. He sees his involvement in activism as more of a pull than a draw. He didn't plan it, it just happened. Seven days after he was born, Pearl Harbor was bombed and most of the men in his life went to war. So, the influences he had at those early ages came from the women in his life. He saw how they did what they could to help the war effort. He's 80 now, and his list of achievements are extensive. They include the president of the NAACP of Alaska, the recipient of the St. Francis of Assisi Award and working with HistoryMakers, an organization that collects and preserves the well-known and unsung stories of African Americans. Considering his current work with HistoryMakers and the Anchorage Museum, Cal says that he chases the dead — he reads obituaries and attends funerals in order to collect the stories that would otherwise be lost forever.  Photo by Jovell Rennie

Air Force Radio News
Air Force Radio News 22 April 2022

Air Force Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022


Today's Story: Final Turn for the Doolittle Raiders

Black Op Radio
#1091 – Jim DiEugenio, Jeremy Kuzmarov Tom Gram

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 136:17


  At Kennedys and King Article: Walker, Oswald, and the Dog That Didn't Bark by Benjamin Cole Video: Paul Bleau's presentation at Dealey Plaza UK Paul Bleau's upcoming articles about the Jim Garrison papers Researchers like Peter Dale Scott, Anthony Summers, Paul Hoch dumped on Garrison after he lost the Shaw trial Book: Let Justice Be Done by Bill Davy: Paperback, Kindle CNN's four-part documentary on Lyndon Johnson: LBJ: Triumph and Tragedy This series is based on the book The Triumph & Tragedy of Lyndon Johnson by Joseph A. Califano Jr. This series whitewashes what really happened under the Johnson administration Articles: CNN's Apologia for LBJ by Jim DiEugenio: Part 1, Part 2 LBJ's Operation Rolling Thunder in Indochina Nixon dropped more bomb tonnage than LBJ in Indochina Kennedy's policy in Vietnam FREE Borrowable Ebook: Lessons in Disaster by Gordon Goldstein NSAM 288 The Gulf of Tonkin resolution was written 3 months before the incident occured !! OPLAN 34A and the DESOTO (DeHaven Special Operations off TsingtaO) patrols Kennedy never sent American combat troops to Vietnam “I always thought it was foolish for you to make any statements about withdrawing. I thought it was bad psychologically. But you and the president thought otherwise, and I just sat silent.” - LBJ to Mcnamara Stream/buy JFK: Destiny Betrayed: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu LBJ's April 1964 meeting with the executive staff of The Washington Post at the White House Katharine Graham of The Washington Post was present at the meeting Johnson asked them for support of his upcoming war against the North Vietnam FREE Borrowable Ebook: In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam by Robert S. McNamara Article: Marilyn, Tony Summers, and his Paper Tiger by Donald McGovern Article: Cleaning up after My Debate with Buzzanco by Jim DiEugenio Jim DiEugenio debates Robert Buzzanco (Aaron Good's American Exception podcast) Buzzanco had Noam Chomsky on his podcast to thrash Oliver Stone and Kennedy Video: JFK Pushed Med4all 57 Years Ago! (The Jimmy Dore Show) Len Osanic's interview of Igor Lopatonok (episode 1088) asked to be taken down Listen to this amazing 2-hour episode featuring Doug Horne about the Pearl Harbor attack Books: Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War by Horne: Vol.1, Vol.2 Doug Horne's new book The McCollum Memorandum Black Op Radio had to switch to a new hosting service So please consider making a donation to Black Op Radio Donate via Paypal to osanic@prouty.org Getting transcript for Malcolm Blunt discussing Fletcher Prouty Video Here Get autographed copies Jim DiEugenio's two books for just $25 !! Jim's address: P.O. Box 4354, Burbank, CA 91503 Listener questions answered Video: Why Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Believes the CIA Was Behind the JFK and RFK Assassinations Videos: Megyn Kelly interviews Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.: Part 1, Part 2 George H.W. Bush and the CIA William Colby was fired as he was too forthcoming with the Church Committee George H.W. Bush, Gerald Ford and a few CIA guys who ended up shutting down the Church Committee Article: The CIA and the Media by Carl Bernstein "I forgot what I was supposed to say" - Marina Oswald Jim is currently working on the book of the film JFK: Revisited Part B: Jeremy Kuzmarov; beginning at 1:04:15 Jeremy Kuzmarov is Managing Editor of CovertAction Magazine He's also the author of four books on US foreign policy Book: Obama's Unending Wars by Jeremy Kuzmarov: Paperback, Kindle Book: The Russians are Coming, Again by Jeremy Kuzmarov: Paperback, Kindle Oklahoma City Bombing: Was Timothy McVeigh a Patsy in a Sinister Black Flag Operation? by Jeremy Kuzmarov "One day you will find out your government was behind this" - Timothy McVeigh Part C: Tom Gram; beginning at 1:15:10 How Tom Gram got interested in the JFK case

The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, April 21, 2022 - USA targeting of Moskva ship is Russia's "Pearl Harbor" ... RETALIATION is next

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 66:56


0:00 Intro 8:10 Netflix crash 11:00 McDonald's 14:00 Russia vs Ukraine 31:30 US Infrastructure 44:00 Tech News 49:50 China Crisis 55:20 Georgia Song For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Damn Lucky: John 'Lucky' Luckadoo and Kevin Maurer

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 83:33


On today's show, Jack is joined by #1 New York Times bestselling author Kevin Maurer and by John “Lucky” Luckadoo, the subject of Kevin's new book, Damn Lucky: One Man's Courage During the Bloodiest Military Campaign in Aviation History .  It's an incredible true story of a World War II hero.  Lucky joined the military in the weeks following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, and after flight training was assigned as a Second Lieutenant to the 100th Bomb Group stationed in England.  During a time when most bombing crews wouldn't survive more than a dozen missions, Lucky completed 25 in the B-17 Flying Fortress over France and Germany on bombing runs aimed at destroying the Nazi war machine. Sponsors: Navy Federal Credit Union: Today's episode is presented by Navy Federal Credit Union. Learn more about them at navyfederal.org Black Rifle Coffee Company: Today's episode is also brought to you by Black Rifle. Purchase at www.blackriflecoffee.com/dangerclose and use code: dangerclose20 at checkout for 20% off your purchase and your first coffee club order! SIG: This episode is sponsored by SIG Sauer. You can learn more about SIG here.     Featured Books: Today's featured gear segment is brought to you by by the online physical training program for backcountry athletes MTNTOUGH: MTNTOUGH is offering Danger Close listeners 20% off the all-new MTNTOUGH+ subscription with the code DANGERCLOSE when you sign up at mtntough.com Damn Lucky: One Man's Courage During the Bloodiest Military Campaign in Aviation History by Kevin Maurer and by John “Lucky” Luckadoo The Bomber Mafia by Malcolm Gladwell

Movies N Sh*t
Episode 50: Our Golden Anniversary Episode

Movies N Sh*t

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 173:07


For our first ever 50th episode, we've pulled out all the stops! This milestone installment of Movies N Shit begins with Patrick administering to Kelly the ultimate movie lovers quiz (6:33) - courtesy of Brett Goldstein, permission pending. Then Kelly covers the Movies We've Seen (1:31:39) since last time with the exception of a single Star Wars movie marathon that Patrick recently undertook and discusses. TV Talk (2:05:46) includes positive watch experiences like The OC and Friday Night Lights, as well as painful watch experiences like Picard and everything else in between. In Entertainment News (2:21:41) we pay tribute to the hilarious Gilbert Gottfried and the incomparable Bruce Willis before covering some fun new games for movie fans and teasing a potential future segment where Kelly tries to stump Patrick on movie release years. A Rocky II edition of What's That Movie Line? (2:35:49) leaves us delightfully confused and a Michael Bay edition of Guess That Rotten Tomato Score (2:39:29) definitely doesn't suck, Pearl Harbor or no Pearl Harbor. Finally, two Hidden Gems (2:49:05) are provided for your viewing pleasure before we bid you adieu til next time. As always, thanks so much for listening and happy movie watching.

Thecuriousmanspodcast
Kevin Maurer Interview Episode 28

Thecuriousmanspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 55:20


Matt Crawford speaks with author Kevin Maurer about his book, Damn Lucky. This is the kick in the teeth, hold on to the seat of your pants story of, Second Lieutenant John "Lucky" Luckadoo. The world was at was and Luckadoo wanted to serve, Pearl Harbor would be the final straw and the United States Air Force would be his branch. Trained as a pilot and assigned to the 100th Bomb Group, 25 missions were required, and you had a 1 and 10 chance of surviving that call to duty. Maurer puts us in the cockpit with "Lucky" and shares his story in a way only he could. You will shiver and your pulse will quicken as you read along and I hopw you do.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – April 18, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 152:47


John Hinckley Jr's world tour adds new dates, Eli Zaret stops by to crap on Miggy's milestones, mass shooting mania, current Drew Crime, the USFL kicks off, Gary Graff checks in and Alex Jones' InfoWars files for bankruptcy.Skeleton Crew: Marc is on vacation. Zooves called in for Trudi today.Eli Zaret joins the show today to discuss the Detroit Tigers injuries, canceling Jack Morris again, Miggy's milestones, Kyrie Irving's middle fingers, USFL's big debut, and give his weekly Winning Time recap.RIP Mike Bossy.Mass Shooting Mayhem: South Carolina . Pittsburgh. NYC. Sacramento. Hana St. Juliana's family is suing Oxford Schools.A music professor at Michigan is sentenced to 5 years for sex crimes. Not this one, another one.Other True Crime: Ed Buck gets 30 years. Lori Vallow has been deemed mentally fit to stand trial.Coachella was so stylish this year. The Revolve Festival has total Fyre Festival vibes.Vince Neil is canceling solo shows. He's supposed to be joining Motley Crue in June but he remains a big (really big) question mark.Alex Jones' InfoWars files for bankruptcy.John Hinckley Jr. has added another tour date!We 'Pearl Harbor' Gary Graff to get info on the Jack White concerts, speculate about Vince Neil and promote the Detroit Music Awards. Drew loses a Beatles-off to Jack White.Music: Travis Barker gets a new tattoo and does a photoshoot with Kourtney because Taylor Hawkins died. The Rory & Mal podcast believes Trey Songz is the new R. Kelly. Women are STILL coming after Marilyn Manson. Tekashi69 wants you to know that he's rich.Jaden Smith is SOOO DEEP.Not-a-Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are gallivanting around with cameras filming their every move.Netflix, Disney+ and HBO Max are losing money due to password sharing marketplaces.If Kychelle Del Rosario is providing for your health, make sure your political beliefs align with hers.Shawnee State University is really strict with pronouns.Rock and roll pastor, Carl Lentz, was totally fooling around with his babysitter and punches were thrown.Jim Bentley joins us tomorrow.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Pee Wee Trivia
Episode 89: April 11, 2022

Pee Wee Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 2:58


Episode 89 Round 1 1. How many noses does a slug have? 2. What is the largest country on Earth? 3. What is the name of getting three strikes in a row in bowling? 4. Which type of astronomical body in the Sun? 5. Where is Pearl Harbor located? Round 2 6. How many balls are used in pool? 7. Which is the first pokemon that Ash Ketchum catches? 8. Who is the author of the Captain Underpants franchise? 9. Fox McCloud is the titular character of which Nintendo franchise? 10. Which parts of the human body never stop growing? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peeweetrivia/support

Los Fanboys Podcast
Ezra Miller Flash Controversy And Sonic The Hedgehog 2 Review | Breaking Geek Radio: The Podcast

Los Fanboys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 90:33


#SonicTheHedgehog2 #StarTrek #Ambulance #Halo #EzraMiller #DC #BGRtP #LRMOnline #TheGenreVerse Three lads, Nick (@geekyNICKDOLL), Danny (@dannykbartlett), and Jonesy (@sirjonesiest) have ALL the reviews this week for you!  Star Trek: Picard, Halo, Ambulance,  AND Sonic The Hedgehog 2 Reviews! But first, the news! The Breaking Geek crew talk the Ezra Miller controversy and what it may mean for his future at DC. We've also got some trailers to talk about, those being Top Gun: Maverick and Russian Doll Season 2. Then we got Star Trek: Picard Season 3 casting news, as well as a review of this week's episode. Then Danny reviews Ambulance, Jonesy reviews Sonic The Hedgehog 2, and all three talk Halo. Nick is shocked to learn Jonesy and Danny like Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor. It's a fun episode, so if you've read this far, check it out! (00:00)- Intro (04:10)- Ezra Miller Controversy, The Flash, & Supes (17:05)- Trailers: Top Gun: Maverick & Russian Doll Season 2 (24:17)- Star Trek News & Picard Catch Up (40:35)- Ambulance Review (55:18) Sonic The Hedgehog 2 review (01:08:13)- Doctor Strange Ticket Sales & Halo Is... Meh (01:26:13)- Will Smith Oscar Ban & Close Visit our websites: www.lrmonline.com www.genreverse.com Follow us on twitter: twitter.com/LRM_Exclusive twitter.com/TheGenreVerse

It Is Written
The March of Death (Video)

It Is Written

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 28:29


Just hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Japan invaded the Philippines. In the midst of the death and destruction, tens of thousands of American and Filipino soldiers were forced to march on what became known as the Bataan Death March. Why does God allow such horrors? Satisfactory answers don't come easy. Join Pastor John Bradshaw on location in the Philippines for “The March of Death.”

It Is Written
The March of Death

It Is Written

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 28:30


Just hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Japan invaded the Philippines. In the midst of the death and destruction, tens of thousands of American and Filipino soldiers were forced to march on what became known as the Bataan Death March. Why does God allow such horrors? Satisfactory answers don't come easy. Join Pastor John Bradshaw on location in the Philippines for “The March of Death.”

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 363-Guest Host Lindsey Graham of History Daily Recounts the Attack on Pearl Harbor

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 49:59


The host of several well known podcasts, Lindsay Graham, of History Daily, American Scandal and American History Tellers, is allowing me to share with you, his coverage of the day that will live in Infamy. Here is the three episode arc from The History Daily Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Scottish Rite Journal Podcast
“The Other Side of Henry C Clausen. Pearl Harbor- Final Judgement”

Scottish Rite Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 10:50


From the March/April 2022 edition of The Scottish Rite Journal.Any accompanying photographs or citations for this article can be found in the corresponding print edition.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2810 - How Presidents Lie Us Into War w/ John Schuessler

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 72:42


Sam and Emma host John M. Schuessler, Associate Professor of Government and Public Service at Texas A & M University, to discuss his book Deceit On The Road To War: Presidents, Politics, and American Democracy, and how the blueprint to manufactured consent for US intervention developed over the last century. Professor Schuessler begins by situating his work coming out of graduate research on FDR and the leadup to WW2 in the early aughts, right as the debate around the Iraq war was peaking, and the inspiration he found in the parallels between how President Roosevelt and President Bush saw a window to get into war, and took it. Jumping back to 1941, Sam, Emma, and John look to FDR's perspective as the Second World War escalated, understanding that if the Nazis took control over the USSR or Europe our time at the top of the global stage would be over, while having to balance that with an anti-interventionist public that wanted no more than economic and military aid to the allies. They distill his plan into the sphere of the Atlantic, where FDR hoped to isolate any action, and the Pacific, where he wanted to avoid any military engagement. However, unable to find any excuses in the Atlantic to garner support for action against Germany, FDR's policy began to shift as he used an oil embargo to push Japan over the brink, expecting light retaliation and instead getting the Pearl Harbor attacks. Next, they walk through the state of the foreign policy elite at the time, who, much like the leaders of the Military-Industrial Complex today, were concerned with the downfall of the Liberal order above all, with much more invested in America's role as a global superpower than they have to lose in going to war. Jumping forwards, they contrast this with the tools George W. Bush had at his disposal, between a fully developed relationship between government, business, and the military, an incredibly homogenized media industry, and an ethos of “the end of history” in the air, all serving to bolster his choice to ride complete misinformation into decades of disaster and bloodshed in the Middle East. They wrap up by shifting to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as they unpack Biden's maneuvers to avoid joining the warfare compared with the complete lack of subtlety on Putin's end, as leak after leak reveals false flag plans and other clamors for justification, before they unpack the relationship between deceptions for war and deceptions for peace, and the similarities that intelligence disclosure plays among the two. Sam and Emma also touch on the updates to KBJ's nomination to the Supreme Court, the House's weed bill, and CNBC's unintelligible squawking about the Staten Island Amazon union win. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma take a call with Jeremy from Indiana on the IBEW strike in Chicago, Mel from TX-3 calls in with some juicy RINO drama, and Dick Durbin talks overnight specials in LA (not innuendo). Sen. Roy Blunt discusses why, despite KBJ meeting all standards, he won't vote to confirm her, Sen. Graham rallies against electing her to the high court, and Tulsi Gabbard says “keep the government out of our children's beds, that's where I belong!” Amir from Northern Virginia showers the crew with front-handed insults, Sam and Emma get some Space Force revelations, and Katie Porter calls in following Nerd Cheetah's whistleblowing on MR's dark money slush fund, plus, your calls and IMs!   Check out John's book here: https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9780801453595/deceit-on-the-road-to-war/#bookTabs=1   Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: Tushy: Hello Tushy cleans your butt with a precise stream of fresh water for just $79. It attaches to your existing toilet – requires NO electricity or additional plumbing – and cuts toilet paper use by 80% – so the Hello Tushy bidet pays for itself in a few months. Go to https://hellotushy.com/?utm_source=Majority+Report&utm_medium=Podcast&utm_campaign=Oxford to get 10% off today! Ritual: We deserve to know what we're putting in our bodies and why. Ritual's clean, vegan-friendly multivitamin is formulated with high-quality nutrients in bioavailable forms your body can actually use. Get key nutrients without the B.S. Ritual is offering my listeners ten percent off during your first three months. Visit https://ritual.com/?utm_source=arm&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=majority to start your Ritual today. ExpressVPN: We all take risks every day when we go online, whether we think about it or not. And using the internet without ExpressVPN? That's like driving without car insurance! ExpressVPN acts as online insurance. It creates a secure, encrypted tunnel between your device and the internet so hackers can't steal your personal data. It'd take a hacker with a supercomputer over a billion years to get past ExpressVPN's encryption. And ExpressVPN is simple to use on all your devices! Just fire up the app and click one button to get protected. Secure your online data TODAY by visiting https://www.expressvpn.com/majority That's https://www.expressvpn.com/majority and you can get an extra three months FREE. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Professional Contestants
ProCo 197: Pearl Harbor, Nebraska - My Kind of Town

Professional Contestants

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 64:42


There is no denying that small towns have a certain charm. The quaint environment they provide is something you just can't get in bigger cities. But know this, every single one also has something weird going on. It might be troll themed. It might have a hyperfixation on a sitcom from the 60s. It might name itself after American tragedies and host an oyster festival despite not being costal. Ok, we made that last one up, but you get the point. Zach brings sherry, Jared gets roasted by his hometown, and Adam truly misunderstands Alf. Talking Points Include: Frasier Vibes, Spin Off Combos, Spooky Re-Edits, Bug Pranks, Not Our Hometown, Mayberry Fest, Making a Weird Town, The Landlocked Oyster Festival, Wolf Flu, Cold Hard Cash

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1480 The Cyberwar Did Not Begin with Cyber Pearl Harbor

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 69:30


Air Date 4/2/2022 Today we take a look at the current iteration of the cynical culture wars being waged by conservative Republicans against LGBTQ kids for political gain. The current wave of anti-trans and anti-gay legislation sprouting across the country is not about protecting kids and is absolutely nothing new. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript Join our Discord community! (What's Discord?) BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows and Bonus Content) Check out Democracy Decoded where you get your podcasts! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Andy Greenberg - Longform - Air Date 12-11-19 Andy Greenberg is a senior writer for Wired. His new book is Sandworm. “I kind of knew I was never going to get access to Sandworm, which is the title of the book - so it was all about drawing a picture around this invisible monster.” Ch. 2: How America's gas got hacked - Today, Explained - Air Date 5-12-21 The largest-known ransomware attack on American energy infrastructure is driving up gas prices and creating shortages. Wired's Lily Hay Newman says Colonial Pipeline might be a turning point for cybersecurity. Ch. 3: Is Russia at War with the West? Part 1 - The Inquiry - Air Date 11-21-18 There are currently a number of serious allegations made in the West against Russia. They include the attempted murder of the former spy Sergei Skripal on British soil; interference in the 2016 US election; the hacking of the American electricity grid. Ch. 4: How prepared is the U.S. to fend off cyber warfare? Better at offense than defense, author says - PBS NewsHour - Air Date 8-6-18 Sanger joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the threats and realities, how the U.S. wages cyber warfare, and how prepared the U.S. is to stop attacks. Ch. 5: Is Russia at War with the West? Part 2 - The Inquiry - Air Date 11-21-18 Ch. 6: Russia Perfected Its Cyberwarfare In Ukraine — America Could Pay The Price - Think | NBC News - Air Date 11-23-19 Russia has been practicing cyberwar in a real-life test lab — Ukraine. Andy Greenberg, author of 'Sandworm', recounts how Russia went from repeatedly shutting down Ukraine's infrastructure to unleashing worms that caused billions of dollars in damage. Ch. 7: Is World War III Already Here? - Your Undivided Attention - Air Date 1-3-22 Warfare has changed so fundamentally, that we're currently in a war we don't even recognize. It's the war that Russia, China, and other hostile foreign actors are fighting against us — weaponizing social media to undermine our faith in each other MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 8: The Hackers Who Took Down the Colonial Pipeline - What Next: TBD | Tech, power, and the future - Air Date 5-21-21 Last week, a hacker group called DarkSide shut down the Colonial Pipeline, which supplies 45 percent of the fuel consumed on the East Coast. Gas prices skyrocketed, people started hoarding gas, and DarkSide walked away with over $4 million in Bitcoin. VOICEMAILS Ch. 9: Puberty blockers experimental? - Maria in Pennsylvania FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 10: Final comments on the deception and logical fallacies at the heart of critiques of gender affirming care MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com Listen Anywhere! BestOfTheLeft.com/Listen Listen Anywhere! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

Learn It from a Layman
The Basics of World War II - Part 3

Learn It from a Layman

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 68:08


We continue our WWII podcast series by discussing the events of 1943. What is the unconditional surrender doctrine? Who was Friedrich Paulus and why did Hitler promote him to field marshal? What is the Mareth Line and how did the Codebreakers affect the war in North Africa? What is heavy water? What are operations Freshman and Gunnerside and did they help avert nuclear war? How did the attack on Pearl Harbor help turn the tide on the war in the Atlantic? What is the Dambusters raid and was Rogue Squadron involved? What was the V2 rocket? What were the Hamburg air raids and did the Allied forces bomb civilians? How was the battleship USS Iowa that FDR was riding on fired on by another US destroyer? And how did that prove FDR is a boss?

Veterans Chronicles
Ralph Goldsticker, Jr., U.S. Army Air Corps, WWII

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 26:39


Ralph Goldsticker, Jr. was 20 years old when he joined the U.S. Army following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. After trying to become a pilot, Goldsticker became a bombardier aboard a B-17 bomber and deployed to to the European theater.In this edition, Goldsticker takes us from training to his first mission and from his assignments on D-Day to the end of the war. He also shares a remarkable story that took him to Russia and even the Middle East in the midst of the war.

The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week
010: Zurk by Richard O. Lewis - At Least One Vintage Sci-Fi Story Every Week

The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 45:30


A thousand colonists were headed for Mars but they didn't make it. They crash landed on this moon of Jupiter's. They were trying to contact the earth, trying to survive. Evil creatures from the land of darkness on the other side of the moon are coming for his daughter. Will he save her from a fate worse than death with his huge part-human war-machine? That's next on The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast. I'm your host, Scott Miller, sci-fi fanatic and audiobook narrator and I want to thank you for your support. Every story you hear, and many more, are available on our website, lostscifi.com. Lost Sci-Fi Books 1 through 40, that's 40 lost Sci-Fi short stories, more than 20 and a half hours, only available on our website and for only $14.97. But as a Lost Sci-Fi podcast listener you get it for a limited time for only $9.88. Go to lostscifi.com, enter promo code “podcast” to get this special price exclusively for Lost Sci-Fi listeners. The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast has been around for a little more than a month and we are blown away by the response from you and others around the world. We're already in the top 50 science fiction podcasts in Australia, Hong Kong, Indonesia and France and we're in the top 150 in The UK and The US. Thank you for making that happen. Today on the podcast our first story from the 1940s. More than eight decades ago Richard O. Lewis wrote Zurk. As is often the case we know very little about Lewis other than the fact that he wrote the story you'll hear today and 20 others from 1939 to 1967. If you bought the 132 page Winter 1941 edition of Planet Stories Magazine, released about a month before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, when it first came out you would have paid only 20 cents. You can buy it now on eBay for $150. Gentle Marene was next when the black space cruiser called for its youth-levy. If only Zurk would spark to life—Zurk, this huge, part-human war-machine of tubular steel muscles and blank, mechanical mind. From Planet Stories Magazine in November, 1941, Zurk by Richard O. Lewis Subscribe to The Lost Sci-Fi Podcast - Vintage Sci-Fi Stories Every Week on Soundwise

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System  

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 361-Interview w/ Edward Aldrich: The Partnership: George Marshall, Henry Stimson and the Extraordinary Collaboration That Won WWII

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 69:06


Edward Aldrich comes on the show to discuss his book that covers the highly effective teamwork of Secretary of War Henry Stimson and Army Chief of Staff George Marshall. Once they are both in position, they will have 17 months to ready the American Armed Forces before Pearl Harbor. Not that they know this. What they do know is war is coming, yet half of the country wants to stay out and FDR can't say much to publicly support to their efforts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Offbeat Oregon History podcast
‘Christmas Ship' needed Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer's help to navigate

Offbeat Oregon History podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 6:56


Rudolph's “nose so bright” would have been the only light showing on the Oregon Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack; unable to see its position, the ship piled onto the beach at full steam. (Clatsop Spit, Clatsop County; 1940s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1608a.christmas-shipwreck-mauna-ala.403.html)

Key Battles of American History
Tora! Tora! Tora!

Key Battles of American History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 93:10


In the late 1960s, a Japanese film production team joined forces with an American team in an effort to produce a balanced and accurate retelling of the December 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The result is the classic 1970 film Tora! Tora! Tora!, which after more than 50 years still remains the definitive Pearl Harbor film. Join James and Sean as they discuss the film's story, its historical accuracy, its quality, and its legacy.

Congressional Dish
CD249: A Few Good Laws

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 108:45


We have some new laws! In this episode, a brief overview of the government funding law that (finally) funds the government for 2022 and provides money and weapons to Ukraine, a new law that protects drinking water, a new law that slightly reduces the corruption of Puerto Rico's financial oversight board, and a new law that guarantees you rights that corporate contracts have been taking away. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Executive Producer Recommended Congressional Dish Episode CD076: Weapons for the World Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD248: Understanding the Enemy CD244: Keeping Ukraine CD229: Target Belarus CD170: Electrifying Puerto Rico CD147: Controlling Puerto Rico CD128: Crisis in Puerto Rico Recommended Congressional Dish YouTube Videos What is the World Trade System? Revolution of Dignity or Regime Change? Ukraine 2014 Explained. Earmarks Jamie Dupree on Twitter Jamie Dupree. Mar 10, 2022. “Russian oil ban heads to Senate.” Regular Order by Jamie Dupree. Continuing Resolution Mary Ellen McIntire. Mar 9, 2022. “House Democrats' retreat upended by spending bill delays.” Roll Call. Ballotpedia. Updated February 11, 2021. “Election results, 2020: Incumbent win rates by state.” Red Hill Water Contamination Sophia McCullough. Mar 7, 2022. “Pentagon to permanently shut down leaking Red Hill fuel tank facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Scott Kim. Mar 4, 2022. “Tap water declared safe for 3 more Pearl Harbor neighborhood zones.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Sophia McCullough. Mar 1, 2022. “Confused about the timeline for the Red Hill fuel storage facility and contaminated water? Read this.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Associated Press, HPR News Staff. Nov 22, 2021. “Navy says 14K gallons of fuel and water leaked from a 'drain line' near the Red Hill facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Scott Kim and Catherine Cruz. Oct 27, 2021. “Navy says operator error was the cause of a May fuel leak from the Red Hill storage facility.” Hawai'i Public Radio. Lead Pipes Karen Pinchin. Sep 10, 2019. “The EPA Says Flint's Water is Safe — Scientists Aren't So Sure.” Frontline. Brittany Greeson. “Lead Pipes Are Widespread and Used in Every State.” Natural Resources Defense Council. Puerto Rico Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. Feb 18, 2019. “Informative Motion Regarding Publication and Filing of Final Investigative Report – McKinsey & Company, Inc.” Case: 17-03283-LTS. Forced Arbitration Matt Stoller. Mar 7, 2022. “Monopolies Take a Fifth of Your Wages.” BIG. Laws H.R.2471 - Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2022 House Vote Senate Vote Law Outline DIVISION C: DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Title VII: General Provisions Sec. 8139: $300 million from the "Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide" account must be used for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative The money can be used for "salaries and stipends" of Ukraine's military in addition to equipment and support Sec. 8140: Prohibitions against Russia will not be lifted until "the armed forces of the Russian Federation have withdrawn from Crimea, other than armed forces present on military bases" agreed upon by the Russian and Ukrainian governments. Sec. 8141: "None of the funds made available by this Act may be used to provide arms, training or other assistance to the Azov Battalion. DIVISION K - DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS Title VII: General Provisions Sec. 7047: "None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be made available for the implementation of any action or policy that recognizes the sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea or other territory in Ukraine." This will end when the Secretary of State certifies that "the Government of Ukraine has reestablished sovereignty over Crimea and other territory in Ukraine under the control of Russian-backed separatists." DIVISION N: UKRAINE SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT Title I: Department of Agriculture $100 million for Food for Peace grants Title III: Department of Defense $195.5 million for US military personnel $213 million for Air Force procurement $5.5 billion for operations and maintenance $3.5 billion of this is for replacing weapons given to Ukraine and for "defense services" and "military eduction and training" provided to the Government of Ukraine. Title VI: Department of State Authorizes $4 billion for direct loans to Ukraine and NATO countries, along with permission to reduce or cancel their obligations to pay us back. Amount provided this way "shall not be considered assistance for the purposes of provisions of law limiting assistance to a country" $2.65 billion to countries housing Ukrainians refugees for emergency food and shelter $1.4 billion for refugees $1.12 billion for Ukraine and "other countries" - Poland and Hungary in particular - that are enacting IMF economic reforms and expanding the private sector $650 million for the "foreign military financing program" for Ukraine "and countries impacted by the situation" $647 million for the "Economic Support Fund" which can be transferred to fund activities "related to public engagement, messaging, and countering disinformation." Expands the emergency powers of the President in 2022 to allow him to provide $3 billion in military equipment, services and money to foreign countries and international organizations, instead of the usual limit of $100 million per year Increases the amount of weapons that are allowed to be exported from $2.05 billion to $3.1 billion $120 million for "Transition Initiatives" H.R.6617 - Further Additional Extending Government Funding Act Law Outline DIVISION A - FURTHERING ADDITIONAL CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2022 Sec. 101: Extends government funding at 2021 levels until March 11, 2022. Allows the Department of Defense to spend their Operations and Maintenance and emergency funds to respond to the Red Hill Bulk Storage Facility spill but caps the spending at $53 million. Adds $250 million to their budget for 2022 to address drinking water contamination caused by the spill. Adds $100 to their budget so they can comply with the Hawaii state order to remove the fuel from the Red Hill facility. H.R.1192 - Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2021 House vote: 429-0 Senate: Unanimous Consent Law Outline Sec 2: Disclosure by Professional Persons Seeking Approval of Compensation Under Section 316 or 317 of PROMESA Requires attorneys, accountants, appraisers, auctioneers, agents, and other professional persons to file a disclosure listing their conflicts of interest with debtors, creditors - or their attorneys and accountants - and the oversight board members, directors, and employees. Failure to file the disclosure, or an incomplete disclosure, will prevent that person from being paid. Being "not a disinterested person" or having an "adverse interest" will also disqualify that person from compensation. This will only apply to cases filed AFTER enactment of this law (January 20, 2022) H.R.4445 - Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 Committee Report House Debate Law Outline Sec. 2: Predispute Arbitration of Disputes Involving Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment. Invalidates predispute arbitration clauses in contracts if the person alleging sexual harassment or sexual assault or a representative of a class action lawsuit elects to go to court instead of use arbitration. This will apply whether the case is to be filed in Federal, Tribal, or State court. The decision over where the case will be heard will be made by a court, not by an arbitrator regardless of what is in the contract. Sec 3: Applicability Will only apply to any dispute or claim that "arises or accrues" on or after the date of enactment. Hearings and Debate House Debate on H.R. 1192: Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2021 February 23, 2022 Highlighted PDF of debate on the house floor Clips 1:19:09 Jennifer Gonzalez-Colon: Representative Velazquez and myself have proposed this bipartisan initiative in the last two congresses having achieved passage in the house during the last session Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX): In response to dire fiscal issues facing Puerto Rico at the time, Congress passed the Puerto Rico oversight management and economic stability Act, or Preska in 2016. That legislation established the financial oversight and management board with control over Puerto Rico's budget laws, financial plans and regulations and the authority to retain professionals to assist the board in executing its responsibilities. Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-NY): The Puerto Rico recovery accuracy in disclosures act of 2021 or product eliminates a double standard currently facing Puerto Rico. On the US Code and federal bankruptcy procedure. Any conflicts of interest or even the perception of such conflict between those working on the bankruptcy and the debtor there are required to be disclosed. However, a loophole in the current law prevents this requirement from being extended to the people of Puerto Rico. Rep. Dan Bishop (R-NC): Most significantly the gap in the 2016 law created a potential for undisclosed compensation terms and undiscovered conflicts of interest visa vi parties and interest for professional serving in Puerto Rico's bankruptcy. Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González Colon: Learning that someone was involved in businesses of one of the parties in the case only after they are named and working on the case does not create assurance of their commitment to the best interest of Puerto Rico or even managing the depth. Rep. Dan Bishop (R-NC): This builds disclosure and oversight requirements increase the likelihood that conflicts of interest will be caught and timely addressed before compensation decisions are made. Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-NY): While we can have different opinions on how effectively the oversight board is carrying out its mission, one thing should be clear. The island's residents should be entitled to the same rights and protections of any debtor on the mainland. House Debate on H.R.4445 - Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 February 7, 2022 Highlighted PDF of debate on the house floor Clips 9:21 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): If H.R. 4445 becomes law contracts will be far less likely to include the option to arbitrate. 10:28 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): Why are some in Congress so intent on taking this legislation forward today? For years, Democrats have tried to gut arbitration agreements for all kinds of different claims and plaintiffs. If Democrats had their way, everyone from consumers to civil rights plaintiffs, to those with antitrust claims, to individuals using financial service products and others would not be able to contract in advance to resolve disputes through arbitration. 47:33 Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH): We know that if parties can't agree in advance to arbitrate then they are unlikely to agree to arbitrate after there has been a dispute. As a result, the plaintiff may never get to arbitration. Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility: The Current Crisis, the Response, and the Way Forward House Armed Services Committee, Subcommittee on Readiness January 11, 2022 This hearing conducted oversight into the Navy's maintenance of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility, the Navy's investigation into and response to the November 2021 release of fuel from Red Hill facility impacting drinking water, its impacts on service members and civilians, clean-up and remediation efforts, and next steps forward. Witnesses: Vice Admiral Yancy Lindsey, Commander, Navy Installations Command Rear Admiral Blake Converse, Deputy Command, U.S. Pacific Fleet Rear Admiral John K. Korka, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Chief of Civil Engineers Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos, Supply Corps, United States Navy, Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command and 49th Chief of Supply Corps Captain Michael McGinnis Pacific Fleet Surgeon, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Clips 9:05 Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA): Why does Red Hill exist in the first place? Even before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States had grown concerned about the vulnerability of above ground fuel storage tanks in 1940. The construction began on the Red Hill bulk fuel storage facility, a one in a kind engineering innovation that secured the fuel from enemy aerial attack. The facility holds 250 million gallons of fuel in 20 steel lined underground tanks encased in concrete. These tanks are connected to three gravity fed pipelines, running two and a half miles to Pearl Harbor fuel appears. However, a statistic less commonly quoted by the DoD is that the facility is also 100 feet above the groundwater aquifer that provides water to the residents of Oahu. Thus, it has always been the responsibility of the military to ensure that these tanks are maintained in a manner that not only protects the wartime fuel supply, but the people have a Oahu water supply 18:45 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: I want to start by saying that the Navy caused this problem, we own it, and we're gonna fix it. 19:45 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: Beginning on November 28, residents of certain neighborhoods on our Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam here in Hawaii in military housing began recording vapors, discoloration and contamination of the water provided by the Navy. The Red Hill shaft well, which sits near the Navy's Red Hill bulk fuel storage facility was immediately suspected to be the source of this contamination as that was the source of the drinking water for those affected neighborhoods. So it was shut down that evening, November 28. And it just remained isolated since that day. Later, samples from the Red Hill shaft well would confirm the presence of petroleum contamination. 39:40 Captain Michael McGinnis: Medical teams have screened over 5900 patients during this event. The vast majority were conducted within the first two weeks of our response. patient's symptoms were consistent with an acute environmental exposure event. patient's symptoms consistent with the following nausea, vomiting, headache, diarrhea, skin or eye irritation. Once patients were removed from the water source, the symptoms rapidly resolved. 42:12 Rear Admiral Blake Converse: Our best information is that this recent spill was due to operator error. 1:31:45 Rep. Kaiali'i Kahele (D-HI): Tanks number three, number four and number 11 have not been inspected for approximately 40 years. So my question to Navy Supply Systems Command is why are these tanks still in operation? And how can you assure this committee and the people of Hawaii that tanks three, four and 11, that have not even been looked at in the last 40 years, are safe to use and meet current API 653 guidelines for bulk fuel storage underground facilities. Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos: Yes, sir. Thank you for the question. Yes, you are correct. There are tanks, as you mentioned, that have been out of periodicity for quite a long time. 1:41:27 Rep. Jackie Speier: Are the commanding officers and our executive officers that are assigned to Red Hill trained in petroleum management? Rear Admiral Peter Stamatopoulos: I'll take that question ma'am. The answer is no. Impact of Continuing Resolutions on the Department of Defense and Services House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Defense January 12, 2022 Witnesses: General David H. Berger, Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps General Charles Q. Brown, Jr., Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force Admiral Michael Gilday, Chief of Naval Operations of the U.S. Navy General Joseph M. Martin, Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Mike McCord, Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) General John W. Raymond, Chief of Space Operations of the U.S. Space Force Clips 29:51 Mike McCord: First, as I believe you're all aware a full year CR, we reduce our funding level below what we requested and what we believe we need. On the surface at the department level as a whole, the reduction to our accounts would appear to be about a billion dollars below our request, which would be significant. Even if that was the only impact. The actual reduction in practice will be much greater. Because we would have significant funding that's misaligned, trapped or frozen in the wrong places and unusable because we don't have the tools or flexibilities to realign funds on anything like the scam we would need to fix all the problems that the chiefs are going to describe. 30:27 Mike McCord: I know all of you are very familiar with the fact that virtually all military construction projects in each year's budget including the FY 22 budget are new starts that cannot be executed under a CR. 34:00 Mike McCord: The six longest CRs in the history of the Defense Department have all occurred in this last 12 year period. We have turned a 12 month fiscal year into an eight month fiscal year in terms of our ability to initiate new starts and enter contracts. This should be unacceptable and not the new normal. It's hard to see this full impact because or in the inefficiency from looking from outside because the organization has of course adapted to its circumstances just as organisms do. Nobody plans to enter into contracts in the first quarter of a fiscal year now because the odds that we would actually be able to do so are so low. Therefore we in turn, have no significant contract delays to report to you when we're under a CR. 1:44:02 Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI): This is about decreasing domestic spending and increasing defense spending. 1:44:20 **Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN):**This was my effort to quash those who are talking about year long CRs. No one on the Appropriations Committee is, yet you see things in the news. And unfortunately, sir, it's usually from your side of the aisle, and I'll pull it again. And it's a December 1 quote, and I can get you the gentlemen, the person who said it. Republicans should be in favor of a CR until Biden is out of office, so they're not going to talk about a one year CR. That would be the proper Republican thing to do. And anybody saying otherwise is deeply foolish. I know you and I, sir, do not agree with that sentiment. And my my goal here is to educate other members who don't understand the appropriations process as well as you and I, and many other of our colleagues that we serve alongside with. Silenced: How Forced Arbitration Keeps Victims of Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment in the Shadows House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law January 16, 2019 Witnesses: Eliza Dushku, Actor/Producer & Graduate Student Myriam Gilles, Professor of Law, Paul R. Verkuil Chair in Public Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Lora Henry, Canton, OH Andowah Newton, New York, NY Sarah Parshall Perry, Legal Fellow, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, The Heritage Foundation Tatiana Spottiswoode, Law Student, Columbia Law School Anna St. John, President and General Counsel, Hamilton Lincoln Law Institute Clips 30:59 Anna St. John: Instead, it's worth considering that taking away the possibility of arbitration for these victims is a top-down, heavy handed approach that denies them the advantages of arbitration as a means of adjudicating their claims. 41:04 Sarah Parshall Perry: Since the 1980s, the progressive leadership of this and the upper chamber has sought to curtail the protections of the Federal Arbitration Act through bills including the Arbitration Fairness Act, Arbitration Fairness for Students Act, Consumer Mobile Fairness Act, Fairness and Nursing Homes Act, Sonsumer Fairness Act, Restoring Statutory Rights and Interests of the States Act, the Forced Arbitration Justice Repeal Act and many, many more. 47:13 Sarah Parshall Perry: arbitration agreements are not mandatory. No one, and the Supreme Court has held, is forced to sign a contract. But curtailing access to arbitration would injure, in the end, the very people that Congress has sought for nearly a century to protect. 54:50 Myriam Gilles: First, the entire regime is shrouded in secrecy. And not just because victims want to keep these issues confidential, which by the way is up to them, right? They should have the autonomy and the choice to decide. But because companies want to keep this stuff under wraps, they want to hide and shield sexual predators, and they don't want their business in the public eye. They don't want to deal with regulators or even with lawsuits. The secrecy here on its own just makes this a terrible way to deal with sexual harassment because it means that victims of sexual violence in the workplace who bravely tried to come forward are prohibited from telling their stories in a public forum. Instead, they're forced into this private process where everything is under wraps and siloed. Right, so this is the second bad thing. Victims can join together, even when their injuries stem from the same wrongdoing, even when they've occurred at the hands of the same perpetrator. Even when the company's tolerance for sexual harassment is structural and pervasive. Victims have to go it alone, never knowing about one another. They have to go into arbitration single file. I don't know where all these statistics are coming from about how great arbitration is how people win it all the time, because the truth is, no one goes into arbitration because it's siloed because it's secret because they don't know about what else is going on in the workplace. The secrecy that blankets these individualized proceedings prevents one victim from ever learning whether others right in the cubicle next to them might have experienced the same, the same tragedies, the same traumas and when vid when survivors are in the dark about cases filed by others in the workplace that makes coming forward that makes being the first person to come forward that much harder. As a corollary, and this is an important corollary, the relief that is available to the individual claimant doesn't prevent the wrongdoer from preying on other women doesn't prevent the predator from having all sorts of misconduct against other women in the workplace. The proceedings are one on one and the relief that arbitrators are allowed by contract to grant is individualized. They can't ever order any changes beyond what can help this one individual that happens to have the courage to come before them. I mean, can you imagine a worse system for dealing with toxic corporate culture because I can't. Third, and I think this is really important and all the survivors who've spoken about this forced arbitration is a system where the employers write the rules, and they pick the arbitral provider. Which means that victims of sexual harassment are shunted into a regime that stacked against them from the get go. First, because the arbitrators economic interest is to be very good to the repeat player employer so that they can be chosen for another arbitration next time. So the repeat player problem has been well documented, and I think it's alive and well in arbitration. And the secrecy protects that. And second, because the employer designs the entire arbitration process, it does so to serve its interests, not the interests of its workers, but its interests which again, are to keep discrimination and harassment under a veil of secrecy and out of the public eye. So given all of these things, given how bad this system is for victims of sexual harassment, it's no wonder that so few ever decide to go into private arbitration. I wouldn't. I think it sounds terrible. 1:04:00 Myriam Gilles: When an arbitration complaint is filed, it's filed in secret. In other words, the only entities that know that the arbitration has even been filed are the the employer, the employer, the complaining employee and the arbitration entity. The AAA or JAMS are one of these arbitration providers. Nobody else knows. Contrast that with court. I go down to the DC District Court today and I file a complaint, that complaint is on the public record. Right. And so as the defendants answer or motion to dismiss all the pleadings, their public litigation in the public court system, it has power, and the power it has is the power of signaling, not only to the defendant that I've sued, but to all similarly situated defendants that this is a wrong. This person has complained about something she's told her story, and she plans to prove it. None of that happens in arbitration from the beginning. It is private throughout the entire proceeding, which is held in a secret location, no public no press. All of it is private. Arbitrators don't write decisions. There are only three states in the union that currently require minimal disclosure of arbitrations pretty redacted and hard to read. If you're a researcher like I am about these issues. Other than that, everything that happens in arbitration is a black box. 1:32:18 Tatiana Spottiswoode: And the forced arbitration is so unfair. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA): I understand you you think forced arbitration is unfair, that's great. Most of the people on that side want to eliminate it for everything not just situations like this. Other representative: will the gentleman yield for a question? Rep. Darrell Issa: I will not. 1:49:15 Myriam Gilles: The FAA was enacted in 1925. But it was enacted so that sophisticated business people could negotiate for arbitration provisions and those provisions would be respected by courts. It was never intended to be imposed via standard form contract. And in fact, if you read the legislative history, if you read the legislation, it accepts and exempts employees. So the idea that the FAA applies to employees is something that was created by a conservative majority of the Supreme Court in 1991, in a case called Circuit City, sorry, first actually was Gilmer and then Circuit City, I can't keep all the bad cases straight. And those are the cases in which the Court interpreted, I would say misinterpreted, the FAA to apply to employees like this. So that now employers can just stick these clauses into job applications, orientation materials, even an innocuous email from HR can include a forced arbitration clause. That was not what the 1925 Congress intended they they'd be rolled, they should be rolling in their in their grades. This is not what they intended. This is what a Supreme Court intent on protecting corporations intended beginning in the 1990s. 2:39:26 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): You know what's happened to so many women and others in the workplace is terrible but I really am concerned that by involving the government in these contracts between adults in the area of sexual harassment and assault we're opening a door for more government involvement in other areas of contracts. 2:42:09 Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN): And I would argue that you have you sign it it is not you know even though we use the it's forced arbitration as people are saying it's not really you you have signed something that you have agreed to it. Justice Denied: Forced Arbitration and the Erosion of Our Legal System House Committee on the Judiciary November 16, 2021 Witnesses: Gretchen Carlson, Journalist and Advocate Myriam Gilles, Paul R. Verkuil Chair in Public Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Phil Goldberg, Managing Partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon L.L.P. Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC Andrew Pincus, Partner, Mayer Brown L.L.P. Lieutenant Commander Kevin Ziober, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy Reserves Clips 26:35 Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI): You'll hear a different view from me. Eliminating arbitration achieves one thing, it enriches trial attorneys. 29:11 Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI): The AAJ, or American Association for Justice, is the nice sounding name of the plaintiffs attorneys lobbying organization. It also happens to be a huge donor to Democratic candidates, contributing millions of dollars each cycle to their campaigns. 29:52 Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD): Mr. Chairman, point of order. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) What is your point of order? Rep. Jamie Raskin: My question is just can we impute the policy positions that members of the committee take to campaign contributions? Because if so, I think I'd be doing it a lot more frequently. I thought that's something that we don't do. Rep. David Cicilline: It's an excellent point of order, I'm sure Mr. Sensenbrenner didn't intend to communicate that in that way. Rep. Jamie Raskin: We're gonna be hearing a lot more of that in our committee if that's permissible, but I'm just curious. Maybe we can have some research done. Rep. James Sensenbrenner: Will the gentleman yield? Rep. David Cicilline: I think we don't need to engage with you. I this is an important issue with strongly held beliefs on both sides. [crosstalk] 36:00 Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY): We used to have a concept in law. When I went to law school they still taught it called contracts of adhesion where a contract was unenforceable if one party had no choice in entering into it. All of these arbitration clauses almost are contracts of adhesion. You try when you want to get a credit card, try crossing out the fine print if you can find it without the magnifying glass that that says that you will settle all all disputes in arbitration, cross it out, see if you get the credit card. See if you get the bank loans if you get the mortgage. You have no see if you get the car loan, you have no choice. 1:42:00 Gretchen Carlson: arbitration means that you have no way of knowing that anyone else is facing the same thing within the confines of the workplace structure. There's no way to know because the whole process is secret. And as I described during my testimony, if you do muster up the courage to go and complain, and you have an arbitration clause, that's a good day for the company, because no one will ever know anything about your story. The worst ramification of all of this is that the perpetrator gets to stay in the job. And I think one of the reasons that we've seen this cultural revolution that we're experiencing right now is because the American public was actually so angry about hearing about these stories, and they were wondering, why didn't we know about this? And the reason they didn't know about it, is because of forced arbitration. 2:00:30 Deepak Gupta: I've gone back and looked at the history of the act from 1925. People weren't blind to the possibility of abuse. They raised these concerns before this, this committee, in fact, and the and the architects of the legislation were clear, this is about letting businesses have equal bargaining power that want to resolve their disputes out of court, letting them do that, and I have no objection to that. That makes perfect sense. But but the the drafters were clear this is not about foisting this on people who don't consent through, take it or leave it contracts. And in fact, Congress put in a provision section one of the Federal Arbitration Act that says this shall not apply to any class of workers. Remarkably, the Supreme Court has read that language to mean precisely the opposite. And now it can apply to any class of workers. And so so we have just we've strayed so far away from what Congress intended in 1925. And that's why only this body Congress can set things right. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)