Podcasts about cheetahs

Large feline of the genus Acinonyx

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ROCK AND/OR ROLL
CHEETAH CHROME

ROCK AND/OR ROLL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 75:06


Legendary Dead Boys guitarist Cheetah Chrome graces Rock and/or Roll with his presence. Listen to hear Cheetah discuss: the evolution of punk rock, Peter Laughner, Cheap Trick, Stiv Bators, GG Allin, Ron Weasley...all this and more.

The Perez Hilton Podcast with Chris Booker
Cheetah - Adam Levine, Prince Harry, Tom Brady, Nick Cannon, Jojo Siwa & more! |The Perez Hilton Podcast - Listen Here!

The Perez Hilton Podcast with Chris Booker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 62:05 Transcription Available Very Popular


Would you toss Adam Levine to the curb over his alleged cheating scandal? The Queen was laid to rest, but not without the family drama that surrounds Prince Harry. Tom Brady is getting special treatment from his team because of his marriage problems with Gisele. Perez is having a fallout with yet another D-Lister. Thanks to our sponsors: Geico = Whether you rent or own, GEICO makes it EASY to bundle home and car insurance. Go to GEICO.com today. Follow Perez! FAMILY CHANNEL: http://YouTube.com/ThePerezHilton WEBSITE: http://PerezHilton.com PEREZ'S INSTAGRAM: http://Instagram.com/ThePerezHilton WEBSITE'S INSTAGRAM: http://Instagram.com/PerezHiltonGET A PERSONALIZED VIDEO FROM ME HERE: https://Cameo.com/PerezHilton LISTEN TO MY PODCAST HERE: http://PerezPodcast.com WEBSITE'S FACEBOOK: http://Facebook.com/PerezHilton

That Record Got Me High Podcast
S6E251 - Bonus Mixtape Episode with Cheetah Chrome

That Record Got Me High Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 63:21


For this BONUS 'Mixtape Episode', we invited guitarist Cheetah Chrome (Dead Boys, Rocket From the Tombs) to curate a mixtape and dug into his selections. From growing up in Cleveland listening to rock-and-roll radio like CKLW out of Detroit to his mom unwittingly turning him on to The Stooges, it was a super-fun conversation with a true punk rock legend! Cheetah's mixtape: 1. Jumpin Jack Flash - The Rolling Stones 2. I Saw Her Standing There - The Beatles 3. 96 Tears - ? & The Mysterians 4. Born To Be Wild - Steppenwolf 5. Good Morning Little School Girl - Ten Years After 6. Long Way To Go / Halo Of Flies - Alice Cooper 7. 1969 - The Stooges 8. Bad Girl - New York Dolls 9. Heroin - The Velvet Underground 10. Search and Destroy - Iggy & The Stooges 11. Hey Boys - The Dictators 12. Time - Tom waits 13. Anthem - The Sensational Alex Harvey Band *Other songs featured in this episode: Sonic Reducer, Down In Flames, Ain't It Fun - Dead Boys; Blitzkrieg Bop - Ramones (It's Alive); I'm Going Home - Ten Years After (Live at Woodstock); B.B On Mars - Alice Cooper; Down In Flames - Rocket From the Tombs; Did You See Her Eyes? - The Illusion; Stay With Me - The Dictators **episode artwork: Cori Elba (On PlanetWeird)

Hochman and Crowder
OJ McDuffie: “pick your poison” trying to cover Tyreek Hill and Jaylen Waddle

Hochman and Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 19:14


The legendary Miami Dolphins WR joined Hoch and Crowder to discuss the Dolphins memorable victory Sunday and had high praise for the two standout receivers on each side of Tua Tagovailoa. 

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 106: Russia's Dolly Gets Mouthy, Indian Cheetahs, & Patagonia Saves The Earth

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 90:40 Very Popular


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Neato Bandito Mexican Lager from Deep Ellum Brewing Company from Texas. She reviews her weekend doing shows in Texas, sharing her top TexMex stops at El Fenix in Dallas and Matt's El Rancho in Austin. Kathleen woke up at 5am to watch Queen Elizabeth II's funeral, and shares her own thoughts on the coverage and the monarchy. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Whataburger Buttermilk Ranch and Utz Potato Stix. UPDATES: Kathleen gives an update on Meta's fall from grace, Lake Powell's upstream water dries up and the Brink's heist mystery gets crazier.“HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the discovery of an ancient Maya City which halts an ongoing Mexican railroad project, and a Palestinian farmer discovered an ancient mosaic when planting an olive tree. FRONT PAGE PUB NEWS: Kathleen shares articles about Burger King's brand revival, cheetahs return to India after near extinction, UK anti-monarchy protesters face police crackdown after the Queen's death, Patagonia gives a $3 billion corp gift to counter climate change, Russia's “Dolly Parton” protests Putin, what happened to the $2 bills, and after more than 50 years reclusive artist Michael Heizer has reviled his life's work in the Nevada desert. SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live > kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

3 Things
The return of the cheetahs, and the challenges ahead

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 29:53


After being declared extinct 70 years ago, 8 cheetahs arrived in India from Namibia on Saturday. This was the first time in the world that a large carnivore was relocated from one continent to another. In this episode, Indian Express' Esha Roy and Iram Siddique join host Shashank Bhargava to talk about the main objectives behind this projects, the concerns that experts have raised, and the measures that forest officials are taking now to ensure the safety of the big cats (which includes roping in a former dacoit, who has over 91-cases of murder and kidnapping to his name).

Improve the News
September 20, 2022: ”Pandemic over”, US-Taliban deal, and Cheetah return

Improve the News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 30:48


Facts & Spin for September 20, 2022 top stories: Biden declares the pandemic 'Over', Biden reaffirms that the US would defend Taiwan if China attacks, the Taliban and US agree on a prisoner swap, Zelenskyy promises no 'lull' in Ukraine's war effort, the EU proposes suspending billions in Hungary funding, New York's Mayor supports a bill granting non-citizens voting rights, Palestinian schools strike over alleged Israeli censorship, the UN denounces the exclusion of Afghan girls from school, Yeshiva University suspends all clubs in response to SCOTUS ruling, Hurricane Fiona knocks out power to Puerto Rico, and cheetahs are reintroduced to India after 70 years. Sources: https://www.improvethenews.org/ Brief Listener Survey: https://www.improvethenews.org/pod

Far From Fact
220: Cheetahs are here

Far From Fact

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:57


It's the dear Prime Minister's birthday and what better way to celebrate it than import some Namibian cheetahs into the Indian wild. Catch the lads as they bite into this top-notch bit of media savvy from the ruling party. Some feelings may be hurt here, but rest assured no animals were harmed in the making of this episode. Here are the links to the Stash info Rags to Riches Sign up for the newsletter Stash + Music credit – Simon D'Souza + Write to us – hello@farfromfact.in + Follow us https://www.instagram.com/farfromfact/ Instamojo https://www.instamojo.com/@thelads_farfromfact Paypal paypal.me/farfromfact

I Am Not Bored - Kids News, Stories & Fun Facts
Episode 317: Cheetahs Return To India | Here Are The Pros & Cons

I Am Not Bored - Kids News, Stories & Fun Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 8:06


In this I Am Not Bored Episode, we explain to your kids the extinction, and reintroduction of the cheetahs in India. From how expensive it is, to cheetahs adapting to a new home, we share conservationists perspectives in this episode. The Big Cat has returned, and here's everything you kid needs to know.

ThePrint
ThePrintAM: Why opinion is divided on introduction of Cheetahs in Kuno

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:36


SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी
India report: Indian Prime Minister releases African cheetahs in Madhya Pradesh

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 9:55


Listen to the latest SBS Hindi news from India. 19/09/2022

As It Is - Voice of America
Cheetahs Once Again Live in India After 70 Years - September 19, 2022

As It Is - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 6:21


The Bledsoe Show
How Training Your Eyes Will Make you Better at Everything

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:34


00:10.29 Dr_ Placebo Welcome back to Monday mornings with max and Mike Today we're going to talk about Mike's funny glasses and we're gonna continue to cut through the Bs where we see it and then we're gonna add some BS. of our own Mike what's up and what's up with the glasses. 00:33.17 mikebledsoe Absolutely only the most helpful BS in the world. So ah, you know I had to get the we've already used that title. Ah. 00:38.00 Dr_ Placebo Oh can we call this episode constructive lives fuck. Okay I Guess that's really all there is is that all language Anyway, whatever right. 00:48.14 mikebledsoe ah ah I mean the enlightened folk out there I think I would tell you that. So yeah, the glasses are to solve ah a problem that was created by trying to solve a problem that we're trying to solve a problem. So. Ah, basically well these are blue light blocking glasses. So these are not my I still have twenty I'm forty years old 2020 vision to this day I ah I have to acknowledge my parents for their good genetics. 01:19.73 Dr_ Placebo Quit bragging. 01:26.50 mikebledsoe And ah and and my own personal work of doing a lot of things outdoors. No but ah, it's funny because I did start getting some floaters in my eyes and but not I mean I don't even notice them unless I'm like staring at the blue sky you know type of thing. But I. 01:37.10 Dr_ Placebo E. 01:46.21 mikebledsoe Was somebody asked me about their floaters and I go I go you know I'm not really sure what it is but I'm sure that if your body is incredibly healthy and doesn't carry a heavy toxic load and a lot of inflammation your eyes are probably eye health overall is going to do well. But so um. Was like you know what? and it's funny after that conversation I started noticing I was like oh when I'm looking at screens all day. My eyes I can tell like there's I go from being in my living room and then I sit down I have this I have a really big screen at my desk and I got the screen. 02:22.70 Dr_ Placebo Um. 02:23.68 mikebledsoe To improve my posture. So if you if you've got a tiny screen you're more likely to be hunched over trying to look at it and your head's gonna jut forward. But if you have a big screen. It's positioned right? You actually have to like sit back a little bit your chin tucks and you go into a much better posture. So I got this big screen and then I. 02:33.46 Dr_ Placebo Yep. 02:42.81 mikebledsoe Realize that my eyes are just getting blasted by a ton of blue light when I'm looking. There's artificial light I'm just staring right at it for hours and hour hours and hour hours and hours a day and I was like oh I need to get some blue light blocking glasses. So these are like my daytime I have some that. 02:47.24 Dr_ Placebo And. 03:01.32 mikebledsoe When the sun goes down I just swap it out with something that's more heavy duty. Ah and when I wear these glasses my eyes like my nervous system. Overall it's not just my eyes. My nervous system tends to be calmer throughout the day so looking into the blue light all day without anything to block it. Yeah. It was frying me. So yeah, we'll see. We'll see if. 03:21.60 Dr_ Placebo I Smell a sponsor. 03:30.11 mikebledsoe You got to be on my email list be on my email list. You might get links to the you know these products these magical products. 03:31.34 Dr_ Placebo Ah, ah, um, man and ah, all right all right I like it. You know I noticed um because I play tennis and. I Don't know if you know but you really need to be able to see quite well to play tennis at a distance in a variety of light scenarios and I noticed a couple times when I was on the computer a bunch before it Just absolutely. Put my ability to see the tennis ball in the basement. It was really rough. So I try to think of it like you know, um, like rpgs like role-playing video games and some you know you're you're going around. Maybe you're fighting monsters or some shit. But occasionally you find yourself. 04:10.54 mikebledsoe Here. 04:28.90 Dr_ Placebo A little console and I kind of think of ah life that way a little bit. It's a role-playing game and I try to be really mindful of how much time I'm spending at the console.. There should be a really compelling Reason. To use the screens basically and we we really we really don't know what the total cost is um, certainly there's the old ah example of the accountant becomes nearsighted and the farmer becomes farsighted. Right? And so I think the cycling between is the key. 05:06.54 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, dude I I agree this is a I love we're talking about this because Ashley and I oh my my mistake, my fiance and I forget her name. Ah yeah. 05:21.39 Dr_ Placebo Jennifer should come up with a fake name. 05:23.75 mikebledsoe Do that now I'm gonna be in trouble. Ah, she'll be the last person listen to this show. She she hears me rant enough. Ah the we we were having date night last night and one these little fancy blind bars. We had bread and accoutrements. 05:34.68 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 05:41.63 mikebledsoe And i't know what that word means but I know when I order it I Love the food that's put in front of me So the ah the oh yeah, the charouty as well. 05:53.29 Dr_ Placebo Charcotery is what I like I can say feed me meat and cheese in like 10 languages. 06:00.81 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean that's that's that's the necessary skills to have any travel. So. It's basically food and and bathrooms. But ah ah we were talking about Myopia and so I had I. Talked about ah I saw a study there day and said there's a huge rides in Myopia and that is nearsightedness that means that people can see just fine something that's in the room with them but something that they try to see far away appears to be blurry and um. You know it's attributed to the fact that everyone's looking at things really close but hardly ever looking at anything very far away and ah that that had me thinking about a concept and I don't know where I picked this up but I I didn't invent it myself. 06:45.19 Dr_ Placebo Edit. 06:56.68 mikebledsoe Which is ah basically the idea is that the more time you spend looking close if you're in a room and all that your your brain actually has a hard time conceptualizing very far out into the future your ability to project. Further out your ability to consider more is hindered and so your eyes are basically just like your your brain is reaching out in front to try to capture some sense of the world and ah if you spend a lot of time. 07:29.63 Dr_ Placebo A. 07:34.42 mikebledsoe And a small space. You're probably gonna think small thoughts. You're gonna have there's gonna small thinking your ability to think into the future is gonna be minimized and you know what? what? Mate. What I thought about next is you know the last two and a half years people spent. There's a 2 wo-year period where a lot of people probably the most people most people who were already indoors way too much now decide to lock themselves inside a house and stare at screens instead of. 07:52.34 Dr_ Placebo Um. 08:08.21 mikebledsoe Instead of looking at somebody who's ten feet away they're always eighteen inches away and if you're on your phone dude it's it's like it's one foot away from your face. So now you have an entire population of people who are near so ah near sighted they're they're myopic their thinking becomes myopic. So. 08:09.71 Dr_ Placebo M. 08:27.38 mikebledsoe As above so below. So whatever's happening in your physical world is going to dictate how your internal world is if you're living in a messy chaotic space your mind is likely gonna be a little messy and chaotic. So this I remember back to when I was living in California and remember. You remember my house and had that big window that was just dude I spent most of my time like I would wake up and walk in the backyard and look over the cliff into the expanse of the ocean and all that and at any time I could leave my computer and put my eyes out there. And it was all it was really nice to be able to get that that contrast and I and it felt good now. You had the practice of looking across the way and trying to spot little boats or a house down the way and to help with my eyesight and. 09:14.56 Dr_ Placebo A. 09:23.80 mikebledsoe And it got me thinking about just my ability to operate in business if I'm in front of a computer screen all the time you know how does that hinder my ability to plan for the future to see greater opportunities or am I going to be able to just see what's in front of me right now. 09:42.42 Dr_ Placebo Man I love what you said there starting about ah 2 two and a half minutes ago in case, anyone wants to timestamp this for later ah, because as soon as you said myopia I was thinking ah visual and psychological right? You get totally locked in. 09:54.20 mikebledsoe Yeah. 10:00.19 Dr_ Placebo Your your world literally shrinks your peripheral vision goes away and from just a more mechanical standpoint your muscles in your eyes and just outside your eyes are going to learn to stay frozen. In that certain area. You know most people are looking between twelve inches and twenty four inches away from their face all the time and if you want to do that. That's fine, but just understand there are going to be tremendous costs to this behavior right. The muscles on the inside of your eyes and outside of your eyes are going to start to freeze into that position because remember your body is always and exactly adapting to whatever you do so just the same way if you sit in a chair all the time your body is going to go. Okay, we sit in a chair a lot How do we make sitting in a chair easier. So if you're looking at a screen that's right in front of you or even papers that are right in front of you which I would argue is a little healthier for you to not have light emitting straight at you but instead have it be bouncing off a page but. Ah, you know before there were screens people were still damaging their ability to see further away by honing in on something really close like a scholar or an accountant or something like that. 11:32.78 Dr_ Placebo Going to get really good at looking at little spreadsheets but they're not going to be very good at seeing far away and it kind of reminds me once again of specialization. It's so useful to have you know 1 person counting the beans. They're locked away in an office all day. And then you have the visionary who never has to look at a spreadsheet in his life. He just looks up from the highest tower to survey the whole situation and lets someone else take care of the details and probably the best. Progress I've made in my life was when I had a clear um separation between those activities. So someone who was really specialized in those minor details. Would take care of that while I was able to see more like the big picture and connecting all these different ideas. So the ah connection between your vision. Ah,, let's call it physically. And your vision psychologically is completely interlinked and there are even um, different physiological responses to the position of your eyes even just looking up for a while. 13:02.96 Dr_ Placebo Been playing a little volleyball recently and so of course I've I've tried to break down all of the volleyball shots and the stances that you find yourself in and sort of like deconstruct volleyball because I don't like to be bad at Sports I like to be good enough to really enjoy them. And I was just thinking how in volleyball you're basically looking straight ahead or up the entire time and I was like wow this would probably be 1 of the best things for people to do just force them to look up and extend. If they're spending tons of time looking. Let's say down at a 30 to sixty degree angle now they're looking up at a 30 to sixty degree angle and everything is up and the hand-eye coordination. Everything is pointed upwards so that. Ah, equal and opposite force could be really beneficial. So just not only the um the distance away from the object and certainly being able to track an object in and out is one of the more fundamental visual skills but also just the angle. Of your eyes has a big influence on your nervous system. You know you snap your eyes up. You should be going into extension. You snap your eyes down. You should be going into flexion so like a fetal position so the position of your eyes and the distance away. 14:33.56 Dr_ Placebo Is going to have a big influence on your nervous system Vision's really complex. So one of the most complex things to understand. 14:37.96 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the other thing is is I mean if you study any body language like I I watched a bunch of videos by this guy who worked for some intelligence agency where he was. Talking about? Well you can you know their eyes do this. It's a tell right? and then I got into a little bit of Nlp and it's you and you can you can watch people when you're talking to them now and you'll I'll ask somebody a question and they'll start looking up into the right or up into the left. 15:00.00 Dr_ Placebo E. 15:08.26 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 15:14.15 Dr_ Placebo Right. 15:16.38 mikebledsoe And then if I ask them how they're feeling and if they're going to be honest with me a lot of times they'll look down like their eyes will will settle straight ahead into my eyes or they'll drop down or they'll they'll want to close their eyes and so yeah, well the the idea the idea that I'm thinking about. 15:30.00 Dr_ Placebo Submissive. 15:35.59 mikebledsoe Is is when the eyes go up a lot of times they're searching for something in the mind they're looking for a memory right in some people say I don't know how accurate this is up into the right you know is more creative processes are going and that part of the brain up into the left is a little more linear thinking more organized. 15:40.36 Dr_ Placebo E o. 15:55.40 mikebledsoe And so I mean I've watched people as I ask them questions and be in conversation. They're looking up and then they're looking to the right and up to the left and I can I can like I can actually see them searching for the information they're looking for. 15:57.51 Dr_ Placebo I. 16:09.28 Dr_ Placebo That's why I always just roll my eyes whenever you talk so you can't get a read on. 16:14.86 mikebledsoe Um, but yeah, ah I mean try try looking up and looking down and see how that impacts. 16:15.40 Dr_ Placebo But but. 16:23.73 mikebledsoe Your experience in that moment. I mean anyone can try this right now just look down or close your eyes see what happens look up see what goat happens and to me for me. It does it shifts I can I can watch my awareness. Go up into my head or my awareness fall into my body. 16:43.60 Dr_ Placebo Well, that's amazing I Think a good example is the connection I'll just bring it back to movement because that's sort of my thing still I Guess if you want to like mellow yourself out. You would basically take a lightweight and do some Romanian Deadlifts and you would look down you would you would you would look down. 17:18.10 Dr_ Placebo You would kind of bend over so you're folding into that fetal Position. You wouldn't stand all the way up and that's going to bring you down that's going to take your nervous system way way down and then um, the opposite would be. You're doing something where you're looking up. And exploding upward whether that's throwing a medicine ball or a sandbag in the air. Um, ah, jumping all that kind of stuff you go up explosively man you are going to jack your nervous system up big Time. So. 1 of the things I've noticed is you can use the eye position as a way to influence the nervous system. Especially if you sync it up with ah synergistic movements along those lines is really powerful. Yeah, you take someone in the very beginning of a session. 18:01.19 mikebledsoe I Like that. 18:08.51 Dr_ Placebo And they're all lethargic and you have them throw a medicine ball up overhead as high and far as they can and snap their eyes upward and within a few repetitions they're they're just absolutely bringing up the level into more sympathetic which is where you're going to get a little more aggression. And then at the end if you want to bring someone back down, you just have them do something kind of eyes down and I'll just say fetal Ish position. Yeah. 18:38.65 mikebledsoe Interesting I like that a lot I like that a lot um are you familiar with Paul check's totem. 18:47.15 Dr_ Placebo No, ah no. 18:51.21 mikebledsoe Basically has a hierarchy of of what dictates the health of the body. So at the bottom of the totem pole is the Musculo skeletal system and then you have the organs and then you have ah ah I think breath. And then you have ah your jaw basically your ability to masticate and then you go up level the stibular system and then you go to the ocular system which is the eyes and then above that is consciousness and all of all of like. 19:12.31 Dr_ Placebo Oo a. 19:26.83 mikebledsoe The idea is consciousness as we were talking about last week is what if something's off in your consciousness. It's going to filter down into your ocular vestibular your jaw your breath your organs and your musculoskeletal system. So if you end up with an injury. It may not just be 1 thing so ah say more. 19:47.18 Dr_ Placebo It reminds me of the neural hierarchy. That's what I've heard which is visual vestibular and propriepptive so visual is the highest vestibular is second inropriacceptive which is your your body and your stuff is third and I've had. Lots of firsthand experience where improving someone's ability to see whether that's just moving their eyes or tracking an object through space has had a really significant difference I mean it feels like Voodoo almost. The fact that some people can have a pain in their back or their shoulder. We do something with their eyes and then it resolves itself and the the criticism of stuff like that is they're like oh well, it won't maybe it won't stay that way but I I would say that anything you can do. To get someone out of the fire basically and into a situation where they can move. Well again is really valuable. So I've seen how that neural hierarchy has played out to be true. You know if someone's got a visual problem. And they don't know that they have a visual problem and their leg hurts. You can do leg circles forever. But it doesn't resolve the root cause which is higher up on the hierarchy just like you know if you. 21:20.50 Dr_ Placebo Give someone liposuction but you'd never repair their relationship with food. They're just going to get fat Again, you know what I mean so it's about addressing things at the root cause of it and the neural hierarchy is a top-down understanding I mean that's why I say vision is so complex because. 21:24.84 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 21:39.70 Dr_ Placebo Our whole frame of the world is based on our ability to distinguish 1 thing from another and being able to label those things so when you see something it's fucking insane. But is actually really going on like we talk about all the different words that the eskimos or inuits have for snow a lot of different words for green and all of it has to do with being able to distinguish 1 thing from another and initially it was just ah like which way is up. Ah, is this thing going to eat me or not in fact, the evolution of the eye is a really interesting thing. There's a book ah by Isaac Asimov who I thought was just a sci-fi writer but he was also a science writer and it's called the human body structure and operation and it talks about. 22:33.29 Dr_ Placebo Evolution of an eye which started out just as a few um photosensitive cells that could basically just detect photons so you know on the body of some organism. They can detect light or no light and then it turned into a little cup. So It could take in a little bit more light and then this eyeball evolved over time and that's also why like a lot of sea creatures are black on the top and white on the bottom so they are camouflaged against the surrounding environment. If You're an orcca whale and you're above something you're coming out of the they're coming out of the light so you want your belly to be light colored and if you're lower, You're going to be coming out of the darkness so you want the top to be darkly colored and a lot of fish are colored that way specifically. So It's a. Quite an interesting game of cat and mouse between vision and camouflage. Really interesting. 23:33.73 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, just goes back and forth. Yeah I think I was watching one of these dock 2 series on like a planet earth or something like that and they were talking about the evolution of the eye and how basically. The the basic functions of our eyes are the same as the a fish and just kind of basically well really. 24:00.33 Dr_ Placebo I think I was saying that last week. Yeah, maybe to you maybe to someone else I talk about that all the time because um, that's there's more similar than there is different. With animals and the fact that a fish eye in your eye are so crazy similar is that blows my mind really because that's a very different creature but in a lot of ways you know they eat or get eaten. 24:27.13 mikebledsoe It's tripping. 24:35.48 Dr_ Placebo Shit stuff out and they have to see what's going on and we're not that different fundamentally. Of course we have all this other ah different stuff like language and metaphor and symbolism and arguably more complex relationships. But even a lot of very simple creatures. Have eyes I mean even ah tardigrades which are like the little water bears. Um, there are really really tiny microorganisms that can survive the. 25:02.68 mikebledsoe Are they that that like the smallest are they the smallest living Organism or. 25:11.15 Dr_ Placebo They no no, no, no, no, they're really weird. They have like 6 legs they're they can survive the vacuum of space they can turn into a crystal if there's not enough water it can survive like radiation. They're really weird. Ah they're. Called water bears but the real name is a tardigrade and they have tiny little eyes. It's a single cell little black spot here and here just in the same place that you would imagine an eye should be and even they have these little eyes. It's it's really trippy. It's it's a huge advantage in the primordial soup to be able to see a little bit further and we talk about ah projection on this show quite a lot and so being able to see further literally with your eyes. And then being able to see further. Let's say ah philosophically or symbolically with like your third eye and being able to project and plan into the future goes right in line with what you were saying before about that myopia of we could call it a. Mindopia like myopia of the mind. Basically that is ah synchronous with the myopia of the vision and once again, it's it's fine because that's how we get the comparative advantage of having someone who's purely focused on a few details. 26:25.82 mikebledsoe Ah. 26:42.81 Dr_ Placebo While someone else can be focused on the big picture and not bother with those details so much. 26:57.23 Dr_ Placebo It's like having a lookout on a ship. Their job is to see and the Captain's job is to choose what to do about that. 27:03.46 mikebledsoe Very specialized. 27:08.14 Dr_ Placebo That's that's the name of our game. We specialize you you go kill the stuff I'll cook it I don't know why I made myself the lady in that example, right? there but but that's what it is specialization. Yeah no. 27:21.87 mikebledsoe Ah I'll be the dude I'll be the dude I okay well at the end of the conversation I had with my fiancee last night was you know what do we do because you know I did go we but we both left. 27:25.38 Dr_ Placebo No, one's going to believe that though. 27:38.90 mikebledsoe California we're living in Texas and there you know, depending on where you live you may have some views that you can look out really far but where we live that's not really the case so spend a lot of time indoors especially because it gets so hot and we get outdoors quite a bit but. If I were to look at the amount of time I spend indoors and looking at screens versus out in nature and looking far away. The ratio is skewed a bit so we've made a commitment to spend more time outdoors my birthday. We're going to go backpacking. We'll be in tahoe next week um 28:16.85 Dr_ Placebo Ah, nice. 28:17.90 mikebledsoe You know? So we'll be so we're doing that and spend a lot of time in nature. Go hiking every day and yeah, so I think that I mean the way I I typically run my life is and ah you know just a sequence of extreme events and it's like. Extreme smallness in my my office and then going out and being nature for 3 4 or five days and then come back to the office for a week and then back and forth which I think is okay for a period of time but the overall goal is to live somewhere where I can regularly. Exercise my vision and and yeah and have that balance. 29:00.98 Dr_ Placebo Yeah, maybe take up bird watching probably some birds down there in Texas really you have a little journal. 29:06.50 mikebledsoe Dude I did so much bird watching when I was in California I ah I you know I lived on that lagoon and I had those I had those? no but I would go out there and I I could I got to where I could predict. No. Every month there was a different type of bird that was coming into the trees these trees in the backyard and they'd be migrating and coming through and then these birds would come hang out for February and then they would disappear and then in April another different type of bird would be hanging out in the same trees. Ah, and. 29:24.50 Dr_ Placebo Ah. 29:28.93 Dr_ Placebo O. 29:38.11 mikebledsoe Yeah I spent a lot of time out there just checking the birds out. 29:44.63 Dr_ Placebo Yeah that's a really ah engaging activity. Actually it's really weird. It's kind of like ah I had this idea that if you see a shooting star. It's lucky, but really. Is it lucky because you are making a wish on the shooting star because if you are that's cool. You're setting an intention. But also if you just happen to be outside looking at the night sky enough that you see shooting stars then that already means like you're bringing that luck. Into your life like that's a healthy behavior and you know it's not like ah this is good and this is bad kind of thing but you know if you are looking at something like straight. Ah you know eighteen inches in front of you ah getting that tunnel vision versus. Actually laying outside and looking at the stars. It's a very different kind of experience. So even if you don't make a wish you just happen to put yourself in a situation where you can see some some shooting stars. It's like you already did the thing that sets you up. For a little bit more peace of mind and relaxation. 30:57.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, how often do use Stargas I don't do it hardly at all anymore it it only happens when I'm traveling and I'm out of the city because the city really messes it up. 31:08.20 Dr_ Placebo Um. 31:13.30 Dr_ Placebo Um, ah the last few weeks of having puppies I've done very little I've done more helping them chase crickets so ah, looking down I'll like find 1 and point it out and then let them go like try to catch it. 31:21.52 mikebledsoe Perfect. 31:30.91 Dr_ Placebo At night but I would say at least once a week I was ah laying outside at night. Um, and just looking up and it's it's ah another one of those really soothing experience it and it's not for everybody like I mean you don't have to do any of that shit it just. Can be a ah nice way to sort of temper the constant ah dopamine buffet that we have available to us. 31:59.24 mikebledsoe All right? This is probably the first time I mean since the invention of the light bulb is you know the last hundred hundred and fifty years I mean really for the average person hundred years the first time that star gazing was not a thing. 32:16.28 Dr_ Placebo M. 32:18.67 mikebledsoe Sun goes down. Everyone's hanging out there's little to do after dark. Maybe you got some candlelight but the stars I mean when you know when you go out into the country you get away from the city. The the stars are so much easier to see it's It's something worth looking at. But if you're. 32:22.37 Dr_ Placebo Oh. 32:30.35 Dr_ Placebo And. 32:36.30 mikebledsoe And L a and you're trying to look at the stars. Good luck. 32:40.86 Dr_ Placebo Right? I mean you'll still see stars. You just won't see as many and I would argue that you're better off to to look up at least a little bit I mean should we just call that ah call this episode look up even. 32:42.61 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 32:57.26 Dr_ Placebo Even that the metaphor of look up is ah synonymous with having a positive attitude right? You can you can look up. You can also look down on somebody. That's a pretty ah unhealthy behavior I would argue you. 33:11.24 mikebledsoe Look up to look down on. 33:15.53 Dr_ Placebo Look up to somebody yeah look up to look down on. Yeah, it's It's pretty big. 33:18.41 mikebledsoe You know. 33:35.10 Dr_ Placebo Ah, do you do any? ah exercises for your vision. 33:39.25 mikebledsoe Ah, there's one I don't do it frequently enough. But um one I like to do is I wrap a towel around my head um Criss Crosss it to basically keep my head from being the thing that turns basically stabilize that and then take my eyes I got a mandala. 33:50.92 Dr_ Placebo And. E. 33:56.77 mikebledsoe Hangs in my garage gym and I circle the mandala with my eyes and I'm I'm really focused on going slow and smooth and then if I find an area where my eyes want to skip which everyone will find some area. It's like oh down and to the right. 34:13.19 Dr_ Placebo E. 34:16.27 mikebledsoe My eye kind of jumped from here to here. Can I go back smooth it out and then keep going and if you can if you can go each way you know from right? you know, clockwise and counterclockwise around the mendala smoothly then you're going to be in a pretty good space. Ah. 34:18.90 Dr_ Placebo In a. 34:36.36 mikebledsoe That's also one way that they're able to see if you had a concussion in the past is if you're if you're either unable to I remember I was I being worked on once and I couldn't look up to the right I think it was. 34:40.10 Dr_ Placebo He. 34:52.91 mikebledsoe Was having trouble looking up to the right? they were doing an eye test on me and they were like oh did you have a concussion and you know where were you hit now. Of course I don't know which concussion they're talking about ah but the the ah. 35:05.10 Dr_ Placebo So. 35:10.14 mikebledsoe They they said oh yeah, a lot of times people they were hit up and to the right, their nervous system remembers that it basically thinks it's still happening and then it's that reaction to try to you know your eyes lead the way and you and you get away from whatever. Ah. 35:19.74 Dr_ Placebo 6 35:29.69 mikebledsoe Force was coming at you and having maybe having some damage to the brain in that area keeps your eyes from being able to go back up and so one of the ways to help heal. The brain is through vision. 35:47.54 Dr_ Placebo Absolutely I think being able to or not being able to but doing a few um circles with the eyes closed and then with the eyes open really smooth is a very simplified and good way to. Improve your ah overall ability to interact with your environment and then another good thing to add is throwing a ball against a wall with some letters drawn on it and calling out the letter that you see right before you catch it. So You're really tracking something in space I would say. 36:21.42 mikebledsoe So you got letters on the wall. Oh on the ball. 36:24.80 Dr_ Placebo Those are probably 2 of the biggest ones on the ball so you take a tennis you take a tennis ball and if you imagine the tennis ball is a cube you draw a letter or a number on each of the 6 faces of the cube. So whatever, whatever you see last you call that out. And do you have to draw anything on it. No, but if you do you're going to track it a little bit longer. So it's going to make you a little more attentive to staying focused on the ball. So even if that was all you did I mean I've written tons of stuff. About vision. It's in a lot of the programs that I've made. But if you just did some ah eyes closed circles and then eyes open circles and then throw a ball against a wall and track it through space that is going to go a really really long way. To improving your overall eye ability and if you do find a spot that's difficult. Um, you know, hold those 8 cardinal directions up up to the right, right? down right down down left left up left and back through. 37:20.00 mikebledsoe I Like that a lot. 37:38.57 Dr_ Placebo And what's interesting is if you do it with the eyes closed. You can focus a lot more on the extra ocular muscles because you're not receiving a lot of input about like oh I'm trying to look at this or that you can really just focus on the movement of the balls in the sockets. 37:54.41 mikebledsoe You can feel it more. 37:57.16 Dr_ Placebo Actually some of the yeah, it's some of the fastest muscles blinking is the fastest thing but your eyes can move really fast, pretty pretty fascinating that we can like look and cover so much distance. Like you can cover way more distance by looking and moving your eyes than you can by moving your body So It's a huge huge advantage. A lot of creatures don't have eyes and they figure it out just fine. They basically have to sniff and bump into stuff. 38:21.90 mikebledsoe From. 38:30.63 mikebledsoe Yeah I was ah I was watching a ah documentary on hunting and they were talking about they they were with these tribes people who had basically um. They would find an animal. They want to hunt and then they would basically creep up on it and then chase it until it ah was exhausted and they would kill it persistent hunting and um it was. 38:59.10 Dr_ Placebo And persistence hunting. 39:06.97 mikebledsoe Really interesting because I mean the the human body is made for that endurance. It's able to endure whereas an animal. Maybe some of these animals may be really fast but they can't cool off fast enough ah like a cheeah like you chase it long enough. It's going to tuck her out. 39:16.74 Dr_ Placebo Yeah, like a cheetah. Yeah. But dude Cheetahs have absolutely shit endurance like they can they can They can hum their motor for like cats in general but Cheetahs especially they can rev it really high but they just can't go very long and. 39:26.22 mikebledsoe So yeah I think that's cats in general. 39:41.27 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 39:45.30 Dr_ Placebo I I talk about this all the time actually because if you look at the human body ah compared to a lot of other animals. It's It's so fucking flimsy it's were. We're Squishy. We're Squishy. We don't have Claws. No armor, no poison. No Venom We're not particularly Fast. We're not particularly Strong. We don't have a lot of offspring. It's It's like really sad but we have Thumbs. We have neocortex and by working together. That's basically good enough that we can have these like. 40:17.39 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 40:21.50 Dr_ Placebo Squishy Bipedal bodies and just dominate every other animal. 40:24.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah I mean one of the things about the persistent persistence hunting the two things that stood out to me was one is we as humans can keep our bodies cooler for long distance than than a lot of these animals and then. 40:42.28 Dr_ Placebo Sweating. 40:42.68 mikebledsoe Yeah, just being able to sweat versus you know, most perspiration coming through the mouth through a lot of these maybe an antelope or something like that that they're chasing down or a buffalo and the other thing is ah if you look at the anatomy of a lot of apes. 40:51.57 Dr_ Placebo That's why dogs pant and. 41:01.81 mikebledsoe They I don't remember the exact like joint it is That's in the neck you may know that allows us to stabilize our vision on the horizon while we run So ah, a typical ape wouldn't actually okay. 41:16.72 Dr_ Placebo It's a vestibular ocular reflex. So that's one of the drills I have people do in Primal Athleticism is to keep your gaze fixed on a spot on the wall. You can draw a spot or put a Post-it note and you move your head left and right you tilt it left and right. 41:20.74 mikebledsoe Is this a. 41:25.58 mikebledsoe They have. 41:34.22 Dr_ Placebo And you nod up and down and you can stay focused on the spot over there. You can do figure eights and if I do figure eights I can still see you crystal clear and that's that's pretty wild. Yeah yeah, this yeah. 41:45.58 mikebledsoe I Like that just doing it with you for the people who are only listening which is everybody. Ah. 41:52.23 Dr_ Placebo You're really missing out on our funny head movements while we stare into each other's eyes. 41:53.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, so it really stood out to me is the the thing that really the the 2 things that allowed humans to consume more meat and more what I would imagine be enough fat. To to sit well 2 things. The fat helps build the brain and gives you the ability to sit and think because you you get a ton of calories for you know you expend some calories you kill the animal. But now you have a lot of calories to sit around. And consider things or to build something whereas ah most animals I think they spend their days finding the food chewing. Well a lot of apes I know it's chewing. Yeah. 42:36.28 Dr_ Placebo It's chewing chewing and it's just chewing. They're just chewing all fucking. How do you get to be a giant gorilla with huge muscles and you're a vegetarian you have to be chewing all fucking day. You're just chewing all day. 42:50.13 mikebledsoe All day. 42:55.61 Dr_ Placebo And we have these vertical bodies So We're also not encumbered by gravity the same way like if you imagine just how much less work you have to do by stacking your entire mass like a pillar. Instead of like a bridge. You know if you're a quadruped you're basically doing a plank all fucking day. So you're constantly expending energy just to to stand. Let alone walk. You're expending even more energy. So The fact that we can use our Skeleton to support our structure in. 43:17.83 mikebledsoe Yeah. 43:33.36 Dr_ Placebo Perfect alignment with gravity more or less with these nice Arches through the neck and the spine and the hips and of course our hips are highly optimized for ah, walking and running especially walking. It allows us to cover a lot of ground much slower. But a lot more ground with a lot less energy expenditure. It's incredible and see further. It's like we're in a constant ah prairie dog position where we're up being able to see further along the horizon right. 43:53.59 mikebledsoe Yeah, what. 44:05.48 mikebledsoe Yeah, the do you have any exercises for working peripheral vision specifically it seems like the the figure 9 might help a bit. 44:18.91 Dr_ Placebo Yeah, ah, um, so if you're doing it yourself. You bring your arms all the way out to the side and you start. Ah, you point your Index fingers straight up and you look straight ahead and you start wiggling your fingers and slowly. Bringing your arms forward until you can see your wiggling fingers and what's interesting is um I can't remember which book I wrote it in but the eye loves movement. The eye is attracted to Movement. So if you um, try to see something in your peripherals. That's. 44:38.37 mikebledsoe No. 44:56.17 Dr_ Placebo Still,, you're probably not going to see it because what ends up happening is you only see like a small field of vision of your focal vision. It's called versus your peripheral and your brain fills in the rest. This is what this is why vision gets so fucking Crazy is. You see stuff and then your brain fills it in based on what it thinks is supposed to be there. But if you have like wiggling objects come in from the outside of your periphery you're going to see them a lot easier because your eye is attracted to movement and of course that's ah, an evolutionary advantage. That you want to see any shit that's moving way more than stuff that is ah, not moving right? Another another thing you can do for a peripheral vision is if you have like ah a partner to do that for you coming in. 45:38.58 mikebledsoe Yeah, something I want to kill or avoid to be killed by. 45:54.54 Dr_ Placebo From the peripheral or even throwing a ball over your head in front of you So you're waiting your partner is behind you and he tosses a ball ah over the back of your head into your field of view and you try to catch the ball. As it goes from your peripheral and to your focal vision. Yeah yeah,. But even if you just do the the the finger wiggling thing that'll give you something and it kind of reminds me of that. 46:10.95 mikebledsoe I Like that a lot that sounds fun. 46:28.92 Dr_ Placebo Ah, martial Arts Soft eyes where you try to diffuse your focus like the lantern versus the laser like we talk about. 46:44.47 Dr_ Placebo Right? No, we haven't talked about that I'm getting getting and getting a lot of silence over here. 46:48.56 mikebledsoe Um, totally I yeah I'm having a you know I didn't get a lot of sleep last night is two weeks in a row I'm just I now I know you. 46:56.87 Dr_ Placebo Here We go with the fucking excuses you son of a bitch I don't want to hear that shit just fake it. 47:04.97 mikebledsoe Um, just having I'm having I'm having a time in my life. You're gonna have to carry me a little bit I think we're gonna We're gonna be okay max. 47:10.11 Dr_ Placebo Um, fake it like your wife cinnamon. Your wife's name is cinnamon Cinnamon cinnamon. 47:17.35 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, cinnamon cinnamon cinminnamon in oh I think we covered a lot of good ground here. A lot of practical ah advice things for people to do go outdoors. 47:31.10 Dr_ Placebo Are. 47:35.70 mikebledsoe Ah, make sure you're looking far I don't think anyone needs to be told to look close I think we're getting plenty of that just make sure you're getting some type of balance there move your eyes around ah circles are great. Ah, what else you say we got. Ah. 47:43.68 Dr_ Placebo Um. 47:54.25 Dr_ Placebo So you have ah visual tracking so being able to track a ball coming in at you. Um, there's way more. But for the sake of simplicity. Yeah, even if you just did the eyes closed ah circles and holds. 47:56.58 mikebledsoe Yep. 48:10.71 Dr_ Placebo Eyes open circles and holds and then tossed a ball against a wall preferably like twenty Ish feet away and then the other thing I would say is whenever you sit down at a console set a fucking timer. We have. These magic rectangles and one of their functions is that you can set a timer just don't get frozen in any single position. You know you want to have the farmer vision and the accounting vision. You want to have the lantern and the laser and it's the Alternating. You know another thing I have people do um in the primal athleticism program I do nearf far drills which is you basically put a post it on the wall twenty thirty feet away and you draw something on it a letter a number something that you have to really be able to focus on. And then you hold another one in your hand like let's say twelve inches away so you have something that's twelve inches or twenty inches away in your hand and then you have something that's about 20 to thirty feet away on the wall and you basically try to see how quickly you can cycle between focusing on each one so you know let's say I have a written in the post it in my hand and I have b written in the posted on the wall and I'm going to try to cycle between a and b back and forth as quickly as I can and of course you can move the post it around. 49:42.29 Dr_ Placebo And have it be down a little lower but the main thing is that you're just changing the distance of your focal point because if you're focused on the post it in your hand. You're not going to be able to see what's written on the posted on the wall and if you wanted to you know?? um. Upgraded a little bit. You could write like love on the wall and courage in your hand or something like that. So you have more of like a psychological thing going On. It's you know a little bit sterile to be like ah look at a and then look at B Ah so as long as you're going to do that You might as well. 50:16.36 mikebledsoe I think you should put Mike and max on these postcards that that you know, ah if you if you go to if you go to the website and there's a lead. 50:20.78 Dr_ Placebo Right? perfect. 50:31.58 mikebledsoe Well, there's a pdf over there. Ah. 50:35.95 Dr_ Placebo This is getting weird I love it. But basically you just cycle back and forth see how quickly and use a metronome if you have 1 available to you get free app on your phone and cycle between the close and the far vision. 50:37.18 mikebledsoe A. 50:52.20 mikebledsoe But the you introduced me to using the metronome with training for all sorts of different things that was incredibly useful for me appreciate that I Highly recommend it? yeah. 50:54.93 Dr_ Placebo So that's another thing you can do. Ah. 51:05.90 Dr_ Placebo Oh my god yeah, it's ah it's an absolute game changer people are so focused on how much mass is being moved versus how much acceleration is happening. And 1 of the most fundamental physics. Equations is force equals mass times acceleration and I think it's hilarious. This perverted obsession. We have with mass and this complete neglect of acceleration when in actuality. Um, people care way more. 51:25.36 mikebledsoe Yeah. 51:41.50 Dr_ Placebo About how fast they can move rather than how much stuff they can move and the people who have the best longevity are the ones who retain their ability to be able to move quickly and in fact, that's the athletic attribute that deteriorates more rapidly. Which is why ah sprinters you know tend to peak before age 30 but power lifters tend to peak often in their 40 s late 40 s fifty s so ah, way too much focus is spent on. The amount of mass that is being moved versus the amount of force that is being generated which includes the acceleration and a metronome improves your coordination. It proves your rhythm and it also is a way to very easily ah increase the force. By increasing the acceleration as opposed to just increasing the mass really powerful stuff. I mean there's a lot of other eye Exercises. You could do with it. But yeah for sake of simplicity ah eyes closed make Circles eyes open make circles throw a ball against the wall. 52:37.81 mikebledsoe Yeah, love it. 52:54.80 Dr_ Placebo And then try that near far drill and then use a timer so you're not stuck ah on any 1 ah console for too long. You know there's like the twenty Twenty rule every 20 minutes look twenty feet away for at least 20 seconds that's fine ah a little bit longer would be better though. You know so every 15 minutes or so look at something further away for a little while it'll make a big difference. 53:20.89 mikebledsoe Yeah, so we call it is anything else. You want to leave him with feel like got some Yeah, everyone's got homework to do. Don't go back and put these things into practice. 53:31.80 Dr_ Placebo Ah. 53:37.52 Dr_ Placebo Do do some drawing and doodling do doodling is better than dawdling is what I say so if you're if you're stuck like draw dry it out. You know, a lot of ah. 1 of the big advantages we have is being able to draw symbols and shapes and connect different ideas together. So if you're if you're not sure just start just start drawing shapes and ah connecting words and ideas with lines so you can see it all. Big picture and I think this is probably one of the things that I do best because sometimes I have difficulty staying engaged with details but I will often get out a piece of paper and just draw down some ideas but I'll connect them with ah shapes and lines and diagrams. And I'll try to make some math equations there too but getting your ideas. Ah not only down on paper in words but also connected together in shapes and symbols and lines is really powerful and so you will be able to improve your ability to visualize. And ah envision the future if you use some symbols on the paper. So ah I'll just I'll close with that. Thank you guys. You can see me Maxshank.com Mike Bleso you can find him on his new newsletter where you can get. 54:53.15 mikebledsoe That hurt. 55:04.61 Dr_ Placebo Hot Fresh ah wisdom delivered to your inbox and then also blue light blocking glasses I think you can learn the secret as well. 55:16.90 mikebledsoe Yep yep, just go go go find on the newsletter. Maybe one day I'll yeah I mean if you actually there's if you Dm me I can get you on the newsletter. But right now I don't have anywhere. 55:19.50 Dr_ Placebo Where can they find that strong coach. What where do I sign up for your newsletter dude right. 55:33.76 mikebledsoe For anyone to sign up so I'm ah. 55:34.84 Dr_ Placebo Yeah, how convenient it's like it's like a secret club with no sign on La door. 55:43.42 mikebledsoe I Got I've got a I got my email list that people that got in or get my messages. The people who want in are confused. It's okay I'm I'm rebuilding some things. Ah. 55:56.86 Dr_ Placebo Ah I like it so send you a dm Mike Underscore blood so if you want to get in on it I like it. 56:00.74 mikebledsoe Yeahp Yeah I'll I'll add you and yeah I like to keep it tight I Only want to be talking to people who really want to be talking to me. So yeah, yeah. 56:08.70 Dr_ Placebo All right? nice. Keep it keep a clear vision until next time folks. Thanks Mikey! Love you buddy. 56:15.61 mikebledsoe Love you lady y'all.

Daily News Dose
Daily News Dose: PM Modi releases 8 cheetahs from Namibia in Kuno National Park | Sept 17, 2022

Daily News Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 6:23


Hello, this is your daily dose of news from Onmanorama. Tune in to get updated about the major news stories of the day.

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी
SBS Hindi News 17 September 2022: The United Nations to investigate mass graves in Ukraine

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 11:03


In this bulletin: Arrests, 24-hour queues, and a gathering of world leaders, as thousands of mourners pay their respects to the Queen; The United Nations to investigate mass graves in Ukraine, with the country's President saying some bodies showing evidence of torture; Cheetahs are returning to India, seventy years after they were declared extinct in the country and more news. ...

Newshour
Russian president says army isn't fighting in its entirety

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 49:17


President Vladimir Putin has warned those celebrating victories in Ukraine that Russia has far more power to deploy. This comes as Ukraine's president, Volodymyr Zelensky says investigations into possible Russian war crimes are continuing in the city of Izyum. Also in the programme: There's been opposition to some of the world leaders who have been invited to the Queen's Funeral; Cheetahs have been reintroduced into a national park in India, seventy years after the animal was officially declared extinct in the country. (PHOTO: Russian President Vladimir Putin attended a meeting of heads of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization CREDIT: Foreign Ministry of Uzbekistan)

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Ledge #536: Covers

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022


As I have stated quite often during these cover tune broadcasts, I have a special folder where I place remakes as I come across them. Once that folder is full, it's time to do a show. This time around, that folder grew at a pretty rapid pace. Of course I'm going to air Ultrabomb's version of “Sonic Reducer”. I don't think anybody is surprised by the inclusion of “Borstal Breakdown” from that new live Replacements album. But many may be shocked by the inclusion of two tracks from the 1968 collaboration between Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood. Honestly, I had never heard these bonkers tunes until one day I hung out in my friend's record store. Seriously, that version of “You've Lost That Loving Feeling” is something everybody should check out. But what made it essential that I do this theme this very week are two special records that arrived a few days ago. The first is All The Covers (And More) by The Streetwalkin' Cheetahs. Released on September 30 on Rum Bar Records, this 38 track compilation gathers together all of the remakes the band has recorded in their 25 year history. The other is the latest project by Geoff Palmer. Standing In […]

The Ledge (mp3)
The Ledge #536: Covers

The Ledge (mp3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 141:38


As I have stated quite often during these cover tune broadcasts, I have a special folder where I place remakes as I come across them. Once that folder is full, it’s time to do a show. This time around, that folder grew at a pretty rapid pace. Of course I’m going to air Ultrabomb’s version of “Sonic Reducer”. I don’t think anybody is surprised by the inclusion of “Borstal Breakdown” from that new live Replacements album. But many may be shocked by the inclusion of two tracks from the 1968 collaboration between Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood. Honestly, I had never heard these bonkers tunes until one day I hung out in my friend’s record store. Seriously, that version of “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling” is something everybody should check out. But what made it essential that I do this theme this very week are two special records that arrived a few days ago. The first is All The Covers (And More) by The Streetwalkin’ Cheetahs. Released on September 30 on Rum Bar Records, this 38 track compilation gathers together all of the remakes the band has recorded in their 25 year history. The other is the latest project by Geoff Palmer. Standing In […]

Top Headlines
Top Headlines Of The Day (September 17, 2022)

Top Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 1:06


RTHK:Video News
Cheetahs reintroduced to India after 70 year absence

RTHK:Video News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 0:39


HT Daily News Wrap
Modi publicly asks Putin to end Ukraine war

HT Daily News Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 6:50


Modi publicly asks Putin to end Ukraine war, Cheetahs to set foot in India after 70 years, The IAF has for the first time assigned two women combat pilots to its frontline Chinook helicopter units that are playing a crucial role in supporting the army's deployments near the LAC, and other top news in this bulletin.

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1153: India gets cheetahs again, CBI moves to cancel Tejashwi Yadav's bail

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 6:55


Veronica Joseph brings you the news from Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, New Delhi, and Russia.Produced by Tehreem Roshan, edited by Hasan Bilal.Download the Newslaundry app. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nothing But The Truth
The Cheetahs are Back | Nothing But The Truth Ep 21

Nothing But The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 13:48


70 years after it was hunted to extinction, the big cat returns to India's wild. What it will take to make it survive? Raj Chengappa explains. Tune in!

All Things Policy
Reintroduction of Cheetahs in India

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 23:04


Cheetahs imported from Africa will be released into Madhya Pradesh on September 17, marking the beginning of the ambitious program to reintroduce cheetahs in India. In this episode, Ananya Rao and Rohan Pai deliberate over the implications of bringing cheetahs back into the Indian ecosystem.Ananya Rao is a researcher at Ashoka Trust for Ecology and the Environment (ATREE). For the past year, she has been working on the implementation of CFRR in Chattisgarh's Bastar district.Reading Links:Action Plan for Introduction of Cheetahs in India https://pib.gov.in/PressReleaseIframePage.aspx?PRID=1788373Explainer on India's plan to reintroduce cheetahs: https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/explained-indias-plan-to-bring-cheetahs-from-africa-to-madhya-pradesh-8050334/You can follow Ananya Rao on twitter: https://twitter.com/ananyakraoYou can follow Rohan Pai on twitter: https://twitter.com/rohanspai12Check out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featuredDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.https://twitter.com/IVMPodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/ivmpodcasts/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/ivmpodcasts/Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, JioSaavn, Gaana, Amazon MusicDo share the word with you folks!

Business Standard Podcast
What is Project Cheetah?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:03


Cheetahs prowled the Indian jungles for centuries -- predating written history. They can be spotted in cave paintings dating back to the Neolithic age, and in journals written during Mughal and British eras. But not in Indian forests anymore. Rising human population, depleting prey base and unrestricted hunting by royals slowly pushed cheetahs close to extinction by independence. The fastest animal on the earth -- which can clock a speed of 120-km per hour within seconds-- could not outrun the bullets. And sometime in 1947, shots fired by the Maharaja of Korawi, are believed to have killed the last three of the felines. In 1952, the big cat was finally declared extinct from India. The re-introduction But India always wanted the cheetahs back in its forests. Attempts to re-introduce Asiatic cheetahs failed as Iran turned down India's request. As of now, Iran has just about 20 Asiatic cheetahs left. It was then that the government turned towards Africa -- which has about 7,000 cheetahs left, mostly in the forests of Namibia, Botswana and South Africa. And after over 12 years of negotiations, the governments of Namibia and India finally signed a pact this year. Namibia has agreed to send 50 cheetahs to India over the next five years. The journey & the arrival Eight cheetahs -- five males and three females-- will be brought to Jaipur from Namibia in a special Boeing 747-400 aircraft, covering over 8,000 kms distance in over 20 hours. A team of Namibia's Cheetah Conservation Foundation (CCF) will also be with the animals. From Jaipur, they will be flown in a helicopter to Kuno National Park in Madhya Pradesh– where Prime Minister Narendra Modi will release them the same day. Incidentally, September 17 is also the birth anniversary of the prime minister. Kuno National Park Kuno National Park is a 748-square-km protected area, about 200 miles south of Delhi. A 12-km long fence has been erected to keep predators away from the park, which can house a maximum of 21 cheetahs. The last moment glitch The ‘project cheetah' suffered a last moment glitch when India refused to take three of the eight cheetahs, saying that they were bred in captivity and could not survive the forest. But Namibia's tourism ministry said that all the eight animals were captured when they were young, and they are exposed to hunting. Under close watch The felines will be quarantined for one month in a 50×30-metre enclosure in the sanctuary, and will be under constant observation. They will be released in the protected area later. The risk factor   Experts have several concerns. Like only a 12-km area is fenced and the cheetahs may stray out of the sanctuary. They also say that the big cats will find it challenging to hunt chital deer, which is not found in Africa. But similar experiments have given good results in parts of Africa as cheetahs are highly adaptable. 

In Hindsight
051: The Cheetah Girls Part 2

In Hindsight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 59:21


We're back in the jiggy jungle! In this week's episode, we continue our cheetah-licious dissection of The Cheetah Girls, a DCOM that premiered on August 15, 2003. Join us as we discuss “urban” marketing, masks, baby seals, the music industry, dance auditions, cheetah cheddah, flip phones, a dog in a hole, and more! Notable Mentions + References in This Episode: Cheetah Girls - Girl Power Beyoncé - Irreplaceable It's a Small World Burn - Hamilton Honey Princess Diaries Beyoncé - Renaissance CD Players B2K Mario tick, tick...BOOM! A Tribe Called Quest - Electric Relaxation Degrassi V Train Britney Spears Pink Ladies Cheetah Girls - Cheetah Sisters Connect with us: Instagram: @in_hindsight_pod Twitter: @in_hindsightpod Want us to dissect one of your favorite childhood movies? Slide in our DMs or email us at inhindsightpod@gmail.com! Thanks for listening! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-hindsight/message

Business Standard Podcast
TMS Ep261: BYJU's revenue, D2C brands, consumer financiers, Project Cheetah

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 27:01


Education technology company Byju's FY21 revenues came in flat, and its losses have widened about 20 times. The results came 18 months after the period of coverage ended in March 2021, prompting the government to seek an explanation from the country's most valuable start-up for the delay. While it may survive this crisis, questions still remain around the future of the unicorn. Watch our next report to know more   Just like BYJU'S, several companies across sectors have started from scratch and carved a niche, capturing the imagination of people with their inventive products. Of late, several such companies in the D2C space are increasingly being gobbled up by bigger FMCG companies. A rush for brand acquisitions is on. Watch our next report to know more Let us move on to consumer financing companies. A strong credit growth on the back of huge pent-up demand is set to push their loan books. As the festive season knocks on the doors, analysts suggest investors warm up to related stocks but with caveats.  The consumer finance companies are eagerly waiting for the festivals to bring in some luck. Meanwhile, for the staff of MP's Kuno National Park, celebrations have already begun -- but for a different reason. And not just the staff, but the entire nation is waiting to celebrate the arrival of cheetahs from Africa. Most of us may have never seen a cheetah as it went extinct from India about 70 years ago. This episode of the podcast tells more about Project Cheetah. 

The Signal Daily
Is India's Plan for African Cheetahs Foolproof?

The Signal Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 10:09


The infamous online community known as Kiwi Farms, which encouraged harassment, has finally disappeared. This internet group grew as a result of an online cult that targeted anyone they perceived as their enemy and was inflamed with hatred, intolerance, and prejudice. In other developments, eight African cheetahs are coming to India from Namibia, by the end of this week, as a part of the Centre's plan to reintroduce the animal in the country, 75 years after it went extinct and in the 75th year of India's independence. But that's not it, we have in-house writer, Roshni Nair joining us in todays episode, who shared some interesting facts about the inception of this project.You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android, iOS or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/.Do follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Prime Music.

A Calm Kid
#26 Cheetah, I am fast and careful

A Calm Kid

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 9:36


Intentions for you and your family:Listen to this episode and incorporate more  breathing, moving your body, and saying the affirmations this week.Write down the affirmations and say them daily as a family.Join a live class or get outside and move your body with your family.Take 5 minutes a day to connect with yourself and your kid(s).Stay in the loop!Support us:  A Calm Kid Journal Follow us: Instagram @acalmkid Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ACalmKid/.  *Please rate A Calm Kid Podcast and write a review!Website: www.acalmkid.comThank you for all your love, support and shares! We wouldn't be able to do this without you! Support the show

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Top Headlines
Top Headlines Of The Day (September 13, 2022)

Top Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 2:16


Let’s Talk Cheer
Jason interviews John Davenport of Cheer Athletics

Let’s Talk Cheer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 90:32


In this episode Jason Larkins interviews John Davenport, Director of Routine Development at Cheer Athletics, and coach of SassyCats, Cheetahs and Panthers. They talk about what it's like for John to coach such high profile teams, NCA vs Worlds, Panthers breaking the curse, and much much more.

Blowing Smoke with Twisted Rico
169. - Frank Meyer - The Streetwalkin' Cheetahs

Blowing Smoke with Twisted Rico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 71:51


Frank Meyer joins us on the show to talk about his long history playing with Hollywood legends The Streetwalkin' Cheetahs and their new double album "All The Covers(and more)" as well as his plethora of other projects, including collaborations with Eddie Spaghetti(The Supersuckers), James Williamson(The Stooges) etc.. We also hit on Frank's documentary "Risen: The Story of Chron 'Hell Razah' Smith and its immediate success. Things got really interesting when Frank shared his love of his "favorite B movie ever" Trancers and played us an unreleased song live on zoom that he wrote about the lead character "Jack Deth". Must listen to show with one of the coolest guys around...and his many projects! Music The Charms "So Pretty"(theme song) The Streetwalkin Cheetahs "We are the ones(We've been waiting for)" Frank Meyer "Jack Deth" (live on zoom) Interview recorded on zoom on September 7, 2022, with additional recording done remotely by the host. This podcast was supported by Baby Loves Tacos(Pittsburgh PA) and Spectacle Eyesore(Boston MA) #Trancers --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blowingsmoketr/support

The Big Homies House
109: WET ROUND HERE FT. KALI - Big Homies House Ep. 109

The Big Homies House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 48:18 Very Popular


WET ROUND HERE FT. KALI - Big Homies House Ep. 109 This week we had big homie KALI come kick it with the homies and we get a sneak preview at her new single “WET”! We also talk about if a guy being funny is good enough to bag her, we dig into “fly out culture”, can a man make it out the FRIENDZONE? And would you be wrong for taking your best friend to POUNDTOWN??? Come kick it wit YA HOMIES!!!!! This weeks Homies are @kaliii STREAM KALI NEW SINGLE HERE “WET” https://music.apple.com/us/album/wet/1638311317?i=1638311323 TIMESTAMPS: :58 - Is A Guy Being Funny Enough For Him To Bag You? 3:11 - Is A Man Wrong For Canceling Her Return Trip After A Failed Flyout? 6:46 - Can A Man Lose Out On A Girl For Being TOO Nice? 11:57 - Can A Man Make It Out The Friendzone? 13:32 - Do You Smash Your Friends? 23:51 - Would You Sue Your BF/GF For Cheating On You ?? 28:30 - What Makes A Woman SUBMIT To A Man? 31:16 - Does Your Social Circle Dictate Your Dating Life? 34:53 - Is A Clingy Person A TURNOFF? 36:52 - Should Broke Men Get Any CAT? Big Homies House, The Big Homies House, Big Homie Kodaq, Big Homie Jojo, ATLANTA RADIO, ATLANTA, PODCAST, ATLANTA PODCAST, IHEARTRADIO, iheartatlanta, iheartpodcasts, Big Homies House, Houston, HTX, Houston Texas, Houston Clubs, Atlanta Clubs, Magic City, Blue Flame, Follies, Cheetah, NFL Cartel Bo 

In Hindsight
050: The Cheetah Girls Part 1

In Hindsight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 59:04


Sorry Dolce, we got Gabbana on the other line. In this week's episode, we dissect The Cheetah Girls, a DCOM that premiered on August 15, 2003. This film was produced by Whitney Houston and Debra Martin Chase, and starred Raven-Symoné, Adrienne Bailon, Kiely Williams, and Sabrina Bryan. Join us (and our special guest Imani) as we discuss NYC, hot sauce, mole people in the subway, belts, leopard print, disco moments, strong bones and teeth, and more! Notable Mentions + References in This Episode: Cheetah Girls Book Series The Truth About the Cheetah Girls Before Dark - Baby ft. Sole I'm in Love with a Church Girl Disclosure Laurieann Gibson i5 - Cinderella Play - Cinderella Cheetah Girls - Cinderella That's So Raven Chloe x Halle Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century (Episode 012) Alley Cats Strike (Episode 025) The Color of Friendship (Episode 026) Double Teamed (Episode 045) Connect with us: Instagram: @in_hindsight_pod Twitter: @in_hindsightpod Want us to dissect one of your favorite childhood movies? Slide in our DMs or email us at inhindsightpod@gmail.com! Thanks for listening! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-hindsight/message

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
09-07-22 Tobin and Leroy Part 2 - The Penguin Plié

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 35:48


In Hour Tua we hear from our 3rd favorite boy out the Bayou Ed Orgeron as he addresses an audience at the Little Rock Football Club and delivers a few signature Orgeron moments. Next we hear from the Cheetah himself as he's eager to score his first TD in Aqua and Orange. We review the connection between Ballet and NFL football as we decide whether or not Jaylen Waddle is an aspiring ballerina. The Ringer put together a list of the best Quarterbacks in the NFL and egregiously disrespected our precious Tua. 

The Big Homies House
LOCKER ROOM TALK FT. TRILLSELDA BLANCO - Big Homies House BONUS

The Big Homies House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 87:54


LOCKER ROOM TALK FT. TRILLSELDA BLANCO - Big Homies House BONUS  THIS WEEK, The Homie sits down with Houston dancer and social media influencer Trilllselda Blanco, and they dig into her life as an entertainer, including her crazy stories in the locker room, and going on the run with her baby daddy!!!! All this and more!!! Cool out wit YA HOMIES!!!!! This weeks Homies are @trillselda.blanco TIMESTAMPS: 7:54 - Do Strippers Think They Are Better Than P-Stars? 8:38 - Can Men Really Handle Being In A Relationship With A Stripper? 12:55 - Could You Handle Your Girl Doing THIS? 24:07 - Are You Spending A Bag On Your Dude? 29:28 - Why Aren't Other Races Scrutinized For Marrying For Money Like Black Women? 37:18 - What Leads A Black Man To Hate A Black Woman? 41:03 - Should You Come Before A Mans Baby Mother? 49:00 - Have Broken Families Been Normalized? 53:21 - Should A Woman Have A Baby If The Father Expresses He Doesn't Want A Kid? 57:30 - Can You Love More Than One Person ? 59:12 - Does Cheating Mean You Don't Love Your Partner? 1:02:48 - Would You Be A Side Chick To A Married Man If It Came With Perks? 1:07:33 - Should Your Partner Be Like Your Parent? 1:09:27 -  Would You Leave Your Man To Get A Quick Bag? 1:14:45 - How Long Should You Hold Your Man Down While He's In Jail? Big Homies House, The Big Homies House, Big Homie Kodaq, Big Homie Jojo, ATLANTA RADIO, ATLANTA, PODCAST, ATLANTA PODCAST, IHEARTRADIO, iheartatlanta, iheartpodcasts, Big Homies House, Houston, HTX, Houston Texas, Houston Clubs, Atlanta Clubs, Magic City, Blue Flame, Follies, Cheetah, NFL Cartel Bo 

The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly
Running the Last Mile with Cheetah Wholesale's Na'ama Moran - EP223

The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 54:52


In this episode of The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly we travel into the world of technology in produce. Today we chat with Cheetah Wholesale's Na'ama Moran, Co-Founder and CEO. Growing up in Israel with a family of farmers and small business owners, she witnessed the imminent need for a more efficient, accessible food supply. Na'ama came to the United States to study economics, math, and political science at Cornell University, and started my career with Greylock Capital Management as a financial analyst. Na'ama then moved to Silicon Valley, founded several startups including Zappedy and Sourcery, and in 2015, co-founded Cheetah to improve the supply chain for independent restaurants through an easy to use app, transparent pricing, and next day delivery service. Join us today and listen to a 30,000 ft overview of Cheetah, discuss the creation of the supply chain and business model of how they operate with last mile delivery, whats next for Cheetah and WHY should a distributor look at technology and Cheetah? Join Na'ama and Patrick on this fun episode! #freshprdouce FANCY SPONSORS: Ag Tools, Inc.: https://www.agtechtools.com, Flavor Wave, LLC.: https://flavorwavefresh.com, Noble Citrus: https://noblecitrus.com, Buck Naked Onions/Owyhee Produce, Inc.: http://www.owyheeproduce.com and John Greene Logistics Company: https://www.jglc.com CHOICE SPONSORS: Indianapolis Fruit Company: https://indyfruit.com, Equifruit: https://equifruit.com Arctic® Apples: https://arcticapples.com Sev-Rend Corporation: https://www.sev-rend.com and Jac Vandenberg Inc.: https://www.jacvandenberg.com Dole Fresh Vegetables: https://www.dole.com/en/produce/vegetables and Golden Star Citrus, Inc.: http://www.goldenstarcitrus.com STANDARD SPONSORS: London Fruit Inc. https://londonfruit.com, Fresh Cravings: https://www.freshcravings.com, Freshway Produce: https://www.freshwayusa.comand Citrus America: https://citrusamerica.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theproduceindustrypodcast/support

the Book Of Very Very Bad Things
Chapter45 - Tim Anderl (Sweet Cheetah Publicity, Journalist, Homie)

the Book Of Very Very Bad Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 143:12


My publicist and homeslice, Tim Anderl (Print and online journalist for the likes of New Noise Magazine, Alternative Press, Ghettoblaster, etc.) get into the goofy mire with one another, breaking down what it takes to be a middle aged Peter Pan Punk in the current climate.  This is Part 2 of Anderl-Palooza! A double dose of the brothers from Dayton! Get busy living, y'all. You have a lot to live up to!


Matt McClasky VP of Sales at Signify Health talks some sports with Lance at RISE West in Los Angeles, CA...

The One With All The 90s
Ep. 53 - The One With The Boobies On Tubi

The One With All The 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 71:38


This one is all about the 1995 cult classic movie, Showgirls rated NC-17. Described as an erotic drama film, it was written and directed by the same guys responsible for Basic Instinct and stars Elizabeth Berkley AKA Jessie Spano from Saved By the Bell in a VERY scandalous, mostly naked, and cringy performance. David Eck (Clarissa Explains It All) joins the conversation as he and Katie take a deep dive on the movie and the behind the scenes drama! And there was plenty of it!Grab your VHS copy and let's go back to a time when we were “so excited” to see Jessie Spano on the big screen, being a Cheetah girl had a different meaning in the ‘90s and boobies flopped at the box office.Life. Was. Good.

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
Cheetah Bombs | The Porpoise Pod

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 16:31


How could we not be hyped up for this offense after the Dolphins first drive vs Philly? Selecting the receivers and running backs that will make the final 53-man cut. After, admiring Jaelan Phillips strong preseason and what's to come for the former Hurricane.   Subscribe to The Porpoise Pod HERE!

Mouse Madness Podcast
Best Disney On-Screen Musical Act (Part 2)

Mouse Madness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 97:22


It's time for the encore, because we're finishing off the Best Disney On-Screen Musical Act bracket. Which artist will rock their way to the Mouse Madness Hall of Fame? - Welcome back to the show, Raymond! - Chris's reminder to go and eat some fruit, and a cotton candy grapes discussion is opened. - Elite 8 starts with pretty cool quadrants. - Cheetah girls save a dog with the power of music - The Hoedown Throwdown is very E-40 of Hannah Montana. - How the A's and Pirates got their names/mascots. 40:33 - Lemonade Mouth IS gay rights! - Kyle found the 4*Town website. - Powerline has the ideal male body. - Kyle and Raymond's Cheetah Girls story. - Chris reads the Wango Tango 2003 lineup. - The writing credits for "Take Me Away" by Pink Slip Got a rebuttal? Want to be a tiebreaker host? We'd love to hear from you: Support us on Patreon: cutt.ly/GerisGang Email us at mousemadnesspodcast@gmail.com Tweet us @MouseMadnessPod Follow us on Instagram @MouseMadnessPod Chat with us on Discord: discord.gg/qwpqAWA Join our Facebook Community: fb.me/MouseMadnessPodcast

Hochman and Crowder
Cheetah Bombs | The Porpoise Pod

Hochman and Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 16:31


How could we not be hyped up for this offense after the Dolphins first drive vs Philly? Selecting the receivers and running backs that will make the final 53-man cut. After, admiring Jaelan Phillips strong preseason and what's to come for the former Hurricane.   Subscribe to The Porpoise Pod HERE!

The Porpoise Pod
Cheetah Bombs

The Porpoise Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 18:31


How could we not be hyped up for this offense after the Dolphins first drive vs Philly? Selecting the receivers and running backs that will make the final 53-man cut. After, admiring Jaelan Phillips strong preseason and what's to come for the former Hurricane. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

12 Pissed off Guys The Pod
Draft Orders and Cheetahs

12 Pissed off Guys The Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 116:22


What's good? 12 POG is back and in this episode, we have a special guest, Blaine Daniel's on the phone. Toon and G grill him with some hard-hitting questions and talk draft order and much more. They also go through every NFL teams mascot and ask Blaine if he could beat their ass. (3:30) - Pre-Season is boring (6:45) - Hard Knocks Review (12:05) - G goes on a rant on how Patrick Mahomes has been getting disrespected (16:00) - Mitch or Pickett? (17:00) - Don't look now players/teams of the week (20:00) - 12 POG content - Draft order revealed - Draft strategy - Who's fucking themselves in the draft? - Who's a lock for playoffs? - Who's in Championship game? (30:00) - Blaine Daniels Interview (01:00) - Can Blaine kill majority of the NFL mascots? (01:30) - The guys talk draft order (01:45) - End credits #Staypissed

The Needle Movers (Formerly Booklub)
E41 | Book Club: Two Mirrors and a Cheetah: Think Differently, Own Your Career & Succeed by Being Yourself by Fiona McDonnell

The Needle Movers (Formerly Booklub)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 61:27


Hello Needlemovers!On this episode of the Booklub series in our Needle Movers Podcast, we take a different approach to this episode as one of our hosts have finally not actually read in advance, so takes the route of review host and audience while delving into Two Mirrors and a Cheetah: Think Differently, Own Your Career & Succeed by Being Yourself by Fiona McDonnell.Let us know if you enjoy the episode and watch out for a future episode where we see the application of lessons applied in this book.Stories and Strategies for Public RelationsCommunication is in every facet of our daily business.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Ringer Dish
The Cheetah Girls: A Look Back | Pop Culture History Lesson

Ringer Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 60:14


The party has just begun! In this Cheetah-licious episode of 'Pop Culture History Lesson', Amelia Wedemeyer and Kate Halliwell join forces to examine the iconic 2000s girl group and Disney Channel original film series. To fully grasp the cultural significance of the Cheetah Girls' reign, Amelia and Kate do a deep dive into the group's individual singers and where they are now, before ending the show with their own Cheetah Girls power rankings. Hosts: Amelia Wedemeyer and Kate Halliwell Producer: Jade Whaley Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices