Podcasts about RNA

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Family of large biological molecules

  • 1,225PODCASTS
  • 2,848EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
RNA

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about RNA

Show all podcasts related to rna

Latest podcast episodes about RNA

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.18.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 60:39


HEALTH NEWS Walking for 150 minutes per week associated with improved wellbeing in over-50  Trinity College Dublin, January 17, 2022  New research using data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin shows that being physically active, for example by walking for at least 150 minutes per week, is associated with more social participation and better mental health and wellbeing.  The findings show that: Two-thirds of the Irish population aged 50 years and older report low or moderate levels of physical activity while only one-third report high levels of activity, based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Middle-aged and older Irish adults with high levels of physical activity report greater participation in social activities, less anxiety, better quality of life, and less loneliness compared to those with low physical activity levels. Middle-aged and older adults with low levels of physical activity are over twice as likely to have clinically relevant depressive symptoms as those with high levels of physical activity (14% versus 6%). Interventions should specifically target women, older adults, those in employment, those who are not engaged in non-church related social activities and those living in built-up areas such as apartments.     Study finds hydroxychloroquine delays disability for least treatable form of multiple sclerosis University of Calgary (Canada), January 17, 2022 A University of Calgary study has found promising results for the generic drug hydroxychloroquine when used to treat the evolution of disability of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the least treatable form of the autoimmune disease.  Cumming School of Medicine research teams found hydroxychloroquine helped to slow the worsening of disability during the 18-month study involving participants at the MS clinic in Calgary. The research was published in Annals of Neurology. The experimental study, known as a single-arm phase II futility trial, followed 35 people between November 2016 and June 2021. Researchers expected to see at least 40 percent, or 14 participants, experience a significant worsening of their walking function, but at the end of the trial only eight participants had worsened. Hydroxychloroquine was generally well-tolerated.     Tree nut consumption is associated with better diet Louisiana State University,  January 16, 2022 A new study, published this week in the open access journal Nutrients, compares the nutrient adequacy and diet quality of those who consume tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), and non-tree nut consumers in a nationally representative population. Tree nut consumption was associated with better nutrient adequacy for most nutrients that are lacking in the diets of many Americans, and with better diet quality. Researchers looked at 14,386 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The data showed that, compared to non-consumers, tree nut consumers had a lower percentage of the population consuming usual intakes of nutrients below the recommended levels of vitamins A, E and C; folate; calcium; iron; magnesium; and zinc. Tree nut consumers had a higher percentage of the population over the recommendation for adequate intake for dietary fiber and potassium    Protein isolated from baker's yeast shows potential against leukemia cells University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), January 16, 2022  An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. "In this study, we characterize the enzyme L-asparaginase from S. cerevisiae. The results show this protein can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells with low cytotoxicity to healthy cells," said Gisele Monteiro, a professor at FCF-USP and the principal investigator for the published study. Production of the enzyme asparagine synthetase is deficient in ALL and several other types of cancer cells, which are therefore unable to synthesize the amino acid asparagine. "This type of cell depends on extracellular sources of asparagine, an essential amino acid for the synthesis of proteins and hence of DNA and RNA. So it's required for cell division," Monteiro said. "The enzyme asparaginase depletes this amino acid in the extracellular medium, converting it into aspartate and ammonia. In patients with ALL, this leads to a sharp fall in serum levels of asparagine, hindering protein synthesis in malignant cells and inducing apoptosis, or programmed cell death." The bacterial enzyme killed about 90 percent of the MOLT4 human leukemia cells and displayed low toxicity to the healthy HUVEC cells, killing only 10 percent. "The yeast enzyme killed between 70 percent and 80 percent of the MOLT4 cells and displayed less than 10 percent toxicity for HUVEC cells. Neither was significantly effective against REH cells."   Pakistan says trial of Chinese traditional medicine for Covid-19 successful International Center for Chemical and Biological Science (Pakistan), January 17, 2022 Local health authorities on Monday announced the completion of a successful clinical trial of Chinese traditional herbal medicine for treating Covid-19, as Pakistan enters a fifth wave of the pandemic driven by the Omicron variant. The Chinese medicine, Jinhua Qinggan Granules (JHQG) manufactured by Juxiechang (Beijing) Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, is already being used in the treatment of Covid-19 patients in China. “Since it was tried on patients with different variants of Covid-19, we expect it to be effective on Omicron as on other variants,” Professor Iqbal Chaudhry, director of the International Center for Chemical and Biological Science (ICCBS) in Karachi, where trials were conducted The trials were conducted on 300 patients who were treated at home, and would work on mild to moderate Covid-19 cases, Dr Raza Shah, principal investigator in the trials, told reporters, adding that the efficacy rate was around 82.67 per cent.   Berry compounds' heart health benefits linked to impact on platelets Sun Yat-sen University (Taiwan), January 14, 2022 The new study, published in Nutrition & Metabolism , deepens our understanding of the heart health benefits of anthocyanins, pigments found in many fruit like black raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, and blackcurrants. Chinese scientists report that 320 mg per day of purified anthocyanins, equivalent to about 100 g of fresh blueberries and blackcurrants, for 24 weeks were associated with significant reductions in platelet chemokine levels, which correlated to lower levels of inflammatory markers in people with elevated cholesterol levels. “Platelet chemokines are involved in inflammatory reactions, immune responses, and other aspects of the development of atherosclerosis,” explained researchers from Sun Yat-sen University. “These findings indicate a potential mechanism by which anthocyanins exert protective effects on the cardiovascular system, achieved through the comprehensive regulation of platelet chemokines, lipid metabolism and inflammation, in which platelet chemokines may play pivotal roles.”   OTHER NEWS Time to Boycott - Companies Discriminating Against Their Unvaccinated Employees The Naked Emperor, January 17, 2022 Suddenly, employment and discrimination laws don't exist. Here is an ever-growing list of companies that are discriminating against their employees. They need boycotting until they change their policies. ·  Finance o    Citigroup - Employees to lose their jobs by the end of the month if unvaccinated; o    Goldman Sachs - Told employees they will require a booster to work in the office from 1 February; o    JPMorgan Chase - Won't pay unvaccinated employees because they aren't allowed to go to the office; o    OneAmerica - Requiring vaccines for all employees; Healthcare o    National Health Service - Staff with direct contact with patients must have had a 1st dose by 3 February or risk losing their job at the end of March; o    Mayo Clinic - Has fired 700 unvaccinated employees; Retail o    Columbia Sportswear - Will begin firing unvaccinated employees from 1 Feb; o    Ikea - Has cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff forced to self-isolate; o    Kroger - Eliminated paid leave for unvaccinated employees who get COVID-19 and require them to pay monthly health insurance surcharges; o    Next - Sick pay cut for unvaccinated staff forced to self-isolate; o    Nike - If employees remain unvaccinated by 15 January they will be fired; o    Morrisons - Cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff in October 2021; o    Ocado - Unvaccinated isolating staff to have sick pay cut; o    Tyson Foods - Require COVID-19 vaccinations for its U.S workforce and providing $200 to full vaccinated frontline team members; o    Vans, Supreme, Timberland & The North Face (Parent company = VF Corporation) - will start firing unvaccinated employees by 31 January without severance; Services o    Wessex Water - To cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff who need to self-isolate; Tech o    Apple - Starting 24 January, employees will need proof of booster. Unvaccinated will need negative tests to go to work; o    Google - Tells unvaccinated employees they'll lose pay and will eventually be fired; o    Intel - Employees to go on unpaid leave if unvaccinated by 4 January;     The Age of Intolerance: Cancel Culture's War on Free Speech John and Nisha Whitehead, January 11, 2022 Cancel culture—political correctness amped up on steroids, the self-righteousness of a narcissistic age, and a mass-marketed pseudo-morality that is little more than fascism disguised as tolerance—has shifted us into an Age of Intolerance, policed by techno-censors, social media bullies, and government watchdogs. Everything is now fair game for censorship if it can be construed as hateful, hurtful, bigoted or offensive provided that it runs counter to the established viewpoint. In this way, the most controversial issues of our day—race, religion, sex, sexuality, politics, science, health, government corruption, police brutality, etc.—have become battlegrounds for those who claim to believe in freedom of speech but only when it favors the views and positions they support. This tendency to censor, silence, delete, label as “hateful,” and demonize viewpoints that run counter to the cultural elite is being embraced with a near-fanatical zealotry by a cult-like establishment that values conformity and group-think over individuality. This authoritarian intolerance masquerading as tolerance, civility and love (what comedian George Carlin referred to as “fascism pretending to be manners”) is the end result of a politically correct culture that has become radicalized, institutionalized and tyrannical. J.K. Rowling, author of the popular Harry Potter series, has found herself denounced as transphobic and widely shunned for daring to criticize efforts by transgender activists to erode the legal definition of sex and replace it with gender. Rowling's essay explaining her views is a powerful, articulate, well-researched piece that not only stresses the importance of free speech and women's rights while denouncing efforts by trans activists to demonize those who subscribe to “wrongthink,” but also recognizes that while the struggle over gender dysmorphia is real, concerns about safeguarding natal women and girls from abuse are also legitimate. Ironically enough, Rowling's shunning included literal book burning. Yet as Ray Bradbury once warned, “There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches.” Indeed, the First Amendment is going up in flames before our eyes, but those first sparks were lit long ago and have been fed by intolerance all along the political spectrum. Consider some of the kinds of speech being targeted for censorship or outright elimination. Offensive, politically incorrect and “unsafe” speech:  Bullying, intimidating speech: Dangerous, anti-government speech:  The problem as I see it is that we've allowed ourselves to be persuaded that we need someone else to think and speak for us. And we've bought into the idea that we need the government and its corporate partners to shield us from that which is ugly or upsetting or mean. The result is a society in which we've stopped debating among ourselves, stopped thinking for ourselves, and stopped believing that we can fix our own problems and resolve our own differences. In short, we have reduced ourselves to a largely silent, passive, polarized populace incapable of working through our own problems and reliant on the government to protect us from our fears. We have allowed our fears—fear for our safety, fear of each other, fear of being labeled racist or hateful or prejudiced, etc.—to trump our freedom of speech and muzzle us far more effectively than any government edict could. Ultimately the war on free speech—and that's exactly what it is: a war being waged by Americans against other Americans—is a war that is driven by fear. By muzzling free speech, we are contributing to a growing underclass of Americans who are being told that they can't take part in American public life unless they “fit in.” Be warned: whatever we tolerate now—whatever we turn a blind eye to—whatever we rationalize when it is inflicted on others will eventually come back to imprison us, one and all.   Spain police officers in Valencia: "We are with the people, not with corrupt politicians. We are in contact with Portugal, Italy, France, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands to unite all the police in Europe. Down with the health passport."     There Is Currently No COVID Medical Emergency Only Psychological Engineering Says Senior Israeli Immunologist GREAT GAME INDIA,  January 16, 2022 The attempts of governments across the globe at “psychological engineering” the population on Covid related matters has now been fully exposed after several years. A well respected immunologist in Israel heavily criticized the approach of every administration globally. In a scathing letter addressed to the Israeli Ministry of Health, a renowned immunologist denounced mass vaccination against COVID-19 and chastised officials who've already “branded” the unvaccinated “as spreaders of the disease.” The letter, penned by Professor Ehud Qimron, who is the head of Tel Aviv University's Department of Microbiology and Immunology, rips off vaccine-focused COVID tactics endorsed by authorities across the globe, which Qimron labels “doomed to fail.” “Two years late, you finally realize that a respiratory virus cannot be defeated and that any such attempt is doomed to fail,” he wrote to the Israeli health ministry. “You do not admit it, because you have admitted almost no mistake in the last two years, but in retrospect it is clear that you have failed miserably in almost all of your actions, and even the media is already having a hard time covering your shame.” Qimron reprimanded Israeli authorities for failing to recognize that COVID-19 vaccines will neither eliminate the virus or provide herd immunity, as the government's immunization campaign “failed” to do. “You refused to admit that the infection comes in waves that fade by themselves, despite years of observations and scientific knowledge,” he said. “You refused to admit that recovery is more protective than a vaccine, despite previous knowledge and observations showing that non-recovered vaccinated people are more likely to be infected than recovered people.” “You refused to admit that the vaccinated are contagious despite the observations. Based on this, you hoped to achieve herd immunity by vaccination — and you failed in that as well.” According to research, immunizations essentially inflict more harm than that of the virus on its own in younger demographics. According to a study released last month by British researchers, the jabs dramatically raise the chance of potentially life-threatening heart inflammation in males under 40 years old compared to COVID-19 and may lead in more lethal types of the heart ailment. “You have ignored many reports of changes in menstrual intensity and menstrual cycle times,” Qimron noted in his letter to the health ministry. “You hid data that allows for objective and proper research. Instead, you chose to publish non-objective articles together with senior Pfizer executives on the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.” “The truth is that you have brought the public's trust in you to an unprecedented low, and you have eroded your status as a source of authority,” he alleged, citing increased incidences of mental illness and misbehavior among Israeli pupils amid COVID regulations. “You have destroyed the education of our children and their future,” said Qimron. “You made children feel guilty, scared, smoke, drink, get addicted, drop out, and quarrel, as school principals around the country attest. You have harmed livelihoods, the economy, human rights, mental health and physical health.” You slandered colleagues who did not surrender to you, you turned the people against each other, divided society and polarized the discourse. You branded, without any scientific basis, people who chose not to get vaccinated as enemies of the public and as spreaders of disease. You promote, in an unprecedented way, a draconian policy of discrimination, denial of rights and selection of people, including children, for their medical choice. A selection that lacks any epidemiological justification. “There is currently no medical emergency,” the immunologist continued. “The only emergency now is that you still set policies and hold huge budgets for propaganda and psychological engineering instead of directing them to strengthen the health care system.” “This emergency must stop!”   Serious Health Risks of Covid-19 Vaccines: Open Letter to Cornell University Board of Trustees and President Martha Pollack Cornell University Community, January 12, 2022 Dear President Pollack and Cornell Board of Trustees, We are students, parents, alumni, faculty, and staff of Cornell University. We are grateful for Cornell's efforts at keeping students and the Ithaca community safe during this pandemic. As concerned members of the global Big Red family, we write this open letter to express our strong opposition to Cornell's Covid-19 booster mandate. In light of new data available about both the vaccine and the virus, we urge you to change the “mandate” to a “recommendation” based on the factors outlined below.  We appreciate that the booster mandate and new procedures for the spring term stem from the good intention to prevent severe illness. But as with any public health policy, many factors — scientific, ethical, and legal — must be considered and weighed. We are concerned that Cornell, in issuing this booster mandate, has overlooked recent and evolving scientific data regarding the vaccine and the virus that makes a booster mandate inappropriate and unnecessary, raising serious ethical and legal questions. In December 2021, Cornell identified over 1,600 Covid-19 positive cases with “every case of the Omicron variant to date [being] found in fully vaccinated students, a portion of whom had also received a booster shot.” Cornell's own data highlights that vaccination, even with the booster, has very limited capability in stopping virus transmission. A similar conclusion has been reached by CDC's research: vaccinated people seem to transmit Covid-19 similarly to unvaccinated people. The virus will continue to be transmitted among our highly vaccinated campuses. In a recent campus-wide email, Cornell explicitly acknowledged the impossibility of containing or eliminating Omicron, the flu, or other respiratory illnesses, which is why it will “shift from counting positive cases.”  As so many students test positive, they are, in essence, receiving a natural booster based on the very latest variants of the virus. And yet, Cornell is ignoring the natural immunity in these students and mandating a booster injection based on older variants, which Cornell knows is ineffective at stopping the spread of Covid-19 in the Cornell community. This decision is counter to science and seems like it was made less to promote students' health and more to achieve some other unstated goal of the administration. Otherwise, why require a booster injection that is ineffective, and potentially dangerous, for students who are naturally contracting and fighting off a virus that many scientists believe is becoming more endemic than pandemic? Mounting evidence points to serious risks from exposure to the Covid-19 vaccines. The latest scientific research shows that Covid-19 vaccine side effects such as myocarditis, thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, and pericarditis are more common in young people than we think (see references 1-5 listed below). Recently, an Oxford-conducted study of men under the age of 40 demonstrated that the risk of myocarditis after one dose mRNA exceeds the risk of myocarditis from an actual Covid-19 infection. Even more alarmingly, the CDC's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) indicates that there were over 15,000 Covid-19 vaccine related death cases in 2021, compared with the previous average of 158 vaccine related deaths per year (Pre-Covid-19), in the context of a yearly total of 280 million injections and 70 different vaccines. This data shows that, compared to other vaccines, Covid-19 injections carry around 100 times the risk of death. Considering new data on the virus and the vaccine, the university may very well cause disability or death by imposing further vaccine requirements, and it will have to bear the responsibility. Please do the right thing, and end this unnecessary and unethical mandate. EU Regulators, WHO Call for End to COVID Boosters, Citing Evidence Strategy Is Failing EU drug regulators, World Health Organization experts and the former chairman of the UK's COVID task force all cited mounting evidence mRNA COVID boosters aren't working and the strategy should be dropped. Childrens Health Defense, January 12, 2022   European Union drug regulators warned frequent COVID boosters could adversely affect the immune system and said there are currently no data to support repeated doses. According to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), continued booster doses every four months could pose a risk of overloading people's immune systems and lead to fatigue. Instead, the agency recommended countries space out the intervals between boosters and coordinate their programs with the onset of the cold season in each hemisphere — following blueprints of influenza vaccination strategies. Boosters “can be done once, or maybe twice, but it's not something that we can think should be repeated constantly,” Cavaleri said. “We need to think about how we can transition from the current pandemic setting to a more endemic setting.” The World Health Organization's (WHO) Technical Advisory Group on COVID-19 Vaccine Composition (TAG-CO-VAC) on Jan. 11 warned, “a vaccination strategy based on repeated booster doses of the original vaccine composition is unlikely to be appropriate or sustainable.” The expert group, created by the WHO to assess the performance of COVID vaccines, said providing fresh doses of already existing vaccines as new strains of the virus emerge is not the best way to fight a pandemic. “It's over, people,” Alex Berenson, former New York Times reporter and best-selling author, wrote. “Aside from a few unlucky Israelis, no one is going to receive a fourth dose of the original vaccine.” Berenson wrote: “Everyone with eyes can see it doesn't work against Omicron — and if you haven't gotten a third dose, at this point, why would you? You are getting at most weeks of marginally improved protection for potentially severe side effects. “Instead the WHO is now promising/demanding vaccines based on whatever the dominant Sars-Cov-2 strain is at the moment. That promise is as empty as all the others the health bureaucrats and vaccine companies have made.”   60% Of Omicron Hospitalization Numbers Were Incorrect Admits Canada's Chief Medical Officer GREAT GAME INDIA. January 17, 2022 Shocking statistics regarding Canada's Omicron hospitalizations being incorrect has come to light recently. The Premier of Alberta has claimed a staggering 60% disparity between the actual figures. Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Alberta Chief Medical Officer Deena Hinshaw both confirmed that public figures for ICU capacity and COVID admissions were up to 60% incorrect. “Of the 163 omicron patients in hospital, 66 have a primary COVID diagnosis … and of the 14 omicron patients in ICU, 11 have a primary COVID diagnosis,” he stated. As per Kenney, this indicates that 60% of individuals labelled as staying in the hospital for an omicron ailment weren't there because they arrived sick with COVID, and also that the ICU statistics reflect the same rationale, with more than 20% of recorded stays being unintentional. This is consistent with developments found throughout Canada, as provincial medical authorities have shifted their focus and begun to release increasingly specific data on hospitalizations.

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast
A Natural Approach to Cancer with John Hall

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:19


Today's guest John Hall, Ph.D. discusses the Beljanski Foundation and its natural approach to cancer.  John has served as an Executive in the Biotechnology Industry and is currently Vice President for Research and Development at Molecular International Research and Director of Research at The Beljanski Foundation. Dr. Hall was a Graduate Fellow at Princeton University, in the Department of Biochemical Sciences, and he completed his Ph.D. at New York University, in the Department of Biochemistry. In this episode, John Hall explains the nutraceuticals behind the amazing Beljanski product Onkobel-Pro as well as the purified RNA extract, Immunobel-Pro.  The two anti-cancer plant extracts in Onkobel pro were originally developed by Mirko Beljanski as a natural approach to cancer.  They have been shown to help those diagnosed with as well as those who want to prevent cancer.  In addition, listen in to learn about some new and exciting research that the foundation is funding, beneficial to late-stage cancers.

This Week in Virology
TWiV 854: Omicron is evasive

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 125:58


TWiV reviews findings that increased fitness of the Omicron variant is due to immune evasion, not an increase in intrinsic transmissibility, and determination of infectious viral load in patients infected with wild type, Delta and Omicron viruses reveals lack of correlation with RNA loads determined by RT-PCR, similar levels of shedding among Delta and Omicron, and greatly reduced shedding in vaccinated people. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Travel Award Applications (ASV) 2:11 Omicron transmission in Danish households (medRxiv) Infectious viral load in vaccinated and unvaccinated patients (medRxiv) Fred Murphy on TWiV 625 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Favorite Science Photos of 2021 Brianne – Viruses, Vaccines, and COVID-19 videos from American Museum of Natural History Kathy – Klompas et al. “Current insights into respiratory virus transmission…” Rich – Leviathan Falls by James S.A. Corey Vincent – Ebola (1996) by David Molesky at The Incubator Listener Picks Randall – Robert Malone & Peter McCullough: A litany of untruths Suellen – Omicron and the case of the hidden evolution – Understanding Evolution Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

This Week in Virology
TWiV 854: Omicron is evasive

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 125:58


TWiV reviews findings that increased fitness of the Omicron variant is due to immune evasion, not an increase in intrinsic transmissibility, and determination of infectious viral load in patients infected with wild type, Delta and Omicron viruses reveals lack of correlation with RNA loads determined by RT-PCR, similar levels of shedding among Delta and Omicron, and greatly reduced shedding in vaccinated people. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Travel Award Applications (ASV) 2:11 Omicron transmission in Danish households (medRxiv) Infectious viral load in vaccinated and unvaccinated patients (medRxiv) Fred Murphy on TWiV 625 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Favorite Science Photos of 2021 Brianne – Viruses, Vaccines, and COVID-19 videos from American Museum of Natural History Kathy – Klompas et al. “Current insights into respiratory virus transmission…” Rich – Leviathan Falls by James S.A. Corey Vincent – Ebola (1996) by David Molesky at The Incubator Listener Picks Randall – Robert Malone & Peter McCullough: A litany of untruths Suellen – Omicron and the case of the hidden evolution – Understanding Evolution Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

The Readout Loud
Episode 192: Michael Gilman on the future of RNA drugs, plus #JPM22 in review and more Biogen news

The Readout Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 34:47


First, STAT health tech correspondent Katie Palmer joins us to recap the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference. Then, we discuss the latest twist in Biogen's quest to expand the use of Aduhelm and what it means for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Finally, Arrakis Therapeutics CEO Michael Gilman calls in to explain how targeting RNA can treat disease and why the characters in "Dune" don't just shoot each other with laser guns.

Straight A Nursing
Your Quick Guide to RSV: Episode 195

Straight A Nursing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 23:21


Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that is transmitted by respiratory droplets. It is highly transmissible and can be quite severe, especially when young children or neonates are affected. In this episode, you'll get an introduction to all the key elements of RSV using the Straight A Nursing LATTE method. Latte Method Template: Use this template to create study guides focusing on the must-know information for nursing school. Study Sesh Podcast: If you want to dramatically change the way you study and free yourself from your books and screens…you'll want to check out Study Sesh! Planner for Nursing Students: Part of being a successful student is excellent time management. This planner is designed specifically for your busy schedule to help you stay on top of everything you need to do. Pediatric Respiratory Distress : Learn why pediatric respiratory distress is a really, really, really big deal.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
COVID, Coronavirus, Omicron and Delta variants, and vaccine updates for 01-13-2022

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 5:22


This is Covid 411, the latest on Omicron and other COVID variants, and new hotspots for January 13th, 2022.A report says around 458 local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement officers died in the line of duty in 2021, an increase of 55% and the most since 1930. 301 of those were Covid-related, making that the leading cause of death. That was also true in 2020 when at least 182 officers died of the virus.You'll notice that even as the vaccines open up to new, younger groups of people, the vaccination numbers in our daily report don't seem to move very much. Authorities are starting to worry about alarmingly low vaccination rates in U.S. kids 5 to 11. As of Tuesday, just over 17% were fully vaccinated, more than two months after shots became available to that age group. More good news coming out of wastewater. This time it's Boston's. COVID samples from that city's wastewater are trending sharply downward, suggesting the region is past the peak of the Omicron wave. The average number of coronavirus RNA copies per milliliter has dropped by over 40% in recent days. However, levels are still higher than levels found during previous surges.Remember the Delta variant? You should because it's still very much around and doing the damage it's always done. The Director of the CDC said most reported Covid deaths in the U.S. are still from Delta, not Omicron. Officials are monitoring deaths over the next several weeks to measure the impact of Omicron on mortality.People in the public eye are still learning that others are watching what they do throughout this pandemic. The U.K. Prime Minister apologized after admitting he attended a “bring your own booze” Downing Street garden party in May of 2020. He said he thought it was a work event at the time. Office employees were invited “to make the most of the lovely weather and have some socially distanced drinks in the garden” at a time when large outdoor gatherings were banned.In the United States, cases were up 159%, deaths are up 51%, and hospitalizations are up 79% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since December 14. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Indiana, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Maryland. There are now over 20 million active cases in the United States, at 20,672,722.The five areas with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: The U.S. Virgin Islands 466%. Puerto Rico 286%, Louisiana 268%. Florida 235%. And Alabama 177%. The top 10 areas with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Teton, WY. Miami-Dade, FL. Greensville, VA. Pitkin, CO. Summit, UT. Tom Green, TX. Providence, RI. Rolette, ND. New York City, NY. And Logan, IL.There have been at least 843,624 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 78.3%, Rhode Island at 77.3%, and Maine at 76.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Wyoming at 48%, Alabama at 48.1%, and Mississippi at 48.8%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 62.6%.Globally, cases were up 145% and deaths up 2% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are now over 49 million active cases around the world, at 49,193,972.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 814,494. France 361,719. India 241,976. Italy 196,224. And Spain 179,125. There have been 5,510,327 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Covid 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Covid 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Epigenetics Podcast
H3K4me3, Set-Proteins, Isw1 and their Role in Transcription (Jane Mellor)

Epigenetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 42:12


In this episode of the Epigenetics Podcast, we caught up with Jane Mellor from the University of Oxford to talk about her work on H3K4me3, SET proteins, Isw1 and their role in transcription. Since the beginning of the century, Jane Mellor and her team have focused on H3K4 trimethylation and the factors that influence this mark. They discovered that H3K4me3 is an almost universal mark of the first nucleosome in every transcribed unit and all organisms. She could subsequently, together with the Kouzarides lab, identify SetD1, the enzyme that is responsible for writing this modification. Later on, the team characterized Isw1, a chromatin remodeler which “reads” H3K4me3. More recently the lab focuses on how the polymerase transcribes throughout the first nucleosomes of the transcribed region at the +2 nucleosome, with the help of Spt4.   References Santos-Rosa, H., Schneider, R., Bannister, A. J., Sherriff, J., Bernstein, B. E., Emre, N. C. T., Schreiber, S. L., Mellor, J., & Kouzarides, T. (2002). Active genes are tri-methylated at K4 of histone H3. Nature, 419(6905), 407–411. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01080 Morillon, A., O'Sullivan, J., Azad, A., Proudfoot, N., & Mellor, J. (2003). Regulation of Elongating RNA Polymerase II by Forkhead Transcription Factors in Yeast. Science, 300(5618), 492–495. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1081379 Morillon, A., Karabetsou, N., O'Sullivan, J., Kent, N., Proudfoot, N., & Mellor, J. (2003). Isw1 Chromatin Remodeling ATPase Coordinates Transcription Elongation and Termination by RNA Polymerase II. Cell, 115(4), 425–435. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0092-8674(03)00880-8 Uzun, Ü., Brown, T., Fischl, H., Angel, A., & Mellor, J. (2021). Spt4 facilitates the movement of RNA polymerase II through the +2 nucleosomal barrier. Cell Reports, 36(13), 109755. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2021.109755   Related Episodes Effects of Non-Enzymatic Covalent Histone Modifications on Chromatin (Yael David) Nutriepigenetics: The Effects of Diet on Behavior (Monica Dus) Epigenetic Origins Of Heterogeneity And Disease (Andrew Pospisilik)   Contact Active Motif on Twitter Epigenetics Podcast on Twitter Active Motif on LinkedIn Active Motif on Facebook Email: podcast@activemotif.com

Cell & Gene: The Podcast
RNA's Advantages Over Other Cell Therapies with Cartesian's CSO

Cell & Gene: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 19:51


Dr. Michael Singer, CSO at Cartesian Therapeutics, details why RNA has advantages over other cell therapies, the company's three RNA trials, and the therapeutic benefit of multiple modifications.

MoneyBall Medicine
At the Cutting Edge of Computational Precision Medicine, with Rafael Rosengarten

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:38


Genialis, led by CEO Rafael Rosengarten, is one of the companies working toward a future where there are no more one-size-fits-all drugs—where, instead, every patient gets matched with the best drug for them based on their disease subtype, as measured by gene-sequence and gene-expression data. Analyzing that data—what Rosengarten calls "computational precision medicine"—is already helping drug developers identify the patients who are most likely to respond to experimental medicines. Not long  from now, the same technology could help doctors diagnose patients in the clinic, and/or feed back into drug discovery by providing more biological targets for biopharma companies to hit."Our commitment to biomarker-driven drug development is very principled," Rosengarten tells Harry. "There are some amazing drugs out there that, when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Some work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 percent. If you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options, and we would know that we've got to develop [new] drugs for the others." Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.For most people, the genomics revolution still feels pretty distant, like something that's happening off in the ivory towers of big pharma companies or research universities.But say, heaven forbid, you get diagnosed with cancer next week. All of a sudden you're going to want to get very familiar with your own genome. Because thanks to the Human Genome Project and all the new tools for sequencing and analyzing genes, we know today that there are many different forms of cancer. And each one may respond to a different type of medicine. So before you and your doctor can decide which medicines will work best for you, you really need to know which genes and mutations you carry and how they're expressed in your cells.Drug companies need similar data when they're testing new drugs. Because if they happen to test a drug on a population of people who happen to have the wrong genes to respond to that drug, they could wind up throwing away a medicine that would work perfectly well on people who have the right genes.The problem is that all of this gene sequencing and expression testing generates incredible amounts of data. And doctors and hospitals and even big pharma companies aren't always set up to understand or analyze that data.My guest this week is the CEO of a company that's helping with that problem. His name is Rafael Rosengarten. And his company Genialis has built a software platform that organizes and analyzes data from high-throughput gene sequencing and RNA expression assays. We'll talk more about what all those terms mean. But what you need to know is that Genialis is one of the companies on the cutting edge of translating genetic data into actionable predictions. Those predictions are already helping biotech and pharma companies get drugs to market faster. And in the near future they could help doctors funnel patients toward the right treatments. I wrote a whole chapter on this stuff for my new book, The Future You. So it was really fun to talk it through all of it with Rafael. Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Rafael, welcome to the show.Rafael Rosengarten: Thanks for having me, Harry.Harry Glorikian: For those listeners that don't have backgrounds in, say, computational biology or drug development, could you define a few terms that are probably going to come up later in our discussion? I mean, first, you know, maybe define next-generation sequencing or this term we call NGS. What is next-generation about?Rafael Rosengarten: Sure, I'd be happy to do that, let me start by just kind of saying what Genialis is with some jargon in the words, and then I'll define the jargon for you. Okay. So Genialis is computational precision medicine. So what that means is we're really interested in matching patients to therapies, right? And we use data about the molecular biology of patients' diseases to do that. And our favorite kind of data to work with come from next generation sequencing. So next generation sequencing, often abbreviated as NGS, although we've been doing that for 15 years now, we probably just need to call it this-generation sequencing, is a technology where you can get the genetic information of the entire, say, genome or the transcriptome, that's the expression [for] which genes are expressed, and you get literally every base pair off of a machine that reads the DNA or RNA from cells in our body. And with that information, you do some fancy computation that, frankly, a lot of that's now fairly commoditized. And it kind of maps all of the individual bits of data into what we think we know about the human genome. And so you can say, OK, we've got this much of this gene and that much of this gene or you can say, you know, Gene A has certain mutations and Gene B has other mutations. And so it allows you to ask whether whether they're mutations or changes in the amount of certain molecules and so forth. But you get to do it for all the genes and not only all the genes you can do it for, [but] for all the space in between the genes in the genome.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I you know, it's funny because just the other day there was the announcement that we quote "actually finished" the entire genome, which I thought was an interesting announcement. One more definition. So this term RNAseq, right? So, you know, drawing the analogy of DNA and saying, OK, RNA is the next level. And why has that become so important now in drug discovery?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question, so again, for your listeners who may not live and breathe this stuff, there's a concept in in biology called the central dogma, and it kind of still holds. And the notion is that there are these different levels of organizations or different layers of the onion and peeling back the information that our cells use to conduct business. And the the core of this is DNA, and that's our genetic information that's encoded in our nucleus and it's passed down from parents to children. It's the heritable information, and I apologize to all my friends who do live and breathe this, who are going to call shenanigans on my definition of being overly simplistic. The next level is, as you described, is the RNA. And so RNA is actually a lot of things. But messenger RNAs are the transcription of the genes. So the DNA genes that hold our genetic information are converted through a molecular process into another kind of molecule. And that kind of molecule is RNA. It's chemically similar to DNA, but different, and that RNA tend to be in smaller pieces than the whole chromosomes, and they represent smaller pieces of genetic information, and they can vary widely from, say, one gene to the next in terms of how much RNA is made for that given gene.Rafael Rosengarten: And then just to fill out the picture a bit more, in principle, then, those RNA molecules get turned into protein, or they are the specific instructions to create proteins, and proteins then go do the work of the cell. What I just told you is mostly wrong, but it's sort of the framework that we think about. So the reason why RNA, the middle layer, is so interesting in drug discovery, and I'm going to add to that, in diagnostics world, is because it's a bit more, let's call it dynamic than the DNA level. So mutations sometimes are heritable and sometimes they arise de novo. But once they've arisen, they're kind of there and they go through from cell to cell, once the cells divide. And that's, you know, that's important and interesting and meaningful information, you can learn a lot about what genes are potentially druggable from that. But it doesn't tell you a whole lot about the state of tissue or the state of disease in this moment, right? It's kind of background information in a way. And so RNA is a bit more dynamic.Rafael Rosengarten: It changes. It can change on, you know, really rapid time scales, but certainly therapeutically relevant time scales. And so in some ways, it's a little bit closer to sort of what's happening now. Harry Glorikian: Right.Rafael Rosengarten: It's also just a different, it's a different class of information because there are these abundances, different genes at different levels. Those relative abundances have biological importance and sometimes therapeutic importance. A lot of cancers, for example, are bad for you. They are essentially dysregulation of gene expression, so they can arise from mutations or they can arise from events at the DNA level. But it's understanding how much of some species of gene is being expressed in the RNA that can be informative or potentially therapeutically actionable. And I'm going to shout out to my proteomics friends, the guys who study proteins. That may be even more therapeutically relevant in a sense, because most of our drugs actually target proteins. And that's quite the key of it. Except for gene therapy, which is a big deal, especially in the CRISPR era, we're not often targeting DNA with our drugs, right? Mostly, we're targeting proteins and occasionally we're targeting RNAs and less frequently we're targeting DNA. Again, all CRISPR bets aside, right?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. No, we did an episode with talking about CRISPR and, you know, amazing advancements happening there. But now, being from Applied Biosystems, I remember an entire room full of sequencers where we, I think they were like 600 or 800 we had running 24 hours a day at one point. Now I can do that on a desktop, right? But. There's a lot of data that comes off that. T  hat's a challenge, I think, for people in drug development to manage that much data. You started at Baylor with a lot of your research. How did how did you personally encounter these challenges in your research?Rafael Rosengarten: I mean, it was very much this challenge that inspired us to start Genialis. So the conception story of Genialis is my co-founders and I, we really wanted to be able to do advanced cutting edge data science like machine learning, AI type stuff, which I'm sure we'll talk about at some point, in order to really bring kind of the next level of analytics to bear on biomedical problems. And what we realized is that's all well and good, but you can't do any of that stuff unless you get the data in a place where you can work on it. And I remember going to talk to one of the top researchers at all ofe Baylor College of Medicine. This person is top of her field, chair of department, et cetera, et cetera. And I asked her, How does your lab deal with your data retention and your data management, your data analysis? And she said, Glad you asked, this is such a big problem. We just had one of our postdocs leave, and he took his little thumb drives with him, and all of the data from all of his stuff was on those thumb drives. And now we can't reanalyze. I was like, You're kidding me! She said “We had to go and redownload download some of it that he had published and put online.” So, so even top researchers didn't have a clue how to do this. And this wasn't that long ago. I would say that drug companies by now are mostly more savvy and certainly the commercial sector for data management tools is thriving, right? There are some really good commercial products.Rafael Rosengarten: Genialis has one. There's some others of note. And Big Pharma has invested a lot, obviously, in building in health solutions. But this creates another kind of complication, which is you get all these different solutions and they don't all talk to each other. Even having data on different clouds. Some people may use Amazon and others Google and others still, Microsoft. And those are the three majors. You know, those create silos in a way. So, so you know, the cloud has been super helpful. The advent of software purposely built for biological data management has been helpful. But, you know, there's still a lot of work to do. And I'm going to argue that the kind of next, let's not call it a frontier, but the next big challenge and the one that we encounter a lot, it's not even around the primary data. We're good now. We're good at sucking that off the machines and putting it in the cloud and organizing it and getting it processed really efficiently using distributed computation. Now the challenge is getting what we call the metadata, the annotations of where those data come from. Is it coming from patients and if so, what's the patient information associated with it? Is it an experiment? Getting those metadata consistently curated and attached and linked to the primary data is a big and very important challenge, and it's one that I think will be solved in a similar way through these software solutions. But it takes a lot of will and a lot of manual effort at this point.Harry Glorikian: Just to summarize, the software that you have is helping biologists and clinicians work with data without necessarily having to become a bioinformatician, if I had to frame it that way, is that is that a decent representation?Rafael Rosengarten: That is that's one of the softwares we have. So you're referencing Genialis Expressions, which was kind of our initial flagstone software. I'm excited, though, in November, at Biodata Basel, we launched our new software, our newest product, which is called Responder ID. And this is where our dreams of really applying machine learning and AI to these data have finally come to fruition. Responder ID is a software or really, it's a suite of technologies that we use on those clinical data and on those experimental data to actually extract knowledge and very specifically to figure out which patients are most likely to respond to certain therapies. And so the first piece of software is really the kind of about the data management. It's about getting data organized, getting it processed, all the best practices and efficiencies around that. And that was sort of, you know, I don't want to call it last year's problem because it's still a problem, but it was the first thing we did. It's where we started. And it's got some beautiful visualizations and it does let bench scientists like myself work with their own data. But the new stuff is where we're really bringing the application to bear on human health and on value propositions that I think really resonate with pharma, diagnostics, and other biotech and frankly, clinicians and and ultimately patients.Harry Glorikian: So, well, that's great, I mean, that transition to the new software, I must have missed that in when I was doing my research. I hadn't seen that yet, but what are some of the stories or anecdotes by customers that you can share? What have they been able to say, accomplish with it, so that we can put it into context for the listener?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. So you know, most of our customers are biotech drug companies and we help them solve a number of problems. But the key challenge is that drug development is just an incredibly risky and expensive and time consuming proposition. Most of our work's in the oncology space, not all of it, but it's a good place to make this example. The success rate of a drug that enters a Phase I clinical trial in the cancer space that actually makes it to market is something like three or four percent. It's dismal, and it's among the lowest of any therapeutic area. And there are any number of reasons for that. But the simplest, simplistic one is that biology is complicated and patients are diverse, right? Even within a single disease like, let's just say, breast cancer, there are at least four kinds of breast cancer. There are probably 40 kinds, and there are actually probably more than that. Each individual's disease is going to have its own unique flavors. And so what we allow a company to do, let's say a company that's developing a drug against, for example, breast cancer, is to really try to understand how many molecular types are we talking about, which ones are going to respond to our drug? And can we find those patients ahead of time? And what that lets them do is think about alternative and sort of novel and innovative strategies for designing clinical trials. It allows them, if they so desire, to think about partnering out on diagnostic development with third parties to actually create a diagnostic to go with their drug. That's not, obviously, necessary. You can you can build assays that you run in-house, but that's an alternative.Rafael Rosengarten: And to make it very concrete, we have one partner we work with a lot. A company called OncXerna Therapeutics. And with them, we've helped develop their first biomarker as part of their biomarker platform to the point not only of clinical trial assay, but also it's been licensed by Qiagen to be turned into a companion diagnostic for their lead drug and a research-use-only assay for scientists writ large around the world. And so, you know, this is a great success story. In about the course of two years, we went from taking a published academic signature, something in the literature—and by the way, there are about a million of these public academic signatures and there are only 46 approved companion diagnostics, so there's a big gulf between them—we went from an academic signature—and this was hand in glove work with them, so I don't want to take all the credit, but we certainly did a lot of the heavy lifting—and we built a category-defining first-of-its-class machine learning algorithm that learned a complex RNA-sequencing-based signature that predicts with uncanny ability patients that are going to respond to a wide array of drugs in a wide array of diseases. So it's pan-cancer, multi-modality, right? This is just it's an astonishing clinical advance, in my opinion, and it's something I'm clearly very proud of and willing to self-promote. But I do think it's an important advance, and I think it shows the power of both the Genialis philosophy around modeling biology and pairing patient biology with potential therapeutics, but also just what you can do if you're really thoughtful about getting the data in the right place, treating the data properly, and then using machine learning and some of these advanced algorithms to decipher.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I think we're starting to get to that cusp of producing the data is getting faster, more cost effective. I mean, if Illumina actually gets down to, I think they, at the last JPMorgan, they said, we're trying to get it down to $60 for whole-genome. But at some point you're getting to numbers that are, I don't want to say a rounding error, but damn near close to that. And so the burden is going to fall on, how do I interpret all this data and what do I do next, right? What's actionable? I mean, I think the treating doctors are like, this is all great data, but tell me what to do, right? And it sounds like your new suite of software might be more applicable for a clinician or to to be communicated to a clinician, than just on the research side. So is is Genialis now moving beyond its original set of customers and moving more towards the clinical space?Rafael Rosengarten: I certainly think that's, on the horizon, that's something that we're contemplating. You know, the U.S. health system, well, systems, plural, is a complicated beast, right? And so there are certainly big companies that have products that are there for drug companies and products that are there for patients and products that are there for providers and so forth. And that makes sense. I think once you've got a wide enough kind of horizontal, you can stack all these verticals on top of each other. You know, hopefully we get big enough to do that ourselves. But you know, for the time being, we found this really, you know, this really great motion and success story working around certain therapeutic modalities for certain therapeutic opportunities. I actually think what may be the bigger prize is to take what we learn about disease biology from some of these diagnostic models and turn them on their head and say, OK, we've shown this model really captures patient biology and it works. And we know that because look, there are patients and they respond to the drug that we predicted they would. We've definitely cracked something there. Now let's take what we've learned about that patient biology and interrogate this model for new therapeutic opportunities. What about all the patients who don't respond to this drug? What will they respond to? The model still has them pegged as nonresponders. The model understands their biology. We just need to interrogate it for the next generation of therapies. And so I think this is where my vision of precision medicine maybe deviates. Diagnostics is an industry. Drug discovery are an industry. Those are separate companies. Those are separate industries. But to me, precision medicine shouldn't be this kind of linear thing where you start with the target, you end up with a drug and a diagnostic, and that's where it ends. It should be a circle. It should wrap around. And what we learn from patients should feed right into the next round of drug discovery, right? And so I'm interested in playing at that sort of fusion point where the where the ends of the string meet and form a circle. And so we're really interested in partnering and learning more about, for example, discovering new drugs to match the targets, right? And so I kind of see that as where a lot of Genialis's future focus is going to go. I'm not ruling out patient reporting software. I'm not ruling out more clinical products. That would be logical, but my real interest is thinking about helping the patients who just don't have therapeutic options today.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude] Harry Glorikian: When I think about this and where we're going with this and the I hate saying it, butthe old dogmatic way of looking at it is very compartmentalized as we look at it in discrete pieces. And these data analytics platforms allow us to look at multifactorial, or almost turn the data into a living organism where we can look at it in multiple ways, and I think it's hard for people to get there mentally. I mean, sometimes, sometimes when I'm looking at something, I realize that my limitation is the information that I have about a particular area and that I need to learn something new to put another piece of the puzzle together. But I think this, let me do this and then let me do this and then let me do this. That's breaking down because of the data analytic capabilities that we're bringing to bear. Applying AI, machine learning, or in reality, sometimes just hard math, to solve certain problems, is opening up a wider aperture of how we would manage a patient and then treat them appropriately. And I think. Hell, I don't know, Rafael,  I'm a little worried, I don't think the system is necessarily designed to absorb that next-gen opportunity, right? Because somebody will be like, OK, where do I get the information? Does that go in the EMR? I mean, wait, where is there a code that I can bill for it? I mean, there's these arcane roadblocks that are in the way that have nothing to do with, "I've got this model, and I'm telling you this will work on this patient," right?Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, I don't know that I'm smart enough to know the solution to that. I will say that there are some really exciting newish young venture-backed upstarts that are interested in disrupting hospital systems, point of care, EHRs. All of that, is fair game, right? It is, as you described, it's just ripe for disruption because it's so, you know, it's so cobbled together, right? You know, I'm thinking about when my wife and I moved from Houston, Texas, to the Bay Area and then we got pregnant with our second child. We wanted to have all of our medical records from pregnancy number one sent from Texas Medical Center, which is one of the shining jewels of health care institutions, to John Muir Health System in the Bay Area, which, listen, they were changing out the wood panels from the 1970s during all of our doctors' visits. And literally, we asked the doctor if he could just print, print something for us. He said, No, I can't do that, but I could write it down on a sheet of paper for you. Like, you know, it's. But that's that's, you know, I agree with you. There are going to have to be changes top down, bottom up, and there's going to have to be hopefully support for this in the regulatory bodies, you know, at the governmental level. Rafael Rosengarten: Where I live and breathe, those is really kind of in a life sciences sector of the health care system. So again, we're interested in in drug development, we're interested in diagnostics, we're interested in drug discovery. And those themselves are kind of big things. So where I think about changes and regulatory and systemic stuff is more along, like, what is the FDA doing to to adopt or adapt to these kind of new technologies? What about standards like how are we thinking about data standards, model standards? Genialis is a founding member of and I'm on the board of directors of the Alliance for AI and Health Care. And this is a really exciting and rather amazing industry organization that was stood up at JP Morgan in 2019. And you know, we've got gosh, I don't know what the headcount, the member number now is, but over 50 member organizations, including the likes of Google and and Roche and bigs like that. Some of the more household names in the smaller biotech community like Recursion Pharma, In Silico Medicine, Valo Health, et cetera. And then and then companies like Genialis as well. Big academic centers. So we have a real great brain trust and we're interested in tackling, I'm going to call them, these hard, boring but incredibly important systemic questions around regulatory and standards and so forth. Health insurance, Medicare, all that stuff is a big fish, and we haven't, you know, we haven't set our hooks in it yet, but you know how hospitals bill and those kinds of codes, we'll have to have to revisit that at some point, for sure.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I know that you're a member there and sort of interesting to hear why you got involved in how you see it working. So if you think about the standardization side of this, you know, what is what is the organization sort of advocating for? Because I totally agree with you, but at some point, I think you almost need to reach back towards, how is somebody doing an experiment to make sure that then the data comes out the other side in a standard way, right? Because I used to joke, which sample prep product are you working with? And I could tell you sort of what direction something is going to lean. And that that in and of itself is a problem. So how is AAIHC thinking about some of these problems, I don't know if there's a proposal. What have you guys proposed so far?Rafael Rosengarten: That's a great question. So we have workstreams around things like the FDA, working with the FDA to propose guidance for a good machine learning, practice guidance for software as a medical device, AI as part of software, as a medical device. So a lot of this, it's less concerned with can we rein in and constrain the experimental part? Because again, that's that's a huge world. And maybe it's not really where the constraints need to be. But rather can we come up with a common set of guidelines for how you evaluate the quality of a data set, right? Recognizing the data are going to come in a lot of shapes and sizes and flavors, and even two different RNA sequencing data sets that are produced on different machines or with different kits may have slightly different flavors or tints to them. That's fine so long as you have some guidelines for characterizing those differences, for appreciating those differences and then for knowing what to do with the data, given those potential differences. A lot of the concern around AI in a regulated setting is that, the whole promise of a machine learning approach is that it gets smarter the more data it sees, right? So these should be, these algorithms should evolve in a way they should be living and breathing. But if you have a regulated product that's to work on patients, it's got to work the same every time or, you know, can't get worse.Rafael Rosengarten: So this is, there's a tension here, but it's not unsolvable. It's not insurmountable. For example, you know, a regulated AI doesn't have to evolve in real time. It can be updated over time, right? Right. And it can be it can be locked and then operate, and then you can improve it and update it and redeploy and relock. So building the plans, what are the change plans? How do you demonstrate that the retraining or the improvements are actually improvements? These are the kinds of things that at least we can sink our teeth into today. And then we're also interested in the standards problem. I think the organization is not necessarily going to be dogmatic about recommending exactly what the standards are today, but what we're trying to catalyze those discussions, right? And we're trying to create frameworks where those discussions can actually lead to some actionable tools. And there are examples of organizations that have done this in other fields. So we do have some blueprints. But it's a lot of work. And frankly, that's the privilege of being in the organization. It gives you the opportunity to roll up your sleeves and build the industry of the future, to build the industry you want to operate in.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And this has got to be in lockstep with the regulatory authorities and everything to make sure that everything is, everybody's on the same page so that when you come up with a golden solution, they're ready to accept it. Because we can't have, you download the latest software for your phone and then it breaks, right? That's not an acceptable update that you can do, right, and somebody has to release a patch to get it to fix. You know, that's that doesn't necessarily... I'm sure it happens in our world, but it's. It's really not what you'd like to see happen.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. You know, I can tell you from having had to invest in a lot of the kind of procedures around clinical reporting in software and so forth, and, working with some really top tier point of care software providers, it's not foolproof. But boy, there are a lot of hoops to jump through, right? Like things do get tested the whole way. And I would just, I would argue, although, you know, let me not be overly full of hubris, that there are plenty of other failure points that are a lot more likely to fail than the AI software that's predicting a biomarker not working in a particular instance, right? Given the room for error in things like biopsy collection and human handling. There's a lot of stuff upstream of that where human error is more likely to play a part. That that may or may not be sweet solace, right. That might not help you sleep at night. But I think that the regulated environment, especially around regulating computational tools, can be rather bulletproof.Rafael Rosengarten: So is there anything else going on that at Genialis that that we would want to know about that and directionally or what's next, that you can [share]?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, the exciting stuff is really twofold. It's, you know, just going deeper with our partners, right? So clinical development, as I mentioned, is is a long game. And you know, we like to start working before the drugs in the clinic, right? So these are meant to be long partnerships. And the other piece of this is we're doing a lot more internal R&D. A lot more internal R&D, a lot more work with our academic colleagues. And so we're really, really excited to just, you know, to innovate our way out of some of these hard problems.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's necessary in this field, right, you're always going to run into some, I like to call them speed bumps because I don't believe that they're like insurmountable problems, but they're speed bumps that you need to like innovate over or around.Rafael Rosengarten: Mm hmm. Yeah. So, you know, I want to give you something meaty like, you know what to look for from Genialis. So, sometime soon, my hope, knock on wood, is that we'll have first patients enrolled in clinical trials that are the biomarker I described to you earlier. This is the OncXerna trial. First patient enrolled, that's going to be super exciting. It's a Phase III trial and we're going to be stratifying patients with the biomarker. I mean, just the gratification of actually having our technology potentially impacting outcomes is huge. We've got a lot up our sleeves in terms of internal development improvements to Responder ID, but also, you know, some biomarker work we're kind of doing for ourselves, digging deeper into some pernicious problems in cancer that others haven't adequately addressed, in my opinion. And some some exciting partnerships, hopefully around, kind of…. we'll call them data partnerships. We talked a bit about just the scale of the data challenge, though, is it lives all over the place, right? And so there are different ways of getting your hands on it. And one of the ways a lot of companies have gone about is to become the testing companies, right? There are some giants out there that sequence literally millions of patients a year, and they've got big data warehouses, right? We haven't done that ourselves. And so we rely oncollaborations for a lot of our data. Not all of it, but we're building some of these collaborations, and I'm hoping we can talk more about that in future episodes or in other forums.Harry Glorikian: Just for a second, so people understand the magnitude. This Phase III trial, how many how many patients would you say are in it?Rafael Rosengarten: I need to be super careful not to misrepresent someone else's trial. It's going to be on the order of several hundred. You know, it's a properly powered Phase III and it's got two treatment arms. And so, you know, so it has to have quite a number of patients. And that's, you know, I would say that's a typical sized trial of for this stage in this kind of disease.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I just want people listening to sort of get an idea of like, these technologies are, you know, can affect lots of people and then if that drug comes through and then the technology is utilized afterwards to sort of stratify people or the biomarkers, then there's an even larger population of people that then gets affected by the work that you guys are doing.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah, yeah. I think that's right. And you know, in a way, you know, our commitment to the sort of biomarker driven, you know, drug development, it's very principled. It's based on this idea that patients deserve to have the best treatment option, right? And there are some amazing drugs out there that when they work, work miracles. But they don't work that often. Right? And some of these drugs have, you know, first line approvals in dozens of diseases. But again, in some of those diseases, they work for half the patients, and that's great. And that's probably how it should be. But in some, they only work in maybe 15 percent of the patients or 20 or whatever the threshold is, because they were better than the alternative, right? But if you could tell which of those patients are going to respond, then at least the ones who aren't can seek other options. Or you know that we've got to develop drugs for the others. So it's very principled, although it's complicated because from an economic standpoint, if you have the ability to sell your drug to everybody, of course you're going to do that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, look, I drank that Kool-Aid. I mean, Jesus, 20 years ago, right? I mean, you know, why wouldn't you want...I mean, if you were a patient, you'd want the best drug you can get, right? Because the data says that you respond to this particular drug. It's getting the system to that point. And I have seen, I have had stories where the data said one thing. They put the patient on it. They looked like they were responding. A new trial opened up. And somebody suggested that they go on the new trial, even though the therapy was working. And they switched and the outcome was not positive. Right. And so it's one of those things of like, I don't understand. The data clearly pointed in a particular direction and you deviated from that, and that doesn't make any sense to me. As a science person is as well as an investor, if the data is showing something, you better respond to the data or you're not going to be happy with the outcome. It's just seeing that implemented in a way that makes it very actionable for everybody, and they embrace that. That's where I sometimes, I find, you know, the biggest problems. But I totally agree. I mean, I have a whole chapter in my new book about that whole dynamic of why you want the data, how the data impacts you as a patient. What are the sort of questions you should ask, et cetera, because if you don't have that information, you're making suboptimal decisions.Rafael Rosengarten: Yeah. No, and that's absolutely right, I think the point you make there is probably the key one, which is a lot of biotechs and companies like ours, we operate with kind of a world view of our own research and our customers'. But we have to remember that the reason we do this, the reason we get up every day and the reason we toil is it's because we can impact patient lives. And if you actually want to really foment that change, then that subset, that stakeholder, needs to be involved, right? A patient needs to understand what are my choices? And so if a patient comes into the clinic and has a grave illness and the doctor says, well, this is the approved drug, but there's a test that could tell you if there's something else. I mean, if I'm the patient, I want to take that test. I want to know what my options are. And I think that frankly, it's unrealistic to expect publicly traded companies to not try to maximize revenue. That's just kind of the system we live in. But it's also incumbent upon us to to engage patients, to help them understand what their options are, to engage physicians the same and to say, there are multiple approved drugs, maybe, or this is the one, but there are some investigational drugs that haven't been approved yet that may be better fits for your disease. Remember, your disease isn't necessarily the same as someone else who happens to have it in the same tissue. And so I think that's a big deal, and I do think that there are any number of exciting organizations that are really focused, doggedly focused on this point of patient engagement and especially patient engagement around data.Harry Glorikian: No, I mean, I always I tell every one of my guests, “Hurry up, go faster,” because I'm not getting any younger and theoretically like, you know, statistically, I could end up in that place. I want the best that I can get when I get there. So Rafael, I know it's getting late where you are. So really appreciate your time and the opportunity to talk about what you guys are doing and the impact that it's having on not just drug development, but downstream on patients.Rafael Rosengarten: Well, thank you, Harry, for having me, for giving me the opportunity. This has been a lot of fun to connect over this.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you. Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can also  find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The Savage Nation Podcast
Malone / Savage : Vaccines

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 61:38


Part 1: Savage welcomes Dr. Robert Malone. Why is the establishment focused on discrediting Malone? Savage asks about the difference between Covid vaccine and measles, etc. vaccinations. Malone explains that COVID-19 vaccine is not licensed, other concerns. Malone explains myocarditis concerns for Covid-19 vaccination for boys. Malone reviews the rulings at the Nuremberg Trials. The trials established that we would not force people to take experimental medical treatments. Malone explains what a mRNA vaccine is. Covid is an RNA virus much like influenza. Malone is not anti-vaccine, in fact, has been involved in vaccination science. Malone states that the data is established. He states that the risk-benefit for children is inverted. Children face better outcomes without the vaccine. The government has created financial incentives for Covid-19 treatments and deaths. Malone reviews The Atlantic attack piece on him. The Atlantic has been purchased by Gates and other tech oligarchs. Malone posited that only the most vulnerable should have been vaccinated. He hypothesized that we would have breakthrough variants. Fauci and others had email communication that they would silence epidemiologists and others who questioned the lockdowns and other measures. Savage and Malone take on Fauci. Fauci is above the law. Malone has been placed in a digital gulag. Malone's considerations are focused on children and the vaccine. Israel pushing the vaccine more than any other nation. Malone explains that Israel is receiving incentives from Pfizer for vaccinations. Malone states that Pfizer is a criminal organization. Pfizer considers fines just part of doing business. Malone warns against over use of vaccination much like the use of antibiotics. Initial vaccination designed for the original Wuhan variant. Savage and Malone discuss mass formation psychosis. Language changed for anti-vaxx. Also, calls made for changes to the Hippocratic Oath and the Nuremberg Trials. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
242 - New Variants & Genetic Insights Part 2: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:35


Welcome to our first episode of 2022! Marcia will bring you 13 genetics papers from October 2021. We will talk about all kinds of topics - right from AD-associated loci to polygenetic risk stratification, all of which can contribute to planning effective treatment strategies. Tune in!  Sections in this episode:  Transcriptomics/Gene Expression Changes (2:33)  Genetic Variants (6:16)  Genetic Risk (13:14)  MicroRNA (20:10)  Other Topics (22:52) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZmtkgGyheSdJreRmjXy6GIkSmoUdMQTP/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 papers so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Chihiro Abe, and reviewed by Anusha Kamesh and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Preserved From The Beast (25) David Eells - 1-2-22 (Audio) Babylon Weaponizes Cells and Computers   We just received by faith at random a text we have received many, many times. It is the story of God's apostate people trusting in the strength of man to save them from the DS Babylonish Beast, which is costing their lives. Jer. 43:4-7  So Johanan the son of Kareah, and all the captains of the forces, and all the people, obeyed not the voice of Jehovah, to dwell in the land of Judah.  5  But Johanan the son of Kareah, and all the captains of the forces, took all the remnant of Judah, that were returned from all the nations whither they had been driven, to sojourn in the land of Judah;  6  the men, and the women, and the children, and the king's daughters, and every person that Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had left with Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, the son of Shaphan; and Jeremiah the prophet, and Baruch the son of Neriah.  7  And they came into the land of Egypt; for they obeyed not the voice of Jehovah: and they came unto Tahpanhes.  God's people went to trust in Egypt to save them from Babylon who then went to Egypt and killed them.  Jer 43:9-11  Take great stones in thy hand, and hide them in mortar in the brickwork, which is at the entry of Pharaoh's house in Tahpanhes, in the sight of the men of Judah;  10  and say unto them, Thus saith Jehovah of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will send and take Nebuchadrezzar the king of Babylon, my servant, and will set his throne upon these stones that I have hid; and he shall spread his royal pavilion over them.  11  And he shall come, and shall smite the land of Egypt; such as are for death shall be given to death, and such as are for captivity to captivity, and such as are for the sword to the sword. I thought to myself this must be very important to the Lord since we have received this text many times concerning his people going down to Egypt and being killed by the DS Babylon, which represents those trusting in the DS depopulationists to give them a vaccine rather than trust the Lord. Jer 17:5-8  Thus saith Jehovah: Cursed is the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from Jehovah.  6  For he shall be like the heath in the desert, and shall not see when good cometh, but shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, a salt land and not inhabited.  7  Blessed is the man that trusteth in Jehovah, and whose trust Jehovah is.  8  For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, that spreadeth out its roots by the river, and shall not fear when heat cometh, but its leaf shall be green; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit. DS Babylon just burned a thousand homes in Colorado just like in Paradise with D/E/W weapons. Conservatives and Christians were resisting the DS there. It reminds me of this verse about Babylon taking down the apostate leadership of God's people. Jer 52:13  And he burned the house of Jehovah (Churches), and the king's house (Their leaderships houses); and all the houses of Jerusalem, even every great house (The great men), burned he with fire. Based on these verses I said almost 5 years ago that Babylon would burn churches and leadership homes. Many apostate Church leaders have sent their people to get the vac/cin/es and now they are dying. Backlash is coming.   In the US, the Supreme Court has ruled that vaccinated people worldwide are products, patented goods, according to US law, no longer human. Telegram @ Dark Universe Through a modified DNA or RNA vaccination, the mRNA vaccination, the person ceases to be human and becomes the OWNER of the holder of the modified GEN vaccination patent, because they have their own genome and are no longer “human” (without natural people), but “trans-human”, so a category that does not exist in Human Rights. The quality of a natural person and all related rights are lost. This applies worldwide and patents are subject to US law. Since 2013, all people vaccinated with GM-modified mRNAs are legally trans-human and legally identified as trans-human and do not enjoy any human or other rights of a state, and this applies worldwide, because GEN-POINT technology patents are under US jurisdiction and law, where they were registered. Download PDF here: Vaccined No Longer legally human .pdfDownload SOURCE of the decision of the US SUPREME COURT    Then this came to me that Michael had found a video that the DS is able to assassinate people by their cellphone. And also the Grap/hine ox/ide computer/cellphone connection is in those who were vac/cin/ated.  The thought came to me that they are able to execute these people by cell phone or computer which we know is capable to contact the graphine oxide in the vaccinated to affect their person. This could be done on multitudes of people scattered over a large area and people would just consider that they died of Covid and the educated would believe by the vac/cin/e.   Here is the video of a woman who is getting her nails done at a salon. The salon video cameras picked up footage of her cell phone sending out electrical flashes towards her left arm and then she immediately went into convulsions and fell out onto the floor.    One Day In 2022 Your Cell Phone May Kill You Or Turn You Into Zombies Before it's News - 12/26/21   Did they figure out how to depopulate humanity using frequency sound weapons, using cell phone tech? I'm not sure they would even need 5G to do that but I do believe that's the plan!! Remember that 2022 is the final year in their three year plan... Frequency weapon…. some of us have seen the videos where people are being frequency attacked by their phones… that's why this video is important. It's likely the woman had the vaxx… did she live or die on the spot?  Your Cell Phone May Kill You    1980′s Music Video “Experiment IV” About Frequency Sound Weapon   Kate Bush nails it on 1980′s Music Video “Experiment IV” About Frequency Sound Weapons… [Editor's note: This video appears to show an inventor whose heart was to do good to humanity with his invention. I believe this could represent Nicolai Tesla whose revelation and inventions proved that frequencies could heal which was his purpose, however, wicked military people turned this into a weapon on the other end of the scale of frequencies. In the video it appears he was very frustrated and angry this was happening. It appeared to at first be a good thing but ended up being deadly. When it got out in the video it killed many.] The final chilling words of her song, “And the public are warned to stay off.” Here are the lyrics:  [Verse 1] We were working secretly for the military. Our experiment in sound was nearly ready to begin. We only know in theory what we are doing. Music made for pleasure, music made to thrill. It was music we were making here, until…[Chorus] They told us all they wanted was a sound that could kill someone from a distance. So we go ahead, and the meters are over in the red. It's a mistake in the making.  [Verse 2] From the painful cry of mothers. To the terrifying scream. We recorded it and put it into our machine. [Chorus] But they told us all they wanted was a sound that could kill someone from a distance. So we go ahead, and the meters are over in the red. It's a mistake that we're making.  [Bridge] It could feel like falling in love. It could feel so bad. But it could feel so good. It could sing you to sleep. But that dream is your enemy. [Verse 3] We won't be there to be blamed. We won't be there to snitch. (The killers will be far away)  I just pray that someone there can hit the switch. [Editor's note: It appears that Tesla tried to turn the switch off but failed.] [Chorus] But they told us all they wanted was a sound that could kill someone from a distance. So we go ahead, and the meters were over in the red. It's a mistake we've made. [Outro] And the public are warned to stay off.    Weaponized Cell Phone Theory Demonstrated in the Movie “Cell”  [Editor's note: John Cusack and Samuel L. Jackson star in this tale of a mysterious phone signal that turns much of the population into murderous predators. Signature Entertainment releases Cell. [Here is the trailer: https://youtu.be/BCns4w3GA9A ]   Zombie Alert Early 2022 Watch the Movie “Cell” Now… It Is Probably A Documentary!!  [Editor's note: The DS always tells us what they are going to do before they do it.]  (Writer's) Theory: Zombies Created With 5G + Graphene Oxide (Vaxx Ingredient) + Cell Phone!! CONOP 8888 US Dept. Of Defense Strategic Command Zombie Defense Plan Exists!! Airlines Panicking Over 5G Rollout!! Folks… this is important… there IS a zombie event coming… the military AND Pentagon already know!!   U.S. military actually made a zombie apocalypse training manual. Yes, really. Internet Culture Published May 14, 2014 - Updated May 31, 2021  If the U.S. is ever attacked by evil magic zombies, or even the relatively tame creature that is a chicken zombie, rest assured that the Department of Defense has it covered. Seriously, a document has apparently been unearthed by Foreign Policy magazine that appears to show either the incredible level of preparedness of the U.S. national security community, or it demonstrates how the people tasked with keeping the nation safe are insane. The zombie attack training manual, “CONOP 8888,” or “Counter Zombie Dominance,” is dated April 2011, and was supposedly found buried on a secret military computer. It tells military planners how to defeat an invasion of flesh eaters, (Editor's note: Remember he outbreak of zombies that were devouring peoples faces.) and how to preserve the sanctity of “non-zombie life.” From magic zombies to chicken zombies, even vegetarian zombies, they're all in the file, with a plan for how to take them out.  “Zombies pose a threat to all non-zombie human life,” says CONOP8888. “[Strategic Command] will be prepared to preserve the sanctity of human life and conduct operations in support of any human population—including traditional adversaries.” While the manual says in its disclaimer that “this plan was not acutally designed as a joke,” it still kind of is. What the intelligence community has done here is use “zombie” as a kind of code word for “enemy,” so as not to look like the Pentagon is planning for an invasion of a particular country, religion, or plague. To prepare for all possible situations, it says, “We elected to use a completely-impossible scenario that could never be mistaken for a real plan.” All of which begs the question, of course, if zombies are being used as metaphors for real threats, what... are “Vegetarian zombies” doing in there? Chicken zombies could, of course, mean avian bird flu, and evil magic zombies could easily be a thinly veiled reference to Al' Qaeda or some other real enemy. But there can be no such thing as a vegetarian zombie. And second, what threat do vegetarians pose, either in this universe or the one inhabited by the person who wrote this manual? In fact, according to the military zombie survival guide, vegetarian zombies “pose no direct threat to humans because they only eat plant life,” which makes total sense… CONOP 8888 also known as Counter-Zombie Dominance is a U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Command CONOP document that describes a plan for defending against zombies. The April 30, 2011 document depicts fictional scenarios of zombie attacks for training students in military planning. Read the full zombie apocalypse training manual below: CONPLAN 8888 Now if that was all bad enough… the airlines are panicking over 5G (The opening scene of the movie “Cell” takes place in airport!!)  What do they know????    Planned 5G Wireless Deployment Could Compromise Airline Safety, Aviation Executives Warn  Newsweek - Justin Klawans - Dec 21, 2021    Aviation executives expressed their fears Monday that the potential coming deployment of 5G wireless technology could harm the airline industry. In a joint letter acquired by Reuters addressed to the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun and Airbus Americas CEO Jeffrey Knittel urged DOT Secretary Pete Buttigieg to postpone the upcoming rollout of the technology, citing multiple concerns. "5G interference could adversely affect the ability of aircraft to safely operate," the letter stated, adding that the rollout of the technology could have "an enormous negative impact on the aviation industry.” Both AT&T and Verizon are planning to deploy C-band spectrum 5G wireless networks across the United States on Jan. 5. The technology was originally slated to go online in November, but the companies agreed to push the date into 2022 after concerns were cited, and now the airline executives are hoping to slide that date even further down the calendar. The airplane manufacturers, who are typically considered direct competitors, came together in a rare show of unity to voice concerns that the 5G initiative could lead to numerous delays at airports throughout the country. The pair of companies represent the vast majority of the airplanes built for commercial aviation use, and they also have a large market share of military aircraft. The letter from Boeing and Airbus cited a statistic from trade group Airlines for America, which stated that if 5G had been in effect in 2019, it would've resulted in the delay or cancellation of 345,000 passenger flights and 5,400 cargo flights. The sentiment from the airline executives echoed a report released Dec. 7 from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that said 5G technology could lead to scheduling problems and safety issues in the skies. After issuing its report, the FAA went on to present a pair of airworthiness directives that would prohibit aircraft from operating certain radio functions while in the area of 5G signals. "Because radio altimeter anomalies that are undetected by the aircraft automation or pilot, particularly close to the ground ... could lead to loss of continued safe flight and landing," one of the directives stated. However, the FAA later issued a statement in which it said that the "expansion of 5G and aviation will safely co-exist." Verizon also released a statement pushing back against the FAA guidelines, stating that "there is no evidence that 5G operations using C-band spectrum pose any risk to aviation safety, as the real-world experience in dozens of countries already using this spectrum for 5G confirms." The communications giant added that it was taking "additional steps to minimize energy coming from 5G base stations." However, in spite of the statements released by multiple parties, the Air Line Pilots Association stated Monday that the discussions regarding 5G were at a stalemate, adding that it was "a big problem for passengers, shippers and the American economy.”  Equally important to look at is what is in the vaccines: Look At The Freaky Live Blood Sample Of Vaxxed Under Microscope!! “The Thing” Is Definitely Alive, As Are Other Strange Unidentified Creatures Swimming Around In Blood Sample Of Vaxxed!! It's Like An Ecosystem Humanity Has Never Seen Before!!     Dr. Ariyana Love said, "I agree with what one scientist suggested… that the reason the vaxxes are kept under extremely cold storage, is to keep the creatures under a suspended animation… until they are thawed out, and activated by human temperatures.  Now looking at this blood sample.. it's clear we can see several creatures moving about, a blue colourful ‘thing', and a large ‘hydra'-like creature, that some are suggesting might be able to self-regenerate itself, and therefore is basically, immortal.  The tinier critters look rather ‘active' and like they are more developed than simple bacteria… I wonder what everybody is doing… probably eating stuff, eliminating waste and reproducing. Most likely… what this means, is that the blood of the vaxxed has likely become a literal alien-hybrid cesspool of waste byproducts, and who knows what else… we're still finding out! Folks… we could be looking at an alien invasion under microscope… and at the very least, the new blood of the new hybrid (human)!”    Is This Why They Want to Change our DNA?  Source: Uncensored Sam, Published September 9, 2021  God's true name is recorded within our DNA. So, just let me go ahead and explain. Our chains of DNA contain four nucleotide-based pairs called Adenine, Guanine, Thiamine, and Cytosine. And then there's a unit within the DNA strand called a sulfuric bridge.  This sulfuric bridge holds our entire DNA strand together. It only appears after every ten nucleic acids have been laid down, and then after every five nucleic acids, then after every six, and then again, after every five nucleic acids. So, we get this repeating numerical value of 10, 5, 6, 5 within our DNA strand. Well, it turns out the Biblical name for God, YHWH, contains the same numerical value as our DNA strand. Yod He Vav He equals ten, five, six, five. What's even more interesting is that if you take the Hebrew name of YHWH and place it on its side, you get the image of a human being. Part three of this video series suggests that DNA is a language. Many people were wondering what god made the language of DNA. Researchers at Harvard University announced today that they have found what appears to be a message from God written inside the human genome. In a little-explored section of non-coding DNA, a team of top geneticists discovered a 22-word snippet of ancient Aramaic in which God confirms this existence and His role in creating life on Earth. “We knew the patterns weren't naturally occurring,” explains Charles Watson, the lead scientist on the project, “but we couldn't come up with any convincing explanation for them.  On a whim, we started cross-referencing the patterns with language databases,” he explains, “and we were shocked to find that the patterns corresponded to ancient Aramaic.” Stunned by its discovery, the team contacted language experts familiar with Aramaic – the language Jesus Christ spoke in daily life. Entirely decoded, the message reads: Hello my children, This is Yahweh, the One True Lord. You have found creation's secret. Now…go tell the world Who is the true God and Creator of all! Rumble Video: IS THIS Why They Want to Change our DNA?  Covid Shots Turn Humanity Into Patentable Species!! Supreme Court Ruling, And It's In The Patents!! Covid Shots Turn Humanity Into Patentable Species!! Supreme Court Ruling, And It's In The Patents!! Zombie Invasion Begins Mid-January 2022… Along With Mass Sickness And Death Especially For The Jabbed.     Zombie Invasion Begins Mid-January 2022… Along With Mass Sickness And Death Especially For The Jabbed!! Make The Omicron/Zombie/Disease X Connection Now And Then Head For The Hills!! One News - December 23, 2021   People… what we have here, is proof, that there is collusion and conspiracy for mass murder, and zombification of humanity on a scale that defies most people's awareness. For starters you must understand that new technologies especially of the electromagnetic radiation kind, tend to coincide with new illnesses. This has been going on for DECADES. Now… the latest is the 5G rollout… a major step scheduled for early January. I'd like you to simply observe the mass media…. two things are ‘scheduled: 1.  5G rollout… a new wave of 5G tech is set to become active.  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=++5g+rollout+january&atb=v255-1&iar=news&ia=news 2.  Media keeps suggesting people will get sick early January! https://duckduckgo.com/?q=+january+new+variant&atb=v255-1&iar=news&ia=news 3.  They seem to know something about ‘Disease X' aka 5G radiation sickness. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=disease+x&atb=v255-1&iar=news&ia=news Gee how do they know? They know because they know 5G is going to make people sick… and even worse. They know the graphene oxide in the vaxxed, is activated by electromagnetic radiation. This Is What Will Create Zombies!! Watch Graphene Oxide Dance To A Frequency In A Lab!! What This Means Is That Vaxx Ingredient Can Be Frequency Adjusted To Do… They know graphene oxide at the molecular level is equivalent of tiny razor blades; a leading scientist was murdered for telling the world this FACT! If you have the jab or several… you probably have lots to be concerned about with 5G. [Editor's note: Fear not… Lo, I will be with you always. From here on down he is speaking to non-believers.] If I were you… I'd pretty much be heading to the countryside. [Editor's note: Since cities are where most of the sin happens and most of the judgment comes, I always recommend people move out of the cities and away from the fault lines and sea shores.] How are you going to live, when tiny razor blades are slicing through your body… 24/7? [Editor's note: Those who believe the Word of God will live by Psalm 91, where it says, “There shall no evil befall thee." and the Passover, which is where God exercised control over the destroyer for those who lived under the blood. Jesus said in Luk 10:19  Behold, I have given you authority to tread upon serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall in any wise hurt you.] How are you going to be healthy? How are you going to survive? [Learn from God's Vaccine Book] How will your body repair itself, as all the organs and capillaries are receiving 1000's of tiny slices… non-stop! [Remember, "nothing shall in any wise hurt you."] 5G is bad enough if you are not jabbed, but if you are, it might be a death sentence, or at the very least, the end of your body as you know it. [Gal 3:13 Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us; for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree:] Face it… what if graphene oxide is in the brain, and then you expose yourself to that radiation that is 100x stronger than 4G? [Pro 10:2  Treasures of wickedness profit nothing; But righteousness delivereth from death.] Now… this is also a trend in the news… the airlines are already bracing people for weirdness. Imagine a vaxxed pilot exposed constantly to 5G… to me, it's like a scenario of the rise of the zombies. Their brains will be sliced over and over by tiny razor blades one molecule thick. This will surely be the rise of the zombies. This sounds like a big joke right?  MILITARY DOES NOT THINK SO and they are also EXPERTS IN ELECTROMAGNETIC WARFARE! Hundreds of military, law enforcement and medical personnel will observe the Hollywood-style production of a zombie attack as part of their emergency response training.  We've put some links below: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=military+zombie+training&atb=v255-1&ia=web Marines, police prep for mock zombie invasion | Fox News https://www.foxnews.com › us › marines-police-prep-for-mock-zombie-invasion You need to know that they don't have a real accurate test for omicron… or the other variants, or covid. That's why they are ‘phasing out' the PCR test… they use this term ‘phase out' instead of ‘it never worked' to avoid admission of guilt for crimes against humanity… or let's be blunt, this is the greatest crime against humanity that has ever been perpetrated, and they won't stop unless humanity figures things out and stops them…  GRAPHENE OXIDE AND THE END-OF-DAYS APOCALYPSE Posted on August 12, 2021 by State of the Nation  Dr. José Luis Sevillano expresses his theory that GRAPHENE OXIDE (GO) is the Bio-Tech ingredient chosen for controlling mankind in THE NEW WORLD ORDER as defined by the DAVOS, the Bildebergs and WWII NAZI collaborator, Klaus Schwab, who founded the Word Economic Forum.  Graphene Oxide (GO) is found in the current Covid-19 vaccines.  GO is a super- conductor with unique electromagnetic properties that can facilitate the altering of human genetics.  The Covid-19 mRNA vaccines are the trial run for the “genetic Apocalypse”.  The plan is to alter the human species to install population control and coercive slavery through injection of Graphene Oxide into the blood stream where intra-cellular conductivity will allow neura-link (Elon Musk) nano technology and remote control of the human body and brain using directed electromagnetic radiation of various frequencies… https://www.orwell.city/2021/08/graphene-and-reset.html They are desperate to get this Graphene Oxide into people any way they can including, Spraying it in the Air, putting it in food and the nasal swabs for the PCR tests.   Sep 23, 2021 - RED ALERT: Aerosolized skin-penetrating nanoparticle spike protein attack vector CONFIRMED https://www.brighteon.com/358dc7fe-2580-40c6-8a90-13a13175caf5 Operation Disclosure: "Former FEMA Whistleblower Celeste Solum explains that the Corona PCR “test” is implanting a microchip  So the Nasopharyngeal Covid19 PCR “tests” were never tests at all. They are implanting chips, inserting Nanobots called Nanites with a bioweapons payload for the brain, while at the same time harvesting DNA. The PCR swab is inserted straight to the Nasopharynx behind the nose and forehead where your eyes are. It's at the blood brain barrier and next to your pineal gland. I believe they are knocking out people's senses with these Bioweapons and killing human intuition and your ability to cognitively see what they are doing to us. They're knocking out our senses and targeting the brain with Nanites that carry a payload. Decline the “tests.” Refuse the masks. Don't let them implant the microchip.”  Here are some very informative links explaining Graphene Oxide; It's history and what they plan on using it for: https://www.holistichealthonline.info/graphene-oxide-basics/ https://www.ftwproject.com/ref/6/      GRAPHENE OXIDE, 5G AND COVID PRESENTATION AND NOTES ON SGT REPORT  Here is a quote from Klaus Schwab's book, “Covid - 19: The Great Reset: “Euthanasia for the terminally ill and the aged shall be compulsory. No cities shall be larger than a predetermined number as described in the work of Kalgeri. Essential workers will be moved to other cities if the one they are in becomes overpopulated. Other non-essential workers will be chosen at random and sent to underpopulated cities to fill "quotas”. At least 4 billion “useless eaters” shall be eliminated by the year 2050 by means of limited wars, organized epidemics of fatal rapid-acting diseases and starvation. Energy, food and water shall be kept at subsistence levels for the non-elite, starting with the White populations of Western Europe and North America and then spreading to other races. The populations of Canada, Western Europe and the United States will be decimated more rapidly than on other continents, until the world's population reaches a manageable level of 1 billion, of which 500 million will consist of Chinese and Japanese races, selected because they are people who have been regimented for centuries and who are accustomed to obeying authority without question. From time to time there shall be artificially contrived food and water shortages and medical care to remind the masses that their very existence depends on the good will of the Committee of 300.”    The Culling of the Human Race Part 2  BY GERI UNGUREAN - 11/21/20 Altering DNA – Luciferase Biogel – Implantable Biochip to be Tracked by 5G Technology- It Isn't a Conspiracy Theory When They Are Openly Telling You What They Want To Do First and foremost, I encourage the reader to watch this short video  in which Dr. Carrie Madej explains the mRNA Vaccine in terms that we can understand. She is a brave woman to openly expose the dangerous, DNA-changing vaccine.   DARPA funded implantable biochip can potentially deploy Moderna's mRNA vaccine   From nanotechnology.news In a bid to try to battle the ongoing Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-10) pandemic, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is funding the development of an implantable biochip that could be deployed as soon as next year. The chip is said to be able to deploy an experimental new vaccine, developed jointly by Moderna and U.S government, that could change human DNA. The chip and the vaccine built on a breakthrough made by then-Harvard University professor and eventual Moderna co-founder Derek Rossi in 2010. In his discovery, which the now-retired scientist says came about purely by accident, Rossi claimed that he found a way to “reprogram” messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) – the molecules that carry genetic instructions for cell development in the human body. The promise provided by Rossi's breakthrough was such that it allowed him to co-found Moderna with private equity firm Flagship Pioneering. The company then attracted almost half a billion dollars from the federal government to begin developing vaccines using the new technology. In a preliminary report last July funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Moderna's mRNA-1273 vaccine was found to have “induced anti–SARS-CoV-2 immune responses in all participants and no trial-limiting safety concerns were identified.” Despite this, however, one obstacle to the deployment of Moderna's vaccine is the method of delivery. While Moderna is developing its own system, it's unlikely to get Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval any time soon. Enter Profusa, which is developing a nanoscale biochip that can detect symptoms of an infection. Profusa's biochip is made using a technology called “hydrogels” that were a product of the “In Vivo Nanoplatforms” (IVN) program that DARPA's Biological Technologies Office (BTO) launched in 2014 to develop implantable nanotechnologies. These hydrogels are soft, flexible nanomachines that are injected beneath the skin to perform monitoring. This hydrogel includes a specially engineered molecule that sends a fluorescent signal outside the body when it begins to fight infection. This signal can then be detected by a sensor attached to the skin that can then be sent to an app or even to a doctor's website. When it was first tested in 2018, this hydrogel was being used to measure glucose, oxygen and lactate levels. However, this past March, the company quietly announced that it was conducting a study to see if the technology could be used to detect respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. More importantly, Profusa's biochip is expected to receive fast-track authorization from the FDA by early 2021. With this in mind, some are speculating that the biochip will more than likely be the candidate for the mRNA vaccine's delivery. Read rest of article HERE    From mintpress.com The most significant scientific discovery since gravity has been hiding in plain sight for nearly a decade and its destructive potential to humanity is so enormous that the biggest war machine on the planet immediately deployed its vast resources to possess and control it, financing its research and development through agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and HHS' BARDA. The revolutionary breakthrough came to a Canadian scientist named Derek Rossi in 2010 purely by accident. The now-retired Harvard professor claimed in an interview with the National Post that he found a way to “reprogram” the molecules that carry the genetic instructions for cell development in the human body, not to mention all biological lifeforms. These molecules are called ‘messenger ribonucleic acid' or mRNA and the newfound ability to rewrite those instructions to produce any kind of cell within a biological organism has radically changed the course of Western medicine and science, even if no one has really noticed yet. As Rossi, himself, puts it: “The real important discovery here was you could now use mRNA, and if you got it into the cells, then you could get the mRNA to express any protein in the cells, and this was the big thing.” It was so big that by 2014, Rossi was able to retire after the company he co-founded with Flagship Pioneering private equity firm to exploit his innovation, – Moderna Inc., attracted almost a half billion dollars in federal award monies to begin developing vaccines using the technology. No longer affiliated with Moderna beyond his stock holdings, Rossi is just “watching for what happens next” and if he's anything like the doting “hockey dad” he is portrayed to be, he must be horrified. Remote control biology As early as 2006, DARPA was already researching how to identify viral, upper respiratory pathogens through its Predicting Health and Disease (PHD) program, which led to the creation of the agency's Biological Technologies Office (BTO), as reported by Whitney Webb in a May article for The Last American Vagabond. In 2014, DARPA's BTO launched its “In Vivo Nanoplatforms” (IVN) program, which researches implantable nanotechnologies, leading to the development of ‘hydrogel'. Hydrogel is a nanotechnology whose inventor early on boasted that “If [it] pans out, with approval from FDA, then consumers could get the sensors implanted in their core to measure their levels of glucose, oxygen, and lactate.” This contact lens-like material requires a special injector to be introduced under the skin where it can transmit light-based digital signals through a wireless network like 5G. Once firmly implanted inside the body, human cells are at the mercy of any mRNA program delivered via this substrate, unleashing a nightmare of possibilities. It is, perhaps, the first true step towards full-on transhumanism; a “philosophy” that is in vogue with many powerful and influential people, such as Google's Ray Kurzweil and Eric Schmidt and whose proponents see the fusion of technology and biology as an inevitable consequence of human progress. The private company created to market this technology, that allows for biological processes to be controlled remotely and opens the door to the potential manipulation of our biological responses and, ultimately, our entire existence, is called Profusa Inc and its operations are funded with millions from NIH and DARPA. In March, the company was quietly inserted into the crowded COVID-19 bazaar in March 2020, when it announced an injectable biochip for the detection of viral respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Read rest of article HERE This next article REALLY caught my attention. These bad actors on the world stage are not even trying to hide anything from the public. I believe that this has happened because of the FEAR TACTIC. Many people who have given up their liberties and have cloistered themselves in their homes are TERRIFIED. Klaus Schwab is the head of the WEF (World Economic Forum). This man is salivating over the coming New World Order.   Klaus Schwab: Great Reset Will “Lead to a Fusion of Our Physical, Digital and Biological Identity” From summitnews.com Globalist Klaus Schwab made it clear that transhumanism is an integral part of “The Great Reset” when he said that the fourth industrial revolution would “lead to a fusion of our physical, digital and biological identity,” which in his book he clarifies is implantable microchips that can read your thoughts. As we highlighted earlier, “The Great Reset” is attracting a deluge of fresh attention in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, which Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said was an “opportunity for a reset.” The agenda is primarily based around dismantling the current capitalist system in favor of greater centralized technocrat rule which will lead to lower living standards, less fuel consumption, fewer civil liberties and the accelerated automation of jobs. However, another key aspect to “The Great Reset,” or the “fourth industrial revolution” as Schwab calls it, is merging man with machine. #TheGreatReset #4IR https://t.co/1ZjrP7F8RQ Schwab went on to explain how his book, ‘Shaping the Future of The Fourth Industrial Revolution', was particularly popular in China, South Korea and Japan, with the South Korean military alone purchasing 16,000 copies. In the book, Schwab explains with excitement how upcoming technology will allow authorities to “intrude into the hitherto private space of our minds, reading our thoughts and influencing our behavior.” He goes on to predict that this will provide an incentive for law enforcement to implement Minority Report-style pre-crime programs. “As capabilities in this area improve, the temptation for law enforcement agencies and courts to use techniques to determine the likelihood of criminal activity, assess guilt or even possibly retrieve memories directly from people's brains will increase,” writes Schwab. “Even crossing a national border might one day involve a detailed brain scan to assess an individual's security risk.” Schwab also waxes lyrical about the transhumanist utopian dream shared by all elitists which will ultimately lead to the creation of human cyborgs. “Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies will not stop at becoming part of the physical world around us—they will become part of us,” writes Schwab.  “Indeed, some of us already feel that our smartphones have become an extension of ourselves. Today's external devices—from wearable computers to virtual reality headsets—will almost certainly become implantable in our bodies and brains.” Schwab also openly endorses something the media still claims is solely a domain of discussion for conspiracy theorists, namely “active implantable microchips that break the skin barrier of our bodies.” The globalist hails the arrival of “implanted devices (that) will likely also help to communicate thoughts normally expressed verbally through a ‘built-in' smartphone, and potentially unexpressed thoughts or moods by reading brain waves and other signals.” So in other words, the “fusion of our physical, digital and biological identity” relates to the transhumanist singularity and a future where people have their every movement tracked and every thought read by an implantable microchip. It isn't a “conspiracy theory” when they're openly telling you what they want to do. source I want to say something very important to the brethren. The Cov-19 vaccine is NOT the Mark of the beast! … [Editor's note: This technology now is not the Mark of the Beast because this starts in the middle of the tribulation. So here is the mid-trib Mark of the Beast.] Rev. 13:11-18  “Then I saw another beast coming up out of the earth, and he had two horns like a lamb and spoke like a dragon.  And he exercises all the authority of the first beast in his presence, and causes the earth and those who dwell in it to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed.  He performs great signs, so that he even makes fire come down from heaven on the earth in the sight of men.  And he deceives those who dwell on the earth by those signs which he was granted to do in the sight of the beast, telling those who dwell on the earth to make an image to the beast who was wounded by the sword and lived.  He was granted power to give breath to the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak and cause as many as would not worship the image of the beast to be killed.  He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Here is wisdom. Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666... Those on the earth during this time who come to the realization that Christ is Lord – they will refuse to take the mark. They will also be hunted down by the armies of Antichrist and will be beheaded. But their souls will be in heaven with our Precious Lord Jesus. Remember this passage of Scripture?  Rev. 6:10 And they cried with a loud voice, saying, “How long, O Lord, holy and true, until You judge and avenge our blood on those who dwell on the earth?”   These were those who were slaughtered for their faith by Antichrist. They are asking the Lord “How long before He will judge and avenge their blood?” Brethren, I hope that this has helped some who worry about the vaccine being the actual mark of the beast. But I still say DO NOT GET THE VACCINE!! It changes our DNA which is God-given! Pray and share the saving Gospel of Jesus Christ with the lost. Time is short!   Conquering Your Beast Holiness or sanctification is a refuge from the Beast as a highway of holiness that leads to Zion. The unclean cannot travel this highway. “Righteousness delivereth from death.” The Beast is always given authority to crucify the flesh. If a person is dead to self, which is a gift from God, they never have to worry about the Beast. Isa 35:1-10  The wilderness (Tribulation in Revelation 12 & 17) and the dry land shall be glad; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.  2  It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing; the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Sharon: they shall see the glory of Jehovah, the excellency of our God.  3  Strengthen ye the weak hands, and confirm the feeble knees.  4  Say to them that are of a fearful heart, Be strong, fear not: behold, your God will come with vengeance, with the recompense of God; he will come and save you.  5  Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped.  6  Then shall the lame man leap as a hart, and the tongue of the dumb shall sing; for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert.  7  And the glowing sand shall become a pool, and the thirsty ground springs of water: in the habitation of jackals, where they lay, shall be grass with reeds and rushes.  8  And a highway shall be there, and a way, and it shall be called The way of holiness; the unclean shall not pass over it; but is shall be for the redeemed: the wayfaring men, yea fools, shall not err therein.  9  No lion shall be there, nor shall any ravenous beast go up thereon; they shall not be found there; but the redeemed shall walk there:  10  and the ransomed of Jehovah shall return, and come with singing unto Zion; and everlasting joy shall be upon their heads: they shall obtain gladness and joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away. Luk 21:34-36  But take heed to yourselves, lest haply your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and that day come on you suddenly as a snare:  35  for so shall it come upon all them that dwell on the face of all the earth.  36  But watch ye at every season, making supplication, that ye may prevail to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man. {Rev.12:9} And the great dragon was cast down, the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world; he was cast down to the earth, and his angels were cast down with him. {10} And I heard a great voice in heaven, saying, Now is come the salvation, and the power, and the kingdom of our God, and the authority of his Christ: for the accuser of our brethren is cast down, who accuseth them before our God day and night... {13} And when the dragon saw that he was cast down to the earth, he persecuted the woman that brought forth the man [child]. {14} And there were given to the woman the two wings of the great eagle, that she might fly into the wilderness unto her place, where she is nourished for a time, and times, and half a time, from the face of the serpent.  

The Todd Herman Show
Joe Biden's chance to prove he runs something - Episode 22 - Hour 1

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 46:57


THE THESIS: We can see who is NOT running things and who IS running them by the words of the figurehead vs the actions of the people who allegedly work for him.  THE SCRIPTURE:  Daniel 11:32-34 32 The king will use deceit to win followers from those who are unfaithful to God, but those who remain faithful will do everything possible to oppose him. 33 Wise leaders will instruct many of the people. But for a while, some of these leaders will either be killed with swords or burned alive, or else robbed of their possessions and thrown into prison. 34 They will receive only a little help in their time of trouble, and many of their followers will be treacherous. THE NEWS: Figurehead's Chief of Stuff, Ron Klain, had some interesting things to say about federal power [AUDIO] - Figurehead: “No federal solution . . . “ Figurehead as candidate [AUDIO] - Rand Paul on the Fauxch's bias toward so called “vaccines …” So … WHY is the FDA still picking winners and losers right along with the rest of The Party?  WAPO will run this, from an academic, but the did the Propaganda of Silence against Kulldorff, Great Barrington, Frontline Docs, Zrenco, Malone, et al . . . → American Association of Physicians and Surgeons: “Molnupiravir's low efficacy may come as no surprise, because drugs that only mutate a viral genome have never been tested before in people."  On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration made what may be the most momentous drug-approval decision in its history: It granted emergency-use authorization for Merck's molnupiravir to treat covid-19. This approval is significant not because molnupiravir is an especially good drug, but because it is a rather ineffective and dangerous one. In particular, molnupiravir might create new variants of SARS-CoV-2 that evade immunity and prolong the pandemic. The problem with molnupiravir lies in its mechanism of action. Unlike any previous antiviral drug, molnupiravir does only one thing: It introduces mutations into the viral genome. We are already familiar with the fact that viruses naturally mutate to evade immunity; the many mutations of the spike protein in omicron, for example, allow it to evade the antibodies created by prior infections or vaccines. Molnupiravir relies on inducing even more mutations so that eventually the virus's proteins are damaged beyond function. That molnupiravir can mutate SARS-CoV-2 to death has been demonstrated in the controlled conditions of a petri dish and lab animal cages, leading Merck to test it in covid-19 patients in clinical trials. Michael Z. Lin is a medical doctor and an associate professor of bioengineering and neurobiology at Stanford University. He conducts research on RNA viruses, including the development of antiviral drugs for covid-19. New study from Israel: "A total of 247, 65 and 32 children were hospitalised with influenza, COVID-19 and measles respectively. Complication rates were higher following measles than after influenza and SARS-CoV-2 infections.”  . . .  Hospitalisation rates and direct medical burdens of measles and influenza were significantly higher than those of COVID-19 infection in children." - ACTA PEDIACTRICA THE MONOLOGUE: QUESTIONS FOR THE PEOPLE WHO RUN JOE BIDEN … ARE YOU GOING TO CALL OFF YOUR PHARMAGANDISTS, NOW? Joy Reid guest, cigarette Doctor Gupta, says unvaccinated patients should be moved to the back of the line for medical care Here's what Gupta said BEFORE he started getting paid HUGE money to say the opposite … was THAT why he changed the words that leave his mouth? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tbidNLumfJQ&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR1rqiw-bptN7h40e80nNt5eXlWT7iaKwAmv0c_74t0QIWiH19BpA1BiQxo   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Week in Evolution
TWiEVO 73: With a little help from your hosts

This Week in Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 96:59


Nels and Vincent review three aspects of SARS-CoV-2: phylogenetics of Omicron, a two-step fitness selection for variants, and putative RNA insertions from host genomes. Hosts: Nels Elde and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiEVO Links for this episode Two-step fitness selection for SARS-CoV-2 variants (Cell Rep) Host origins of SARS-CoV-2 genome insertions (Virological) Time stamps by Jolene. Thanks! Science Picks Nels – Plant virus satellite accelerates wing formation in insect Vincent – A plant virus that switched to vertebrates Music on TWiEVO is performed by Trampled by Turtles Send your evolution questions and comments to twievo@microbe.tv

Behind the SchƎmƎs
S01E77: Only Nerds Know What Verbs Are

Behind the SchƎmƎs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 145:44


When you See's It You See's It Lepers and Lawyers It's The Picklemancer For the first time ever, BTS has an in person episode! Medus from http://meduspod.com/ joins us for tonight! We frolic in the Open Fields, we dance thru the RNA spray, and we even get Christmas ruined for us by SCIENCE! Seriously tho, if Santa was a necromancer following the Roman Eunuch Model, that only make him cooler. How do Catholics find bones in the winter? BYO3-DG Call in and leave your Scream-Mail on the Cr33p Phone! 612-263-SXXY ZOSO'S CORNER (Show Notes) If you like what you heard here, check out our revue show! ms. informed NAtion Follow us on Social Sesame at FeedBag (Facebook), Insta-Groan (Instagram) and The Twits (Twitter)! @behindthesch3m3s https://www.behindthesch3m3s.com/

Abels tårn
Panelet - Tellus, Theia og månens fødsel

Abels tårn

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 57:04


- Månen blei dannet da en liten planet krasjet med jorda (sier den rådende hypotesen). Endret dette også jordas rotasjonshastighet? - Fyller mann en ku med gress, kommer det melk ut. Kan man få til det samme med en maskin? - Hvordan oppstod to kjønn? Var det et mellomstadium? - Roterer alt i universet? I så fall: hvorfor? Og er det en foretrukket retning? - Er vaksinene gode nok? - m-RNA vaksiner og kreftbehandling - Om perspektiver i verdensrommet - Fargeforandring hos hummer - Hvor smart var det av mennesket å kvitte seg med pelsen? Panelet: Cellebiolog Katharina Vestre Astrofysiker Vegard Rekaa Molekylærbiolog Sigrid Bratlie. Hør episoden i appen NRK Radio

Naturally Inspired Report
Can Melatonin Decrease Risk For Covid-19?

Naturally Inspired Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 3:33


Today on the Naturally Inspired Daily Clip: Can Melatonin Decrease Risk For Covid-19?  

Puls
mRNA-Technologie und Aerosol-Übertragung

Puls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 34:37


Durch die Covid-19-Impfstoffe erhielt die mRNA-Technologie einen riesigen Schub. Nun soll die Technologie gegen verschiedenste Krankheiten zum Einsatz kommen. Ausserdem: Der Übertragungsweg von Atemwegserkrankungen über die Luft wurde lange Zeit unterschätzt. mRNA-Technologie – Allheilmittel für die Zukunft? Mit den Covid-19-Impfstoffen schaffte die mRNA-Technologie den Durchbruch. Nun soll die sogenannte messenger RNA auch bei Impfungen gegen andere Viren und zur Therapie von Krankheiten wie Krebs genutzt werden. «Puls» über eine Technologie mit dem Potenzial, die Medizin zu revolutionieren. Aerosol-Übertragung – Die Lehren aus dem Irrtum Heute weiss man, dass das Coronavirus massgeblich über die Luft übertragen wird. Doch während Monaten pochte die WHO und viele andere Expertinnen und Experten auf das jahrzehntealte Dogma, dass sich Atemwegserkrankungen nur über Tröpfchen verbreiten. Ein Irrtum mit einer langen Vorgeschichte. Live im Studio: Christian Münz und Thomas Peter Daniela Lager spricht mit dem Immunologen Christian Münz über die Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der mRNA-Technologie sowie mit dem Aerosol-Experten Thomas Peter über die Luft-Übertragung von Viren und wie man diese verhindern kann. Masken für Blasinstrumente – Der Versuch aufs Exempel Beim Spielen von Blasinstrumenten werden mit Druck Luft und Aerosole ausgestossen. Zu Zeiten von Corona ein Problem. Das Orchester der Uni Basel macht mit «Puls» den Versuch, ob Masken für Blasinstrumente die Ansteckungsgefahr senken können.

Loucos por Biografias
ROSALIND FRANKLIN – A Química que descobriu a estrutura de dupla hélice do DNA

Loucos por Biografias

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 11:00


Rosalind Franklin, uma química britânica que contribuiu para o entendimento das estruturas moleculares do DNA, RNA, vírus, carvão mineral e grafite. Embora seus trabalhos sobre o carvão e o vírus tenham sido apreciados em vida, suas contribuições para a descoberta da estrutura do DNA só tiveram reconhecimento após sua morte. Rosalind descobriu a estrutura de dupla hélice do DNA e tirou a famosa foto 51, que comprova a descoberta da dupla estrutura helicoidal da molécula do DNA. Mas foi injustiçada por colegas de laboratório que usando a descoberta de Rosalind, receberam o Nobel de Medicina sem dar os devidos créditos a ela. E essa é nossa história de hoje. Espero ter contribuído para que seu dia seja bom! Se você gostou, deixe seu joinha, faça seu comentário. Conheça as outras histórias do canal e compartilhe com seus amigos. E se puder, apoie esse projeto: catarse.me/loucosporbiografias Esse apoio é muito importante para que eu possa continuar com esse projeto trazendo sempre novidades para vocês. Encontro vocês na próxima biografia do canal. Até Mais! (Tânia Barros). Fontes: - Livro: As Cientistas – 50 Mulheres que mudaram o Mundo - Livro da Ciência – Edições Globo - Revista Galileu --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/loucosporbiografias/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loucosporbiografias/support

RNZ: Sunday Morning
Prof Gary McLean on the rise and (eventual) fall of Omicron

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 15:07


We may think we have a handle on the Omicron variant, but are we sure? People are certainly being hospitalised, and some are dying, albeit thankfully in low numbers. Professor Gary McLean joins the show for an Omicron update. 

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 18, 2021: CDC recommends using Moderna, Pfizer over J&J for booster doses; ACHS working on Race & Sports initiative

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 17:35


This is not the final Saturday of 2021, but this is the final Saturday edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement for this two thousandth and twenty-first year of the common era. There’s been nothing common about this year, or any other, for that matter. This newsletter and podcast seeks to point out items of note, though it’s up to you to decide if there’s a tune. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs.This newsletter and podcast is supported by readers and listeners. Sign up for a regular update on what’s happening in the community, and decide later whether to pay! On today’s show:An update on the pandemic including a recommendation related to the Johnson and Johnson vaccineAn Albemarle Supervisor has concerns about the MPO hiring a consultant to craft a strategic plan Albemarle is considering three software platformsThe Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society explains its Race and Sports initiative and how it advances the study of the era of school desegregation In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out:Algorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. Support freeform community radio on WTJU. Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Pandemic updateOn Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control endorsed a recommendation that individuals should receive the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine over the Johnson and Johnson shot. Both Moderna and Pfizer use messenger RNA. Still, the CDC recommends any vaccine in the face of another surge of cases nationally and internationally. (CDC release)“In general, the mRNA vaccines by Pfizer and Moderna should be used in preference over Johnson and Johnson’s vaccine,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia Health System.”Dr. Sifri said the new preference is due to new information that shows the possibility of higher rates of blood clotting than was previously known. “Still, it is a rare event but they are higher and it led to the change in stance,” Dr. Sifri said. The Blue Ridge Health District announced Friday that the Johnson and Johnson shot will only be offered a first dose but boosters will no longer be provided at community-based vaccination events or in mobile vaccination clinics. They will still be available at the community vaccination center at Seminole Square while supplies last. Dr. Sifri said those who have had the booster of the Johnson and Johnson should monitor for any symptoms of blood clots such as shortage of breath. He said UVA Health is recommending those who have not had the J&J booster select either the Moderna or Pfizer when they go in for a booster. Two-thirds of Virginians have now received enough doses to be considered fully vaccinated, or 5.7 million people. So far, only 1.7 million of Virginians have had a booster or third dose. “This is the time now to get your booster,” Dr. Sifri said. “The time for getting boosters to prepare yourself for the holiday season is starting to run out. It takes a little bit of time for that booster to take effect and to boost your immune system to encounter what it may encounter along the way.” As of yesterday, the seven-day average for vaccines administered is at 42,631 shots a day. The seven-day average for new cases was 2,760 a day and the percent positivity is 8.6 percent. The next set of numbers in Virginia will come out on Monday. Dr. Sifri said he expects the surge to continue.“We are anticipating that we’re going to see more cases and I think the likelihood that’s going to translate into more hospitalizations and deaths,” Dr. Sifri said. “We’re starting to see modeling information from the CDC that is warning of that possibility so we are concerned about that. That’s similar to what we saw last year as well.”The difference this year is a supply of vaccines. To inquire about vaccination opportunities at the UVA Health System, call 434-297-4829. You can also visit the Virginia Department of Health site at vaccinate.virginia.gov. Albemarle County softwareAlbemarle County’s procurement office has identified that the firm Granicus will be awarded a sole-source contract for a community engagement platform unless other vendors come forward. In a notice dated December 17, procurement officials state that Granicus “is the only source practically available” and the platform Bang the Table is mentioned. Their website lists it as “a platform to listen, inform, measure, and build community” and also has a helpful online assistant known as Eddie the Engager. Other vendors have until December 28 or the contract will be awarded. In similar procurement notices, Yardi Systems has a sole source award for the Breeze Premier platform for property management and that closing date is December 27. Lexis Nexis Systems has a sole source award that closes on Monday for the Accurint Virtual Crime Center which is touted as a way for law enforcement to obtain “a comprehensive view of people’s identities.”New transportation personnelTwo new faces joined the virtual table at the December 7 meeting of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Board. The federally-mandated body consists of two Albemarle Supervisors, two Charlottesville City Councilors, and the head of the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Culpeper District. That’s now Sean Nelson, who became District Engineer in mid-October replacing John Lynch. “I’m glad to be a part of this team here,” Nelson said. “I look forward to continuing to keep things going the way John Lynch did and just hold the steering wheel and carry us in to the future. I appreciate being here and plan to be an active participant.” Ted Rieck is the new director of Jaunt after a period running a similar agency in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “Really happy to be here in Charlottesville,” Rieck said. “As you all know, this is great community and a great part of the country. I look forward to hopefully being a contributor and a partner to all of you as we development transportation and transit in the area.”MPO Strategic Plan?Staffing shortages at the Thomas Jefferson Planning District have meant some delays in work that transportation staff had expected to work on. Director of Planning and Transportation Sandy Shackleford said planners are focused on what has to be done. “We are preparing for things like our long-range transportation plan and that we’re going to be able to do a good job with that,” Shackleford said. “It does mean that there are some projects that we just haven’t been able to pursue for right now like focusing on how we can better integrate climate action initiatives into our long-range transportation plan process.”Shackleford said another item that will be delayed will be the creation of a strategic plan for the MPO. She suggested additional funding could be placed in an existing item would outsource that work rto a consultant. That idea drew the concern of Albemarle Supervisor Ann Mallek. “This makes me very nervous that we’re going to turn over something as particular and local as our strategic planning to some consultant who probably has no familiarity with us at all,” Mallek said. TJPDC Director Christine Jacobs said the plan already had been to spend $25,000 on a consultant to do the plan, but no firms responded at that price. The new idea is to increase that amount by using funds that have not gone to pay a TJPDC staff member. Shackleford said no other MPO in Virginia has a strategic plan. Mallek suggested waiting until the local elected bodies are sat and select new MPO members. The MPO Policy Board will next discuss the matter in January. Julia Montieth, a land use planner at the University of Virginia’s Office of the Architect, said the pandemic has delayed creation on a master plan called the Grounds Plan. “We ended up putting the project on hold until post-COVID or post-better understanding of COVID,” Monteith said. “But one of the things that we did during that year was we did some enabling projects in-house that we felt we were capable of doing to inform the plan. That lowered our fees once we got to hiring the consultants.” Take a look at the 2008 Grounds Plan here You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement. Time for a second Patreon-fueled shout-out:Winter is here, and now is the time to think about keeping your family warm through the cold Virginia months. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society’s Race and Sports projectThe Brown vs. Board of Education ruling in 1954 led to the eventual desegregation of public schools. For many schools created for Black students, that ended an era for beloved institutions. That’s the case with Charlottesville and Jackson P. Burley High School. Dr. Shelley Murphy is the chair of the board of the Albemarle-Charlottesville Historical Society, which has been working on collecting more oral histories as part of a project called Race & Sports: The Desegregation of Central Virginia Public High School Athletics.“Our goal is to collect 50 to 60 interviews from those in our local communities who were young students at that time, many of whom were in the athletics who desegregated the first teams at Lane and Albemarle high schools and some of whom went on to the University of Virginia to play teams there.”Murphy and others presented their work on November 28 to as part of the Sunday Sit-In series put on by AARP Virginia. You can watch the event on their YouTube page. Former City Councilor and historian George Gilliam is one of the participants in the project. He provided some historical context. “So in 1954 in the case of Brown v. Board of Education, the United States Supreme Court ruled that racially segregated schools were unconstitutional,” Gilliam said. “That put Virginians into a box because Virginians had adopted a state constitution in 1902 that provided ‘white and colored children shall not be taught in the same school.’” Virginia resisted the directive even after a reaffirmation in 1955 that ordered desegregation happen with “all deliberate speed.” “And after two years, some Charlottesville residents got frustrated and finally brought suit against the Charlottesville School Board seeking admittance of Black children to all-white schools,” Gilliam said. “The Virginia General Assembly then sprung into action enacting a package of laws providing that among other things that any school that desegregates, whether voluntarily or pursuant to court order, is to be seized by the Governor and closed.”Gilliam said this era is known as Massive Resistance because the state government refused to comply with the law. He said in the fall of 1958, the state closed Lane High School when it appeared some Black students would be admitted. The Massive Resistance laws were determined to be unconstitutional.“In 1959 the parties reached a compromise,” Gilliam said. “The schools agreed to ease Black students into the previously all-white student bodies achieving full desegregation but not until the fall of 1967.”For this period, Jackson P. Burley High School remained open for several years while the transition took place. This is where athletics come in. “Charlottesville’s Lane High for white students and Burley High for Black students both had championship football teams,” Gilliam said. “The high school for white students had a 53-game streak during which they were undefeated. And Burley, the high school for Black students had an entire season where they were not only undefeated and untied, they were not even scored upon!”Gilliam said the legacy of the Burley Bears was threatened with the order to desegregate. UVA historian Phyllis Leffler said telling that story is crucial to understanding many of the dynamics of the time in a way that transcends the legal framework. “The Race and Sports inserts the voices of those who lived through a critical time in our local and national history,” Leffler said. “Those voices of Black and white athletes and what they went through are in danger of being lost. So many of the people we would have liked to speak with are no longer with us so it is imperative to document this period now with those who have stories to tell.”Leffler said a common assumption is that sports was seen as a way to bring the community together, but some of the stories paint a different picture. “We are still living the consequences of racial inequities that go back 400 years,” Leffler said. “This project will hopefully help bring our divided communities together by honestly looking at the costs and benefits of desegregation.”Late last year, Jackson P. Burley High School was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The Sean Hannity Show
Dr. Robert Malone - December 17th, Hour 2

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 38:46


Dr. Robert Malone, is the Inventor of mRNA vaccines and RNA as a drug, and he is outraged by the government's decision to mandate people into a one size fits all medicinal solution. Malone is now working on a new media initiative which is just launching. The first rollout can be found at www.globalcovidsummit.org. This is an umbrella organization that is bringing together different physician groups from around the globe. Plus, Tom Homan, former ICE director, joins to discuss the growing threat at the border, which the Biden administration is ignoring, and is allowing unscreened migrants to enter the nation, and be transported all over the country.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Pathway To A Universal CoVid Vaccine

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 1:28


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/hBmawhoOY-s   Unlike CoVid spike proteins that can mutate wildly, the viral polymerase protein common to many coronaviruses remains relatively stable and could be the key to developing vaccines that generate variant-independent immunity.   Molecular biologists and immunologists at UCLA have identified a CoVid RNA polymerase that can evoke an immune response and in so doing lead to its own inactivation by cellular immunity.   The investigators show that the human immune cells, the T killer cells that are capable virus killers, attack this viral polymerase protein and significantly impede the viral replication process.  This leads to viral destruction.  Since this RNA polymerase is common to not only CoVid but to other coronaviruses that cause SARS, MERS, and the common cold, this may be the route to a universal coronavirus vaccine.   It's to soon to tell for sure, but stay tuned.   https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/pdf/S2211-1247(21)01667-3.pdf?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS2211124721016673%3Fshowall%3Dtrue   #coronavirus #vaccine #RNApolymerase #tcells  

DIA: Driving Insights to Action
Advanced Tests and Therapies Making Daily Care Anything But Routine

DIA: Driving Insights to Action

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 26:39


Global Forum Co-Editors Gary Kelloff and David Parkinson discuss translational science milestones in 2021 against the backdrop of disruptive technologies advancing disease diagnostics and therapies. “The sensitivity of the diagnostic assays is getting better and better, and so is the analytical validation,” says Gary. “We have now the opportunity with liquid biopsies that allow from 20 cc of blood whole exome sequencing, whole transcriptome sequencing, and therefore deep DNA and RNA interrogation, real biology characterization. And that has fantastic opportunities for drug development, for patient diagnosis and prognostication, but also for the longitudinal monitoring of patients,” concurs David.

Working Capital Conversations
Gregory Zuckerman: A Shot to Save the World — The Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine

Working Capital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 25:31


By now we know what went wrong in the response to the most devastating pandemic in a century. Mistakes were legion and many of the world's biggest drug and vaccine makers were slow to react or couldn't muster effective responses. “A Shot to Save the World: The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a Covid-19 Vaccine” by award winning Wall Street Journal reporter and bestselling author Gregory Zuckerman is the untold story of what went right. It's a riveting business, science, and public sector chronicle of the scientists' epic sprint to create Covid-19 vaccines, fulfilling decades of unheralded yet revolutionary work on messenger RNA, virology, immunology, and more.

Equine Innovators
Rotavirus on the Move in Foals

Equine Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 33:30


In this episode Dr. Emma Adam of the University of Kentucky describes the research that identified a novel strain of rotavirus in foal diarrhea cases this year.This podcast is the twelfth episode in our “Equine Innovators” podcast series, brought to you by Zoetis.Show notes:An Update on Rotavirus in FoalsSessions from the 2021 Rotavirus Workshop, funded by the University of Kentucky's CAFE Gluck Equine Research Center Koller Emergency Response Funds and gifts from the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, Coolmore America, and Grayson Jockey Club.The Gluck Equine Research CenterThe Gluck Center's newsletters, Equine Science Review and Equine Disease QuarterlyPractical Biosecurity Tips to Protect Your HorseInfographic: Protecting Your Horse From DiseaseAbout the Researcher: Emma Adam, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVS, is an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky's (UK) Gluck Equine Research Center and the equine outreach veterinarian for UK's Department of Veterinary Science. Her career focuses on the health and wellbeing of the equine athlete and she has worked in four countries on three continents. Adam received her veterinary degree from the Royal Veterinary College, in the U.K., after which she gained equine internal medicine specialty training at Texas A&M University and equine surgery specialty training at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center. She completed her PhD research in regenerative medicine as it relates to articular cartilage using RNA sequencing at the Gluck Center. Her primary role now is to connect the university with equine industry stakeholders through outreach and the dissemination of information.

What's Next|科技早知道
S5E36|养活 96 亿人口的种子,应该长成什么样子?

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 40:15


什么样的种子,才能保证世界上的每一个人都不会再挨饿?今年十月,联合国粮食计划署曾因呼吁马斯克捐款 66 亿美元而陷入逼捐门风波,同时也让大众再度关注到了疫情后持续恶化的农业安全问题。联合国此前曾预测,2050 年全球人口数量将达 96 亿,持续增长的人口叠加有限的土地与水资源,粮食危机离我们到底还有多远? 本期节目,我们邀请了来自跨国种业巨头拜尔圣尼斯的商务育种家 Sufei ,共同探讨种业的前沿技术与经济模式。高新技术怎么应用在农业领域?种业巨头如何解读自家业务?转基因技术与有机食品是坏是好?我们为什么需要关心种子与粮食安全? #声动小邮筒# 欢迎订阅 声动活泼 的付费 newsletter,点击 一封来自胡同中的邀请 (https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s?__biz=MzIwMDczNTE3OQ==&mid=2247491199&idx=1&sn=ef14905483869eb81f746de8243ea096&chksm=96f9fedba18e77cd1793b7f267c60fef39664c98b1e7d787f3b857f7910977ff3e9324c3d818&scene=21#wechat_redirect) 即可了解如何订阅。或者在 声动活泼 公众号菜单栏点击「会员通信」了解更多详情。 #加入我们# 声动活泼正在招聘「内容研究员」、「业务拓展和合作管理总监/经理」、「声音设计师」、「播客制作实习生」、「内容营销负责人」及「节目制作人」,查看详细讯息请在公号「声动活泼」回复暗号:入场券 。简历接收邮箱

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights
Australian to produce RNA vaccines

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 7:32


Luke Grant speaks to RNA research expert Dr Archa Fox from University of Western Australia about the planned manufacture of RNA vaccines in Australia. Click play to listen to the full interview. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TrueLife
The Opportunity of Despair

TrueLife

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 44:03


Speaker 1 (0s): Welcome back to the TrueLife podcast. It is December. I haven't spoken to everybody for a while, but I've been thinking about you. I hope you're all doing well. I hope your kids are out of school. I hope they're learning. I hope your parents are healthy and all your loved ones, or are still talking to you. I have been fascinated by the world that we live in. As of recently, in some ways it's incredibly depressing and I'll go into that in a minute. However, I think it was Rami manual who said never let a good crisis go to waste. And it's so true that the opportunities that surround us right now are equally as overwhelming as the feeling of despair. Let me try to flesh that out a little bit, you know, right now is as much as people are being locked down. I think there's a whole lot of freedom. I think right now, people in positions of authority are desperately trying to reorganize society in a way that they seem to see fit. They want to change what we're thinking about. They want to change the world we live in and they want to change the environment around us, fundamentally changing small businesses for large corporations, changing the tax structure, changing society. It's the great reset. And it's the build back better. If you want to look into more detail on that, like there's certain think tanks that you could subscribe to, like the McKinsey Institute, you know, you can look at the bill and Melinda gates foundation website, and you can kind of see the direction in which people want to go, but just because people want to go in a direction, doesn't mean that's the direction we're going to go into. And that is where the freedom and the opportunity, I believe lie for everyday working people now more than ever. I think that we, and by we, I mean, obviously anybody who's listening to this has the opportunity to make big changes. Let me give an example of education as an, as just a quick example. So think for a moment about this great experiment that COVID-19 has thrust upon the world of education. There's a fantastic study at a, I think it's education.gov or in ces.gov. And it talks about the educational aspects of what happened in 2021. And it's, it's, it's really fascinating it's it goes into different ethnic groups. It goes into a single parents and then it classifies how all the kids are performing. It says, I think there's all these different charts and it's pretty much a child's education performance. And then it breaks down into other charts about it goes into different races. And it says like, you know, white parents who are married are about 70% and 20% of white children live with their mom and 10% live with their dad. And then it goes into like Asian parents, Asian parents. This is probably no surprise to anybody who, who can, who sees Asian, Asian children excelling at school, Asian children have their parents married at about 84%. And you know, it's like 6% live with their mom. And then the remainder of what their dad, it's sad to see that in the black community, there is something like 50% of black children come from a home with married parents and then like, you know, 40% or 45% live with their mom and a single mother household. And then like a small percentage of what their dad. And then it goes into Pacific Islander, which is a rather high percent. I think it's 60% and it really breaks down stuff. Not, I don't, I don't say to, to, to make it like a race thing, but more like a, a cultural thing kind of, you know, it's and then if it continues to go on and talks about schools that don't have a lot of money and how they perform during the pandemic. And obviously the poorer schools performed worse. The children that only had one parent performed considerably worse. And you can understand why. I mean, if your kid's on has to learn on zoom and they're five or six years old, and then you as a parent have to be there to help them be on zoom, you know, and you're a single person you're probably working. You might not be able to be there. You know, the reason I bring all this up is we were talking about education and COVID-19 and, and opportunities will this process of education. This process of COVID-19 is a transition. You see, I don't know. Let me try to put it in pop culture a little bit. Has anybody seen that movie ready player one, or hopefully you read the book because the book is a million times better than the way they actually wrote the movie, the movies, it looks kind of lame. However, it doesn't change the fact that people put on a headset and they go to school, right? They put on a headset and they, they learn from people from God knows where. And you think about that. Like, if you think about it in an imaginative creative way, it sounds kind of awesome. Imagine being in a digital school where you could have the best teachers from the world, giving you a virtual tour of the Colosseum and you could, you know, you could probably be like a, a Roman warrior and you could be in the Coliseum fighting and you could learn so much about it. And that ideal sounds awesome. The problem is that's not what's happening and it's not, what's going to happen. It's, that's more of a, that's a headset with rose colored glasses. What we see is that without discipline, without structure, children are not going to learn. You know, and it's this, I deal, listic utopian vision of saving every child. But in reality, it's just a way for corporations to, you know, force people into a virtual world because the real world around them is crumbling and dying. Not to mention, if you think about a lot of education in public school, you know, you have to ask yourself, is it education or is it indoctrination? It's more indoctrination, I think. And so the opportunity comes in where you as an individual right now, like you, you could start a YouTube channel, you could start your own method of teaching kids things. And if it could catch on, like, there's no reason why it can't catch on my daughter watches this show called Ryan's world. And it's just about this family that like plays games and they do experiments and they're like a really good family. And they do these things together. And a lot of kids watch it. And it's a, it's a beautiful understanding of what a loving family could contribute to the world, I think. And so that's where the opportunity is, especially if you know, everybody, you know, is probably unique in some way and has different ways of expressing themselves or communicating ways. Or everybody knows that person who is like really good with kids, or it's just interesting or has fun things to say there's always positive. And the chances are you listening to this, probably have some of those qualities. And if you have those qualities that are beneficial to society, I think you're almost obligated to share them. I know what can be scary to start a channel or start a podcast. However, think about what you're doing now. Like, what are you doing right now? Are you I'm working on a Saturday? Like I had to get up, leave my house, leave my family. So I could work six days a week, you know, like 60 plus hours a week. And I would much rather take some time to provide awesome ideas and content to try and make the world a little bit better than get up and leave my family and everything I love and help a large corporation make tons of money. So it's just an idea that there is opportunity out there for everybody. And I want to try to shine a light in some of these darker times on the topic of education. You know, I've recently got to meet with some of my child's teachers and I got to ask them some questions about, you know, we had some great conversations and here's a few questions I asked and I'll speak a little bit upon how I felt about it and how our discussion went. Some of the questions I asked were, how do you feel that children wearing masks today is going to influence the world in 20 years? And I'm happy to tell you that the majority that every teacher I spoke to was doing everything they can to be the best teacher, they can, but also understood the damage that was being done. And it was sad in a way because while the teachers are the teachers at my kid's school are amazing and they're doing everything they can to be part of the children's future. And they really work hard. But I could see the sadness in their eyes when they spoke about other children from different schools who were unable to have the privileges that maybe some of their children have. And the truth is COVID-19, as far as an educational experiment is going to widen the gap in education to a point where the children that didn't go to school for a year that were on the border of falling behind are now so far behind that they'll never catch up and that's going to lead to the fact that they were gone for a year. The fact that they have to wear masks when they go to school. Now, you know, it's important to understand that a large part of communication comes from facial cues. You know, the rise, smile on the girl with dry humor or the small smile that kind of pulls to the side. When someone is joking or the stern look of a teacher to tell you to shut up, you know, all these nonverbal cues that you learn when you're a kid or, you know, all these communication cues we use with our face are being denied to the children of the future. And just the fact that a kid wears a mask is a way to shut them up, right? Like it's a way of symbolizing compliance. It's a way of symbolizing. Your opinion. Doesn't matter. It's a way of symbolizing that you're not worthy of speaking. And while these things are not being said, they, the mask alone being a medical looking mask and hospitals being, you know, places where people go to die, the mask is a symbol of fear and think about how sinister it is to subject a child to fear all day long. You don't have to think too hard because you as an American or you as a citizen of a country are under the same totalitarian propaganda instrument, a fear all day long. Like that's what COVID is. It's an, it's a, it's an instrument of fear. Oh no, you're all going to die. You're not going to die. COVID is the flu albeit maybe a, maybe a heightened strain of flu. Maybe it leaks from a lab. Maybe it is a new variant of some kind. I don't thoroughly understand exactly what it is, but I know it's not what they're telling me. And the way you know, that is to look at the propaganda that's coming out of the television, look at the propaganda that's coming out of the actual government right now, you know, think about, Think, think about the laws being passed in the name of COVID think about the slogan, build back better. How can you build anything back until you've broken everything down? I think In my opinion, what COVID is, is the beginning of a decade long plan to re-engineer humanity. And let me be clear on what I mean by that. I think it's important to note the strategies of tech companies and their slogans move fast and break stuff, you know, think about that slogan. Like that is, that is the driving force behind the majority of tech companies. And I'll give you an example. Look at Uber, Uber came out of nowhere and they completely disrupted the ride sharing economy. They invented a ride sharing economy and they got so big, so fast. They became too big to fail, you know, similar with Amazon, Amazon got government contracts and next thing you know, they're the biggest baddest out there and now they're too big to fail. Well, what's been happening over the last probably 20 years is that we have seen the corporate takeover of governments. And you're hearing a lot of rhetoric right now about how governments are horrible and they're dumb and they're stupid and they're corrupt and that's all true. However, it's important to note what, one of the greatest philosophers John Dewey said, and what he said is that governments are the shadows cast upon people by business. And I think that puts things in perspective. Our government has been bought and paid for for a long time. And what's happening now is that they're just taking the mask off. You know, they are sick and tired of having to play the game of, okay, we're going to write the bills and we're gonna give them to a Congressman. And then the Congressman is going to pretend to go up there and read it. They're sick of paying the bribes. They're sick of all the red tape, you know, and they're just taking the mask off and saying, look, we fucking have been running this show for the last 20 years. We're done playing games. It's just better that everybody knows. And that's difficult for a lot of people to understand. You know, I heard a quote one time that said, if you were born before 1970, you live in 1950. If you're born after 1970, you live in 2010. You know, a lot of people today, if you think about the older generation, like they believe the United States is 50 states that are run by, that are stayed true to a constitutional document. And they have these rights and you know, nothing is further from the truth. If the United States is not the United States that you were told, when you went and learned civics in high school, that's not what we live in anymore. The constitution unfortunately is not the law of the land. It is not something that people stand by or behind. It is something that is used when it's purposeful. Let me give you another example of, of this idea, this antiquated idea of nation states that we all hold dear to us. Like we, we believe we live in nation states, but let me tell you, at least in my opinion of some things that will help you at least maybe try to see my, you may not agree with me, but let me try to illuminate to you why I think what I think, do you guys remember the Bundy ranch for those of you that don't know there was a guy and his family that lived on this ranch and it had been in his family for generations and he raised all his cattle on there. And one day the ATF and the parks and forest came in and they said, oh yeah, sorry, Mr. Bundy, this ranch is ours. And they wanted to take something, you know, maybe 150 acres. I don't know. I forgot the exact amount, but they just came in and they said, this is ours. And he said, no, fuck you. It's not yours. Get off my property or I'll shoot you. And so he ran him off his property and he went and told his local, all his neighbors and everybody, and, and the CA you know, the, the, they had a big meetings about it. And then the, the government said, listen, we're going to come and take this property. It's no longer yours. It's a national park. And so about a month later, 150 troops came, you know, ATF, CIA guys, FBI guys, you know, they brought in like a, a, a militant group of people to seize the land. And when they showed up, they were surprised to see that Bundy had recruited his own militia. And his guys were sitting up on the Hills and they had the government surrounded. And, you know, he walks out there and it was, it was almost like a, it would look like a couple captains getting ready for the coin, toss at a football game. So you have Bundy go out and you have some, some big wig government guys go out. And they're, you know, they are S both of them are escorted on each side by guys with like AR fifteens. And they're sitting there talking, and, you know, the government's like, it's our land and Bundy's lag well, come and take it. You know, when they like a, a good old fashioned Mexican standoff, but the government was outnumbered and they ultimately backed down because they realized it had national attention. And they realized what they were doing was wrong. The most important question about that particular scenario is why do they want to seize his land? Well, they wanted to seize his land because one Senator had sold that land to China. They had sold that land to be used as a solar farm. And so that's an example of what our government has been doing, not only in our country, but in all countries, then that's the process of globalization what's been happening is that, you know, government officials have been selling resources in our country to other countries, to other corporations. The same thing happened with uranium. One when Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were in office, they were selling uranium from the United States, taking it to Canada, and then selling it to Russia, which the people, some people say it made its way over to Iran, which would be the ultimate irony. If we got hit with a nuclear weapon where the uranium came from our own country, you know, you can, you can begin to see the problems there. And this is a great segue into globalization being a form of resource allocation. Right. We hear a lot about climate change, and we hear a lot about saving the planet, but these are all just euphemisms for seizing resources. You know what I mean by that? Like, why is it that Nestle can suck all the water out of California? And like, no one even talks about it. Like it's, it's because the state of California has sold their water rights to a corporation that's what's happening. And it's happening all throughout the world. In fact, it's kind of the Chinese model, you know, when, when you hear Elon Musk or some of these big tech guys say that China's the model for the future. They're not saying that communism is the future. What they're saying is the merger of government power with corporate structure is the future. Right? And that's why you hear, when you hear people talk about, build back better. You hear a lot of rhetoric about public, private partnerships, public, private partnerships, what's a public private partnership. Well, it has a nice flow to it. Doesn't like, oh yeah, the public, I was just going to be working with this private company and it's going to be great. But is it, you know, when I think of public private partnerships, I think of, of privatizing profits and socializing losses, and that's exactly what they're going to do. You're going to see large infrastructure projects begin to happen. However, it doesn't necessarily have, like if you're in California, you're going to see some Chinese companies coming in and building huge roads, huge rails. And that's going to be funded on your dime as a taxpayer. So you're the public, and you will pay this foreign corporation to build in your state. And this is the, this is what's going on in Congress. This is what's going on at the world economic forum. And this is what's going on throughout our world right here. It's also, what's going to continue to be going on and it's hitting some snags right now. And like that, that is why you're seeing the COVID crisis continue to be what it is in order for the large multinational corporations from all countries to seize control of the entire financial apparatus. It's imperative that small businesses be cast aside. They can't ha there's no room for you as a business owner to be competing with the likes of Walmart or Amazon, or, you know, whatever giant conglomerate the government has decided will take over that industry. In the name of efficiency and effectiveness, a small number of technocrats have decided that as the arbiters of the greater good, they know what's best for everybody. Let's think about healthcare for a minute. The healthcare system in the United States is, is a problem for a lot of reasons. You know, we tried to pass healthcare for everybody. It didn't work the amount of strings attached by insurance companies and big drug companies are so incredibly tied in this Gordian knot of corruption. That it's an it's, you're not able to untangle them. We're one of only two countries in the world where you're allowed, where, where drug companies are allowed to advertise on television. And you can see this happening. You can see the effect of this happening on your own family. At least I can, like, I remember when I talked to my dad a while back and he was telling me about, oh man, you gotta go get your shingles shot, George. And I said, what are you talking about? He's like, oh yeah, man. There's a lot of shingles going around right now. And I thought to myself, like, I don't know, I've never, I don't know anybody that has shingles. I haven't even heard of that term in like 20 years. And I started thinking to myself like, oh, well, you know, he came from Oregon. Maybe there's was an outbreak there or something. And maybe it's just not where I am. And then, because he came to stay in, in Hawaii where I am, I went to go hang out with them for the day. And he was at his place and he had the TV on and he goes, Hey, I'm going to get ready. And then I'll be ready to go in a little bit. So I sat there and I was kind of reading. And I had had the TV on, in the background. My dad was watching like Fox news or something like that. And on the TV, I hear ask your doctor about getting the new shingles shot. Most people who are over the age of 50 are in danger of getting shingles. If they've had chicken pox and it just kinda hit me like a ton of bricks, like, oh my God, my dad has this goddamn TV on five hours a day. And like, he clearly leaves it on when he's walking around the house. And it's just, you know, this propaganda is just seeping into his head. He went out and got a shingle shot because the TV told him to, you know what I th I think it's the, the most vulnerable people are being targeted. And by most vulnerable, I mean like the kids who are home alone, whose parents let them watch TV. And you know, our parents like the boomer generation who are retired and maybe their kids are out of the house. So they just sit home and watch TV all day. You know, TV is a drug, TV is something you take into your, into your body. And it changes your perception about how you see the world. Imagine, imagine doing a drug for like five or seven hours a day, man. Like you see the world differently. Like imagine some crack just doing a bunch of blow for seven hours a day. They're a fucking wreck, you know, or if you just, you know, it it's, it's probably worse than Coke or meth, man. Like it just gets in your head and it makes you do shit that is wrong. And that's a big part of you. Don't look at it this way. If, if you look out your window right now, it probably looks pretty peaceful. Like you probably look out there and you can see some, like right now I can see some Palm trees swinging some cars passing. It's, it's pretty quiet. But if you look through your TV as a lens, it's chaos, there's people in the streets where people shooting everybody, everyone's dying to COVID and you got to get all these shots. Like it's, it's a different lens in which you're being shown reality. But in reality, it's not reality. It's the reality that people in positions of authority want you to see it's behavior modification and it's fundamentally changing the way we work as a society. And so in some ways I think it's, it's, it's so silly. It's so dumb. Then it's causing those who have eyes to see. And those who have ears to hear are beginning to see the cracks in the foundation. In some ways I believe the internet is the great equalizer. Even with the censorship, you know, I think it was Julian Assange's who said that censorship is a something to celebrate. I know it sounds crazy, but he says, censorship is something that should be celebrated because that means that the power structure is so fragile that they must stop people from hearing certain words like that's how fragile it is. And there's a lot of truth to that right now. Like our entire economy is built on a lie. Our entire system of healthcare is built on lies. And Ms. COVID 19 is a distraction to stop you from thinking critically it's to stop you from going, Hey, how much money are the, are the drug companies making? No, let's think about the rhetoric sometimes you'll hear, oh, this is a, this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. Think about that really. It's a, it's a crisis of the  the problem with that is that, you know, I think like 8% or 9% of Africa is unvaccinated. You know why they're unpacked? Because the pharmaceutical companies will not allow their patent product to be given to third world countries. They will only sell it to them at the highest price possible. So if this is a pandemic of the  are not the drug companies responsible for that. Instead, they want everybody in your country to get two shots, three shots, four shots, five shots, you know, it's, it doesn't take a whole lot of mental horsepower to understand the new model for health care is to there's a new variant. Okay. We're going to make a new vaccine. It's Medicare on demand. It's a subscription service, and it doesn't even really work. I don't think there are some echoes of doctors. I think Dr. Robert Malone, he invented the RNA technology. And what he says is that the are the variants. So you get a vaccine and it stops the one, the original variant. It may stop that. However, it causes the vaccine to mutate. And that's where these mutations are coming from. You know, Gibraltar, 100% vaccination rate. They have like the biggest outbreak of the army, Chrome Omni chrom, or whatever the hell it is. You know, something to think about. If you jumble the words around an Omnicom, it spells moronic. Just think about that for a minute. Same thing with Israel, they're like one of the highest vaccinated places they have the highest counts of COVID. You know, they want you to wear a mask and stay six feet apart. But the Omnicom virus came from South Africa. It jumped over the whole fricking Atlantic ocean. If it can jump the Atlantic ocean and only vaccinate people can travel on planes. How did they get here? What good is a mask or what good is six feet. If the virus can jump the ocean, you see it doesn't make logical sense. The only logical explanation is that it's a distraction. It's a lie. And you have to peel back that onion. And it's difficult because when you peel back the onions, you might want to start crying. Our country is being gutted. The financial infrastructure is being debated right now. When you hear about it, three and a half trillion dollar spending bill for infrastructure that is large corporations and corrupt government officials trying to decide who should get the pay off. That's what that is. You know, I, there's a great, there's a very interesting woman called Catherine Austin Fitts. And she used to be the secretary of housing under the George Bush administration. I recommend that you all take a look and, and, and look up some of her videos. I think she has a site called Solari report.com and she has just some fascinating information about what's happened over the last 20 years. She talks a lot about how the tangible dollar bills, the actual money of the United States was taken out of our economy. And now all we have left are like these digital representations of ones and zeros. And she talks a lot about how during nine 11, what nine 11 was according to Catherine Austin Fitts was the destroying of the evidence of the looting of our country. And she says that in tower seven, you had all the records of like Enron. You had all these records of these black budget operations, where they just stole all the money. The wing of the Pentagon that blew up was actually a part of the Pentagon. It was investigating the loss of like $21 trillion. And she says, effectively today, what you have running the government is a conglomerate of defense contractors, pharmaceutical companies, and insurance companies. And it kind of makes sense. I mean, who do you think makes the rules, the like AOC and Chuck Schumer, and you think those guys make the rules, or do you think insurance companies make the rules like, think about how powerful insurance companies are they just say to you? Well, if you don't do what I say, then you can't go to the doctor. If you don't do what I say, then I'm going to raise your premium to point where you can't even afford it. You know, the insurance companies have the ability to legislate behavior and that's what they do. I think that's a big reason why I read an article that talked a lot about how much money that insurance companies are paying out right now because of COVID. And that's a big part of why they want everyone to get a vaccine. If you get a vaccine, it takes away the liability of the corporation. It takes away the liability from the insurance companies, because you can't Sue. You cannot have any sort of real recourse against the drug agencies because you sign that away. When you go to get your shot, you sign a waiver that says, I will not Sue people. I don't know what's in this thing, but I promise that I won't Sue anybody. And as soon as you do that, you no longer have any recourse. And that's what, that's what a lot of insurance companies need you to do, because they don't have the money to pay everybody out for this. Not only do they have not have money to pay out people for COVID, but they don't have enough money to pay out the annuities, the social security benefits like that. They don't have the money to pay people. So they find themselves in a crisis where like, holy shit, what are we going to do? That's why you see the fed printing money. There's, you know, there's still, the federal reserve is still in a point of quantitative easing where they're buying $36 billion a month. Think about that $36 billion a month. Think about how much money that is. That's just to fill the hole. Imagine having like a big bucket and you're pouring water in there. And 36 billion gallons are just falling out of the bottom. And as that, as they're pumping in 36 billion society is still crumbling. Like it can't continue that way. And that's why we have COVID. That's why we have camps being built in Australia. That's why you're seeing people in the streets all over Europe. The shit is about to hit the fan. And I think it's amazing that we've held it together this long. I think another point is the supply chain issue. Like if there's clearly a supply chain issue, and if everybody's seen what they call shrink inflation, if you go to Costco, the 40 ounce bottle is now a 20 ounce bottle, but it's the same price. You know, if you get a bag of chips, it's half the size. It used to be. It might have some cool new colors and a new design, but it's half the size, you know, less is more, only at cost. More. I think about your house. Do you own a house? You own a condo. Is your house and property going up in value or is the dollar going down in value? Which one you think it is? What do you think happens to middle managers? When the CEO's just pull the plug on them? You know, what happens to the guy who gets up and goes to work everyday and has like six kids living paycheck to paycheck and having a tough time at work. And all of a sudden, you know, his 20 bucks an hour is now worth five bucks an hour. You know, it's the same 20, but now he can only buy five. It's only $5 worth of purchasing power, but he's still making 20, but food is going up. Housing is going up, electricity is going up like that guy is going to fucking going to start having some ideas of workplace violence, right? And he's not going to take out. The CEO is not going to get the board of directors. He's going to take out the middle manager who thinks that they're somehow doing good. And in a weird way, like if you're conspiracy minded, look at all the people that we've put in positions of authority lately, they're not the best. And the brightest they're like mascots. We have put a bunch of people in positions of authority that are fucking dummies, man. Like they, they at, at a lot of places, the people in charge, the people with the most authority would be the people who were picked last for kickball in fifth grade. You know what I mean by that? Like, they're there because they'll do exactly what they're fucking told to do. They're there because they got a chip on their shoulder because they've never made it in life and are going to be the people that get that face. The brunt of the manifestation of anger, of the working people. They're going to catch the pitchforks, not the guys up top, not the guys in the boardroom. Those guys are going to walk away with everything, but the middle managers, the ones that finally feel as if they've accomplished something in life, because they're, they've begun climbing the corporate ladder. The only problem is they've been climbing the corporate ladder their whole life. And when they get to the top, they find out that the ladder was against the wrong wall. And now they're fucked, but that's what I got for now, guys. I, I, I love all of you and I hope you're preparing, I hope I'm wrong about most of this stuff I do. And maybe I'm just a lunatic. That's that parts for sure. I'm definitely a lunatic, but you know, I, I think a lot of what I'm telling you is at least half true. And if you just think about some of these things, I'm saying, I think it'll start making sense. Like, if you just, it's hard because you don't want to think about this stuff, but you have to, if you choose not to think about what I'm telling you, then you, if you think about it, you can write it off. Know, Hey, George's crazy. But I, I honestly think if you just take time to research some of this stuff I'm telling you you'll find that it's true, or it's at least true enough, the policies people are putting out don't make any sense unless the whole thing's coming down, the lies are being put out for everybody to see. And I, I, I do. I think there's opportunity. I think that if people wake up and see what's happening, we as a group can make conscious decision to do what's best for our future. So that's what I got for right now. I love you guys. I hope everything's going great. I hope you spend time with your family and you tell him, you love him and you do your own research and you know, you fight for what you believe in. I'm a big believer in people should have the freedom to choose. And I want my kid and your kid and you and your family to be able to choose to do what you think is right, because that's what I think is right. A lot. 

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi
EN :: India Blockchain Roadmap, Mastercard Startup Path, Brazil's 1st Tokenized Corp, and more

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 18:37


Drop 1: India Blockchain Roadmap https://www.ledgerinsights.com/india-rolls-out-5-year-roadmap-for-national-blockchain-strategy/ Drop 2: MC Startup Path https://www.pymnts.com/mastercard/2021/5-crypto-startups-to-join-the-mastercard-start-path/ Drop 3: 1a SA tokenizada do Brasil https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/brazilian-creates-is-the-first-tokenized-joint-stock-company-in-the-country/ .. Messari Report https://messari.io/crypto-theses-for-2022 Metamask's 200M revenue https://www.readthegeneralist.com/briefing/metamask Novi wallet on WhatsApp http://Novi.com/WhatsApp SIX Project Jura - crossborder wCBDC tokenized assets DvP https://six.swiss/3rMq9af Meditrack Fase 1 no Líbano https://www.unlock-bc.com/82262/lebanese-ministry-of-health-launches-first-phase-of-blockchain-meditrack/ JPM NFT https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/12/03/jpmorgan-gave-away-nfts-at-an-event-this-week-one-is-now-listed-for-420-eth/ Beatles NFT https://cryptobriefing.com/four-beatles-nfts-are-up-for-auction-this-week/ Palm NFT 27M series B https://decrypt.co/87859/microsoft-warner-bros-palm-nft-studio-27m-series-b-round Covid-19 RNA song NFT by ViroMusic on Rarible https://consequence.net/2021/12/covid-19-song-nfts/ Ubisoft on NFT and back https://amp-acidadeon-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.acidadeon.com/game-on/NOT,0,0,1699767,ubisoft-anuncia-plataforma-de-jogos-nfts-que-incluira-o-brasil.aspx https://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/ubisoft-delists-its-nft-announcement-as-youtube-dislikes-top-22000/ Alchemy venture fund https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenehrlich/2021/12/10/why-a-35-billion-crypto-firm-is--going-to-invest-in-its-own-clients/ Moss token listed on Coinbase https://www.coinbase.com/price/moss-carbon-credit Minehub ESG tracking https://minehub.com/minehub-launches-solution-for-carbon-emissions-tracking-and-esg-compliance/ Bitt CBDC in Belize https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bitt-to-deploy-stablecoin-in-central-america-301432663.html China CBDC in HK fasters payments https://www.ledgerinsights.com/china-cbdc-linked-to-hong-kong-faster-payments-system/ $MEGA Megadeth's own crypto https://brasilnft.art.br/megadeth-lanca-sua-criptomoeda-oficial/ Gemini in Colombia https://cointelegraph.com/news/gemini-partners-with-colombia-s-biggest-bank-for-crypto-trading/ BTG Pactual ETH fund https://invest.exame.com/btg/conheca-fundo-que-permite-investimento-em-ether-eth-a-partir-de-r-100 State Street FX fwd on Symbiont smart contract https://investors.statestreet.com/investor-news-events/press-releases/news-details/2021/State-Street-Digital-Vanguard-and-Symbiont-Complete-First-Live-Trade-for-Foreign-Exchange-Forward-Contracts-Leveraging-Revolutionary-Blockchain-Technology-and-Smart-Contracts/default.aspx Kickstarter joins Celo https://www.kickstarter.com/articles/the-future-of-crowdfunding-creative-projects Invert whitepaper is out https://whitepaper.letsinvert.io/start/ Visa Crypto Advisory https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/currencies/visa-crypto-advisory-group-clients-nfts-cbdcs-banks-payments-finance-2021-12 Australian treasurer to regulate cryptocurrencies https://au.news.yahoo.com/treasurer-moves-regulate-cryptocurrency-163043432.html Brasil regulators move crypto bills in Congress https://www.blocknews.com.br/regulacao/projetos-de-lei-para-regular-criptomoedas-avancam-na-camara-dos-deputados-e-senado/ Blockchain Games Brasil https://exame.com/future-of-money/1o-evento-de-blockchain-games-do-brasil-tera-campeonato-de-axie-infinity/ Star Atlas SCORE launches Dec 16th https://aephia.com/star-atlas/what-is-the-star-atlas-mini-game-score/ Solana booming - my 1st article on Cointelegraph https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/play-to-earn-defi-metaverse-and-nfts-games-solana-ecosystem-is-booming .. Instagram.com/blockdropspodcast .. Twitter.com/blockdropspod .. blockdropspodcast@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blockdropspodcast/message

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi
Plano da India para Blockchain, Mastercard Startup Path, Primeira SA Tokenizada, e muito mais

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 19:17


Drop 1: India Blockchain Roadmap https://www.ledgerinsights.com/india-rolls-out-5-year-roadmap-for-national-blockchain-strategy/ Drop 2: MC Startup Path https://www.pymnts.com/mastercard/2021/5-crypto-startups-to-join-the-mastercard-start-path/ Drop 3: 1a SA tokenizada do Brasil https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/brazilian-creates-is-the-first-tokenized-joint-stock-company-in-the-country/ .. Messari Report https://messari.io/crypto-theses-for-2022 Metamask's 200M revenue https://www.readthegeneralist.com/briefing/metamask Novi wallet on WhatsApp http://Novi.com/WhatsApp SIX Project Jura - crossborder wCBDC tokenized assets DvP https://six.swiss/3rMq9af Meditrack Fase 1 no Líbano https://www.unlock-bc.com/82262/lebanese-ministry-of-health-launches-first-phase-of-blockchain-meditrack/ JPM NFT https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/12/03/jpmorgan-gave-away-nfts-at-an-event-this-week-one-is-now-listed-for-420-eth/ Beatles NFT https://cryptobriefing.com/four-beatles-nfts-are-up-for-auction-this-week/ Palm NFT 27M series B https://decrypt.co/87859/microsoft-warner-bros-palm-nft-studio-27m-series-b-round Covid-19 RNA song NFT by ViroMusic on Rarible https://consequence.net/2021/12/covid-19-song-nfts/ Ubisoft on NFT and back https://amp-acidadeon-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.acidadeon.com/game-on/NOT,0,0,1699767,ubisoft-anuncia-plataforma-de-jogos-nfts-que-incluira-o-brasil.aspx https://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/ubisoft-delists-its-nft-announcement-as-youtube-dislikes-top-22000/ Alchemy venture fund https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenehrlich/2021/12/10/why-a-35-billion-crypto-firm-is--going-to-invest-in-its-own-clients/ Moss token listed on Coinbase https://www.coinbase.com/price/moss-carbon-credit Minehub ESG tracking https://minehub.com/minehub-launches-solution-for-carbon-emissions-tracking-and-esg-compliance/ Bitt CBDC in Belize https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bitt-to-deploy-stablecoin-in-central-america-301432663.html China CBDC in HK fasters payments https://www.ledgerinsights.com/china-cbdc-linked-to-hong-kong-faster-payments-system/ $MEGA Megadeth's own crypto https://brasilnft.art.br/megadeth-lanca-sua-criptomoeda-oficial/ Gemini in Colombia https://cointelegraph.com/news/gemini-partners-with-colombia-s-biggest-bank-for-crypto-trading/ BTG Pactual ETH fund https://invest.exame.com/btg/conheca-fundo-que-permite-investimento-em-ether-eth-a-partir-de-r-100 State Street FX fwd on Symbiont smart contract https://investors.statestreet.com/investor-news-events/press-releases/news-details/2021/State-Street-Digital-Vanguard-and-Symbiont-Complete-First-Live-Trade-for-Foreign-Exchange-Forward-Contracts-Leveraging-Revolutionary-Blockchain-Technology-and-Smart-Contracts/default.aspx Kickstarter joins Celo https://www.kickstarter.com/articles/the-future-of-crowdfunding-creative-projects Invert whitepaper is out https://whitepaper.letsinvert.io/start/ Visa Crypto Advisory https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/currencies/visa-crypto-advisory-group-clients-nfts-cbdcs-banks-payments-finance-2021-12 Australian treasurer to regulate cryptocurrencies https://au.news.yahoo.com/treasurer-moves-regulate-cryptocurrency-163043432.html Brasil regulators move crypto bills in Congress https://www.blocknews.com.br/regulacao/projetos-de-lei-para-regular-criptomoedas-avancam-na-camara-dos-deputados-e-senado/ Blockchain Games Brasil https://exame.com/future-of-money/1o-evento-de-blockchain-games-do-brasil-tera-campeonato-de-axie-infinity/ Star Atlas SCORE launches Dec 16th https://aephia.com/star-atlas/what-is-the-star-atlas-mini-game-score/ Solana booming - my 1st article on Cointelegraph https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/play-to-earn-defi-metaverse-and-nfts-games-solana-ecosystem-is-booming .. Instagram.com/blockdropspodcast .. Twitter.com/blockdropspod .. blockdropspodcast@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blockdropspodcast/message

Biotech 2050 Podcast
82. RNA therapeutics for neurological indications, Barry Ticho, CMO, Stoke Therapeutics

Biotech 2050 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 27:13


As Chief Medical Officer Dr. Ticho is responsible for Stoke's efforts to develop first-in-class RNA based disease-modifying medicines to treat severe genetic diseases. He is also co-founder and former CEO of Verve Therapeutics which is developing therapies to edit the genome and confer protection from cardiovascular disease. Prior to joining Stoke Barry was Head of R&D for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases at Moderna Therapeutics. He was previously Head of External R&D Innovation for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases at Pfizer. Prior to that he was Vice President of Clinical Development at Biogen where he led clinical development for the Tysabri program for MS and led the aducanumab program for Alzheimer's Disease. Barry obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago and completed Pediatrics training at Northwestern University and a Cardiology fellowship at Children's Hospital in Boston. He was on clinical staff at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Dr. Carolyn Dean Live

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 63:02


HOUR 1 Vitamin C - Crucial Building Block for Health-Carolyn Dean MD ND  Vitamin C – Building Block of Health  Over the last few weeks on my radio show, I've been sharing with you what I already knew and have been recommending, what is still being discovered, and what may yet be proven [which falls under the category of what I already knew lol]. The bottom line remains – the immune system is made of cells and we have to keep building healthy cells using the right building blocks. These building blocks are available to you in our Completement Formulas.  This week we are reviewing the value of vitamin C as a building block of health, vitality and well-being. To sum it up, I'll quote Dr. Rhonda Patrick,  an American biomedical scientist, researcher, and entrepreneur. I subscribe to Dr. Patrick's newsletter and was thrilled to see a publication simply titled “Vitamin C”, a 42-page, 20,000-word, up-to-the minute description of the benefits of vitamin C.  Here is how Dr. Patrick begins her paper:  Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is an essential nutrient, widely recognized for its antioxidant properties. These properties arise from its potent redox potential due to its capacity to donate electrons to oxidized molecules. Even in small quantities vitamin C can protect critical molecules in the body such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from damage by reactive oxygen species, which are generated during normal metabolism, by active immune cells, and through exposure to toxins and pollutants (e.g., certain chemotherapy drugs and cigarette smoke). The vitamin also plays a critical role as a cofactor – a molecule that assists enzymes in chemical reactions. This dual nature of vitamin C means that it is instrumental in multiple physiological processes, including those involved in the biosynthesis of collagen, carnitine, and catecholamines. As such, vitamin C participates in immune function, wound healing, fatty acid metabolism, neurotransmitter production, and blood vessel formation, as well as other key processes and pathways.  The dual nature of Vitamin C! It's exciting, isn't it, to think about how many benefits you receive as you engage this versatile, essential nutrient?  Getting Vitamin C From Food  Unless you live in a remote community, untouched by the problems of modern farming, it's highly unlikely your local food supply will provide you with enough vitamin C. Even if you were to focus on eating foods with a high concentration of vitamin C, you would only end up denying yourself other nutrients or suffering indigestion (from overeating). And, if you try to get all your vitamin C from fruit, you may end up getting too much fructose-sugar in your diet.  Benefits of Vitamin C  helps repair tissues, including skin, blood vessels, bones and teeth  fights against heart disease and cancer with its high levels of antioxidants  can accelerate wound healing and helps eliminate bruising – which is low grade scurvy  improves vascular elasticity reducing blood pressure  reduces the stickiness of blood platelets, making them less prone to forming clots  can lower oxidized cholesterol levels: when Vitamin C levels are low, cholesterol becomes elevated; and when more vitamin C is consumed, cholesterol levels decline  increases type I collagen synthesis – collagen is the vital protein scaffolding of our body  helps reduce levels of lead, mercury and other heavy metals  reduces histamine in the body — the hormone that triggers allergies and asthma attacks  Tonight, we'll talk with Dr. Carolyn Dean about the Dual Nature of Vitamin C -along with a wide range of other health topics and clinically recommended nutritional assets to support your body. You will love hearing the beneficial interactions with our callers and hosts alike including the body/mind connection, identifying the ‘conflict' in the ‘conflict basis' of disease and much more!!  Video Version: https://youtu.be/_4KeAtkoEio About Dr. Carolyn Dean    Dr. Carolyn Dean MD ND has been featured on national media for over 30 years offering practical strategies to improve health, vitality, and well-being the natural way. As a medical doctor, naturopath, certified clinical nutritionist and master of many modalities including acupuncture and homeopathy, Dr. Carolyn Dean MD ND has authored over 33 books and 100 publications including The Magnesium Miracle, 3rd Edition, Hormone Balance, Future Health Now Encyclopedia and Heart Health. Please note that the information and opinions expressed on these broadcasts are not designed to constitute advice or recommendations as to any disease, ailment, or physical condition. You should not act or rely upon any information contained in these broadcasts without seeking the advice of your personal physician. If you have any questions about the information or opinions expressed during these broadcasts, please contact your doctor.  Disclosure: Dr. Dean does have a financial interest in the sale of all the Completement Formulas.  Call in and Chat with Dr. Dean during Live Show with Video Stream: Call 646-558-8656   ID: 8836953587 press #.  To Ask a Question press *9 to raise your hand  Dr. Dean takes questions via email. Please write questions@drcarolyndeanlive.com We will be glad to respond to your email  Learn more about Dr. Carolyn here: https://drcarolyndeanlive.com   Chatline on Station: http://bit.ly/Dreamvisions7Radio_Network  

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Dr. Carolyn Dean Live

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 56:48


HOUR 2 Vitamin C - Crucial Building Block for Health-Carolyn Dean MD ND  Vitamin C – Building Block of Health  Over the last few weeks on my radio show, I've been sharing with you what I already knew and have been recommending, what is still being discovered, and what may yet be proven [which falls under the category of what I already knew lol]. The bottom line remains – the immune system is made of cells and we have to keep building healthy cells using the right building blocks. These building blocks are available to you in our Completement Formulas.  This week we are reviewing the value of vitamin C as a building block of health, vitality and well-being. To sum it up, I'll quote Dr. Rhonda Patrick,  an American biomedical scientist, researcher, and entrepreneur. I subscribe to Dr. Patrick's newsletter and was thrilled to see a publication simply titled “Vitamin C”, a 42-page, 20,000-word, up-to-the minute description of the benefits of vitamin C.  Here is how Dr. Patrick begins her paper:  Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is an essential nutrient, widely recognized for its antioxidant properties. These properties arise from its potent redox potential due to its capacity to donate electrons to oxidized molecules. Even in small quantities vitamin C can protect critical molecules in the body such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from damage by reactive oxygen species, which are generated during normal metabolism, by active immune cells, and through exposure to toxins and pollutants (e.g., certain chemotherapy drugs and cigarette smoke). The vitamin also plays a critical role as a cofactor – a molecule that assists enzymes in chemical reactions. This dual nature of vitamin C means that it is instrumental in multiple physiological processes, including those involved in the biosynthesis of collagen, carnitine, and catecholamines. As such, vitamin C participates in immune function, wound healing, fatty acid metabolism, neurotransmitter production, and blood vessel formation, as well as other key processes and pathways.  The dual nature of Vitamin C! It's exciting, isn't it, to think about how many benefits you receive as you engage this versatile, essential nutrient?  Getting Vitamin C From Food  Unless you live in a remote community, untouched by the problems of modern farming, it's highly unlikely your local food supply will provide you with enough vitamin C. Even if you were to focus on eating foods with a high concentration of vitamin C, you would only end up denying yourself other nutrients or suffering indigestion (from overeating). And, if you try to get all your vitamin C from fruit, you may end up getting too much fructose-sugar in your diet.  Benefits of Vitamin C  helps repair tissues, including skin, blood vessels, bones and teeth  fights against heart disease and cancer with its high levels of antioxidants  can accelerate wound healing and helps eliminate bruising – which is low grade scurvy  improves vascular elasticity reducing blood pressure  reduces the stickiness of blood platelets, making them less prone to forming clots  can lower oxidized cholesterol levels: when Vitamin C levels are low, cholesterol becomes elevated; and when more vitamin C is consumed, cholesterol levels decline  increases type I collagen synthesis – collagen is the vital protein scaffolding of our body  helps reduce levels of lead, mercury and other heavy metals  reduces histamine in the body — the hormone that triggers allergies and asthma attacks  Tonight, we'll talk with Dr. Carolyn Dean about the Dual Nature of Vitamin C -along with a wide range of other health topics and clinically recommended nutritional assets to support your body. You will love hearing the beneficial interactions with our callers and hosts alike including the body/mind connection, identifying the ‘conflict' in the ‘conflict basis' of disease and much more!!  Video Version: https://youtu.be/_4KeAtkoEio About Dr. Carolyn Dean    Dr. Carolyn Dean MD ND has been featured on national media for over 30 years offering practical strategies to improve health, vitality, and well-being the natural way. As a medical doctor, naturopath, certified clinical nutritionist and master of many modalities including acupuncture and homeopathy, Dr. Carolyn Dean MD ND has authored over 33 books and 100 publications including The Magnesium Miracle, 3rd Edition, Hormone Balance, Future Health Now Encyclopedia and Heart Health. Please note that the information and opinions expressed on these broadcasts are not designed to constitute advice or recommendations as to any disease, ailment, or physical condition. You should not act or rely upon any information contained in these broadcasts without seeking the advice of your personal physician. If you have any questions about the information or opinions expressed during these broadcasts, please contact your doctor.  Disclosure: Dr. Dean does have a financial interest in the sale of all the Completement Formulas.  Call in and Chat with Dr. Dean during Live Show with Video Stream: Call 646-558-8656   ID: 8836953587 press #.  To Ask a Question press *9 to raise your hand  Dr. Dean takes questions via email. Please write questions@drcarolyndeanlive.com We will be glad to respond to your email  Learn more about Dr. Carolyn here: https://drcarolyndeanlive.com   Chatline on Station: http://bit.ly/Dreamvisions7Radio_Network  

Circulation on the Run
Circulation December 7, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 23:20


Please join Guest Host Mercedes Carnethon along with first author Connie Hess and Guest Editor Gregory Lip as they discuss the article "Reduction in Acute Limb Ischemia With Rivaroxaban Versus Placebo in Peripheral Artery Disease After Lower Extremity Revascularization: Insights From VOYAGER PAD." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, director of the Poly Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, our feature discussion is on a really important topic, peripheral artery disease. So important, so rampant, not talked about enough. And it's really insights from the VOYAGER-PAD trial telling us about the reduction in acute limb ischemia with Rivaroxaban versus placebo in peripheral artery disease after lower extremity revascularization. But before we get into all that, I want you to get your coffee while I tell you about my picks of today's issue. Should I start? Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Okay. So the first paper deals with the residual ischemic risk following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. We know that despite advances, patients following CABG still have significant risk. So this paper refers to a subgroup of patients from the REDUCE-IT trial with a history of CABG, which was analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of icosapent ethyl treatment in the reduction of cardiovascular events in this high risk patient population. Now, as a reminder, the REDUCE-IT trial was a multicenter, placebo controlled, double blind trial, where statin treated patients with controlled LDL cholesterol and mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia were randomized to four grams daily of icosapent ethyl or placebo. They experienced a 25% reduction in risk of a primary efficacy endpoint, which was cardiovascular death, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Now the current report tells us about the subgroup of patients from the trial with a history of CABG. Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, Carolyn. So what did they find in this subgroup of patients? Dr. Carolyn Lam: So of the 8,179 patients randomized in REDUCE-IT, 22.5% had a history of CABG with 897 patients randomized to icosapent ethyl and 940 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar between the treatment groups and randomization to icosapent ethyl was associated with a significant reduction in the primary endpoint, as well as in key secondary endpoint and in total ischemic events compared to placebo. This yielded an absolute risk reduction of 6.2% in first events with a number needed to treat of 16 over a median follow up time of 4.8 years. So, Greg, I think you'll agree, icosapent ethyl may be an important pharmaco-therapeutic option to consider in eligible patients with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. What an excellent summary. So Carolyn, for my first paper... And this study comes to us from Professor Judith Haendeler from the Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine. So Carolyn, this is a new type of quiz question. And as you listen to the presentation, help us predict the clinical implications. Okay, here we go. Dr. Greg Hundley: All right. So Carolyn, telomerase, also called terminal transferase, is a ribonuclear protein that adds a species dependent telomere repeat sequence to the three prime end of telomeres. And Carolyn, just to refresh our memories, a telomere is a region of repetitive sequences at each end of the chromosomes of most eukaryotes. And telomerase was discovered interestingly by Carol Greider and Elizabeth Blackburn in 1984. And together with some others, including Jack Szostak, they were awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for discovery. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, telomerase is active in gamuts and most cancer cells, but is normally absent from or at very low levels in most somatic cells. And the catalytic subunit of telomerase called telomerase reverse transcriptase or trt has protective functions in the cardiovascular system, particularly in regard to ischemia reperfusion injury. And interestingly trt or telomerase reverse transcriptase is not present in the nucleus, but also in mitochondria. However, for us in cardiovascular medicine, it is unclear whether nuclear or mitochondrial trt is responsible for the observed protection. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, fascinating. So what did today's paper find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So it was mitochondrial, but not nuclear telomerase reverse transcriptase that was found critical for mitochondrial respiration during ischemia reperfusion injury. And mitochondrial telomerase reverse transcriptase improves complex 1 subunit composition. And trt is present in human heart mitochondria and remote ischemic preconditioning increases its level in these organelles. Also, Carolyn TA65 was found to have comparable effects ex vivo and improved migratory capacity of endothelial cells and myofibroblast differentiation. So Carolyn, with this summary, can you help speculate on the clinical implications of this paper? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, Greg. You set it up so nicely. So I would speculate that the clinical implications are that an increase in the mitochondrial telomerase reverse transcriptase or trt would be able to help with cardioprotection in ischaemic reperfusion injury, or at least that's what we hope and that's where we should be going with this. Am I right? Dr. Greg Hundley: Absolutely, Carolyn. So in the future, this research showing that trt and cardioprotection... Maybe we increase this and it could serve as a therapeutic strategy. Excellent job, Carolyn. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Thank you, Greg. All right. My next paper is a preclinical paper. I will spare you of difficult quizzes and maybe... This is just so neat. Let me tell you about it. So the study really provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation that contributes to the development of vascular diseases like renal atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. So very important. Dr. Jiliang Zhou from Medical College of Georgia and colleagues basically used an in silico approach to probe unbiased, proprietary, and diverse, publicly available bulk RNA-Seq and scRNA-Seq datasets to search for smooth muscle cell specific long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs. Dr. Carolyn Lam: The search ended up identifying CARMN, which stands for cardiac mesoderm enhancer-associated non-coding RNA, CARMN. As a highly abundant, highly conserved smooth muscle cell specific lncRNA, CARMN was recently reported to play roles in cardiac differentiation and was initially annotated as a host lncRNA for the microRNA, the MIR143145 cluster, which is the best characterized microRNAs in regulating smooth muscle cell differentiation and phenotypical modulation. Dr. Carolyn Lam: But in the current study, the authors confirmed the expression specificity of CARMN using a novel GFP knock-in reporter mouse model, and discovered that CARMN is downregulated in various vascular diseases. They further found that CARMN is critical for maintaining vascular smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype, both in vitro and in vivo by directly binding to the smooth muscle cell specific transcriptional cofactor known as myocardit. Dr. Greg Hundley: Okay. Carolyn, what a beautiful summary here. So what's the take home message here? Dr. Carolyn Lam: So these findings collectively suggest that CARMN is a key regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype, and therefore represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of smooth muscle cell related proliferative diseases. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, Greg, thanks for letting me to tell you about that one. But let me tell you also about other papers in today's issue. There's an exchange of letters between Dr's Lee and Chew on high rates of coronary events in the rapid troponin T0 one hour protocol. Is it a reality or illusion? There's an ECG Challenge by Dr. Liu on “Acute Inferior Wall Myocardial Infarction. What is the Culprit Artery? In Cardiology News, Bridget Kuehn writes on persistent heart effects of COVID-19 and how that emphasizes the need for prevention. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. Well, I've got a Research Letter to tell you about from Professor Huang, entitled “High Prevalence of Unrecognized Congenital Heart Disease in School-Age Children in Rural China: A Population-Based Echocardiographic Screening Study.” Well, Carolyn, what a fantastic issue. And how about we get onto that feature discussion now and learn more out lower extremity revascularization and insights from the VOYAGER-PAD study? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Good morning, everyone. Welcome to this episode of Circulation on the Run podcast. I'm Mercedes Carnethon, Professor and Vice Chair of Preventive Medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and associate editor of the journal. Really excited today to hear from one of our authors of a particularly interesting piece that we'd like to discuss today about peripheral artery disease after lower extremity revascularization. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: And we have with us today, the lead author, Dr. Connie Hess from the division of cardiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. And we have Dr. Gregory Lip with us. So welcome to the both of you. Professor Gregory Lip: Hello there. Dr. Connie Hess: Thank you for having me. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you both for joining us. This is really exciting. I know that when I read this piece, I was really excited to think about the implications that these study findings from this clinical trial will have for a very important clinical problem of peripheral arterial disease and those complications. So, Connie, would you be willing to start by telling us a little bit about what you found in this study? Dr. Connie Hess: Yeah, absolutely. I think maybe a good place to start first is, if that's okay, is just a little bit of the background and why we looked at this and thought to look at this. I think as you're both probably aware, peripheral artery disease is a very highly prevalent condition. It affects a lot of people, but there's not a lot of awareness about it. It's in some ways the forgotten manifestation of atherosclerosis. And so acute limb ischemia in particular is a very feared complication of peripheral artery disease. And unlike things like ST elevation, myocardial infarction, and stroke about which patients and providers have a lot of knowledge and understanding, many people don't know about acute limb ischemia. And in particular ALI, acute limb ischemia, is a complication of peripheral revascularization that many of us as proceduralists are very concerned about. Dr. Connie Hess: And so what we wanted to do was use this very unique clinical trial and dataset to look at acute limb ischemia, to describe it, to better understand it, especially after a peripheral revascularization. And then also to look at the effect of Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on this feared outcome. We're lacking therapies to effectively prevent ALI. Dr. Connie Hess: And so if I just briefly review the trial, VOYAGER-PAD randomized 6,564 patients undergoing peripheral revascularization, both surgical or endovascular to Rivaroxaban, 2.5 milligrams twice daily versus placebo on top of aspirin. And then providers could use prochidagril for up to six months per their discretion. Now, the primary outcome for VOYAGER-PAD was very unique. This was a five point composite that looked at acute limb ischemia, major amputation of vascular etiology, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death. Dr. Connie Hess: And so in this trial in the primary results, Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone was highly effective in reducing the primary endpoint, that five point composite I just described. And so we were excited to look specifically at the effect of this combination therapy on acute limb ischemia alone. What we found to begin with, I think in terms of describing acute limb ischemia is important. So the three year cumulative incidence in the patients assigned a placebo was about 8% for ALI. So this is not an uncommon problem. And in fact, we found that there was incidents of ALI occurring quite early after the procedure and that the risk persisted, even three years out. Dr. Connie Hess: And Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone was very effective in reducing ALI by about 33%. Beyond that, we also looked at ALI in terms of severity of these complications. And we found that about a third of patients had a very severe ALI event that we defined as ALI followed by death, major amputation, or requiring a prolonged hospitalization with time in the intensive care unit. And for those patients, Rivaroxaban plus aspirin was even more effective with almost a 55% reduction. Dr. Connie Hess: Lastly, I think we also looked at just the patients who are at risk for ALI after peripheral revascularization. And we did identify some patient and procedural factors that might help us identify these patients. For example, having a prior lower extremity revascularization, having more severe PAD as indicated by a low ankle brachial index, undergoing surgical revascularization, and having longer target lesions. So I think we were able to describe ALI in a way that some other trials and datasets have not been able to do. And then also beyond that to provide some evidence for effective therapy to prevent this complication. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: All of that is so exciting. And for somebody coming to this outside of the initial field, I can certainly see a lot of innovations that you describe in what you've done and the importance to the population of people who experience this very debilitating illness. So it's really wonderful to see this in print. So tell me, Greg, what excited you as the editor about this particular paper? So what made it really stand out in your mind? Professor Gregory Lip: Thanks, Mercedes. And firstly, congratulations to Dr. Hess for a really nice paper. And I think that it's really important because many cardiologists tend to neglect looking at and managing peripheral artery disease, especially with the medical therapies. And I think VOYAGER-PAD was an important advancement of how we can have... You could say, dual blockade, both with low dose anticoagulation plus antiplatelets should improve the outcomes. Professor Gregory Lip: So I think it really brings to the forefront how we should optimize medical therapy and peripheral disease. It's not simply a matter of surgery or just intervention with stenting. And I think maybe the other important aspects in regard to this study, this trial is when you combine an antiplatelet with an anticoagulant, it's worth flagging up the potential for added risk of bleeding. And it's therefore the fact that your analysis included to identify the patients at high risk of acute limb ischemia, then we will actually facilitate risk stratification so that we can perhaps target the very high risk patients where that balance in terms of the net benefit for the combination therapy compared to aspirin alone would be there because you're balancing the thrombotic and limb ischemic outcome versus the potential for bleeding. Professor Gregory Lip: We are also using of course, in VOYAGER-PAD low dose Rivaroxaban, which is not the stroke prevention dose of Rivaroxaban in everyday clinical practice. And that's worth emphasizing. So we translate peripheral disease dosages or regimes versus what we see in other prothrombotic situations like atrial fibrillation, which leads to stroke. And that's probably worth emphasizing. And I think really what is most important is that we can hopefully identify the high risk subset of patients with peripheral artery disease at risk of acute limb ischemia, where they're going to particularly benefit from combination therapy. So an important advance for medical therapy for peripheral disease. So congratulations on this paper as well. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Yeah. I really echo that. One of the things that when we write original research papers, we are always encouraged not to speculate beyond the data that we're presenting. But one of the values of this podcast is that we get a chance to really needle the authors and challenge them to speculate about what does this mean? What does this mean for the field? And Connie in particular, what do you think the next steps are for patients and providers based on what you found today in this excellent study? Dr. Connie Hess: Mercedes, that's a great question. Certainly we always want to know what next? What are the implications of these findings? And so to me, I echo both of you. I'm personally very excited as someone in the field. And as a proceduralist, I'm very excited that for the first time, we actually have data to support a medical therapy post intervention. Although there's a lot of use of things like dual antiplatelet therapy and even anticoagulation, there's not a lot of data to support it after peripheral revascularization. So this really is the first large scale, high quality data to support a strategy. And so I do think that this is something that we should adopt. Dr. Connie Hess: I think what I didn't mention before is that actually, when you look at the cumulative incidence curves for ALI in the Rivaroxaban versus placebo groups, not only do you see that there is early risk for ALI after the procedure... And typically we think of this as potentially technical failure that we can't modify, but you saw a very early benefit for Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone here, suggesting that the sooner you start, the better. Of course, it has to be when it's safe from a bleeding perspective and when the proceduralist feels comfortable with this. But I do think that the implications are that we should... We proceduralists, especially in this population and as professor Lip mentioned the high risk patients in particular, should be starting this therapy as soon as we feel safe. And so I think the data are there. The next step to me is really increasing awareness, in particular among providers who are treating these patients, but even among our other colleagues or cardiovascular colleagues who may not treat these peripheral artery disease patients primarily, but do see them in their clinic. Dr. Connie Hess: A lot of them have cardiovascular disease and other cardiovascular problems, but to increase awareness that this dual pathway inhibition with low dose factor 10, anticoagulation inhibition and low antiplatelet therapy is a viable and favorable combination and to continue this so that when they see this, they're not surprised and not questioning whether to stop it. Dr. Connie Hess: I think also of course now that we are getting more data to understand how morbid and bad ALI is, I do think we also need to educate patients. You both probably recall all the tremendous efforts that were made to increase awareness in the patient population about myocardial infarction and stroke. You have all those campaigns and understanding the importance of timely intervention and reperfusion. I think that actually should be done for acute limb ischemia as well. We need to have providers aware about this complication and understanding emergent treatment. We also need patients to understand it so they can come in sooner so that they're not having delayed presentation for which primary amputation is the only treatment option. So I think there's a lot of work to be done, but certainly very excited that we have a better understanding of ALI as well as preventive therapy. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: I really appreciate that final word. And I really can't think of a better way to wrap up than the final words that you provided, Connie. Both the context that you provided around this piece and your thoughts as well, Greg, about what makes it innovative and exciting for our readership at Circulation are really invaluable. So I just really want to thank you for joining us as an author and thank you for selecting this, Greg. This is a really great piece. I've learned a good deal. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: This is me, Mercedes Carnethon, wrapping up this addition of Circulation on the Run, following an outstanding discussion with Dr. Connie Hess from the University of Colorado and Greg Lip, the handling editor for the piece. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

Prognosis
Part Eight: The Future of mRNA

Prognosis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:29


Covid-19 is just the beginning for messenger RNA vaccines. Researchers are testing shots across a range of diseases, from cancer to malaria, HIV or even multiple sclerosis. There's no guarantee the technology will work beyond infectious diseases, but if it does, it could transform medicine. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

This Week in Virology
TWiV 837: COVID-19 clinical update #91 with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 39:24


In COVID-19 clinical update #91, Dr. Griffin discusses final results of molnupiravir trial, Omicron variant of concern, outcomes in B-cell depleted patients, recovery in T-cell depleted macaques, peptide for induction of T cell immunity, high respiratory viral RNA loads in infants, IgA and T cells transferred to breast milk after vaccination, sensitivity and specificity of ID NOW, post-acute sequelae at 12 months, disease in low and middle income countries. Hosts: Daniel Griffin and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Update on Molnupiravir results (Merck) Omicron (Wikipedia) P681H and IFN resistance (bioRxiv) Synthetic DMARDS and disease severity (Ann Rheum Dis) Recovery in T cell depleted macaques (mBio) T-cell inducing peptide (Nature) Respiratory viral RNA load in infants (J Inf Dis) IgA and T cells in breast milk (Cell Rep) ID NOW specificity and sensitivity (J Clinical Viral) Risk prediction algorithm (Thorax) PASC in adults at 12 months (Front Med) Letters read on TWiV 837 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

Prognosis
Part Seven: The Vaccine Race

Prognosis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:05


Two biotech companies, Germany's BioNTech and the U.S.'s Moderna, decided in January 2020 to wager their futures on developing a messenger RNA shot to fight Covid-19. What ensued was a head-spinning race to bring a vaccine to market quicker than ever before. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 30, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 22:09


Please join first author Cecilia Bahit and Associate Editor Graeme Hankey as they discuss the article "Predictors of Development of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Embolic Stroke Of Undetermined Source: An Analysis of the RE-SPECT ESUS Trial." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center, and Duke; National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor and Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn, this week's feature, we're going to analyze the RE-SPECT ESUS trial. What does that pertain to? Well, you're going to have to wait and find out, but it relates to atrial fibrillation and embolic stroke. But before we get to that, how about we grab a cup of coffee and go through some of the other articles in the issue? Would you like to go first? Dr. Carolyn Lam: I sure would. Greg, we know that Chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse outcomes among patients with established cardiovascular disease or diabetes. The question is: What are the effects of Icosapent Ethyl across the range of kidney function in patients with established cardiovascular disease or diabetes from the REDUCE-IT trial? Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, Carolyn, can you remind us what was the REDUCE-IT trial? What did it encompass there? Dr. Carolyn Lam: The REDUCE-IT trial was a multicenter double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that randomized statin treated patients with elevated triglycerides, who had cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and one additional risk factor, two treatment with icosapent ethyl at 4g daily versus placebo. After a median follow up period of 4.9 years, the study drug demonstrated a 25% relative risk reduction in the primary composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or unstable angina. Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, great summary of the original paper, but now this is sort of a follow-up paper. What did this paper research? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well first, remember they focused on renal function and the median baseline GFR was 75 ml/min with a range of 17 to 123 mL/min/1.73 m2. Treatment with Icosapent Ethyl led to consistent reduction in both primary and secondary composite endpoints across the baseline GFR categories. Patients with the GFR >60 treated with Icosapent Ethyl had the largest absolute, but similar relative risk reduction for the primary composite endpoint. And while patients with GFR >60 treated with Icosapent Ethyl had the highest numerical rates of atrial fibrillation of flutter and serious bleeding. The hazard ratios for atrial fibrillation flutter and serious bleeding were similar across GFR categories. In summary Icosapent Ethyl reduced cardiovascular events among patients with elevated triglycerides in a well-controlled LDL on statin therapy across a wide range of baseline renal function. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, Carolyn. Beautiful presentation. That presentation was so good that I know you are ready for a quiz. We haven't had Carolyn's quiz in a week, so we've got to get right back to that. Dr. Carolyn Lam: No, we don't (laughs). Dr. Greg Hundley: Can you describe the primary sequelae of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh wow. Okay. So this is the syndrome where there's premature aging, there's a lot of vascular stiffening, calcification. I'm going to guess some sort of atherosclerotic consequence (laughs). Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nicely done Carolyn. Oh my goodness. I need to get you to take my ABIM recertification- Dr. Carolyn Lam: (laughing) Dr. Greg Hundley: Beautifully done. So Carolyn, this paper comes to us from Dr. Vicente Andrés from Centro Nacional De Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare disorder characterized, just like you said, Carolyn by premature aging and death, mainly due to myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure. The disease is provoked by progerin, a variant of lamin A expressed in most differentiated cells. Carolyn, these patients look healthy at birth and symptoms typically emerge in the first or second year of life. In assessing the reversibility of progerin induced damage, and the relative contribution of specific cell types is critical to determining the potential benefits of late treatment and to developing new therapies. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, you've really, really piqued my interest. So what did these investigators do and what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh Carolyn, very clever design. So the authors use CRISPR-Cas9 technology to generate mice engineers to ubiquitously express progerin while lacking lain A and allowing progestin suppression in lain A restoration in a time and cell type specific manner upon CRE recombinase activation. They characterize the phenotype of these engineered mice and cross them with CRE transgenic lines to assess the effects of suppressing progestin and restoring lain A ubiquitously at different disease stages, as well as specifically in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. So Carolyn, what did they find? Well, number one, like Hutchinson-Milford progenia syndrome patients, their engineered mice appeared healthy at birth, and progressively developed Hutchinson-Milford progenia syndrome symptoms, including failure to thrive, Lipodystrophy, vascular smooth muscle cell loss, vascular fibrosis, electric cardiographic anomalies and early death. Their median lifespan was 15 months versus 26 months in the wild types. Dr. Greg Hundley: Second, ubiquitous progestin suppression in lain A restoration significantly extended lifespan, when induced in six month old, mildly symptomatic mice, and even in severely ill animals aged 13 months, although the benefit was much more pronounced upon the early intervention. And then finally, Carolyn remarkably major vascular alterations were prevented and lifespan normalized in engineered Hutchinson-Milford progenia syndrome mice when progestin suppression and lain A restoration were restricted to: just Vascular smooth muscle cells and Cardiomyocytes. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, just fascinating, but, okay. What is the clinical take home message? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So these authors findings suggest that it is never too late to treat Hutchinson-Milford progenia syndrome, although the benefit is much more pronounced when progestin is targeted early in mice with mild symptoms. Also, restricting its suppression to Vascular smooth muscle cells in Cardiomyocytes is sufficient to prevent Vascular disease and normalize lifespan in mice, and therefore these data suggest that strategies to treat Hutchinson-Milford progenia syndrome through gene therapy or RNA therapy should consider targeting Vascular smooth muscle cells and Cardiomyocytes. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh wow. Very, very cool. Well, my next paper is a basic science paper that's significant for both its methods and its results. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh wow, Carolyn, I can't wait. So tell us about this novel methodology. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, this paper is from Dr. Chang from Westlake University in Hangzhou, China, and colleagues who use a gene editing approach to efficiently institute Exon Skipping without introducing DNA double-strand breaks. So harnessing a fusion of a nuclease defective Case protein, and a cytidine deaminase, which is, we're going to abbreviate it as Targeted AID-induced mutagenesis (TAM) or base editor three (BE3), their approach precisely edited conserved guanines at splice sites, thus abrogating Exon recognition resulting in a programmable skipping of the targeted Exons. Isn't that neat? Dr. Greg Hundley: Yeah, it really is sophisticated Carolyn, wow. So what did they do using these methods? Dr. Carolyn Lam: A novel mirroring model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy was generated, which recapitulated many cardiac defects observed in the human form of the disease, including dilated cardiomyopathy, reduced left ventricular function and extensive cardiac fibrosis. Using this model, they examined the feasibility of using a cytidine base editor to install Exon Skipping and rescue the dystrophic cardiomyopathy in vivo. A single dose administration of an Adenovirus 9EtAm, instituted over 50% targeted Exon Skipping in the Chengdu muscular dystrophy transcripts and restored up to 90% dystrophin in the heart. And as a result, early ventricular remodeling was prevented and cardiac and skeletal muscle function were improved, leading to an increased lifespan of the mice. Despite gradual decline of the Adenovirus vector and base editor expression, the dystrophin restoration and pathophysiological rescue of muscular dystrophy lasted for at least a year. And so this technique really has the potential to be applied to monogenic human diseases, to modulate Exon Skipping or inclusion. Isn't that cool? Dr. Greg Hundley: Absolutely, Carolyn. Beautifully explained. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, let me end by sharing what else is in today's issue. There's a Perspective piece by Dr. Alexander on “Chest Pain Redux: Updated and Patient Centered.” There is an In Depth paper by Dr. Kroemer on NAD plus metabolism in cardiac health, aging and disease. And there's a Research Letter by Dr. Shepherd on sudden death in female athletes, with insights from a large regional registry in the United Kingdom. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good, Carolyn. What a great issue. Now, how about we get to that feature discussion? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to our feature discussion today on this November 30th. And we have with us Dr. Cecilia Bahit from Rosario, Argentina and our own associate editor, Dr. Graeme Hankey from Perth, Australia to talk to us about a paper pertaining to Atrial Fibrillation. Welcome to you both, and Cecilia, we'll start with you. Could you describe for us a little bit of the background information that went into formulating your study, and then what hypothesis did you want to address? Dr. Cecilia Bahit: Thank you for the invitation. So we all know that embolic stroke of undetermined source, which is called ESUS isn't just a subset of cryptogenic stroke, and is associated with stroke recurrence about 3-6% per year. And on the other hand, we know that continuous cardiac monitoring in this patient population shows that atrial fibrillation can be detected between 10% at six months or 30% at three years. So the underlying atrial fibrillation may be a mechanism for the recurrent thromboembolic stroke in this patient population. So we know that prior studies have identified some predictors of atrial fibrillation in these patients. And if we are able to identify which patients could benefit from cardiac monitoring and have a higher yield to detect atrial fibrillation, we could do a better job at treating them. So, that was our idea behind the paper. So using the RE-SPECT ESUS trial, which was a trial that included patient with ESUS stroke and were randomized to the bigger trend versus Aspirin, we look at predictors of atrial fibrillation unassociated regarding stroke. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And so, now was this a sub-study here and maybe define for us a little bit, your study design and specific study population. Dr. Cecilia Bahit: So this was a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial that as mentioned it was not a sub-study, it was a secondary analysis. We thought all along to do it because of the interest of the clinical question. We look at the total patient population was 5,390 patients. And we looked at those patients who developed atrial fibrillation during the 19 months of follow-up. And it was 7.5%, 403 patients developed atrial fibrillation. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. And what were your results? Dr. Cecilia Bahit: So, as I mentioned, we saw that 7.5% of our patient population developed atrial fibrillation during the follow-up. And we know those patients were older, were like, have higher morbidities, and we assessed, we did an one variable analysis and then a multi-variable analysis, trying to identify predictors for atrial fibrillation. And for our model, we identified different predictors, older age, hypertension, lack of diabetes, and higher body mass index, were independent predictors of atrial fibrillation. So the patients who have atrial fibrillation have a higher recurrence of stroke, it was 7.2 versus four, compared to those that did not have atrial fibrillation. Dr. Cecilia Bahit: So I think there's an important part, that 20% of the patient population of the overall trial, this is a little more than a thousand patients, had NT-prob measure at baseline. And when we included this biomarker into the model, only older age and NT-prob were independent predictors of atrial fibrillation. In addition, even though this was not the objective of this analysis, we look at the treatment effect of the bigger trend. And even though we saw that there was a statistical benefit of the bigger trend versus Aspirin in the higher group of these in our score, the overall treatment effect was not there. So we couldn't assess the fact that the bigger trend was better compared to Aspirin in patient with atrial fibrillation, but of course the numbers were very small. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Thank you so much for that wonderful description. And Graeae, now we'll turn to you as associate editor for us at Circulation, and also the editorialist on this particular paper. What caught your attention about this particular study and the results from the many papers that really come across your desk. Dr. Graeme Hankey: Thank you, Greg. And congratulations to Cecilia and her RE-SPECT ESUS colleagues. I mean, this is a landmark study, the RE-SPECT ESUS study, and just to go back, embolic stroke of undetermined source is really common. About one in four ischemic strokes, we don't know the cause of, and it's one of the major subtypes of cryptogenic stroke is an embolic ischemic stroke in which the source could have come from the heart or the aortic arch or the carotids. And we're not really sure. And we think that some of these patients have occult atrial fibrillation, but we can't pick it up at the time. So one way is to try and monitor them with prolonged ECG monitoring. And another way is to actually treat them with anticoagulation because we know that, that's more effective in people with cardio embolic stroke. And so RE-SPECT ESUS and NAVIGATE ESUS used the latter strategy and said, let's see if treating people with ESUS with anticoagulation is more effective than antiplatelet therapy. Dr. Graeme Hankey: And both studies were not significant in terms of showing that Dabigatran or Parovarian for NAVIGATE ESUS was more effective than antiplatelet therapy. So we're left now with this default that all patients with ESUS just get Aspirin, but we have a hunch that some of them actually have cardiogenic embolism and are being undertreated with Aspirin and need anticoagulation. So it's a heterogeneous entity, but we're treating it homogeneously with a sort of weak antiplatelet. So we want to try and find out who's going to get AF or who's already got it that is occult. And this study is a really great and prospective study with 5,000 patients as Cecilia said, who of whom 7% did develop AF just through annual ECG reporting and just with symptom reporting. And that's probably an under report. You know, if they'd had monitoring, they probably would've found about 20 or 30% would've developed AF during that time of 19 months follow up. Dr. Graeme Hankey: And it's the first study to really then show that not just the AF people had a higher stroke rate, but in that group who they predicted to be at high risk of AF with older age and the NT-prob, that the high risk group had a significant reduction with Dabigatran versus Aspirin in that high risk group. It's just, when you look for hetero homogeneity or heterogeneity across the risk groups, it wasn't quite significant. And that might be because it's not significant or it might be that study was underpowered to look at those three, across those three risk subgroups. And also it might be a bit confounded because of it, the patients weren't randomized according to their risk status for AF, they were just randomized, whether they had ESUS, so it's further excited us that there might be a subgroup who needs anticoagulation. And that's why the ARCADIA trial is ongoing now, looking at where the people with ESUS who have high risk of AF benefit from a apixaban versus aspirin. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And so, with these results that we have here, maybe come back to Cecilia, what do you think would be the next series of studies that needs to be performed in this area of research? Dr. Cecilia Bahit: Well, there's one side that's ongoing as Dr. Hankie mentioned, but I think we should be able to identify which patients have a higher risk of atrial fibrillation and those patients who use cardiac monitoring for long term to identify atrial fibrillation and to treat properly. So I think that would be key in this area. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Graeae, what are your thoughts? Dr. Graeme Hankey: Yes. Well, one way is to have our ESUS patients have prolonged ECG monitoring by implantable loop recorders, for example, and then those who develop AF randomizing them to anticoagulation versus antiplatelet therapy. Although if they declare themselves with AF they're usually just go straight onto anticoagulation therapy. So the burning question is, in these people with ESUS who haven't declared themselves as AF, but have predictors of AF like those shown in RESPECT ESUS, like older age, high blood pressure, high BMI ,prob, and perhaps echo features, like left atrial size or ECG features like lots of premature atrial contractions or P wave of abnormalities. Dr. Graeme Hankey: Are these, the subgroups or even LV dysfunction, are these subgroups who need to be more specifically targeted in a randomized trial rather than the whole group of ESUS. And also with longer follow up. NAVIGATE ESUS stopped after 11 months. The bigger RESPECT ESUS stopped after a median follow up of 16 months and the curves were diverging. Maybe with five years follow up, a lot of these people would've developed AF and would've benefited from longer term anticoagulation, but the trials were stopped early, because there wasn't a signal of benefit and there was an early risk of bleeding with anticoagulation. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well listeners, this has been a really interesting study and we want to thank Cecilia and Graeme for sharing results of the RESPECT ESUS study, highlighting that, in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source, atrial fibrillation occurs and is a possible source of this stroke, and then also older age, and elevation of NT-prob can be associated with development of atrial fibrillation, subsequent to that stroke event. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well listeners, we want to wish you a great week. And on behalf of Carolyn and myself, look forward to catching you next week on The Run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more visit ahajournals.org.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 85:08


Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long! We're going to talk a little bit about shopping right now. Then we'll get into our chip crunch, and why Intel is being left on the side of the computer road. [Following is an automated transcript.] [00:00:16] There's lots of fun stuff to do. And it's kind of fun getting out of the house. Isn't it getting out, going out, going around? There's a, an outlet store close by where I live and it's kind of one of these outdoor. Outlet things. And it was fun. Just walking around, enjoying the little bit of fresh air, no matter what the weather has. [00:00:40] Uh, I even enjoy going up there when there's some snow on the ground. Because again, it's a little bit of a, uh, it's, it's fun. It's a little bit of a change, which is not. Part of what I love about living in the Northeast. You really get all four seasons and they can be really, really nice. Well, black Friday of course came and went. [00:01:01] It was not a bad black Friday, but one of the questions I been asked all week long, all month long, frankly, has to do. When should I buy, what should I buy? What are the deals? And it is weird this year. Let me tell you really weird. And the reason I say that is I didn't my show prep. And I spent some hours just looking on different websites and looking at opinion pieces, looking at news sources, just trying to find, okay, what's going on? [00:01:36] What's the real word out there. Our items, as rare as everybody seems to be saying they are, or is it easy enough to find. Well, that's what we're going to talk about right now. Really. We've had a very turbulent two years for retail, every branch of retail, whatever it is, it's been been terrible. So many people have lost their businesses. [00:02:03] So many small businesses, small retail restaurants, some restaurants that I, I enjoy and just haven't been to in years, really. Completely gone, which is such a crying shame. And a lot of people have put a lot of the blame for the general retail malaise on Amazon and Walmart. Because again, you know, I had a discussion just this last weekend with. [00:02:35] Oh, friend's father. And he was saying, well, you know, I've been a biologist in pharmacology for years. And, uh, you know, th this is just as just a science. It's all science talking about the lockdown. And so I pointed out how, well, let me see, let me see. I got family from Canada. They cannot drive across the border because of the lockdown, but in, in the states, they won't let us, us, we won't let them fly. [00:03:03] But they drive in, I should say, but they will let them fly in. How does that science, right. There's coronavirus not survive at 30,000 feet. Is that what it is? You know? No, come on. People it's politics and part of the politics was. Walmart got to stay open and all of these other small businesses couldn't so what are they supposed to do? [00:03:29] How are they supposed to compete? And yet, Hey, I understand you need clothes, right? And you need food. Most Walmarts have both. You might need medicine in order to even survive. So that kind of makes sense, but why. Walmart. Why did the government choose Walmart and target are going to survive all of you, little mom and pops stores, you know, that maybe have been multi-generational where it's your parents. [00:04:00] And maybe even your grandparents that started the store, started the restaurant. And now all of a sudden there's a lockout and you cannot be over. It just, it entirely political, entirely political. And I understand the science behind all of this. I have spent a lot of time studying it and you might remember if you've listened to me even. [00:04:26] Dean or 20 years ago, I'm trying to remember when it was, I started talking with scientists about RNI, RNA interference and the coolest stuff that was happening with African violets and getting the, the purple flowers to change to white and all of the stuff they were doing. It it's exciting. It's fun. But why. [00:04:49] Did we use politics here. And so many people lost their livelihood. So many people lost their businesses. It's, it's absolutely incredible. And just pain companies basically to stay closed. Uh, doesn't make sense either. Because now you're pumping more money into the economy and that's causing inflation because there are not more products or not more vendors. [00:05:15] There's not enough competition. So the prices go up. And when there's inflation, how about people who are retired, who have saved something. And now their money is worth what the inflation rates are. Again, it's a hidden tax, but it's really hard on retirees because their money that they've saved, you know, they're getting the pitons, you put it in a savings account and you're making a fraction of 1%. [00:05:43] And yet we're seeing inflation rates on things like fuel being almost a hundred percent. Think about what it was like in 2019, what the gas prices were. It is insane. So small businesses have to be supported. They are the backbone. They are the innovators. Walmart didn't start as a big company. They started very small. [00:06:10] He innovated his claim to fame. That old Sam Walton was let's go ahead and have the best prices and anywhere. Right. And so they got the best prices by beating up their suppliers, et cetera, but it all worked. And Walmart increased, raised its it's demonstrable again through real science, but they raise the standard of living in every community. [00:06:39] They opened a store. It's absolutely funneling. But Walmart stopped innovating a long time ago. Now again, the innovations come just like they do in the tech world. Typically not from the existing companies, right. Facebook isn't innovating, they bought WhatsApp, they bought so much of the technology they're using to drive their company. [00:07:02] Oculus. You look at it, right? That's their future. According to of course, uh, you know, Mr. Mark. What did it come from? What was the cost? Right. They by their competition. So I want to encourage everybody to really try and go out of your way, try and shop at these small places. There are. And so many of these malls nowadays kind of local stores where they've got together and they're running their co-op or where someone's managing a bind product from local craftsman, really that they, everything from these women that are knitting doilies all the way on out, through very cool black iron work things, things that you can find there. [00:07:54] That maybe you can find on Amazon, maybe they come from China. Maybe they're locally sourced. Not very likely, but it's been a very, very tough, tough time here for so many of these industries. One of the things that I did talk about this week, I, one of my radio appearances is. Tik TOK live shopping. If you haven't heard of tick tock, tick tock is this short form video site. [00:08:21] And it kind of started by people saying, okay, well with this song, uh, use that song to make a funny little 32nd. And 22nd and that's what people did. And it was really quite cool to see they there's some innovative people out there. Tick talk has a lot of, I share nowadays way more popular amongst the younger people than Facebook is Facebook has kind of become something for the older people. [00:08:49] But what tech talk is now doing is providing live shop. And this is an innovation that really started in China, which of course is where tick-tock is located. But in 2020, there was a survey done that found that two thirds of Chinese consumers said that they bought products via live stream in the past year. [00:09:13] So what's live stream. I want you to think about QVC online share or a television shop. Those channels, those infomercials that come on at night, but particularly the channels that are constantly selling stuff like micro did a little bit of that at one point in time, right? His interview was, he came in and the, he, the guy who was interviewing him, held up a pen. [00:09:37] Is that okay, you sell me this pencil. And so micro went on and on for 10 minutes or more just talking about the pencil and everything related to the pencil and what a great quality was. All he course, she didn't know anything about it. Right? And that's part of what bothers me about some of these things, right? [00:09:55] These people are just making stuff up, but talk live now is allowing you to go ahead and make funny little things. Gain an audience. Maybe they're not funny. Maybe they're just informative. Have them inserted into people's streams and then sell it right there. In fact, instant purchasing of a featured product during a live stream. [00:10:22] And then obviously audience participation, they got chat functions, reaction buttons. This is what's coming our way. And so all of you, small businesses out there, I really want to encourage you pay attention to social media. This is the sort of thing that you can do. You can target your local area, which is where most small businesses operate, right? [00:10:48] It's in, in your town. It's maybe a 10, 20 mile radius, depending on what, what you're doing, what you're selling. And you can micro target nowadays. That's the joy. That's the beauty of the online world. Micro-targeting Hey, and if you're interested, let me know. We can talk a lot more about this because I have studied this for years now. [00:11:12] Hey, stick around Craig peterson.com online. [00:11:20] So while you're shopping online, what are some of the things you should do or look out for? I've got a few ideas. I'm going to tell you what I do, and it has worked wonders for me. So here we go. [00:11:35] When you're shopping online, there are some obvious tips, just run through them very, very quickly because I don't, I think you guys being the best and the brightest really know these things. [00:11:50] So just very quickly, make sure your security. Today, make sure that everything is patched up the way that it should be, that you have some really great anti-malware hopefully advanced anti-malware, but apply any updates before you start doing shopping, because this is a bad time of year to lose all of your personal information and to have your money stolen. [00:12:18] Uh, number two. If you're seeing an email or you're seeing a deal that really looks too good to be true. Take, take caution here. Right? Do you see a place? Oh, I got five brand new Sony PlayStation fives for sale. You might not want. To buy those, right? The minister, Jeff Foxworthy. Here's your sign. So be careful about that. [00:12:46] Criminals are really taking advantage of consumers who, uh, you know, life's been tough, money's been tight. You're trying to find a deal. So be careful about that. Okay. Coupons or other way, the bad guys have been trying to get consumers. To compromise their own cyber security. Okay. Uh, 12% of emails out there are considered to be spam emails. [00:13:15] I think it's more like 80% or 90%, but then I've had the same email address for 30 years. Okay. Uh, so don't click on link. Be sure you shop on the real website and apply coupons there by manually typing out the code. So for instance, if, if let's say you use duck, duck, go for your search engine, which you should be using for most cases, most searches a duck duck go says, okay, let me see where coupons here you go. [00:13:46] Here's a site that has a lot of coupons be careful about those sites, because some of them are trying to lure you in. Are the websites you're going to the real ones, the legit one. Are you clicking a link in your email in order to get to that sale site? Double check, because what they're doing is using some of these URLs that aren't. [00:14:14] Right. And we see those all of the time. They'll have a misspelling of the business name or they'll, they'll do something else. So they might have Amazon Dodd bad guys.com. Oh, okay. Amazon. Okay. Is Amazon, uh, obviously they wouldn't say bad guys, but yeah. That's kind of what they're doing. So be careful. So once you're on a website, look for that little padlock that's to the side, click on it and double. [00:14:43] To make sure that it is legit because they might have us. What's called a secure, sir. And they might have a certificate that's valid for the site that you just went to, but it's not, there's a different kit for Amazon or Walmart or target or w you know, whatever Joe's clothing.com. It might be something entirely different. [00:15:07] So be careful, okay. Is what you're looking at on the ad. Because there are a lot of fake advertisements out there that looked like they got great deals. And even though black Friday has come and gone, they're going to continue to do this through the end of the year and be on. Okay. So rather than clicking on the ad, just type in the retailer. [00:15:35] Information, because some of these ads that are showing up are in fact, almost every last one of them is coming from what's called an ad network. So that ad network is where people go and buy ads and they say, Hey, I want to retarget people that were at this site or clicked on this link, et cetera, et cetera. [00:15:54] And now. If you are a bad guy, all you have to do is sneak into one of those big ad networks. And all of a sudden your bad guy ads are showing up everywhere. So you see a great ad for a Chromebook. For instance, we've talked about those before you can just go ahead. Okay. Chromebook. No problem. Wow. Yeah. [00:16:14] Yeah. Type it in. If the ads for a Chromebook from Walmart, just type in walmart.com. Okay. Avoid clicking on ads. Isn't it terrible how bad it's gotten, man. I liked the internet better back in the 1980s and nineties. Uh, how should you pay? We're going to talk about that in a minute. Public why fi is a potential problem. [00:16:40] The bad guys will often create fake hot spots and you are now using their hot spot. Now this isn't as much of a problem as a used to be because your visits to most websites nowadays are encrypted. Do you remember that lock? I mentioned in the URL. Well, that means it is using SSL or TLS, which is a secure communications pro protocol. [00:17:07] So if you're seeing that, you know that you basically have a VPN, you don't have to buy a VPM service. You don't have to use a VPN service. You have a VPN that's being provided by the website, your. And that's really what that lock means. So the public wifi is less of an issue for the monitoring, what you're doing, although yeah, they can still do some monitoring. [00:17:33] They might play with DNS and things, but they can also scan you, which is the biggest problem from my perspective about using public wifi and never. Share your personal data. If you can avoid it, one of the things we're going to be covering in the upcoming boot camps and workshops is using fake or alternate email addresses. [00:17:57] I do it all of the time. That's why I have 3000, 3000. Yes. You heard it right different log-ins right now in use active use on. Uh, in my password manager, at least over the last decade. So I've accumulated a lot of them. So I use a different email address pretty much all of the time. And I'll, I explain how to do that in the boot camps and workshops that are coming up. [00:18:25] So keep an eye on. On my weekly emails again, Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So you can find out about them, you know, these, the free ones. I really want to give you guys all of the basics, right? So that's what I'm going to be doing anyways. How should I pay? This is maybe the even bigger side of things. It is very, very rare that I actually put my credit card number in on a website at least. [00:18:54] Real credit card number. There's a number of options that are available to you now that weren't before, even if it's not a credit card, even if it's a debit card and generically, this is known as single use credit cards. So we've got a few things. I use typically capital one's email E N O. If you have a capital one card of any sort, this is a little browser plugin that you can put on. [00:19:25] Now, the downside of this is they will by default, try and look. Every web page you visit. So from their perspective, it's worth it because now they get that data from you. However, in all modern browsers, you can restrict when it runs. But what happens is I go to a website, it wants a credit card and I can pop up that little Eno browser plugin. [00:19:53] And now. Todd, uh, I can generate a virtual credit card number that's tied in behind the scenes to my real credit card number. I can even put an expiration date on that credit card number. So it can't be used after a certain. Some of these virtual credit card options, even allow you to say, Hey, it really is only single use. [00:20:18] It can only ever be used once. And that way the bad guys can't run up your credit card. Bill Citibank, American express, JP Morgan, and the more have these types of options and basically any visa or MasterCard. Look for virtual credit cards. From your bank or whoever's providing your credit card. Hey, stick around. [00:20:42] You're listening to Craig Peterson and I'll be right back. [00:20:46] We're going to talk a little bit now, since it's getting near the end of the year, about what kind of technology do we think is going to be big next year. And I've got to mention this project. My daughter has been working on it. Finally hit the ocean. [00:21:02] My daughter has been busy. You might know she's been in the maritime industry for quite a while now. [00:21:11] And a man, she went to, she graduated 2008. I think it was this, this daughter. And you probably already know I have five daughters, right? Uh, three sons too. So it was kind of a mix, but she has been working on a ship called the Yarra Burkland it's over in Norway. And what the ship is doing here is hauling fertilizer, anything. [00:21:38] Oh, wow. Isn't that exciting? Wow. Craig, I'm so excited for you. Well, it is the world's first autonomous electric ship period. Okay, cargo ship and what it is doing ultimately, is it to eliminating the need for about 40,000 truck round trips a year. See what's happening over there in Norway is there's a factory that's right. [00:22:07] Located right next to a mine. That's making all of this fertilizer and it needs to be hauled down through some fjords. To get to the main shipping Depot where it can be loaded onto the big ocean ship. So these trucks are going up and over the mountains alongside the fjords. And this is a ship that's going to take a trip that's about seven and a half nautical mile. [00:22:34] So give or take eight miles and on the water. And now Norway is doing this in its own waterways. So there's no problem with international rules and regulations about ships here. This is just local and it loads itself. It drives itself and it unloads itself. I think that's really, really cool. And what it does is it plugs itself. [00:23:02] When it is on either port w now we've seen this with some ships, right? You might've been on some of these ferries that are electric. They work pretty well for electric ferries. Cause they're usually short haul. They connect up to shore power and they do a rapid charge and they're ready for. The next leg of their ship while they are busy taking all of their load in right. [00:23:26] Makes sense. And you might've done it, but this is, this is different. And a lot of the incidents that happen in shipping are due to human error. Think about all of the problems we've had with Navy ships, even running into things, human error, and a lot of that's due to fatigue. On the ships. I don't know if you know it. [00:23:47] I have two kids that, well, three actually that have been in the maritime industry, uh, the, the big maritime industry and they take four hour shifts. So four on four off four on four off every day. So fatigue is a very big deal for a lot of the shipping industry. And for the first few years, they're planning on having the ship be. [00:24:15] They're going to be up, of course, on the bridge monitoring everything, because you've got a problem with artificial intelligence machine learning. If a big ship is coming along and there's a kayak in the way, it's actually the kayaks job to get out of the way. But if you run over a kayaker things, aren't going to go very well for you, frankly. [00:24:37] But how does a computer recognize a kayak? Maybe Marine life or even some sort of a swell that's out there. So they think they've got most of this solved. And this is the project that my daughter's been working on for a few years here. She's a Mariner. She has her captain's license unlimited. Tonnage unlimited vessels on unlimited waterways anywhere in the world is just incredible. [00:25:06] All of the stuff she's done. So the wheelhouse could disappear all together, but they've got to make sure that everything is working pretty darn well. Okay. Uh, large vessels. Do anything about the kayak? All they can do is warn, but they definitely can't maneuver. And that's why the deep draft vessels have priority over sailboats or pretty much anything else that's out there. [00:25:32] But, and what that brings up is the fact that we don't have the regulations yet for these autonomous ship. Well, we don't have the regulations yet for the autonomous cars, right? This is normal. The technology tends to proceed the regulations, and we have regulations in place right now for autonomous vehicles in certain areas. [00:25:57] But they're nowhere near mature. It's going to take a while before everything has all frigging. And now that is leading us into our friends at Ford. Ford's done a couple of interesting announcements over the last couple of weeks. So I have to bring the. And an effort really to deal with this ongoing chip shortage. [00:26:21] Ford has made a deal with global founders. Global foundries is a chip maker and they have a non-binding agreement. Now that makes it interesting. If it's non-binding. Why even bother, but the press release says opening the door for global foundries to deliver more chips to Ford in the short term. But what's happening right now because of the chip shortages. [00:26:50] Well, companies are designing their own. Purpose built chips rather than relying on the general purpose chips made by Intel or AMD Qualcomm, Samsung and video media tech, depending on what kind of chips we're talking about. This is fascinating because it is hurting Intel. No question about it. And AMD. So what does Intel done? [00:27:15] Intel is moving its stance to being more of a contracted chip manufacturer. So you can go to Intel and say, here's my chip design. Go ahead and make that for us. And off they'll go and they will manufacture it and they probably even help you with some of the design things. Fascinating. Now, the other thing that's been happening for a while is if you look at apple, for instance, they have been using their own chips in their I phones and eye pads. [00:27:52] Now they also are using their own chips in the laptops and various desktop computers. So apple is the highest profile example I can think of offhand. That have replaced Intel's chips. That's absolutely amazing. Google has also created its own chip for the latest pixel phone. So if you buy the latest flagship pixel, which I would not do, because this is the first time they're really using their own chip, but they've got their own chip now. [00:28:28] Amazon has been deploying its own chips in its internal servers to improve performance as well as to make it better for the Alexa voice assistant. You see how long tail that's a marketing term, but really how special purpose purpose designed purpose built chips are. So it's huge. Intel's changing course. [00:28:55] They've never been a great chip designer. If he asked me and a few know my history, you know, I've been down at the chip level. I was down there for many years in the kernel of operating systems and dealing directly with all. From chips, you know, when you're thinking about drivers and the low end and the operating system, that's what I did for a lot of years. [00:29:18] So I'm, I'm glad to see this happen. It's going to be better for you because the devices can be cheaper because they don't use a general purpose chip. The chip is built and designed. For what it's being used for. So good news there for four, because Ford is going to be kind of doing the same sort of thing. [00:29:39] I bet mark my words. Okay. Well, I didn't get to the predictions for this year, but I will, when we get back this upcoming year, stick around, of course you listening to Craig, Peter Sohn, you can get all kinds of information. And in fact, if you sign up for my email list, which is not a heavy marketing. [00:30:02] Believe me, you'll get a bunch of different special reports. So ones I think are going to help you out the most. Craig peterson.com. [00:30:13] Well, we just talked about the future when it comes to chips and our computers, we're going to continue that discuss discussion right now on artificial intelligence and machine learning. What else is going to be important next? [00:30:29] So, what is the future? [00:30:31] We're getting close to, you know, the end of the year and the beginning of the year. So what am I looking forward to? Well, you just got my basic predictions about what's going to happen with chip manufacturing. These various vendors of various devices are going to continue to move away from Intel AMD, et cetera, these general purpose chips and move more to special purpose chips. [00:31:02] Now there's a number of special purpose type designs that have been out there for a very long time. For instance, a six OCB in industry. No, those I programmed some way back when. I have gotten much more complicated, but for instance, when we're putting in systems for a business, we will typically use Cisco systems that have a basics so that everything is extremely fast. [00:31:29] You don't notice any delay and yet it can do very heavy duty filtering. Packet examination, stream examination, because it's being done in hardware. That's the advantage to it. So we're going to see more and more that since Apple's already moved to their own chips, Google has already moved to their own chips, Amazon, their own chips, et cetera. [00:31:53] And there'll always be a need for general purpose chips. In fact, you can say that the apple chips for instance, are fairly. The purpose they're being used in your iOS devices, your iPhone, your iPad, but they're also being used in desktop applications. But if you look more closely at what Apple's done, it has a couple of different types. [00:32:16] Of CPU's inside the chip. So it has the high-performance CPU's that are only engaged when it needs some serious computing going on. It has the low power, lower performance CPU's that are also built into that same chip that now handle kind of background tasks, things. Dated the don't need a whole lot of CPU or don't need to be really fast. [00:32:42] And then it also has graphics processing units that will handle things like screen updates, moving stuff around on the screens. There is a lot of technology in that chip in reality, it's it would use to take three. Completely different sets of chips to do what the one apple chip can do. So it is an example of a special purpose CPU. [00:33:11] We're going to be seeing more and more of those now as a consumer, you're not really going to notice other than, wow, this thing's fast or wow. This battery lasts forever. You're going to have some great, great functionality. And I think we are seeing, because they're spinning. $2 billion a week right now in the industry, you're going to be seeing more of these fabs come online, chip fabrication plants, and they take a long time to build and put up online, but they're going to be making more specialized chips, which I really. [00:33:46] Well, there's an article that came out based on a survey from the I Tripoli. And this is called the impact of technology in 2022. And beyond of these are some global technology leaders. Of course I Tripoli was all about electrical engineering back in the day today, it's more about general technology. But here's the results. [00:34:12] What is important for next year? Now, remember, I don't give investment advice. So don't look at this as things you should be putting your money into. This is just stuff that is good to know and probably should be considered, but this is not again, investment advice. So. Technologies will be the most important in 2022. [00:34:33] While according to this kind of little, little brain trust, if you will, amongst the respondents more than one in five, say that AI and machine learning are going to be very important. What's the difference between artificial intelligence and machine learning. Uh, the lines are blurred nowadays. They used to be a lot more clear machine learning used to be the, the machine, the computer learns it. [00:35:02] Let's say it's working on a factory floor and it has to do some welding on a joint. And the, it has sensors and it learns, oh, okay. Well, this part, when it comes into me may be here, but I might be there and I might be here. So I got to kind of move around a little bit. That's basic machine. Artificial intelligence, which I think is a super set of machine learning, but other people argue the other way, but you know, they don't know what they're talking about. [00:35:30] There is artificial intelligence is where it doesn't even have to be taught how to learn. It. Just figures things out. So it's. When it's built, talk to learn where that piece that it needs to weld is likely going to be and how to find it. It just knows. Okay, well, I'm supposed to weld. So how do I do that? [00:35:56] That's much more of an artificial intelligence. So that's number one, artificial intelligence next. Cloud computing 20%. Now my opinion on cloud computing is not very high, frankly, because cloud is just the name for somebody else's computer cloud computing does not mean it's safer. It does not mean that it requires less work on your part where I think cloud computing can help a business is where. [00:36:30] Push over flow to the cloud. The many businesses that have moved technology to the cloud have moved it back now because frankly, the cloud did not provide them with what they thought they'd get, which is cheaper, better computing. And a lot of the breaches that we're getting nowadays are in the cloud. [00:36:53] People's databases being exposed, applications, being exposed. It's great for hackers because they know. Okay, well, let me see. Amazon has the majority of all cloud computing in the world, so let's just scan Amazon computers and see what we can find. Right. And they're going to find that this bank has this opener, that company has that database available, et cetera, et cetera. [00:37:17] So be careful with that, but they think cloud's number two, five G. 17% that I am very excited about it. And here's why five G is kind of a generic term for the high speed, uh, room wireless data. So think cell phone basically, but why it really matters is it's designed to handle billions of devices. So that you can have a lot of people sharing data and getting to data, sharing a network connection in a densely populated area. [00:37:58] That's where it really, really shined. And then it also has a faster data rate than the older technology. One of the things you'll find as you compare, if you really dig into the technology compare, the various cell companies is that for instance, T mobile, which is who I use has a lower frequency spectrum. [00:38:24] Lower frequencies can not carry as much data for, but what they can do, I'm really oversimplifying. But what they can do is more readily peers, glass, and brick and walls. So T-Mobile's frequencies are lower than Verizon, for instance. So Verizon can get you faster data. But can't get it into as many places and not as well as T-Mobile just really putting this quite simply. [00:38:57] And in fact, just what was it? Two weeks ago, we had a court order stopping the deployment of these higher frequency, 5g networks. Because of complaints from some people, uh, particularly in the avionics, in the airline industry where they're saying, well, they could be squashing some of our critical systems because they're using some of the old satellite frequencies for 5g up in the upper bands. [00:39:25] Anyhow, one of the things that 5g. Which has already been used for is what I was involved with. You know, I was involved with emergency medicine for a long time and I was an EMT I P D uh, back in the day. So almost a paramedic. And think about what could happen now, you're in the back of an ambulance that you could be the hands for the doctor who can be seeing the patient as you're driving down the highway, bringing that person in, because historically I remember this one woman. [00:40:01] Placenta previa and had just soaked through some towels with blood. She was in really bad shape and we were squeezing IVs to get fluid into her. It was, it was incredible. It was something else. And we brought her right in on the gurney, in emergency room and right up to the operating room and put her on the table, right from her ambulance gurney while with five G. [00:40:27] They can be doing that now, not just in an ambulance, but in, in more rural areas, doctors can be operating remotely on someone. It's very cool. This whole tele medicine, including remote surgery. It's huge. So these technology leaders agreed with me on that 24% is the number one, most benefit four or five G telemedicine. [00:40:53] Number two, remote learning and education 20%. Personal and professional day-to-day communications. Think of all of the stuff we're doing now, how much better that's going to get entertainment, sports, live streaming, manufacturing, and assembly transportation, traffic control. Now we're down to 7% and by the way, that's where the cars are talking to each other. [00:41:16] If you have five G. You don't need a mesh because you can use 5g, carbon footprint reduction in energy efficiency. That's 5% and 2% farming and agriculture. Our farming equipment is already using GPS in order to plow fields, planned fields, harvest fields. It's amazing. So there you go. Those are the top pieces of technology that are predicted to influence us next year. [00:41:46] I think it's absolutely correct. And I've got to give you a bit of good news here again. 97% of these people polled agree that their teams are working more closely than ever before. Because of these working from home workplace technologies and apps for office check-in, et cetera. Good news. All around. [00:42:11] Hey, if you want more good news. If you want to know what's happening, even some bad news, I got the right place for you to go. I have five minute little trainings in my emails every week. I have bootcamps again, all of this is the freeze stuff. You imagine what the paid stuff is like, but I want you to understand this. [00:42:32] Okay. Craig, peter.com/subscribe. Do it right now. [00:42:39] I had a good friend this week that had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his passwords. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. [00:42:55] Well, let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. [00:43:00] I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most businesses do so in some way, we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition there's customers that go away. So how do we keep them? [00:43:25] Well, we do what we can. How do we get new customers? Well, for him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line. You have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. [00:43:51] Same thing's true with Google. And then on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, you know, about those already. [00:44:17] And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookie's about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel, the get set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. [00:44:39] I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there's a lot of people that are interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising and I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads that were related to that, which is what I've always said. [00:45:04] Is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. Right. It isn't like TV where it seems sometimes every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me kinda crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me because I don't want those things. [00:45:33] And it's also not only just annoying in money wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically the Facebook pixel gets to know you gets to know. All of the people who like you, that might've bought from you. [00:45:58] Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebooks and them ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. There's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. [00:46:19] And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done exactly that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a very bad thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. Now there's really two or three problems here. [00:46:52] We'll talk about one of them is. Why was the bad guy going after him? Well, he has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can, can go up almost immediate. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. [00:47:21] So our bad guy can get an account like his, that has years worth of advertising credibility, and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. [00:47:51] Also of course, very bad, very, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week and I was out on a trip with just kind of a vacation trip. It was absolutely wonderful. You know, I, I never just do vacation. Right. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on. [00:48:11] Trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGuard program. I had him reach out to my friend and they, he helped them out and they talked back and forth. Here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a really good way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. [00:48:35] And you know, if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. Go ahead and drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com if you know, a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count as well as many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, his email account, et cetera. [00:48:57] And. Uh, he has people who manage his ads for him who manages website for him, who put up some of the promotions for him, you know, the advertising and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private stuff. [00:49:24] And, well, how does he do it or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was go to have I been poned.com. You'll find that online at have HIV. E I been. [00:49:50] Poem dispelled PW, N E d.com. So I took him to have I been poned and I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five different sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. [00:50:21] All bad. Right. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said, well, put in the password because have I been, poned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredibly. Of all of these known passwords. [00:50:44] So he put in his password and no it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I I'd love to get him. [00:51:12] But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust the last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked, uh, one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. [00:51:33] And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted, uh, kind of like the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. [00:52:09] So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to kind of figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or volts, or maybe all of your volts. [00:52:49] And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the U S and people would work for me overseas and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. [00:53:12] So, you know, if a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. [00:53:35] Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's Emmy at Craig Peter Sohn, S O. Dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. [00:54:02] So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think the. [00:54:18] One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. [00:54:27] I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. [00:54:56] And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. [00:55:15] And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Uh, easily simply. Well, when we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. [00:55:42] I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. [00:56:16] At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases take control of your phone. [00:56:45] Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile, uh, a T and T one of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. [00:57:15] So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or pass code that you gave them. And once they have that pass code now, Right. [00:57:37] Uh, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really, it, it may not make a huge difference. Uh, but I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. [00:58:03] If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? Well, there are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. [00:58:34] So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. [00:59:08] So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the free way to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. [00:59:37] Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. Right. But you can tell it. [01:00:00] And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authentication. By the way. That's why I advise you to do don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the site, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. [01:00:20] Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. [01:00:44] And then it asks for that code, uh, indication code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. [01:01:05] One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really like one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. [01:01:37] These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. [01:01:59] Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. [01:02:25] M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O n.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of these special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. [01:02:56] It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, you know, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. Stick around everybody. We'll be right back again. Craig peterson.com. . [01:03:20] According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. [01:03:37] There's a great article that came out in the wall street journal. [01:03:40] And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms. Uh, now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. [01:04:12] So that is some studies again, that looks like, um, yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. [01:04:38] Apparently for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard of course, of how this, this, uh, I don't know what it is. [01:05:09] Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. Uh, I'm trying to remember, but, uh, of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. [01:05:37] There's a, a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and, uh, we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, you know, a little, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. [01:06:01] And what an influencer is, is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. [01:06:23] Right. Uh, they have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. And we've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire, I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. [01:06:48] So you get a micro influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. Oh, look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together. And people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. [01:07:16] There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. [01:07:49] And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. [01:08:18] And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the U S each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. [01:08:57] Facebook it's getting, uh, the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. Uh, and also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics, quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate. [01:09:20] And when with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook and post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. [01:09:54] Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have, can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. [01:10:36] Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. [01:10:58] We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. Uh, he says they're proud of this research. I'm just kind of summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Uh, internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. [01:11:36] These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Uh, Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. [01:12:01] They have a pay wall and I kind of hate to use payroll articles, but this one, this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, you know, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. [01:12:29] Give me a few days to respond. Uh, but me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:12:41] We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. [01:12:57] Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. [01:13:06] I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. [01:13:27] Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your Mac pro if you needed four screens, it's really handy. [01:13:53] No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. [01:14:25] That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. [01:15:06] It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. [01:15:30] Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paper back in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. [01:15:57] So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. [01:16:34] Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Yeah. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. [01:16:58] Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. [01:17:23] Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. [01:17:50] You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. [01:18:31] They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. [01:18:56] That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be connects to the company's network. [01:19:25] Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. [01

Prognosis
Part Six: Unlikely Heroes

Prognosis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:56


The messenger RNA vaccines against Covid-19 seem to have emerged out of nowhere. But they're based on decades of painstaking work, done in relative obscurity, by researchers who believed in the promise of the technology even if few others did. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. T1D gene replacement therapy, BG finger scan, insulin on Olympic skis and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:52


It's In the News... the only Diabetes newscast! This week learn about: The DIY #WeAreNotWaiting movement gets a medical write up in the Lancet, a big move for #T1D stem cell therapy and identifying the cause behind a common #T2D condition. We also look at coffee & gestational diabetes and find out why the molecular structure of insulin pictured on an Olympic-hopeful's skis -- Join Stacey LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode transcription below: Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. XX In the News is brought to you by The World's Worst Diabetes Mom, Real life stories of raising a child with diabetes. Bit of breaking news here.. we just found out today we won a pretty big deal prize. American Book Fest announced The World's Worst Diabetes Mom is the winner of their Best New Non-Fiction category! Huge thanks to the judges and to Spark Publications. How about that? You can find the book – it's my book if that's not clear - in paperback, on Kindle or as an audio book – all at Amazon.com. -- XX Our top story.. a stamp of professional approval for the do it yourself #WeAreNotWaiting movement. Over 40 doctors, legal experts, and other healthcare professionals published a consensus statement in The Lancet, one of the most prestigious and respected medical journals. The authors conclude: “Although we do not suggest that open-source AID systems be universally recommended over commercial options, strong ethical reasons support the use of open-source AID systems, with safety and effectiveness data derived from real-world evidence." Essentially, they say it's time for the medical industry to take these methods seriously, and to establish some standards and protocols to help further access and safe use. https://mashable.com/article/doctors-approve-diy-diabetes-tech-treatments XX Stem cell therapy for type 1 moves forward. CRISPR therapeutics and Viactye announce approval for a clinical trial application. We've covered this before and talked to ViaCyte on the podcast. They've been moving forward with stem cell research and you may know Crispr as a gene editing platform. The idea is that together these companies could find a functional cure for type 1. This is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to look at safety and efficacy. They expect to start enrolling patients by the end of the year. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/crispr-therapeutics-viacyte-inc-start-133000366.html XX A new study suggests a lack of a specific molecule in red blood cells may be the root cause of vascular problems in people with type 2. Red blood cells are important for many reasons, one of which is maintaining what's called cardiovascular equilibrium. This is partly achieved through the production of nitric oxide. This is a problem in people with type 2 and these researchers speculate it's because they have much less of something called micro-RNA-210 than those without diabetes. Interestingly, blood sugar control through medication appeared to cause no major improvement here – it didn't affect the red blood cells. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/scientists-identify-new-cause-of-vascular-injury-in-type-2-diabetes XX Good news for pregnant coffee lovers: Consuming a low amount of caffeine during pregnancy could help to reduce gestational diabetes. This is one of those confusing health issues that seem to change every year.. right? Drink more coffee, drink less coffee.. this study says if you're already drinking coffee or any caffeine, about two cups a day is just fine and may reduce your risk of gestational diabetes. If you're not already a coffee drinker, there's really no reason to start. There were no statistically significant differences in blood pressure, preeclampsia, or hypertension between those who did and did not drink caffeine during pregnancy. https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211111/Low-amount-of-caffeine-intake-during-pregnancy-may-help-reduce-gestational-diabetes-risk.aspx XX The government of Japan announced this week that a company there has developed quote - the world's first blood glucose level sensor that requires no blood sampling. The sensor uses cutting-edge laser technology for a much brighter infrared laser, enabling anyone to hold a fingertip over its light for about 5 seconds to easily measure their blood glucose levels. The company is now working on mass production. Not a lot of info here but the website says 2023 is their goal for launch. http://www.light-tt.co.jp/?lang=en&fbclid=IwAR0h6rlJKXwxEuUDQ8O0_KFYLCg885_pITiVE9xPjgsIXLPCaK9cuJntjSo XX Scotland has become the world's first country to begin routine testing of C-peptide levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. Couple of goals here they say… first to identify people who have retained robust natural insulin production and second.. to see some who might not have type 1 at all. C-peptide is a substance that is created as a byproduct of natural insulin production. A preliminary study looked at 850 people with type 1 and found that about 13% had more than what's thought to be the usual expectation of insulin production. They also found that 5.1% were reclassified to type 2 diabetes and 1.6% were reclassified to monogenic diabetes. Many of those people didn't need to take insulin any more. One quick note – I've seen this article floating around which says that half of the people in this study did NOT have type one. That's not the case at all. The only thing I can think is that someone misread the 5.1% reclassified to type 2 and misread it as 51%? But it's a tiny number. Many more people are misdiagnosed as type 2 when they have LADA or type 1. https://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/why-scotland-is-now-testing-the-c-peptide-levels-of-everyone-with-type-1-diabetes-691720/ XX Finally Something really unique for Diabetes Month. A ski company has created a custom set – with the pattern of the chemical composition of insulin. I'll show it here and in the FB group for those listening.. Lauren Salko is a cross racer who lives with type 1. Elan Skis worked with her to design the skis and they're donating all the profits to Children with Diabetes.. It's the Limited edition Ripstick 94 W ski. Lauren Salko has an eye on next year's Olympics.. we'll be watching. https://elanskis.com/lauren-salko quick reminder that the podcast this week is all about less stress for the holidays. It's an ask the D-Moms and guys.. I got an amazing message from a mom who said she quote – cried tears of relief listening to it. I remember how tough it is at first.. but really, we can make great memories and worry less. Let the Dmoms help! you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

American Conservative University
Dr. Robert Malone: “This is the Largest Experiment Performed on Human Beings in the History of the World.”

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 72:24


Dr. Robert Malone: “This is the Largest Experiment Performed on Human Beings in the History of the World.”  by Veronika Kyrylenko November 9, 2021 https://thenewamerican.com/dr-robert-malone-this-is-the-largest-experiment-performed-on-human-beings-in-the-history-of-the-world/ In an exclusive and explosive one-hour interview with Veronika Kyrylenko of The New American, pioneering mRNA scientist Dr. Robert Malone explains the intensely corrupt workings of the government regulatory bodies that have mismanaged the pandemic, discusses the problems with the vaccine program and delves into potentially explosive and game-changing revelations about the shady origins of the Covid-19 pandemic in Wuhan, China. Who is Dr. Robert Malone? While working at the Salk Institute in 1988, Dr. Malone discovered important findings about in-vivo and in-vitro RNA transfection. He continued his work on the technology a year later at the biopharma start-up Vical where he conducted additional experiments. According to his bio, “The mRNA, constructs, reagents were developed at the Salk institute and Vical by Dr. Malone.” His research has also included important work on DNA vaccines. In addition to his fundamental work developing mRNA and DNA vaccine technology, Malone is also a medical doctor. According to his bio, Dr. Malone “received his medical training at Northwestern University (MD) and Harvard University (Clinical Research Post Graduate) medical school, and in Pathology at UC Davis.” Few people are as qualified to comment on the course of the COVID pandemic and the mass vaccination campaign as Dr. Malone. In this important interview he shares his unique and deep insights on matters of critical national and international importance. Bio source: https://www.rwmalonemd.com/about-us For up to date info on COVID-19, please visit https://thenewamerican.com/tag/covid.  Facebook  Twitter  Linkedin  Email  Print  PDF   Connect with TNA Video YouMaker Bitchute Rumble YouTube MeWe Facebook Instagram Twitter Category Healthcare Video World News See More About: COVIDmrnaRobert Malonevaccine  Facebook  Twitter  Linkedin  Email  Print  PDF Veronika Kyrylenko Veronika Kyrylenko, Ph.D. is a research associate at GeoStrategic Analysis (Arlington, Va.) and a freelance writer whose work has appeared at the Western Journal, American Thinker, The Hill and other publications. She can be found on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/nkyrylenko   The New American  »  Healthcare/Video/World News  »  

Super Human Radio
Magnesium and Your Immune System

Super Human Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 62:03


SHR # 2789:: Magnesium and Your Immune System - Wade Lightheart - Magnesium participates in immune responses in numerous ways. As a cofactor for immunoglobulin synthesis, immune cell adherence, IgM lymphocyte binding, macrophage response to lymphokines, T helper-B cell adherence and antigen binding to macrophage RNA. Magnesium deficiency impairs IgG synthesis and cell-mediated immunity. IgG is the most abundant antibody in the blood. It helps prevent infections. So, people with IgG deficiency are more likely to get infections. Magnesium deficiency occurs in various degrees in our population and deficiency in humans are subtle. Magnesium deficiency causes susceptibility to allergy and to chronic fungal and viral infections. Magnesium also appears to play a protective role in acute allergic reactions. Go to http://shrnetwork.biz/mag and use code SHR10 to save big and get $200 worth of free gifts throughout the month of November for the Black Friday Blowout.

This Week in Virology
TWiV 826: COVID-19 clinical update #87 with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 48:50


In COVID-19 clinical update #87, Dr. Griffin reviews PCR cycle threshold and RNA copy number, rapid antigen tests, hospitalization rate after infection or vaccination, allergies and vaccination, community transmission and viral RNA load, early treatment with sotrovimab, meta-analysis of tocilizumab treatment, antibiotic overuse, and guidelines on the use of anticoagulation for thromboprophylaxis. Hosts: Daniel Griffin and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode CDC vaccine nod to 5-11 year olds (CDC) Sensitivity of rapid antigen tests (Front Micro) COVID-19 among infected or vaccinated (MMWR) Allergy and vaccination symptoms (JAMA) Community transmission and viral RNA load (Lancet) Early treatment with sotrovimab (NEJM) Tocilizumab treatment meta-analysis (Leukemia) Antibiotic overuse in COVID-19 (Am J Trop Med Hyg) Anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis (Blood Adv) Letters read on TWiV 826 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

The Sean Hannity Show
Best of Sean Hannity: Dr. Malone, October 29th, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 35:18


 Dr. Robert Malone, is the Inventor of mRNA vaccines and RNA as a drug, and he is outraged by the government's decision to mandate people into a one size fits all medicinal solution. Malone is now working on a new media initiative which is just launching.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

How I Built This with Guy Raz
Moderna and Flagship Pioneering: Noubar Afeyan

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 67:52


In the field of bio-tech, it can take 10 years and millions of dollars to see if an experimental idea might turn into a life-saving treatment—if it ever does. Noubar Afeyan fully understood those risks when he co-founded Moderna in 2010. He and his colleagues were looking for a way to deploy the messenger RNA molecule to tackle life-threatening diseases. In January of 2020, an urgent opportunity presented itself in the form of a deadly virus that was spreading across the globe. At a breathtaking pace, Moderna produced a prototype for a COVID-19 vaccine, partnered with the NIH to test it, and produced millions of doses, becoming part of the most rapid vaccine roll-out in human history. While Moderna is the best known of Noubar's companies, he has launched many others in the bio-tech space as part of Flagship Pioneering, his multi-billion dollar venture studio.