Podcasts about older adults

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Best podcasts about older adults

Show all podcasts related to older adults

Latest podcast episodes about older adults

Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp
Diabetes and Depression: What To Know and What To Do with Mary de Groot, PhD

Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 73:48


#S2 E2 - Diabetes affects more than 34.1 million people in the U.S. The prevalence of diabetes significantly increasing as we age with 29.2% of older Americans living with diabetes.  If that is not enough, depression is 2 times more likely in people with diabetes than the general population. In this continuing education podcast course, you will learn: The prevalence and impact of co-existing depression and diabetes, Tools for assessing depression in the context of diabetesEffective treatment modalities for co-existing depression and diabetes.  Link to the show notes of this episode hereAttention Social Workers, Psychologists, Therapists, Aging Life Care Experts: Click here to learn more about earning CEUs for listening to this podcast.

Untrained Wisdom
54: Panola, Ala. COVID-19 Vaccine Advocate Dorothy Oliver

Untrained Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 22:56


Dorothy Oliver, owner and operator of the general store in rural Panola, Ala., joined forces with a local county commissioner in 2021 to get as many people as she could to get vaccinated from COVID-19 in her small black community. Dorothy's efforts included diligently communicating with residents and educating them about the disease, which resulted in a nearly 99 percent vaccination rate among the community's adults in a state with one of the lowest vaccination rates in the U.S.In this interview, Dorothy talks about the work she did before and after the vaccine became available as well as the recognition she's received publicly, which includes a personal address by Dr. Anthony Fauci. Her story was also featured in a 2021 short documentary by The New Yorker magazine called The Panola Project.View PDF TranscriptIf you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Check out guest recommendations on Pinterest. Finally, you can support the show through Patreon.Interested in starting your own podcast? Sign up here for your own Buzzsprout account.

Boomer Living Tv - Podcast For Baby Boomers, Their Families & Professionals In Senior Living
Navin Goyal - How Baby Boomers Are Changing the Social Impact Landscape

Boomer Living Tv - Podcast For Baby Boomers, Their Families & Professionals In Senior Living

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 55:56


The Baby Boomer generation is known for being ambitious, hard-working, and eager to take risks. As such, they are well-positioned to invest in early-stage venture capital and alternative investment firms.These firms are often looking for individuals with the financial resources and willingness to take risks that can help them grow impactful companies across the globe. Baby boomers can leverage their experience and networks to make these firms more purpose-driven, inclusive, and accessible.For example, they can provide mentorship and support to entrepreneurs from underrepresented communities or connect them with resources and contacts that can help them succeed. By investing in these firms, baby boomers can not only earn a financial return but also help to create positive social change.----------Bio:Dr. Navin Goyal M.D. is the CEO of LOUD Capital and a practicing anesthesiologist. He is passionate about making venture capital more purposeful, inclusive, and accessible, with a focus on businesses that have a positive impact on society.Visit Navin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/navingoyalmd/LOUD Capital: https://loud.vc/Physician Underdog: https://www.physicianunderdog.com/Offor Health: https://www.offorhealth.com/

Boomers Today
Life-enriching Experiences for Older Adults

Boomers Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:02


For over 30 years, Amy Temperley has committed her work to improving the lives of older adults in some form or fashion. and has served caregivers, individuals with dementia and disabilities, and nonprofit leaders. Amy and her husband, Damien, founded Aging is Cool in 2016 with the dream to create smart, engaging, fun activities for older adults, being passionate about issues related to living a full life, active aging and ageism. In 2020, Aging is Cool partnered with Heart and Soul Care to create and launch, A Mighty Good Time, a website and one-stop-shop for engaging activities for older adults nationwide. www.amightygoodtime.com Sponsor: www.SeniorCareAuthority.com

Living to 100 Club
The Benefits of In-Home Care for the Older Adult Population

Living to 100 Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 38:44


The Benefits of In-Home Care for the Older Adult Population In this Living to 100 Club Podcast, we explore the world of in-home care, a service that allows older adults to remain in their own homes as long as possible. Our guest is Russ Knopp, the owner of Comfort Keepers Home Care in Traverse City, Michigan. We discuss how to know when in-home assistance is needed, what services are available, and the types of individuals who benefit the most from having care brought into their home. Russ shares personal stories about some of his clients, a rural geographic area in the lower part of the peninsula in northern Michigan. How did his company, his staff, and his clients manage the new challenges brought by Covid? What about those homeowners who are resistant to this service, even though family and neighbors request it? We also discuss that fine line when in-home care is no longer sufficient, and out of home placement is needed. This is an educational conversation that will help with the decision-making of many of our listeners. Tune in. Mini Bio When Russ was thirteen years old, his grandmother fell and became a paraplegic. Her doctors told the family that she would need to go to a nursing home and that she had about 6 months to live. Russ' mother and her siblings, who lived in Toledo, Ohio, made the decision to bring Grandma back to her own home instead, where the family cared for her – for the next nine years! Among all of the children, their spouses and grandchildren, the family provided total care, around the clock. When he was old enough, Russ started helping, and through college, he often worked the night shift. His grandmother was able to participate in family events, see her grandchildren grow up, and overall enjoy a great quality of life in her elder years.  Having seen first-hand what is possible with in-home senior care, Russ related to the mission from the moment he heard about it. Items for Our Listeners Website for Comfort Keepers in Traverse City, MI

The Art of Decluttering
Top Tips for Downsizing

The Art of Decluttering

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 34:37


Moving to a smaller home can be stressful especially when you've collected a lifetime of memories and belongings. Today we are revisiting our downsizing topic but with much more detail and even more practical advice!Focusing more on those at the retirement/empty nester stage of life we take you through our top tips to make your downsizing experience a smoother one.We believe that EVERYONE is unique and every SITUATION is unique - what will work for you may not even work for your partner! So get ready for an episode chock full of practical tips to get you set up and living your best new season of life!In this episode we;● Share that decluttering plays a key role in any downsizing process;● Remind you that having a clear vision for your new home that you can come back to will help you when things get bumpy;● Give suggestions for ways to honour sentimental items and preserve the memories;● Suggest enlisting the help of professionals during the downsizing process;● Emphasise having grace for yourself and those around you - packing up a life time of possessions is BIG!;And so so so so much more...We hope from this conversation we all learn something and put a smile on your face!Things mentioned in this episode and other helpful links:● Downsizing into Freedom episode ● Apartment Living episode ● Downsizing episode● Sea Change episode● Moving Overseas● Sentimental Papers episode● Sentimental Items episode● Decluttering with Older Adults episode● Estate Planning episode● Momentum episodeThank you to our newest Patreon member Alison Smith!!Thank you to Katharine 55 and HeatherFD for your podcast reviews!! Don't forget you can leave us a review that helps others to find us.For more details on how to connect with us head to our website.For details on becoming a Patreon supporter take a look here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AP Audio Stories
Ukraine: Women, kids, older adults evacuated from steel mill

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 0:33


Intro and voicer on 'Russia Ukraine War'.

Voices for Eldercare Advocacy
Change Our Attitude: Change The Culture: Openlygray.org

Voices for Eldercare Advocacy

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:00


According to Matt Thornhill, When we as older adults change how we think, feel, and and act about getting older we can change the culture around aging. It's no secret that we live in an ageist society and whether we know it or not, contribute to perpetuating ageist attitudes. In doing so, we continue to perpetuate the last bastion of the isms...ageism. Central to the issue is that though we may feel lovingly about the older adults in our families or amongst our friends, as a society we don't feel the same way towards the older adults in our communities. They are not valued as they are in other cultures where elders are viewed with respect and sought out for their wisdom. How can we turn around these negative attitudes towards older adults? I agree with Matt Thornhill. We must embrace our elder hood years, embrace our longevity journey. This involves changing our mindset about how we see ourselves. I'm sure we can all identify words or phrases we have heard that reflect ageist attitudes. We see and hear them all around us but we probably don't realize the things we say or think about ourselves. Stigmatizing societal attitudes become internalized long before we reach the senior years of our lives. When we describe ourselves or refer to ourselves as old, we are merely reinforcing a stereotype. However, irrespective of a person's age, old can be thought of as a mind state or mindset. One way to counteract this mindset is by choosing to live an engaged life. This must be a purposeful and intentional choice, a choice to live every day to the highest potential or ability at any point in time. People who live in this way are not in denying the reality of the end of life, but rather realized that life is meant to be lived. We are the ship in our life's journey. It is our attitude that is the driving force steering our ship. We have to remain intentional and mindful, caring for and tending to our attitude. If not, we allow ourselves to fall prey to the pitfalls of life, as with a ship that strays off course when encountering rough waters, we will drift into a kind of holding pattern letting the water and waves take us where they will. This is an act of surrendering. Embrace your elder hood years. Join the movement at: openlygray.org. For 40 years, Matt Thornhill has been studying consumer behavior and trends, first as an advertising executive on Madison Avenue, then as an interactive marketing pioneer and for the last 20 years as a futurist and the nation's leading authority on Boomer consumers. He has advised companies and organizations across the globe, including Walmart, Google, AARP, Proctor & Gamble, Verizon, and the Social Security Administration, and he's delivered memorable keynote addresses at national conferences and company events across dozens of industry sectors. Matt has provided commentary on NBC Nightly News, CBS Evening News, CNN, CNBC, and PBS. He's appeared in articles in The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and countless magazines. A serial entrepreneur, Matt has left his think tank and consulting to create and build a new type of community of smaller homes for middle-income Boomers at this stage of life called: Cozy Home Community, which addresses the largely unmet need of affordable housing and community living that encourages social connections with neighbors helping neighbors. You can find more information about these communities at cozyhomecommunity.com. Matt has also launched the Openly Gray movement, a nonprofit fighting age discrimination by encouraging older adults themselves to change how they think, feel, and act about growing older. Change our attitude, change the culture around aging. Join the movement at: openlygray.org

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
RSV in Older Adults: Immunology and Vaccine Development

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:46


In this episode, Dexter James Wiseman, MD, discusses immunology and RSV vaccine development for older adults, including:Need for a vaccineEconomic burden of RSVReasons for poor outcomes in older adultsInvestigational vaccinesPresenter: Dexter James Wiseman, MDClinical Research FellowNHLIImperial CollegePhysicianRespiratory MedicineRoyal Brompton HospitalLondon, United KingdomReview the downloadable slideset and the full program at: https://bit.ly/3ydC8Ri

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
RSV in Older Adults: Identification and Impact

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:56


In this episode, Dexter James Wiseman, MD, discusses the impact and diagnosis of RSV in older adults, including:Risk factors for poor outcomesRSV vs influenza outcomesRSV symptomsRSV diagnosticsPresenter: Dexter James Wiseman, MDClinical Research FellowNHLIImperial CollegePhysicianRespiratory MedicineRoyal Brompton HospitalLondon, United KingdomReview the downloadable slideset and the full program at: https://bit.ly/3ydC8Ri

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
RSV in Older Adults: Epidemiology and Risk Factors

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 14:57


In this episode, Dexter James Wiseman, MD, discusses the epidemiology and risk factors for RSV in older adults, including:OverviewDisease burden based on ageSeasonalityImpact in care facilitiesEffects of the COVID-19 pandemicPresenter: Dexter James Wiseman, MDClinical Research FellowNHLIImperial CollegePhysicianRespiratory MedicineRoyal Brompton HospitalLondon, United KingdomReview the downloadable slideset and the full program at: https://bit.ly/3ydC8Ri

Where It Happens
Why You Should Start a Business For Older Adults

Where It Happens

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 78:12


There's a giant opportunity in helping older adults live a more vibrant, empowering life throughout their later years. Today we're joined by John Zapolski, the founder and CEO of Alive Ventures, to better understand that opportunity. John is dedicated to building products and services that cater to older adults, and has developed a co-design system that allows them to be part of the process. On this episode we cover the future of smart wallets, Bing's search engine, Greg's security deposit business idea, and then bring in John to discuss several startup ideas geared towards older adults. Interested in developing these startup ideas further? Join us in the Discord. ►► Want more community? Learn more here: http://trwih.com THIS EPISODE John Zapolski: https://twitter.com/jzapolski Sahil Bloom: https://twitter.com/SahilBloom Greg Isenberg: https://twitter.com/gregisenberg Production & Marketing Team: https://penname.co/ FIND US ON SOCIAL Twitter: https://twitter.com/_trwih Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_trwih TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@_trwih Web: https://trwih.com Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6aB0v6amo3a8hgTCjlTlvh Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/where-it-happens/id1593424985 SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp
How Our Beliefs About Aging Impact Health and Well-being with Becca Levy, PhD

Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 63:48


#S2 E1 - Ageism, which is bias and discrimination based on age has profoundly harmful effects on our mental and physical health as we age. In this podcast CEU episode,  preeminent ageism researcher, Becca Levy, PhD will: Define the Stereotype Embodiment TheoryList cultural differences related to age beliefs Discuss how our beliefs about aging impact our physical and mental health as we ageApply a model for challenging ageist stereotypesSocial Workers, Psychologists, Therapists, Aging Life Care Experts: Click here to learn more about earning CEUs for listening to this podcast.

St. Louis on the Air
Sleep apnea correlates with increased traffic accidents for older adults, sleep expert says

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 23:04


The director of Wash U's Sleep Medicine Center discusses his new study on sleep apnea and driving behavior, takes questions from listeners and explains why it's important not to let sleep problems go untreated.

Untrained Wisdom
52: Grief + Healing Author Jennifer Ohman-Rodriguez

Untrained Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 41:39


Tony Rodriguez was a well-respected trauma therapist whose life was cut short in a tragic accident. Some time after, his wife Jennifer Ohman-Rodriguez began journaling. Many of her raw, unfiltered accounts in the first 14 months of grief became the foundation of her 2022 book, "A Time to Mourn and a Time to Dance: A Love Story of Grief, Trauma, Healing and Faith" published by Chalice Press. In this interview, Jennifer talks about the complexities of navigating life as a widow and mom to their two sons, the therapies she turned to in helping her healing, writing the book, and who this book is for.View PDF transcriptJennifer's Recommendations:- Cello suites of J.S. Bach- The Book of Longings by Sue Monk Kidd If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Check out guest recommendations on Pinterest. Finally, you can support the show through Patreon.Interested in starting your own podcast? Sign up here for your own Buzzsprout account.

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP105 - AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge: Transportation

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 10:19


According to the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, almost 600,000 older adults quit driving each year. This makes doctor's appointments, shopping for needs, visiting relatives, and attending social events more difficult for older adults. As a result, they become more isolated, which has a negative impact on their health and well-being. One of the most prevalent forms of assistance offered by family members and caregivers is transportation. However, transporting older adults isn't always convenient or straightforward. For family members and caregivers, transportation is one of the most challenging tasks. According to a 2018 poll by the National Aging and Disability Transportation Center (NADTC), almost 40% of caregivers spend roughly five hours each week providing or scheduling transportation. While public transportation is a feasible alternative in many cities, it may be non-existent or limited in rural and suburban areas, where older adults are most likely to live. To keep older adults healthy and active, This Is Getting Old rounded up our 10-part AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge with this series' final episode—Part 10: Transportation. Stay tuned to learn moonshot—but possible—innovative solutions and transportation options that help older adults get around.    Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️ There's More To Transportation Than Driving When we think about transportation, it's more than just driving; it's all the different ways we move around our communities. Transportation includes; cars  cyclists  sidewalks  pedestrians dedicated bike lanes public transportation safe crosswalks for pedestrians  smaller transportation options such as taxis, shuttles or rideshare services large scale public transportation options such as trains, busses and light rails    ✔️Sarah And Her Age-Related Challenges   Sarah is 69 years young and lives in Alexandria, VA, with her husband, who has Parkinson's. Lately, her eyesight has been failing, making it harder to get things done. She can no longer drive and doesn't feel safe with so many cars everywhere on the streets. On top of everything, it's winter, and it gets dark so early. Sarah doesn't like to ask people for help or favors, but she had to get herself and her husband to their doctors' appointments, and it just feels like too much some days. Sarah needs help but doesn't know how to ask for it.   ✔️ It All Starts With Information Sarah needs a way to get high quality, vetted, affordable, inclusive, relevant information and supportive connections and services. She needs to feel that she is provided and receives the information and resources to manage her life, including getting where she needs to go and managing caregiving responsibilities. Hence, the group came up with the "Best Information System Ever"—the need is the information piece, and the rest can stem from there.   ✔️ "Best Information System Ever" -Diverse And Inclusive Innovative Solution For Older Adult's Transportation.   What does it do?   Provides high quality, vetted, affordable, inclusive, relevant information and supportive connections and services. It includes all the resources in the region, all-knowing everything at your fingertips and how it's connected How does it work?  The program includes all resources (new and existing) in the region; the biggest and best database with continuously updated and vetted information. Easy to use (web-based, app-based, and call-in) Well crafted; one click or warm transfer by phone (e.g., easy to get to provider website/phone) Connects people with people and services (rides to anywhere: grocery stores, senior centers, parks, doctors appointments) It will support diversity and inclusion for all users at all income levels and supports all unique needs. It includes trained staff who know all the programs across regions, call to next step, volunteer village - sign up for village and get a ride - connect to neighborhoods. Includes good triage function. Includes quarterly Professional Development for staff on new programs and systems. Includes cross-organization buy-in for all regional organizations. The system can process accounts for users and families, and payments and applications for different programs are included in the database. The service providers are certified and vetted by appropriate organizations. ✔️ More Age-Friendly Transportation-related Resources You can also check out Episode 70 of this podcast to learn more about Transportation Options for Older Adults and a program called NV Rides. Or if you have a loved one and wonder if it's time to take the keys and limit their driving, you can check out Episode 63 titled Alzheimer's disease and driving: Five signs that it's time to take the keys. You may also have another idea for a solution - or know of a program that would help older adults and their families facing similar challenges. Please add your comments below this video - or on my website where you can find this episode - MelissaBPhD.com We'd love to hear from you! ------------------------------------------- If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  About Melissa Batchelor, Ph.D., RN, FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 which led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
Attorney Kerry Peck: ‘Financial exploitation of older adults is a horrific epidemic'

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022


Elder law attorney Kerry Peck joins John Williams to talk about being appointed by the Illinois Supreme Court to chair a new commission on elder law. Kerry discusses some of the issues the new commission will tackle and the biggest concerns they need to address. Kerry also answers all of your elder law questions.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Attorney Kerry Peck: ‘Financial exploitation of older adults is a horrific epidemic'

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022


Elder law attorney Kerry Peck joins John Williams to talk about being appointed by the Illinois Supreme Court to chair a new commission on elder law. Kerry discusses some of the issues the new commission will tackle and the biggest concerns they need to address. Kerry also answers all of your elder law questions.

Untrained Wisdom
51: Quad Cities-Based Packing + Moving Expert Gwen Tombergs

Untrained Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 28:31


Helping others has always been the center of Gwen Tombergs' being, especially when it comes to the senior population. So when the opportunity came to start her own business, she took a leap of faith and started Fresh Start Living QC in January 2021. Based in the Quad Cities – a region of four cities in southeastern Iowa and northwestern Illinois – Gwen helps senior citizens organize and declutter if they are staying in their home or helps them downsize if they are moving. In this interview, Gwen shares how the business started and some of the living situations she comes across.View as PDFGwen's Recommendation:- DarrenDaily podcastShuva's Recommendations:- A Slight Change of Plans podcastIf you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Check out guest recommendations on Pinterest. Finally, you can support the show through Patreon.Interested in starting your own podcast? Sign up here for your own Buzzsprout account.

Repurpose Your Career | Career Pivot | Careers for the 2nd Half of Life | Career Change | Baby Boomer
Becoming a Domain Lead at GetSetUp using Her Passion for Healthy Food #267

Repurpose Your Career | Career Pivot | Careers for the 2nd Half of Life | Career Change | Baby Boomer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 29:42


Description: This week I am speaking with Deb Livingston, domain lead in the health and wellness, cooking, food, and nutrition areas for GetSetUp. Deb made this leap only with her passion for healthy food and no formal credentials. Deb had a pretty traditional business background but when her mother became ill, she took a break to be with her mother in her final years. Deb joined the Career Pivot community and through a bit of serendipity, she found GetSetup and became a contract guide.  This led her down a path that she could not have imagined. She has since guided quite a few Career Pivot community members to become GetSetup guides in both full and part-time roles. I had the GetSetUp CEO on the podcast in episode 242 called, GetSetUp is the Fastest Growing Online Learning Community of Older Adults. I also had Vicki Soll on the podcast in episode 260 called, Vicki Soll Finds a Happy Place in Her Career by Teaching Older Adults. Teaching part-time for GetSetUp led her down a new path that she did not expect. This episode is sponsored by Career Pivot. Check out the Career Pivot Community, and be sure to pick up my latest book, Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the 2nd Half of Life Third Edition. For the full show notes click here.

Missouri Health Talks
“We don't want to warehouse our older adults and all of their wisdom and knowledge away in homes.”

Missouri Health Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 3:59


Alisha Johnson is a Care in Aging Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Sinclair School of Nursing here in Columbia. She spoke about the culture of aging in the United States and how that can impact older adults.

Public Health Review
68: Older Adults and Healthy Aging

Public Health Review

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 26:31


Older-adult health has been increasingly on the radar of public health agencies over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. For many, it prompted new or enhanced partnerships with their sibling agencies. As the population of older adults continues to grow, it is crucial for public health agencies to join partners in the aging network to create systems that support healthy aging. In this podcast episode, Jewel Mullen (alumni-CT) offers perspectives on the value of cultivating partnerships between state public health agencies and state units on aging. In addition, Elizabeth Head (Deputy Director, Injury Prevention Section, Georgia Department of Public Health) and Aline Stone (Georgia Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Coordinator, Division of Aging Services, Georgia Department of Human Services) describe their collaboration to improve the health of older adults in Georgia. They share their experience participating in a pilot project with ASTHO and Trust for America's Health to cross reference their state health improvement and aging plans. Guests Jewel Mullen, Former Public Health Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health Elizabeth Head, Deputy Director, Injury Prevention Section, Georgia Department of Public Health Aline Stone, Georgia Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Coordinator, Division of Aging Services, Georgia Department of Human Services Resources Age-Friendly Public Health Systems - Trust for America's Health (afphs.org) Healthy Aging and Brain Health | ASTHO ASTHO Learning: Integrating Healthy Aging into Public Health ASTHO Learning: Healthy Brain Initiative (HBI) Road Map Module

Wilder Research: Talking through the numbers
How does social isolation impact older adults in Minnesota?

Wilder Research: Talking through the numbers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 37:14


Guests discuss how social isolation and loneliness impact the health of Minnesota's older adults, efforts underway to better understand and address the problem, and the ways everyone can help. Guests • Steven M. Hoover, PhD, Healthy Aging Coordinator, Central Minnesota Council on Aging • Christin Lindberg, Research Associate, Wilder Research • Rebecca Sales, Research Scientist, Wilder Research Resources • The Foundation for Social Connection https://www.social-connection.org/ • Commit to Connect: Combatting Social Isolation and Loneliness in all Communities https://acl.gov/CommitToConnect • National Coalition to End Social Isolation and Loneliness https://www.endsocialisolation.org • enGaged: The National Resource Center for Engaging Older Adults https://www.engagingolderadults.org • MinnesotaHelp.info https://www.minnesotahelp.info/SpecialTopics/Seniors/Search?sm=All&q=social+isolation&loc=&geo=®= • Senior LinkAge Line® @ 1-800-333-2433 • Mental Health Minnesota CONNECT Initiative provides social connections by phone between volunteers and people who may be struggling with social isolation https://mentalhealthmn.org/support/minnesota-warmline/ • Little Brothers Friends of the Elderly Phone Companions program matches older adults with volunteers https://www.littlebrothersmn.org/programs/ • AARP Friendly Voice program provides trained volunteers who call people who are feeling isolated or anxious https://www.aarp.org/home-family/friends-family/friendly-voice/ • Minnesota Compass https://www.mncompass.org/topics/demographics/age/older-adults

Untrained Wisdom
50: "In the Heights" Dancer Lillian Colón

Untrained Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 26:38


Lillian Colón was the first Latina Rockette to perform at Radio City Music Hall. Her years of experience on stage and backstage prepared her to ultimately audition for and be cast as a dancer in the 2021 musical film In the Heights.  In this interview, Lillian shares what it was like to be at the audition and on the set, where she was the oldest dancer. Furthermore, Lillian briefly mentions her rough early years, which she spent in an orphanage and have served as a launching point for recent creative projects, including her memoir called Lilly: The First Latina Rockette. View as PDFIf you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Check out guest recommendations on Pinterest. Finally, you can support the show through Patreon.Interested in starting your own podcast? Sign up here for your own Buzzsprout account.

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP103 - AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge Long-Term Care Workforce and Caregiving

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 8:48


The state of health of the individual receiving care is connected to the forms of help and care provided by caregivers. Yet despite this analogy, Federal employment statistics indicate that long-term care workforce concerns remain at a 'crisis' level. As per American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living statistics from the January Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Situation data, a 6.7% drop in the assisted living workforce indicates a loss of 31,200 caregivers, from 463,100 workers in February 2020 to 431,900 in January 2022. Thus, to provide better care for millions of older Americans, the United States needs a roadmap to a sustainable, reinvented workforce of professional caregivers. To this end, today's episode of This Is Getting Old features Part 8: Long-Term Care Workforce and Caregiving of the 10-part AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge. Watch the full episode or listen to the podcast to learn more about valuable programs and innovative solutions specifically designed for older adults and healthcare providers. Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️Partake Into Leoña And The Long-Term Care Workforce's Case Scenario The case study for  Leoña:a  Leoña was 58 years old, came to D.C. four years ago from Nigeria, and worked as a home health aide. She had been a hospital nurse in her home country, skilled and experienced, but she didn't feel seen by her bosses. She felt a real connection to her patients but found the work very hard, and she had difficulty with this kind of work. She needed to find a way to care for herself and her family while still being up for the challenge of helping her clients.   ✔️ Long-term Care Workforce - Problem Statement  Leoña is burned out and will leave the field if we don't start listening to her and paying her more than an hourly wage. Working in a flawed long-term care system, she lacks a way to be heard, valued, and advance in her career.   ✔️ Innovative Solutions— Leoña As An Essential Worker Given the political moment, the time is right to call for systemic change and create a better individual situation for Leoña. This include: becoming a salaried employee receiving local recognition securing employer-employee communication,  succession planning around important work that she was doing ✔️ More Ways To Help Leoña The team passionately asserts that caregiver Leona should be recognized as an essential worker—she is like a firefighter. There were different levels of recognition that caregivers should have, and they should have people on the team who had experience with offering rewards and awards to people in their localities.  ✔️ Giving Voice To Our Unheard Caregivers There was also the recognition caregivers like Leoña do not feel heard. Leoña and caregivers should be able to tell their stories and set goals that will place them on a career ladder. We wanted her and people like her to be able to identify these challenges and begin to work with their employers to overcome challenges. You can also check out Episode 69 with Dr. Marc Cohen, where we discuss the basics of how long-term care is paid for now - and talk about future trends for the long-term care insurance industry.  You may also have another idea for a solution - or know of a program that would help older adults and their families facing similar challenges. Please add your comments below this video - or on my website where this episode can be found - MelissaBPhD.com   We'd love to hear from you!   --------------------------------------------------------------   If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  About Melissa Batchelor, Ph.D., R.N., FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN:   I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 and led to me joining the George Washington University (G.W.) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the G.W. Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

JACC Podcast
Association of Left Atrial Structure and Function With Heart Failure in Older Adults

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 13:44


GEROS Health - Physical Therapy | Fitness | Geriatrics
Optimizing Cognitive Health in Older Adults

GEROS Health - Physical Therapy | Fitness | Geriatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 17:53


As old people in training, optimizing and conceptualizing cognitive health can be so important. In this episode, Christina breaks down how we as clinicians can get involved and how we ourselves can shine a light on cognitive reserve.  Want to make sure you stay on top of all things geriatrics? Go to http://PTonICE.com/resources to check out our Free eBooks, Lectures, & the MMOA Digest!

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #823 - Debbie Heiser On Rethinking Age And Aging

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 47:11


Welcome to episode #823 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #823 - Host: Mitch Joel. When I read Debbie Heiser's bio after her being named to the Thinkers50 list, I knew I wanted to dig into her domain of authority. Debbie is an Applied Developmental Psychologist, a TEDx speaker, consultant, Founder of The Mentor Project, and an Adjunct Professor in the Psychology Department at SUNY Old Westbury. Debbie has additionally authored peer-reviewed articles, is co-editor of Spiritual Assessment and Intervention with Older Adults, and a frequent expert guest for syndicated and local talk radio shows, international and local podcasts, and print and online media outlets. Her research covers a wide range of topics related to aging, including depression identification, dementia, and frailty. She received an international award for her research on depression identification, as well as serving for nine years on the Board of the State Society on Aging of New York and was President in 2008. Later In 2016, she served as President of Queens Psychological Association in New York. How do you think about age and aging? If you're young, aging is just around the corner, and for those in their middle age, it's a topic that can impact everything from health and happiness to wealth and progress. Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 47:11. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Debbie Heiser. The Mentor Project. Follow Debbie on LinkedIn. Follow Debbie on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.

Living to 100 Club
Depression in Older Adults: Discovering Our Innate Potential to Meet Any Challenge

Living to 100 Club

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 45:16


Depression in Older Adults: Discovering Our Innate Potential to Meet Any Challenge Dr. Alan Weisser is our guest for this Living to 100 Club Podcast, as we discuss the topic of depression in older adults. We examine the symptoms of depression and contrast it with the symptoms seen in middle-aged adults. And we explore many questions about this condition in the senior population. Despite its prevalence in the over 65 population, are there ways to move beyond the multi-layered list of negative consequences that can impact this age group. How do we help the person who is in denial? How is depression related to anxiety and anger? Here are more topics that are addressed. Why is it that older adults tend to want to handle depression themselves, and are less inclined to seek treatment? More importantly, can we learn different approaches to surviving the physical and personal setbacks and even thrive once we get beyond them? Beyond this, can we rely more on our innate ability to manage stresses, and if so, what would this look like? Join us for this conversation about re-framing depression in older adults. For more information about depression, read a past Living to 100 Club blog article here. For details about the differences among depression, dementia, and delirium, click this link to a past article by Dr. Casciani. Mini Bio Dr. Alan Weisser is a clinical psychologist who has worked in public sector mental health institutions for many years, becoming expert at bringing people together and solving problems. He founded New Options, Inc. in 2002 to help people with chronic pain learn to fully engage in recovery. He is the author of the book, New Possibilities: Unraveling the Mystery and Mastering Chronic Pain. Items for Our Listeners Alan's Website: New Options, Inc. Alan's Book: New Possibilities: Unraveling the Mystery and Mastering Chronic Pain

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP102 - AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge: Lifelong Learning

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 8:03


Learning throughout one's life encourages social inclusion and improves one's health. There's a substantial correlation between learning and improved health, especially among older adults. The notion of life-long learning encompasses not only the acquisition of job-related credentials but also the promotion of learning throughout one's life to improve overall well-being. While 73% of older adults in the United States of America consider themselves lifelong learners, educational engagement tends to decline as people become older. Still, it's never too late to gain new skills and information. This presents a challenge to organizations, employers, and policymakers, who must guarantee that everyone has the opportunity to obtain, retain, and acquire new skills throughout their lives. Toward these goals, This Is Getting Old, with our mission to move toward an age-friendly world, features Part 7:Lifelong Learning of the 10-part AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge. Watch the full episode or listen to the podcast to learn more about valuable programs and innovative solutions specifically designed for older adults and healthcare providers. Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️ Does Julio's Case Sounds Familiar? Julio is 55 years old and lives in Hyattsville, MD, with his wife, three children and dog, Fluffy. He has worked as a hospice nurse for nine years now and loves his work. But, Julio feels stuck and burned out. The pay isn't great, and he has to work about 70 hours a week to make ends meet. Julio would love to see fewer patients and learn to be a manager. Still, sometimes he thinks he would have better chances in IT. So, Julio thinks of leaving healthcare altogether and enrolling in a technical community college.    ✔️ Lifelong Learning - Problem Statement Julio needs a way to increase income and job satisfaction and find a life-work balance because he's burned out and unhappy. This problem results from the employer's lack of attention, support and employee development programs designed to help care workers thrive and grow within the healthcare industry. ✔️ Lifelong Learning - Innovative Solutions Identify nonprofit or public resources that can provide low-cost or free career counseling or training services for mid-career workers or the 55+ cohort, including how to advocate with employers. If recommended and feasible, continuing education may be undertaken. Encourage Julio's employer to create pathways within the organization for upward mobility, including training, mentoring, job exploration, and higher pay. This might occur through partnerships with local community colleges, for example.   Research concept of unionizing, organizing workers in the caregiver industry to achieve fairer working conditions (higher pay, fewer hours, meaningful support on the job, opportunity for promotion).   ✔️ Nobody's Too Old To Learn   Lifelong Learning involves being intentional about learning new things - no matter how old you are. Essentially, participation in cultural and recreational activities is essential for our health and the quality of life in our communities as we age. Thus, older adults should increasingly participate in lifelong learning programs and bring a lifetime of experiences to intergenerational programs - like ice skating! Besides, there's nothing wrong with learning a new physical skill and an intellectual one! Both types of lifelong learning are beneficial! ✔️More Ways To Help Julio   The challenges that Julio faces could potentially be made better if he worked for an Age-Friendly Employer - and if you haven't heard of that program, you can check out episode 58 with Tim Driver, Founder and CEO of Age-Friendly Ventures.     Another option for retooling could be finding an Age-Friendly University, and if you haven't heard of this initiative, please check out my interview with Dr Joanne Montepare in Episode 55. You may also have another idea for a solution - or know of a program that would help older adults and their families facing similar challenges. Please add your comments below this video - or on my website where you can find this episode - MelissaBPhD.com   We'd love to hear from you! --------------------------------------------------------------   If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  About Melissa Batchelor, Ph.D., R.N., FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN:   I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 and led to me joining the George Washington University (G.W.) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the G.W. Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.  

Pivot and Thrive
Amy Temperley promotes mental stimulation and community wherever you are

Pivot and Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 26:08


Amy Temperley is dedicated to making sure adults 50 and over (the Varsity generation!) are having a good time, learning new and quirky things, and making friends. Her company, Aging is Cool offers activities and classes in the Austin, TX, area while A Mighty Good Time connects people all over the country with classes on any subject you can think of. https://agingiscool.com/ https://www.amightygoodtime.com/ Thank you to Bokuwa and Wizzie2k for your music! https://open.spotify.com/artist/7HfQ9VLWIRSikubNOZiu8J

Physio Explained by Physio Network
#41 - How do we get older adults to exercise? With Dr Mariana Wingood

Physio Explained by Physio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 15:39


In this episode with Dr Mariana Wingood, she shares with us the recommended guidelines for exercise in the aging population as well as patients and therapists beliefs around this. We also discuss how clinically she finds most older adults are under-dosed when it comes to exercise and she forces us to think about the message that we are sending these patients which is the real magic.Dr Mariana Wingood is a clinician and a program director and she has recently completed a PhD on exploring barriers and solutions related to physical activity prescription among physical therapists treating older adults.Learn more about exercise dosage for the older adult with Mariana's recent Masterclass with us on Exercise prescription for aging adults. You can watch her whole class now with our 7-day free trial: https://www.physio-network.com/masterclass/exercise-prescription-for-aging-adults/Our host is Michael Rizk from Physio Network and iMoveU: https://cutt.ly/ojJEMZs

Rodger That
EP 125 :: Recapturing Memories Through Dementia Choir :: Joshua Vickery

Rodger That

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 30:46


In this foot-tapping episode, Bobbi & Mike talk with Joshua Vickery, Executive Director of Encore Creativity for Older Adults. We learn how Joshua uses music to engage people living with dementia and tap into their memories of beloved songs. Don't forget to subscribe, download, and review to share your thoughts about the show! To find out more about Bobbi and Mike or the inspiration behind this podcast, Rodger That, head over to rodgerthat.show. ***************************************** Rodger That is produced by Missing Link—a podcast media company that is dedicated to connecting people to intelligent, engaging and informative content.    Also in the Missing Link line-up of podcasts, is The Designated Drinker Show —a high-spirited show featuring craft cocktails and lively banter with the people who create (and quaff) them. Now, if you are looking for a whole new way to enjoy the theatre, check out Between Acts—an immersive audio theatre podcast experience. Each episode takes you on a spellbinding journey through the works of newfound playwrights—from dramas to comedies and everything in between.

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP101 - AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge Housing

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 8:20


One in every five Americans—nearly 80 million people—will be over 65 in 20 years, and surveys suggest that almost 90% intend to stay in their own homes  as long as possible. However, the nation now lacks the affordable housing and accompanying social services required to meet these needs. In particular, the four issues are; The majority of houses in the United States are inaccessible to older adults with limited mobility. Many older Americans who remain at home will need pricey long-term care. Millions of older adults cannot maintain their present living arrangements due to financial constraints. Isolation is common among older adults who live alone. We invite you to join us in another episode of This Is Getting Old with these circumstances in mind. Today's episode is Part 6: Housing—the 6th episode of the 10-part AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge.  Watch the full episode to learn more about housing-related issues, programs, and innovative solutions for older adults. Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️Aging In America As Seen In Nomadland Have you watched Nomadland?  The 2020 movie Nomadland has so many issues related to aging in America, from managing multiple chronic illnesses while living in a van, to finding employment after the age of 60. But it also has some heartwarming scenes because it demonstrates the importance of having a social network and being connected to other people, no matter how old you are. The movie shows resilience and how some older adults find a solution to losing their homes. ✔️ Housing - Scenario Monica, 67 years old, is living in Alexandria. She's lived in the same neighborhood for 30 years, a small two-bedroom house and her partner died about seven years ago. Since her arthritis has gotten worse, she's been thinking about leaving her home so she can afford to move, but nothing in her neighborhood is affordable. She's worried that she'll need in-home care or need to remodel her home and make it more accessible for mobility declines. Monica got a home equity loan on her house to help her kids buy their own homes. Also, Monica's currently living on Social Security, which will not cover higher housing or care costs.  ✔️ Housing - Problem Statement  Monica needs a way to transform her community because she has roots, connections, and a sense of community written into the fabric of her life. ✔️ Housing - Innovative Solutions  To help Monica and others access more affordable options and resources, we need to reframe the conversation around zoning and land use in our communities to increase density and encourage mixed-use. More notably, community support, family, and friends are important for Monica—this is important for all of us - no matter how old we are.  ✔️ Aging In Place Solutions for Older Adults Aging in Place begins with Housing. Ideas to solve these problems include; Forward-thinking when designing communities as Ryan Frederick does - retro-fitting spaces to be physically accessible and safe with universal design solutions.  If you'd like to learn more about Housing options and different models for housing, you can visit the AARP website on Housing in Livable Communities. You can also check out episode 40 on the Role of Place in Healthy Aging with Ryan Frederick on MelissaBPhD.com or on our YouTube channel. CAPABLE stands for Community Aging In Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders and is a person-directed, home-based solution that addresses both functional ability and healthcare expenses. CAPABLE provides integrated services by an Occupational Therapist, a Registered Nurse, and a handyman who all work together with the older adult to set goals and develop a plan to change behaviors to improve health and promote independence and safety.  If you'd like to learn more about this program, you can visit the website or email CAPABLEinfo@jhu.edu for more information.  You may also have another idea for a solution - or know of a program that would help older adults and their families facing similar challenges. Please add your comments below this video - or on my website where this episode can be found - MelissaBPhD.com We'd love to hear from you! --------------------------------------------- If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  About Melissa Batchelor, Ph.D., R.N., FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 and led to me joining the George Washington University (G.W.) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the G.W. Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

Maximum Wellness
Episode 118: Creatine & Resistance Training Increase Bone Mineral Density in Older Adults

Maximum Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 7:28


CDC.gov says that each year millions of people over 65 years of age fall – with one out of five causing serious injury, such as broken bones, or head injury, while three million older individuals are treated in emergency rooms for fall injuries. Over 800,000 older patients are hospitalized due to fall injury – most often head and hip trauma.Researchers from the faculty of Kinesiology, University of Regina and College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan in Canada report that interventions, “which improve radius and tibial bone geometry and muscle density (MuD) in the surrounding areas may be clinically important for decreasing the risk of falls and fractures in older adults.”The Canadians writing – Efficacy of Creatine Supplementation and Resistance Training on Area and Density of Bone and Muscle in Older Adults – which appeared in the November 2021 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, reference that, “creatine (Cr) supplementation (methylguanidine-acetic acid) during supervised whole-body resistance training (1 yr) decreased the rate of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) loss in the femoral neck and increased femoral shaft subperiosteal width compared with placebo in postmenopausal women.”There is a lack of research looking into the effect of oral creatine monohydrate supplementation with or without resistance training (RT) on cortical and trabecular bone structure properties in older individuals. It's known that resistance training supports bone structure and remodeling, irrespective of concurrent creatine supplementation.Therefore, the Canadians chose to investigate the efficacy of Cr supplementation relative to sex differences under supervised, whole-body RT on properties of bone and muscle in older adults.Seventy participants – 39 men and 31 women with an average age of 58 years - were randomized to supplement with Cr at 0.1 grams per kilogram/day, or placebo (Pl) during three days per week of whole-body resistance training for one year.Bone geometry (radius and tibia) and muscle area and density (forearm and lower leg) were assessed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The primary exercises placed specific strain on regions of the forearm (i.e., radius) and lower leg (i.e., tibia), which included dumbbell wrist pronation and supination, lever machine elbow flexion and ankle plantarflexion and plate-loaded tibia dorsiflexion. Secondary exercises included the hack squat, hip (abduction, adduction, flexion, and extension), leg curl, leg extension, low-back extension, chest press, lat-pull.The Canadians determined that, “older adults who supplemented with Cr experienced a significant increase in lower-leg MuD compared with those on placebo, which may be important because low MuD is an independent risk factor for falls and disability in older adults.” It was concluded that, “1 yr of Cr supplementation (0.1 g·kg−1·d−1) and supervised resistance training increased total bone area in the tibia and lower leg MuD in older adults.”If you would like to read this study and order creatine monohydrate made in the US, under good manufacturing practices (GMP) and third-party tested, go to maxwellnutrition.com.

Always On EM - Mayo Clinic Emergency Medicine
Episode 5 - Newer Medicine for Older Adults

Always On EM - Mayo Clinic Emergency Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 63:47


Dr. Lauren Southerland, president of ACEP and former president of SAEM geriatric EM sections and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Ohio State University, joins the show and truly inspires us to think differently about how we approach the care of older patients. She talks us through four models for providing geriatric emergency care, what does an ideal setup for older patients look like, what should we be doing to train future geriatrics-capable emergency physicians and much more! Please listen and check out the companion piece in the Mayo Clinic EM Blog.  Tweet Dr. Southerland @LSGeriatricEM Tweet Dr. Bellamkonda @VenkBellamkonda Tweet Always on EM Podcast @AlwaysonEM

Feisty Side of Fifty
Romance and Cyber Scams Aimed at Older Adults: Tamar Cooper, LICDC-CS, LISW-S

Feisty Side of Fifty

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 22:00


In many ways, aging can truly bring on our “Golden Years.” Yet, sadly, the number of scams and various other fraudulent means of targeting us seniors are on the rise. And older adults, who have experienced loneliness and isolation during the pandemic, are more susceptible than ever. That is why you will want to be sure to listen to what our guest has to share. Tamar Cooper, Director of Health Services at Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging, joins us to share all about a new therapy group for adults 55 and older who have experienced these types of romantic scams. If you or someone you care about has been impacted by online fraud—especially romantic scams--please take a few minutes to tune in. You will hear Tamar Cooper discuss the issues involved and ways you can successfully deal with these and heal from the emotional trauma you may have experienced.

Agent Survival Guide Podcast
Help Medicare & Medicaid Clients Secure SNAP Benefits

Agent Survival Guide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 8:19


  Find out how you, as an insurance agent, can coordinate SNAP benefits for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries! Read the text version.  Register for your FREE RitterIM.com account   Mentioned in this episode:   5 Tips for Selling Medicare Advantage Plans Adding SNAP Benefits for Older Adults in Medicare, Medicaid Can Reduce Hospital Visits, Healthcare Costs Are You Offering Multiple LTC Insurance Options? Building Client Loyalty: More than Just a Plan Four Ancillary Cross-Sales to Show Clients You Care Get the Facts on SNAP and Senior Hunger How Client Retention Boosts Insurance Sales Senior Food Insecurity Studies Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) SNAP Retailer Locator SNAP Special Rules for the Elderly or Disabled SNAP State Directory of Resources The Beginner's Guide to D-SNPs The Pros and Cons of Selling Insurance The Importance of a Good Breakfast Understanding the Details of Annuities   More episodes you'll like:   Agent Apps | What's Cooking? Meal Planner Apps Tips for Cross-Selling Medicare Products 4 Myths About Duel-Eligible Special Needs Plan (D-SNP) Sales   Articles to Share with Your Clients:   The Health Benefits of Cumin 3 Surprising Ways to Feel Better When You're Sad What are Federally Qualified Health Centers?   Ritter Insurance Marketing eBooks & Guides:   Agent Survival Kits: Beginners or Experts Social Media Marketing for Insurance Agents The Complete Guide to Client Loyalty and Retention Your Step-By-Step Guide to Getting Started in Insurance Sales   The latest from Ritter's Blog:   How to Help Clients Avoid Medicare Late Enrollment Penalties 2022 State of the Senior Market: In Review Ritter's Quest for Cash is Back Again for 2022!   Subscribe & Follow:   Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Overcast Podbean Spotify Stitcher   Connect on social:   Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Instagram TikTok Sarah's LinkedIn Sarah's Instagram  

Nutrition Nerd
Food Poisoning Among Older Adults

Nutrition Nerd

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 2:25


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Circulation on the Run
Circulation March 29, 2022 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 18:42


This week, join authors Steven Lubitz and Associate Editor Mark Link as they discuss the article "Screening for Atrial Fibrillation in Older Adults at Primary Care Visits: VITAL-AF Randomized Controlled Trial." Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass of the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr.  Carolyn Nam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center in Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And I'm Dr. Greg Huntley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center from VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Well, guess what we have for the featured discussion today, Greg. It's about screening for atrial fibrillation in older adults at primary care visits. Very, very important topic. And what we'll be looking at is the vital AF randomized control trial. Ooh, we're going to keep everyone in suspense here as we carry on and discuss today's papers. Can I start? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Absolutely. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Alright. This first paper is about infective endocarditis. Now, we know that cardiac surgery often represents the only treatment option in patients with infective endocarditis. However, infective endocarditis surgery may lead to a sudden release of inflammatory mediators, which is associated with the severity of postoperative organ dysfunction. So, authors Dr. Doesnst from Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany, and colleagues, decided to investigate the impact of hemo absorption during infective endocarditis surgery on post-operative organ dysfunction. This multicenter, randomized, non-blinded controlled trial assigned 288 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for infective endocarditis to hemo absorption, which is integration of cytosorb to the cardiopulmonary bypass or control. The primary outcome was defined as the difference between the mean total postoperative sequential organ failure assessment score, calculated maximally to the ninth postoperative day, and the difference with the basal score. Secondary outcomes were 30 day mortality, durations of mechanical ventilation, basal presser and renal replacement therapy. Cytokines were also measured in the first 50 patients. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Interesting study, Carolyn. Wow. So, what are the results? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Yes, this trial involved a lot of work and results showed, however, that there was a failure to demonstrate a reduction in postoperative organ dysfunction, 30 day mortality, or any of the clinically relevant secondary outcomes through intraoperative hemo absorption. Although hemo absorption reduced plasma cytokines at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there was no difference in any of the clinically relevant outcomes. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Great description, Carolyn. Well, my first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science. And Carolyn, the ascending thoracic aorta, site of aneurysm formation, is populated by a mosaic of medial and adventitial cells that are embryonically derived from either the second heart field, or the cardiac neural crest. Second heart field derives cells, populate areas that coincide with the spatial specificity of thoracic aortopathies that are often associated with aneurysms. And so, this study, led by Dr. Alan Daugherty, from the University of Kentucky. Its purpose was to determine whether and how second heart field derived cells contribute to as sending aortopathies. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Wow, an important topic, Greg. What did the authors find? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Okay. So, Carolyn, first, ascending aortic pathologies were examined in patients with sporadic thoracic aortopathies and angiotensin 2 infused mice. And so, the investigators found several things. First, second heart field derived smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts associate with angiotensin 2 induced aortic pathologies. Second, angiotensin 2 induced a distinct fibroblast sub-cluster that was less abundant for messenger RNAs related to major extracellular components and TGF beta-ligands and receptors, but more abundant for proliferative genes. Third, TGFBR2 deletion in second heart field derived cells were embryonically lethal, with significant dilatation of the outflow tract in the mice. And finally, second heart field specific deletion of LRP1 led to aortic pathologies in mice, supporting the importance of second heart field derived cells in maintaining ascending aortic wall integrity. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Wow. Could you just sum up the clinical implications for us, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Well, Carolyn, I knew you were going to ask me that. So, these results indicate that heterogeneity of the embryonic origins of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts contributes to complex mechanisms of vasculopathy formation, which should be considered when investigating the pathogenesis of thoracic aortopathies. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Wow, thanks Greg. Well, my next study is also a translational study, and this one provides a deeper understanding of insulin regulation of cholesterol metabolism, and its disruption in type one diabetes. So, this is from Dr. Biddinger from Children's Hospital Boston and colleagues. In order to define the mechanisms by which insulin controls plasma cholesterol levels, the authors knocked down the insulin receptor, FOXO1, and the key bioacid synthesis enzyme, CYP8B1, in mice. They measured bioacid composition, cholesterol absorption, and plasma cholesterol. In parallel, they measured markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis in humans with type one diabetes treated with ezetimibe and statins in a double blind crossover study. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Oh, wow, Carolyn. So, experiments in both animal models and in human subjects. So, what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Insulin, by inhibiting FOXO1 in the liver, reduces 12 alpha hydroxylated bio acids, reduces cholesterol absorption and reduces plasma cholesterol levels. Thus, type one diabetes leads to a unique set of derangement in cholesterol metabolism with increased absorption rather than increased synthesis. These derangements are reversed by ezetemibe, which is a cholesterol absorption inhibitor, but not simvastatin, which is a cholesterol emphasis inhibitor. So, taken together, these data suggest that a personalized approach to lipid lowering in type one diabetes may be more effective, and highlight the need for further studies specifically in this group of patients. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Nice, Carolyn. Well, we've got some other really interesting or articles in the issue. And first, from the mail bag, there's a Research Letter from Professor Bers, entitled "Empagliflozin Reverses Late Sodium Current Enhancement and Cardiomyocyte Proarrhythmia in a Translational Murray Model of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction." Carolyn, there's another research letter from Professor Shu entitled, "Activation Of INKY Cells at the Maternal Fetal Interface that Predisposes Offspring to Cardiac Injury." Also, there's a really nice, in depth article entitled, "Takasubo Syndrome Pathophysiology Emerging in Concepts and Clinical Implications." And it's from Dr. Trisha Singh. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Nice. We also have an ECG challenge by Dr. Mugnai on “A Tachycardia in Disguise” and a Perspective piece by Dr. Alexander on “Equipoise in Clinical Trials: Enough Uncertainty [but] in Whose Opinion?” Isn't that interesting? Wow, thanks, Greg. Now, though, let's go on to this super exciting feature discussion on screening for atrial fibrillation in older adults' primary care. Dr. Greg Hundley:           You bet. Well, listeners, we are here for the feature discussion, now, on this March 29th issue. And we have with us Dr. Steve Lubitz, from Mass General and Boston, and our own associate editor, Dr. Mark Link, from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Welcome, gentlemen. So, Steve, we're going to start with you. Can you describe for us some of the background information that went into the construct of your study, and then what was the hypothesis that you wanted to address? Dr. Steven Lubitz:            Sure. Well, thanks for the opportunity to talk with you today about our work. So, as we know, AFib is a common and more bitter arrhythmia. And the first manifestation of AFib can be stroke in a substantial number of individuals. Strokes from atrial fibrillation or debilitating, but they can be prevented using oral anticoagulants if we know who has atrial fibrillation. But atrial fibrillation can be a symptomatic and it's possible, therefore, that screening pre-AFib could lead to new diagnoses and ultimately improve outcome by enabling stroke prevention. Point of care screening for AFib has been embraced by some guidelines for individuals age 65 or older, such as those in Europe, and mobile technology has now evolved and enables rapid mask screening using handheld ECGs, single lead ECGs, which obviates the need and expense of performing 12-lead ECGs to screen for AFib. Nevertheless, though, some guidelines have suggested that data are insufficient to recommend screening AFib using ECGs, such as those from the United States Preventative Services Task Force. We tested whether screening individuals age 65 or older at the time of a primary care clinic visit using a single lead ECG would lead to an increased rate of detection of AFib in contemporary United States practices. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. And so, maybe describe for us this task force, and also what was your study design and, again, your study population? Dr. Steven Lubitz:            Sure. So, specifically our study design, we performed a cluster randomized control trial in which primary care practice clinics were randomized to the screening intervention or to usual care, and patients aged 65 or older arriving for a primary care visit with their provider were eligible for participation. Patients were offered screening by practiced medical assistants at the time of their vital sign assessments, and screening was performed, if they consented, within a live core cardio mobile single ECG device, which was affixed to an iPad and stationed in the clinic. The results of the screening were made available to the providers at the time of the visit, and then the provider was able to make any and all decisions about subsequent management, confirmation or treatment. The primary outcome was a new diagnosis of Afib made in the medical record at one year following the start of the screening intervention, and the outcome was ascertained using the electronic health record and then manually adjudicated. We powered the study to detect a difference of nearly 0.5% in the rate of atrial fibrillation diagnoses at 12 months between the screening and usual care arms. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And how many patients did you enroll? And then what were your study results? Dr. Steven Lubitz:            Well, eight practices were randomized to the screening arm and eight practices to the usual care arm. And in total, that equated to about 15000 patients without a history of atrial fibrillation in the screening arm and 15000 patients in the control arm without a history of atrial fibrillation. The mean age was about 74, about 60% were female, 82% were white. And the mean chad-vad score was 3.4. We observed several main findings. The first is that, of the individuals in the screening arm, 91% were screened at least once. And this is the largest point of care screening study to date. The rate of screening in the intervention arm was substantially greater than any other contemporary trial, point of care, single ECG screening. We think that high rate of compliance with the intervention reflects patient enthusiasm for screening and a widespread feasibility of incorporating single ECGs into the routine vital sign practice workflow. Secondly, the primary endpoint, however, incidence of new AFib diagnoses at 12 months, was 1.72% in the screening arm, and 1.59% in the usual care arm, which equates to a risk difference of .13%. That was not statistically significant in the overall sample. We observed a substantial difference in new AFib diagnoses among those aged 85 or older in pre-specified subgroup analyses, 5.56% in the screening arm and 3.76% in usual care arm, which corresponds to a risk difference of 1.8%, where a number needed a screen of about 55, raising the possibility that point of care single ECG screening among the oldest and highest risk individuals might be effective. But this finding warrants future study. Third, we observed a shift in the location of diagnosis. So, they fit with a higher likelihood of diagnosis at a primary care practice encounter in the screening arm, as compared to the usual care arm, which is as expected. And the implications on downstream management pathways, cost of care, other downstream work flows is unknown at the moment. And lastly, we observed it in anticoagulation use was high, even among those with AFib diagnosed in the screening arm, which is a reassuring finding, suggesting that clinicians recognized that AF detected using this single lead point of care screening is likely to represent high burden, persistent AF that carries a substantial risk of stroke. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well, Mark, I know you review many papers for us here at Circulation. What attracted you to this particular paper? Dr. Mark Link:    This issue of point of care screening for AFib is a very hot topic. We all know that clinically diagnosed AFib carries with it a high risk of stroke, but what we don't know is incidentally found Afib, or nonclinically found Afib, what does that mean? This was one of the largest, if not actually the largest, study of point of care screening. And the i-cors are a very accurate device, or reasonably accurate device. So, we thought it's an important contribution to the literature. I think it surprised the authors, as well as us, there wasn't a difference in the diagnosis of AFib between the two arms. I think all of us would've expected to see that. But we're still learning a lot about point of care screening, and we're not to the point where we know what to do yet. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And Mark, what are some of your thought? Steve raised the point that, in that subgroup, greater than age 85, any additional insights there? Dr. Mark Link:    Yeah. I think that, if you can enrich your group with people that are more likely to have AFib, and the older you get, the more likely you are to have AFib, you are more likely to find Afib. But then treating people over age 85 also becomes a little bit riskier, with both anticoagulants and antirhythmic drugs and ablation. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Great points. Well, Steve, coming back to you, what do you see as the next study to be performed, really, in this sphere of research? Dr. Steven Lubitz:            Thanks. I think I proposed two additional lines of inquiry. At first, I think our hypothesis generating observation to the point of care screening with a single EDCG can lead to higher rates of AFib detection among the oldest individuals, age 85 or older, with a small number needed to screen warrants, replication, and the downstream implications of that on stroke and bleeding merit further evaluation. I think secondly, given the proliferation of wearable technology, future studies should examine the effectiveness of detecting perccismal atrial fibrillation for preventing downstream adverse events, including stroke. This point of care screening is likely to detect the highest burden persistent forms of atrial fibrillation in contrast to some of the wearable technology, like consumer wearable technology, that might detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, more commonly. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Ah, great point. And Mark, how about you? Anything to add? What future study do you see needs to be performed in this space? Dr. Mark Link:    It's clear from a number of studies that the longer that you monitor someone, the more likely you are to get a diagnosis of AFib. And that's pretty clear. This was a 30 second monitor. We have a number of studies that have shown two week and ILS monitoring is far more likely to get a diagnosis of AFib. But what we don't know is, if making that diagnosis of AFib makes any difference on ultimate outcomes. That's the studies that we need to see, is does treatment of incidentally found AFib improve clinical care. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very good. Well, listeners, we want to thank Dr. Steve Lubitz from Mass General in Boston, and also Dr. Mark Link from UT Southwestern in Dallas, bringing us results from this study indicating that screening for atrial fibrillation using a single lead EKG at a primary care visit did not affect new atrial fibrillation diagnoses among those that were aged 65 years or older. There was, perhaps, a difference in those aged greater than 85 years, but more research is to come in that space. And, of course, looking for peroxisomal AFib with handheld devices is another area you yet to be investigated. Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week, On the Run. Dr. Greg Hundley:           This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

Round Table China
How to help older adults re-enter the workforce?

Round Table China

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 52:45


For retirees who still want to work, are there ways to help them reenter the workforce? / Does remote work make employees "invisible"? / Motivational Monday!

Healthy Skeptic, MD
An Epidemic of Unhoused Older Adults with Jean Galiana

Healthy Skeptic, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 32:01


We often think of homelessness as a problem of the young. But recent projections suggest that the number of unhoused older adults will triple over the next decade. Today's guest is Ms. Jean Galiana, the Coordinator for Older Adult Services with the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. Jean discusses creative approaches for increasing housing options for the geriatric population. Jean also describes her recent book, Aging Well. Solutions to the most Pressing Global Challenges of Aging. Make sure not to miss this one, since after today's episode the Healthy Skeptic, MD will take a hiatus .

Lessons in Lifespan Health
Assistant Professor Ryo Sanabria: Studying the Intersection Between Stress and Aging

Lessons in Lifespan Health

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 19:46


Assistant Professor of Gerontology Ryo Sanabria joins Professor George Shannon to discuss their research seeking to understand why stress response pathways break down as we grow older and whether there may be ways to delay that breakdown and potentially promote healthier lifespans.    Quotes from this episode On the definition of stress: Stress can come in so many different forms and flavors. It can come in the form of something external, something like heat stress. For example, being out in the desert heat, it can be something as similar to cold stress of a winter storm, or even something like a bacterial or viral infection… Stress can also be internal though. It's not only external. When we think of humans, we can think of big things like mental stress, emotional stress, social and societal stressors. So really the definition of stress is pretty large. And just to say anything that causes some kind of adverse reaction to the body is a stress. And so we study all of these various types of stresses and how it impacts our bodies, our health, and of course aging. On how our cells respond to stress: The response to stress within the cell is simply to activate mechanisms that prevent damage. And the main way that this happens is to turn on genes. So genes encode specific types of proteins and processes and mechanisms that are important to mitigate the stress. So it's like essentially activating or turning on a switch that has some kind of functional output, similar to how you will just flip a switch to turn on a fan or an air conditioner. So you can cool down the house. Exactly in the same way, the cells will switch on jeans that can activate pathways that prevent or mitigate that is associated with exposure to stress. So for example, when we are under heat stress, our cells will turn on the mechanisms and pathways that will essentially alleviate damage associated with heat stress, such as damaging proteins or things like that, that happen under heat stress. So the cell is essentially trying to repair or discard damaged proteins that happen with exposure to heat. On efforts to give older person to have  a younger person's ability to deal with stress We know that the capacity to deal with stress declines during the aging process. So the question is if we give an older person, a younger person's capacity to deal with stress, would that actually combat aging? So if we go back to example again, before, if I give the grandmother her grandchild's capacity to deal with desert heat, we know that she'll be more resilient to the heat. She'll likely survive the desert, but generally, would she actually be healthier overall as well? Would she be in a sense younger? And the answer in most model organisms that we study is yes. When we give an old organism, a young organism's capacity to deal with stress, not only can they handle that specific stress better, but overall they're healthier and live longer. So when we think about model organisms, what we're doing is activating those genes that I talked about. So essentially turning on those switches that will then activate a specific pathway, like in the example I gave earlier where heat stress causes damaged proteins, you can turn on the switches that will essentially activate pathways that will remove or repair the damaged proteins. So what happens during the aging process is that the capacity to turn on these genes switch on these genes are impaired. So what do we do with this? We really try to increase the capacity of that gene to turn on. So it would be like increasing the electrical circuit's capacity to pump energy into your AC so we can increase the gene's output and in model organisms, this is easy. We can simply overexpress your gene. So what does that mean? If we think about the number of copies a gene has, usually one gene will have one copy, but if we give an organism 50 copies of the same gene, even if we decrease the output by half during aging, you're still having 25 times the gene expression, which will improve the overall outcome. But of course, in humans, you can't just go in and increase the number of copies of a gene. We're not yet there for gene therapy. So what can we do in humans? Well, if we know what specific mechanisms are activated by the gene, we can try to target them with drugs. So use drugs that increase the function of one specific mechanism. So we know many of the genes and mechanisms that get activated when we're exposed to for example, heat stress. So we can try to develop drugs that activate these pathways to essentially hyper-activate the stress response and try to use this to combat aging. On the concept of  hormesis and the benefits of exercise: Hormesis - what it means is that exposure to low levels of stress can activate a beneficial stress response that makes you more resilient to exposure to future stressors. Exercise is exactly this. When you exercise you're stressing out the body, you can get micro-tears and the muscles when you do strength training, and that's what lets the muscles grow and become stronger. Any kind of cardio or any type of fitness will make your body temperature elevate, which will cause a mild heat, stress and exposure to all of these mini stressors during exercise activates all of these stress response pathways that I talked about before. And so when your body faces stress, you essentially become more resilient to it. So athletes tend to be healthier mostly because they have a higher tolerance for stress. Their bodies are better able to mitigate damage associated with stress because their bodies can activate stronger stress responses. So the concept of hormesis is that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Every hardship you face makes you more resilient and stronger to face the next one. So truly there's a connection to exercise and fitness as a model of essentially adapting to stress, to essentially combat aging.   On the benefits of stress Yeah, I know we covered a lot today. I went into so many diverse topics, so I just want to summarize everything by, uh, saying Kelly Clarkson sings it right. For sure. She says what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Definitely true. So while people will always tell you avoid stress, it isn't good for you. I want to just say, well, some stress isn't so bad living a completely stress-free life might actually not be so beneficial. So let yourself experience some good stress, work out, go to the gym, fight off a bully, maybe, immerse yourself in a challenging job. Everything you face in life will make you that much stronger. And who knows. It might even positively impact your lifespan.

Today with Claire Byrne
Covid in older adults

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 5:31


Professor Ronan Collins, Consultant Geriatrician at Tallaght Hospital

GEROS Health - Physical Therapy | Fitness | Geriatrics
Sit to Stand training for older adults: Do we go for depth or load?

GEROS Health - Physical Therapy | Fitness | Geriatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 22:32


Want to make sure you stay on top of all things geriatrics? Go to https://MMOA.online to check out our Free eBooks, Lectures, & the MMOA Digest!

Bob & Brad
How Much Exercise Do Older Adult Need

Bob & Brad

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 8:32


Bob and Brad discuss how much exercise older adults should get. Medical Disclaimer All information, content, and material of this website is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. Affiliate disclaimer: Keep in mind that we may receive commissions when you click our links and make purchases. However, this does not impact our reviews and comparisons. We are highly selective in our products and try our best to keep things fair and balanced in order to help you make the best choice for you.

Butts & Guts: A Cleveland Clinic Digestive Health Podcast
Colorectal and GI Surgery for Older Adults

Butts & Guts: A Cleveland Clinic Digestive Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 14:11


Colorectal surgeon Joshua Sommovilla, MD joins Butts & Guts to discuss common procedures performed on older adults and considerations taken to ensure optimal recovery time. Dr. Sommovilla also provides an update on minimally invasive surgical research that will further benefit patients.

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support
Using Art To Connect to Older Adults

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 53:46


Art is one of the most enjoyable ways to connect with an older adult. Participating in art can provide older adults with multiple benefits and enhanced cognitive function. One of the challenges caregivers face is handling frustration when confusion is common. When our loved ones lose control because their memory is failing, they frequently lash out.  Art for older adults can help relieve this fear and anger by;  helping individuals relax; providing a sense of control; reducing depression and anxiety; assisting in socialization; encouraging playfulness and a sense of humor; improving cognition; offering sensory stimulation; Plus, it can be a lot of fun. It's worth a try. My Mom was a very creative person, but she feared "getting it wrong" whenever I attempted to do an art project with her. I've seen some other methods that I would have liked to have tried with her, but since I can't, I'm sharing this passionate young woman's story with you. Marie-Louise is my guest today, and how she became passionate about using art to connect with older adults will delight you and maybe, give you the confidence to give art therapy a try with your loved one. The passion and insight that Marie-Louise shares will make you feel great. She has tons of advice, ideas and heart-warming stories! Related Episodes: Art Therapy for Older Adults Connecting through Art Check out our new sponsor!  ​Life is a journey, and at Pharma-C-Wipes, we provide products that support you at each twist and turn.   Access all your medical records in one place & opt into research with PicnicHealth PicnicHealth (Our Sponsor)  Sign up for free & get $25. Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com Join Fading Memories On Social Media! If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  Choose your favorite platform and follow us for more advice, motivation, recipes, and cute dog photos. Facebook    InstagramTwitter Subscribe to our YouTube channel. There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share. Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session, Jen is available. Contact her at fadingmemoriespodcast@gmail.com   Make Your Brain Span Match Your Lifespan with Relevaate NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan  

This Week in Cardiology
Mar 11, 2022 This Week in Cardiology Podcast

This Week in Cardiology

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 25:35


AF screening, CTA, stroke prevention and broken observational studies, and medical writing are the topics John Mandrola, MD discusses in this week's podcast. This podcast is intended for healthcare professionals only. To read a partial transcript or to comment, visit: https://www.medscape.com/twic I - AF Screening - Handheld ECGs Ease A-Fib Screening in the Very Elderly https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/969846 - Screening for Atrial Fibrillation in Older Adults at Primary Care Visits: the VITAL-AF Randomized Controlled Trial https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.121.057014 II - CTA - DISCHARGE: CTA Shows Safety Edge vs Cath in Intermediate-Risk Stable Chest Pain https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/969732 - CT or Invasive Coronary Angiography in Stable Chest Pain https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2200963 III - Stroke Prevention post TAVI - Silver Lining Emerges for Embolic Protection in Post-TAVR Stroke https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/969992 - Cerebral Embolic Protection and Stroke-Related Mortality Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement https://www.jacc.org/doi/full/10.1016/j.jcin.2022.01.007 - Safety and efficacy of cerebral protection devices in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A clinical end-points meta-analysis https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29550047/ - Cerebral Embolic Protection and Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Results From the Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33619968/ IV - Medical Writing - Writing Program Asks Physicians to Explore Their Experiences https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/969973 You may also like: Medscape editor-in-chief Eric Topol, MD, and master storyteller and clinician Abraham Verghese, MD, on Medicine and the Machine https://www.medscape.com/features/public/machine The Bob Harrington Show with Stanford University Chair of Medicine, Robert A. Harrington, MD. https://www.medscape.com/author/bob-harrington Questions or feedback, please contact news@medscape.net