Podcasts about Aldon

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  • 53PODCASTS
  • 98EPISODES
  • 1hAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Aug 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Aldon

Latest podcast episodes about Aldon

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H2 - Ian Rapoport details the Jamal Adams contract, and other Seahawks news / Texts react / Softy

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 38:42


Ian Rapoport nearly falls down stairs while telling us how the Jamal Adams deal finally got done, plus updates on the Duane Brown negotiations, and what led to Aldon Smith's release. Texts react to the Jamal Adams extension, the Raiders requiring proof of vaccination, and more. Softy covers a variety of subjects as he joins Ian for cross talk.

The Ian Furness Show
Ian Rapoport - How the Jamal Adams deal got done / The latest on Duane Brown / Why Aldon Smith was released

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 14:18


John Clayton's Cold Hard Facts
John Clayton on Aldon Smith's release

John Clayton's Cold Hard Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 22:00


John Clayton dissects the news of Aldon Smith being released by the Seahawks and discusses the remaining depth along the defensive line. Plus, insight on Duane Brown and when the Seahawks might see Trey Lance as the 49ers starting quarterback. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H1 - Mollywhop Monday with Nathan Bishop and Chris Crawford / USMNT win Gold Cup

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 38:50


We start the week with another installment of Mollywhop Monday with Chris Crawford and Nathan Bishop as we try to figure out where this Mariners baseball team stands after last week's trades. Is the team better now than they were one week ago? Will this team be better next year because of the moves that were made? We've spent a few days joking about it, but how important is club control? Lastly, when will this team loosen the purse strings? While the US Women's soccer team didn't fair so well over the weekend, the men took home the Gold Cup. Next up: Making, and then performing well in the World Cup. It's absolutely vital for the sport in this country for the team to make the tournament at teh very least.

Vital MX
The Mental Side Of Moto With Aldon Baker

Vital MX

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 61:57


Aldon Baker is the number-one name in motocross training. He changed the game with Ricky Carmichael and never looked back. Obviously, he knows what he's talking about when it comes to fitness, nutrition, gym work, bike work, cardio, and every other physical piece of the training puzzle. But we sometimes forget that the squishy, grey mass between our ears is what is controlling us and controlling the bike. With the bikes being so good, and nutrition and fitness being at such a high level, where does the mental factor fit in this puzzle? Confidence, ego, pressure, fear, anger, aggression, calm, focus… The mind is a roiling torrent of thoughts and feelings and every racer has to deal with negative, and positive emotions, to get the most out of all the hard physical work that they put into their program. Aldon talks about how each rider is different, but ultimately it is a balance of confidence, respect, fun, and hard work. 

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)
Tales of Aezeron Ep 18 Tournoi du Arbmos pt 4 Called Home

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 89:47


Hail and well met Adventurers!The tournaments first round has concluded with Morgrim making it past a brutal first round by taking out the disguised Kun-Ghar.  Afterwards there was a betrayal of the highest degree by none other than the spoony bard Sai Burglecut!  It seems that Sai has moved on to greener pastures and has thrown his lot in with Silver Moon who seems to have received a bye for most of the tournament!  Seirryth has formed more of a bond with Kun-Ghar after his loss to Morgrim, Aldon has found himself hurt by Sais betrayal but full of determination to see Morgrim successful, and Morgrim has discovered that he will soon be squaring off with Lt. Baker.  Does Sai have ulterior motives for joining Moon?  Will the party forgive him for his transgressions?  Will party run into more ghost shenanigans ?  Find out this and more on this weeks episode!

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H2 - Ian Rapoport on NFL news / Mayor of Maple Valley Open announcement / Father's Day tribute / Softy

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 36:55


Ian Rapoport joins us as he does every Friday at 2pm PT to talk all things NFL. This week, we ask him about the latest on Aldon Smith, updates on the Jamal Adams contract negotiations, the latest COVID protocols for those choosing not to get vaccinated, and more. Eric Briggs from LakeLand Village Golf Course joins Ian as we announce this year's Mayor of Maple Valley Open coming up in July. Texts to 49451 honor dads across the region and beyond as we head into Father's Day weekend. Softy is out on the golf course. He drops in before his show begins.

The Ian Furness Show
Ian Rapoport on NFL news - Aldon Smith / Jamal Adams contract negotiations / COVID protocol / Stadium in Chicago

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 10:28


Don't miss Ian Rapoport's weekly visit with Furness as Rap catches us up on all the news around the league. Rap's visits are thanks to the fine folks at Porter and York. Rare meat, well done. Visit PorterandYork.com to get great meat delivered straight to your door!

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H1 - Will we see Aldon Smith this year? / Darren Dreger on the Kraken coaching search / Power Play / Something Good

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 35:19


Will we see Aldon Smith in a Seahawks uniform this season? Slick asked Mike Garafolo this question earlier today, and he didn't seem very optimistic. How much will Smith really add to this defense? Ian takes a few minutes to discuss. Darren Dreger calls in to talk some Kraken hockey. Ian asks how close we are to naming a head coach, and is Rick Tocchet the front runner at this point. Montreal ties their series with Vegas up at one. We've got the highlights on the Power Play. On Something Good, a man in his 90s gives life to someone else by donating his liver after he passes away.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H2 - Coach Carroll on Aldon Smith, and more / Bobby Casper on the US Open at Torrey Pines / Texts: Losing hope already?

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 35:55


Pete Carroll spoke to the media today. He's asked about what's happening with Aldon Smith, and more. Of course we've got the highlights for you. The US Open is underway at Torrey Pines. Real Golf Radio's Bobby Casper joins us to discuss what we're seeing on Day 1. No coach, no free agents, and no sweater yet? Is it time to give up on the new hockey team? One texter seems to think so. Softy drops in before the afternoon show.

WGA Podcast
Listen 2 Me Podcast - FK Aldon

WGA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 69:44


F.K. Aldon : Question the Status Quo Author and YouTuber F.K. Aldon is a Jill of All Trades: she writes ✍

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)
Tales of Aezeron Ep 17 Tournoi du Arbmos pt 3 Bard Off

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 112:04


Hail and well met adventurers!Morgrim has overcome his first tourney battle in an epic showdown with the Masked Marauder, which turned out being a disguised Kun-Ghar!  The first day of combat continues with the party being able to see the other competitors and what tricks they may have up their proverbial sleeves.  Seirryth continues their infiltration of the nobles viewing area to try and get Morgrim an upper hand, Aldon works on healing Morgrims injuries, and Sai doubts his contributions to the party as a whole.  Who will be Morgrims next opponent?  Will Sai shake the funk before Morgrims next fight?  Will the party figure out who the Masked Marauder actually is?  Find out this and more in the exciting episode!

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H2 - Ian Rapoport: Orlando Brown trade, Aldon Smith, and more / Rob Rang on potential Seahawks draft picks / Texts / Softy

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 39:35


The Chiefs have trade four picks, including their first pick in 2021 to Baltimore for Orlando Brown Jr. plus a couple of their picks. How did this trade come about, and why did it happen before the draft? For answers, we check in with Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network. We also find out how the league is handling vaccinations, and what's the latest on the Aldon Smith story? Fox Sports draft insider Rob Rang joins us with a few names of players the Seahawks are likely eyeing during Days 2 and 3 of the draft. A texter is offended by the Ians talking about the vaccines, and Softy reacts to the discussion.

The Ian Furness Show
Ian Rapoport - KC trades multiple picks to Baltimore for Orlando Brown / NFL and vaccines / What's happening with Aldon Smith?

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 12:16


Don't miss Ian Rapoport's weekly visit with Furness as Rap catches us up on all the news around the league. Rap's visits are thanks to the fine folks at Porter and York. Rare meat, well done. Visit PorterandYork.com to get great meat delivered straight to your door!

Guessing from the Stands
"Walk It Back"

Guessing from the Stands

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 113:58


-Lamarcus Aldridge retiring due to irregular heartbeat -d Wade now part owner of jazz, had talks with heat -bout 15 games left, let’s pick awards -Anthony Davis return -Austin rivers signs 10 day with Denver -curry and Tatum duels it out, Celtics on a run. Is it time to walk back the stevens fire? -Steph hot streak -Zion reveals Zion 1s, did nike blow the bag? -Nike & Kobe contract ends -lock in our picks for nba awards -condolences out to Scottie pippen and his family. Lost his son to chronic asthma. -Aaron Donald accusers walks back accusation after video surfaces -nfl signings : Aldon smith to the seahawks, cordaelle Patterson to the falcons, James Conner to the cards -aldon smith wanted by police, one week after signing -Alex smith retirement, jordan reed retires -mike tomlin signs 3 year extension with Steelers through 2024

The Final Batch Podcast
Girth Brooks

The Final Batch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 86:18


Aaron Donald assault claims dropped,Aldon smith continues troubled career.Deshaun Watson fires back.Current status of the Mamba brand and Legacy.Recent racial tension and current police brutality. #DerekChauvin #MaxineWaters  Covid Positive Lions? Johnson&Johnson back giving out poison! Yung Coach K drop-in guest appearance Would you give you Woman a "Hall Pass"?

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)
Tales of Aezeron Ep 16 Tournoi du Arbmos pt 2 1st Blood

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 104:29


Hale and well met Adventurers!Our heroes are in Morgrims home city of Ürsnæ as representatives of King Ferdinand.  Morgrim has passed the stage of the battle royal for the tournament and has come to his first challenge of fighting the Masked Maurader.  Will Morgrim overcome his challenge?  Will Seirryth be able to blend in with the nobles now that the King is with them?  Will Sai and Aldon be able to secure Morgrims victory with their support?  Find out this and more in this weeks episode!

Bob, Groz and Tom
Hour 1 - The Seahawks must decide quickly on Aldon Smith's future PLUS The Scott Servais Show

Bob, Groz and Tom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 39:39


How should the Seahawks handle the quickly evolving situation with Aldon Smith after an arrest warrant was made on Monday? Jake and Stacy tell you exactly what needs to happen to start Tuesday's show. It's an early edition of The Scott Servais Show partway through the hour! How does Servais explain the team's hot start? What can we expect from Kyle Lewis in his return? He tells Jake, Stacy, and Mariners Insider Shannon Drayer. What will be the toughest thing for the Mariners to sustain through the entire rest of the season? They answer that question before Tuesday's early finish for Mariners day baseball. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H1 - Arrest warrant issued for Aldon Smith / Super League: Could it happen here? / Aaron Torres on college basketball / Power Play

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 39:57


An arrest warrant has been issued for newly-signed Seahawks defensive end Aldon Smith. There's a lot of jumping to conclusions right now, but let's wait to see what information comes out before we label a guy guilty. With that said, if you have the history that Aldon Smith has, it's best to avoid these types of situations at all cost. The largest soccer teams in Europe are reportedly attempting to start their own Super League, much to the consternation of almost everyone. Could we see something like this here with the top 15 college football brands splitting from their own respective conferences to join a new super college football league? There's a lot to discuss in college basketball despite the season being over. With updates on it all, we check in with Aaron Torres of Fox Sports. Patrick Marleau plays in his 1767th game. He'll break the all-time record for most games played in the NHL tonight. On Something Good, Kevin re-visits a story about Shaq paying for a man's engagement ring.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H2 - Mariners in first place! / Dennis Beyak on drafting Patrick Marleau / Texts / Softy has no opinion

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 39:36


The Mariners are in first place after 16 games. Is this team actually for real? We've been here so many times before that it's hard to get too excited, but things are a little different this time with so much young talent coming up through the system. At least they're keeping things exciting. Patrick Marleau is about to break the NHL record for most games played. The man who drafted him as GM of the Thunderbirds all those years ago Dennis Beyak joins the show to reflect on scouting the young Marleau, and the career he's had since those two seasons in Seattle. Texts react to Aldon Smith, the super league idea, and more. Softy insists that we shouldn't get too excited, or have an opinion on this Mariners team until at least June.

The Ian Furness Show
Greg Cosell - A look at Aldon Smith, and the rest of the Seahawks D-line / Offensive linemen in the draft / Value vs. need

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 19:21


From NFL Films and ESPN's NFL Matchup, Greg Cosell joins Ian Furness every Friday at 1:20pm PT. He appears thanks to Seattle Cider... not your standard cider and Two Beers... life is just a little more honest after two beers. Make sure to check out both Seattle Cider and Two beers at the woods tasting room in the SoDo industrial district.

The Ian Furness Show
Ian Rapoport - How the Aldon Smith deal came together so quickly / Is the Mac Jones love a media creation?

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 10:50


Don't miss Ian Rapoport's weekly visit with Furness as Rap catches us up on all the news around the league. Rap's visits are thanks to the fine folks at Porter and York. Rare meat, well done. Visit PorterandYork.com to get great meat delivered straight to your door!

Softy & Dick Interviews
R.J. Choppy on 105.3 The Fan on Aldon Smith's tenure with Cowboys

Softy & Dick Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 11:40


RJ Choppy of 105.3 The Fan joins Softy and Hugh to discuss Aldon Smith’s year in Dallas on the field, his mental state while playing for the Cowboys, the team and fans’ reception to Smith’s criminal history.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H1 - Aldon Smith signs with Seattle / Gary Parrish's final visit (for now) / Power Play: Marc-Andre Fleury / Something Good

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 39:10


Aldon Smith has officially joined the Seahawks. The announcement was made official on Twitter. Whether you think he deserves to play again in the league, he is here, and still has the ability to contribute. Gary Parrish makes his last appearance on the show until next season. We ask about the schedule for upcoming tournaments, Tommy Lloyd as the new Arizona coach, and possible new college basketball rule changes. Marc-Andre Fleury is now the fourth-winningest goalie of all time. There's a lot of good on this beautiful Thursday afternoon. Ian and Kevin both share stories for Something Good.

The Ian Furness Show
Furness H1 - Do you want Aldon Smith on your team? / Ryan S. Clark talking all things Kraken / Power Play: 1,000 games

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 37:53


The Seahawks have been linked to Aldon Smith, but with his past, is he worth the cost? The Athletic's Ryan S. Clark looks at what Ron Francis and the Kraken staff have learned about who might be available come July now that the trade deadline has passed. We discuss a couple of possible future Kraken players. Could PK Subban end up here? On the Power Play, Milan Lucic plays his 1,000th game. He is one of only four active players to have played in a thousand or more games, with a thousand or more penalty box minutes.

The Ian Furness Show
Mike Holmgren - Thoughts on Aldon Smith potentially in Seattle / Chuck Arnold's contract extended / How voluntary are voluntary practices?

The Ian Furness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 13:27


Mike Holmgren joins Ian every Wednesday at 2pm to talk about all things Seahawks and NFL. His weekly appearance is brought to you by Windermere Real Estate, Toyota of Kirkland, and Redbox.

Cliff and Puck
4-14 H1 - Seahawks sign Damarious Randall / Aldon Smith visiting the Seahawks / What's next for Kyle Seager?

Cliff and Puck

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 35:02


The Seahawks have signed Damarious Randall and will move him to cornerback. Aldon Smith will be visiting the Seahawks. Do you want him to play for Seattle in 2021? This may be Kyle Seager's last year in Seattle, but in un-Seager-like fashion, he's started the season out hot. What's next for the Mariners' longtime third-baseman?

Cliff and Puck
Michael-Shawn Dugar of The Athletic talking Seahawks football - Tyler Lockett's comments on the offense / Voluntary OTAs / Aldon Smith

Cliff and Puck

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 17:44


CoDrive.pl - Aldona Marciniak, Cezary Gutowski i Jasiek Olejniczak o F1, ELMS i motorsporcie
CoDrive.pl 4: Cezary nadaje z Barcelony, gdzie Robert Kubica zadebiutuje w ELMS! O zawartości szczęścia w sukcesach kierowców F1. „Idioci” - Ricciardo wyzywa Formułę 1.

CoDrive.pl - Aldona Marciniak, Cezary Gutowski i Jasiek Olejniczak o F1, ELMS i motorsporcie

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 0:30


Robert Kubica przygotowuje się do pierwszego startu w ELMS! Cezary prosto z Barcelony opowiada, co słychać w ekipie WRT. Wspominamy także o drugim Polaku - Mateuszu Kaprzyku.Max Verstappen mówi ile szczęścia potrzebuje kierowca F1. A ile miał go sam Max? Czy dopisze mu w momencie gdy ma szansę zawalczyć o mistrzostwo świata?"Chcieliśmy zakończyć karierę drugiego!" Daniel Riccardo o wewnętrznej rywalizacji z Maxem Verstappenem w Red Bullu.Niebezpieczeństwo i wypadki - pokazywać czy nie pokazywać? Ricciardo ostro o zagraniach PR-owych Formuły 1.Razem z Aldoną pakujemy się do Włoch i zapowiadamy weekend F1 na Imoli.

Listen 2 Me
E47 · F.K. Aldon : Question the Status Quo

Listen 2 Me

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 69:37


Author and YouTuber F.K. Aldon is a Jill of All Trades: she writes ✍

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)
Tales of Aezeron Ep 14 Gh-Gh-Ghosts!?

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 82:31


Hale and well met Adventurers!The party is in Ürsnæ and getting ready for the Tournament to crown the king and honor the god Arbmos. Morgrim has been on a proverbial roller coaster of emotions as he has encountered not only his former lover, the king, his father, but also his dead brother all in the span of a day! King Ferdinand sent the party here to participate in the tournament in his stead but also to investigate the weird phenomenon of the dead appearing, since spirits and specters aren't a thing in Aezeron, and Aldon and Sorrow encountered one of these spirits with Aldon getting nearly taken out in the process. Why are spirits appearing in Ürsnæ? Will Morgrim qualify for the tournament? Will Sai’s debauchery catch up to haunt him? Find out right meow!

Gypsy Tales
Gypsy Tales Archive - 2014 - Aldon Baker Interview

Gypsy Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2021 40:07


Digging through the archives we found this gem with Aldon Baker for a project that never came to life. We are posting some clips on the YouTube channel but thought we would post the full conversation here. Aldon talks about his philosophies on talent, what makes a champion and riders like Ryan Villipoto and Adam Cianciarulo.SPONSORS:DriTimes: http://www.dritimes.comhttp://www.rivalinkdesignco.com - CODE: GYPSYGANG 15%http://www.mxstore.com.auhttp://www.crickstweed.com.auhttp://www.fisthandwear.com - CODE: GYPSYGANG 15%http://www.dixxonquality.com.au - CODE: GYPSYGANG 15%http://www.boost.com.auWear Gypsy Tales Merch ► https://gypsy-tales.com/​SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST ►https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsBGR5UR7UCyLvNbHSxisFQADD GYPSY TALES ON INSTAGRAM ►https://www.instagram.com/gypsytalespodcast/?hl=enLISTEN ON:ITUNES:https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/chapter-136-ft-luke-kidgell/id1335551721?i=1000508051454SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/episode/3WaBKQaxua1BBiy3TDVdLm?si=GgZ3KFlcRk6e60AgSpELXAADD ME ON:INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/jasemacalpine/?hl=enTWITTER: https://twitter.com/jasemacalpine?lang=en

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)
Tales of Aezeron Ep 11 A Town called Mal Ice Pt 2

P.U.G.S. (Players Underground Gaming Society)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 139:28


Hail and well met Adventurers!The party has awoken from their wild and crazy night and are in the mood for breakfast? At least Sai is but Serriyth, Morgrim, and Aldon are growing ever more suspicious of this quaint resort town. What will the party have for breakfast? What rest and relaxation will they truly receive? And why don’t they just believe that the DM is just giving them a place to relax on their journey?

Law Nation Podcast
Jerry Jones Wants DE Aldon Smith Back W/ Dallas Cowboys In 2021 + Michael Irvin Thoughts On Quinn

Law Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2021 11:17


Smith put in the work to get his life in order and attempt an NFL comeback. The Dallas Cowboys have rarely met a redemption project they didn’t like, so Aldon got that chance here and put in a surprisingly productive season. After 2020 ended, Jerry Jones’s public comments left little question about he perceives Smith: “It’s inspirational to see a man like Aldon Smith have the comeback here that he had. He played some outstanding football for us. He certainly was more positive than not, and I think he can take this year and build on it, and we want him to build on it to the benefit of the Cowboys.” Smith’s name will be among the top free agents for the Cowboys in 2021. While Dak Prescott will certainly dominate the headlines, Aldon may be right below him over the likes of Chidobe Awuzie, Sean Lee, Xavier Woods, and Tyrone Crawford.

The PulpMX.com Show
Pulpmx Show #448 Wrap Up Show

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2020 110:05


This week Darkside has Justin Jennings and Connor Olson on to talk about Pulpmx Show #448 including how polarizing it was, RV and Weimer's "performance", Aldon stories, is Steve a journalist, Mitch Payton coming on the show and what they think Steve's opinion of the show was

Murph & Mac Podcast
12-17 Jay Glazer joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about how he helped Aldon Smiths return to the NFL!

Murph & Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 14:39


Fox NFL's Insider Jay Glazer joins the Murph & Mac Show to talk about how he helped Aldon Smiths return to the NFL! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 104: “He’s a Rebel” by “The Crystals”

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020


Episode 104 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “He’s a Rebel”, and how a song recorded by the Blossoms was released under the name of the Crystals.  Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Sukiyaki” by Kyu Sakamoto. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. A lot of resources were used for this episode. The material on Gene Pitney mostly comes from his page on This is My Story. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the Brill Building scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era, including articles on both The Crystals and the Blossoms. I’ve referred to two biographies of Spector in this episode, Phil Spector: Out of His Head by Richard Williams and He’s a Rebel by Mark Ribkowsky. And information on the Wrecking Crew largely comes from The Wrecking Crew by Kent Hartman. There are many compilations available with some of the hits Spector produced, but I recommend getting Back to Mono, a four-CD overview of his career containing all the major singles put out by Philles.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A brief note — there are some very brief mentions of domestic abuse here. Nothing I think will upset anyone, but you might want to check the transcript if you’re at all unsure. Up to this point, whenever we’ve looked at a girl group, it’s been at one that had, to a greater or lesser extent, some control over their own career. Groups like the Marvelettes, the Chantels, and the Bobbettes all wrote their own material, at least at first, and had distinctive personalities before they ever made a record. But today, we’re going to look at a group whose identity was so subsumed in that of their producer that the record we’re looking at was released under the name of a different group from the one that recorded it. We’re going to look at “He’s a Rebel”, which was recorded by the Blossoms and released by the Crystals. [Excerpt: “The Crystals” (The Blossoms), “He’s a Rebel”] The Crystals, from their very beginnings, were intended as a vehicle for the dreams of men, rather than for their own ambitions. Whereas the girl groups we’ve looked at so far all formed as groups of friends at school before they moved into professional singing, the Crystals were put together by a man named Benny Wells. Wells had a niece, Barbara Alston, who sang with a couple of her schoolfriends, Mary Thomas and Myrna Giraud. Wells put those three together with two other girls, Dee Dee Kenniebrew and Patsy Wright, to form a five-piece vocal group. Wells seems not to have had much concept of what was in the charts at the time — the descriptions of the music he had the girls singing talk about him wanting them to sound like the Modernaires, the vocal group who sang with Glenn Miller’s band in the early 1940s. But the girls went along with Wells, and Wells had good enough ears to recognise a hit when one was brought to him — and one was brought to him by Patsy Wright’s brother-in-law, Leroy Bates. Bates had written a song called “There’s No Other Like My Baby”, and Wells could tell it had potential. Incidentally, some books say that the song was based on a gospel song called “There’s No Other Like My Jesus”, and that claim is repeated on Wikipedia, but I can’t find any evidence of a song of that name other than people talking about “There’s No Other Like My Baby”. There is a gospel song called “There’s No Other Name Like Jesus”, but that has no obvious resemblance to Bates’ song, and so I’m going to assume that the song was totally original. As well as bringing the song, Bates also brought the fledgling group a name — he had a daughter, Crystal Bates, after whom the group named themselves. The newly-named Crystals took their song to the offices of Hill and Range Music, which as well as being a publishing company also owned Big Top Records, the label that had put out the original version of “Twist and Shout”, which had so annoyed Bert Berns. And it was there that they ended up meeting up with Phil Spector. After leaving his role at Atlantic, Spector had started working as a freelance producer, including working for Big Top. According to Spector — a notorious liar, it’s important to remember — he worked during this time on dozens of hits for which he didn’t get any credit, just to earn money. But we do know about some of the records he produced during this time. For example, there was one by a new singer called Gene Pitney. Pitney had been knocking around for years, recording for Decca as part of a duo called Jamie and Jane: [Excerpt: Jamie and Jane, “Faithful Our Love”] And for Blaze Records as Billy Bryan: [Excerpt: Billy Bryan, “Going Back to My Love”] But he’d recently signed to Musicor, a label owned by Aaron Schroeder, and had recorded a hit under his own name. Pitney had written “(I Wanna) Love My Life Away”, and had taken advantage of the new multitracking technology to record his vocals six times over, creating a unique sound that took the record into the top forty: [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, “(I Wanna) Love My Life Away”] But while that had been a hit, his second single for Musicor was a flop, and so for the third single, Musicor decided to pull out the big guns. They ran a session at which basically the whole of the Brill Building turned up. Leiber and Stoller were to produce a song they’d written for Pitney, the new hot husband-and-wife songwriting team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil were there, as was Burt Bacharach, and so were Goffin and King, who wrote the song that *Spector* was to produce for Pitney. All of them were in the control booth, and all of them were chipping in ideas. As you might expect with that many cooks, the session did not go smoothly, and to make matters worse, Pitney was suffering from a terrible cold. The session ended up costing thirteen thousand dollars, at a time when an average recording session cost five hundred dollars. On the song Spector was producing on that session, Goffin and King’s “Every Breath I Take”, Pitney knew that with the cold he would be completely unable to hit the last note in full voice, and went into falsetto. Luckily, everyone thought it sounded good, and he could pretend it was deliberate, rather than the result of necessity: [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, “Every Breath I Take”] The record only went to number forty-two, but it resuscitated Pitney’s singing career, and forged a working relationship between the two men. But soon after that, Spector had flown back to LA to work with his old friend Lester Sill. Sill and producer/songwriter, Lee Hazelwood, had been making records with the guitarist Duane Eddy, producing a string of hits like “Rebel Rouser”: [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, “Rebel Rouser”] But Eddy had recently signed directly to a label, rather than going through Sill and Hazelwood’s company as before, and so Sill and Hazelwood had been looking for new artists, and they’d recently signed a group called the Paris Sisters to their production company. Sill had decided to get Spector in to produce the group, and Spector came up with a production that Sill was sure would be a hit, on a song called “I Love How You Love Me”, written by Barry Mann with another writer called Jack Keller: [Excerpt: The Paris Sisters, “I Love How You Love Me”] Spector was becoming a perfectionist — he insisted on recording the rhythm track for that record at one studio, and the string part at another, and apparently spent fifty hours on the mix — and Sill was spending more and more time in the studio with Spector, fascinated at his attitude to the work he was doing. This led to a breakup between Sill and Hazelwood — their business relationship was already strained, but Hazelwood got jealous of all the time that Sill was spending with Spector, and decided to split their partnership and go and produce Duane Eddy, without Sill, at Eddy’s new label. So Sill was suddenly in the market for a new business partner, and he and Spector decided that they were going to start up their own label, Philles, although by this point everyone who had ever worked with Spector was warning Sill that it was a bad idea to go into business with him. But Spector and Sill kept their intentions secret for a while, and so when Spector met the Crystals at Hill and Range’s offices, everyone at Hill and Range just assumed that he was still working for them as a freelance producer, and that the Crystals were going to be recording for Big Top. Freddie Bienstock of Hill & Range later said, “We were very angry because we felt they were Big Top artists. He was merely supposed to produce them for us. There was no question about the fact that he was just rehearsing them for Big Top—hell, he rehearsed them for weeks in our offices. And then he just stole them right out of here. That precipitated a breach of contract with us. We were just incensed because that was a terrific group, and for him to do that shows the type of character he was. We felt he was less than ethical, and, obviously, he was then shown the door.” Bienstock had further words for Spector too, ones I can’t repeat here because of content rules about adult language, but they weren’t flattering. Spector had been dating Bienstock’s daughter, with Bienstock’s approval, but that didn’t last once Spector betrayed Bienstock. But Spector didn’t care. He had his own New York girl group, one that could compete with the Bobbettes or the Chantels or the Shirelles, and he was going to make the Crystals as big as any of them, and he wasn’t going to cut Big Top in. He slowed down “There’s No Other Like My Baby” and it became the first release on Philles Records, with Barbara Alston singing lead: [Excerpt: The Crystals, “There’s No Other Like My Baby”] That record was cut late at night in June 1961. In fact it was cut on Prom Night — three of the girls came straight to the session from their High School prom, still wearing their prom dresses. Spector wrote the B-side, a song that was originally intended to be the A-side called “Oh Yeah, Maybe Baby”, but everyone quickly realised that “There’s No Other Like My Baby” was the hit, and it made the top twenty. While Spector was waiting for the money to come in on the first Philles record, he took another job, with Liberty Records, working for his friend Snuff Garrett. He got a thirty thousand dollar advance, made a single flop record with them with an unknown singer named Obrey Wilson, and then quit, keeping his thirty thousand dollars. Once “There’s No Other” made the charts, Spector took the Crystals into the studio again, to record a song by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil that he’d got from Aldon Music. Spector was becoming increasingly convinced that he’d made a mistake in partnering with Lester Sill, and he should really have been working with Don Kirshner, and he was in discussions with Kirshner which came to nothing about them having some sort of joint project. While those discussions fell through, almost all the songs that Spector would use for the next few years would come from Aldon songwriters, and “Uptown” was a perfect example of the new kind of socially-relevant pop songwriting that had been pioneered by Goffin and King, but which Mann and Weil were now making their own. Before becoming a professional songwriter, Weil had been part of the Greenwich Village folk scene, and while she wasn’t going to write anything as explicitly political as the work of Pete Seeger, she thought that songs should at least try to be about the real world. “Uptown” was the first example of a theme which would become a major motif for the Crystals’ records — a song about a man who is looked down upon by society, but who the singer believes is better than his reputation. Mann and Weil’s song combined that potent teen emotion with an inspiration Weil had had, seeing a handsome Black man pushing a hand truck in the Garment District, and realising that even though he was oppressed by his job, and “a nobody” when he was working downtown, he was still somebody when he was at home. They originally wrote the song for Tony Orlando to sing, but Spector insisted, rightly, that the song worked better with female voices, and that the Crystals should do it. Spector took Mann and Weil’s song and gave it a production that evoked the Latin feel of Leiber and Stoller’s records for the Drifters: [Excerpt: The Crystals, “Uptown”] By the time of this second record, the Crystals had already been through one lineup change. As soon as she left school, Myrna Giraud got married, and she didn’t want to perform on stage any more. She would still sing with the girls in the studio for a little while — she’s on every track of their first album, though she left altogether soon after this recording — but she was a married woman now and didn’t want to be in a group.  The girls needed a replacement, and they also needed something else — a lead singer. All the girls loved singing, but none of them wanted to be out in front singing lead. Luckily, Dee Dee Kenniebrew’s mother was a secretary at the school attended by a fourteen-year-old gospel singer named La La Brooks, and she heard Brooks singing and invited her to join the group. Brooks soon became the group’s lead vocalist on stage. But in the studio, Spector didn’t want to use her as the lead vocalist. He insisted on Barbara singing the lead on “Uptown”, but in a sign of things to come, Mann and Weil weren’t happy with her performance — Spector had to change parts of the melody to accommodate her range — and they begged Spector to rerecord the lead vocal with Little Eva singing. However, Eva became irritated with Spector’s incessant demands for more takes and his micromanagement, cursed him out, and walked out of the studio. The record was released with Barbara’s original lead vocal, and while Mann and Weil weren’t happy with that, listeners were, as it went to number thirteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The Crystals, “Uptown”] Little Eva later released her own version of the song, on the Dimension Dolls compilation we talked about in the episode on “The Loco-Motion”: [Excerpt: Little Eva, “Uptown”] It was Little Eva who inspired the next Crystals single, as well — as we talked about in the episode on her, she inspired a truly tasteless Goffin and King song called “He Hit Me And It Felt Like A Kiss”, which I will not be excerpting, but which was briefly released as the Crystals’ third single, before being withdrawn after people objected to hearing teenage girls sing about how romantic and loving domestic abuse is. There seems to be some suggestion that the record was released partly as a way for Spector to annoy Lester Sill, who by all accounts was furious at the release. Spector was angry at Sill over the amount of money he’d made from the Paris Sisters recordings, and decided that he was being treated unfairly and wanted to force Sill out of their partnership. Certainly the next recording by the Crystals was meant to get rid of some other business associates. Two of Philles’ distributors had a contract which said they were entitled to the royalties on two Crystals singles. So the second one was a ten-minute song called “The Screw”, split over two sides of a disc, which sounded like this: [Excerpt: The Crystals, “The Screw”] Only a handful of promotional copies of that were ever produced. One went to Lester Sill, who by this point had been bought out of his share of the company for a small fraction of what it was worth. The last single Spector recorded for Philles while Sill was still involved with the label was another Crystals record, one that had the involvement of many people Sill had brought into Spector’s orbit, and who would continue working with him long after the two men stopped working together. Spector had decided he was going to start recording in California again, and two of Sill’s assistants would become regular parts of Spector’s new hit-making machine. The first of these was a composer and arranger called Jack Nitzsche, who we’ll be seeing a lot more of in this podcast over the next couple of years, in some unexpected places. Nitzsche was a young songwriter, whose biggest credit up to this point was a very minor hit for Preston Epps, “Bongo, Bongo, Bongo”: [Excerpt: Preston Epps, “Bongo Bongo Bongo”] Nitzsche would become Spector’s most important collaborator, and his arrangements, as much as Spector’s production, are what characterise the “Wall of Sound” for which Spector would become famous.  The other assistant of Sill’s who became important to Spector’s future was a saxophone player named Steve Douglas. We’ve seen Douglas before, briefly, in the episode on “LSD-25” — he played in the original lineup of Kip and the Flips, one of the groups we talked about in that episode. He’d left Kip and the Flips to join Duane Eddy’s band, and it was through Eddy that he had started working with Sill, when he played on many of Eddy’s hits, most famously “Peter Gunn”: [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, “Peter Gunn”] Douglas was the union contractor for the session, and for most of the rest of Spector’s sixties sessions. This is something we’ve not talked about previously, but when we look at records produced in LA for the next few years, in particular, it’s something that will come up a lot. When a producer wanted to make records at the time, he (for they were all men) would not contact all the musicians himself. Instead, he’d get in touch with a trusted musician and say “I have a session at three o’clock. I need two guitars, bass, drums, a clarinet and a cello” (or whatever combination of instruments), and sometimes might say, “If you can get this particular player, that would be good”. The musician would then find out which other musicians were available, get them into the studio, and file the forms which made sure they got paid according to union rules. The contractor, not the producer, decided who was going to play on the session. In the case of this Crystals session, Spector already had a couple of musicians in mind — a bass player named Ray Pohlman, and his old guitar teacher Howard Roberts, a jazz guitarist who had played on “To Know Him is to Love Him” and “I Love How You Love Me” for Spector already. But Spector wanted a *big* sound — he wanted the rhythm instruments doubled, so there was a second bass player, Jimmy Bond, and a second guitarist, Tommy Tedesco. Along with them and Douglas were piano player Al de Lory and drummer Hal Blaine. This was the first session on which Spector used any of these musicians, and with the exception of Roberts, who hated working on Spector’s sessions and soon stopped, this group put together by Douglas would become the core of what became known as “The Wrecking Crew”, a loose group of musicians who would play on a large number of the hit records that would come out of LA in the sixties. Spector also had a guaranteed hit song — one by Gene Pitney. While Pitney wrote few of his own records, he’d established himself a parallel career as a writer for other people. He’d written “Today’s Teardrops”, the B-side of Roy Orbison’s hit “Blue Angel”: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, “Today’s Teardrops”] And had followed that up with a couple of the biggest hits of the early sixties, Bobby Vee’s “Rubber Ball”: [Excerpt: Bobby Vee, “Rubber Ball”] And Ricky Nelson’s “Hello Mary Lou”: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, “Hello, Mary Lou”] Pitney had written a song, “He’s a Rebel”, that was very strongly inspired by “Uptown”, and Aaron Schroeder, Pitney’s publisher, had given the song to Spector. But Spector knew Schroeder, and knew that when he gave you a song, he was going to give it to every other producer who came knocking as well. “He’s a Rebel” was definitely going to be a massive hit for someone, and he wanted it to be for the Crystals. He phoned them up and told them to come out to LA to record the song. And they said no. The Crystals had become sick of Spector. He’d made them record songs like “He Hit Me and it Felt Like a Kiss”, he’d refused to let their lead singer sing lead, and they’d not seen any money from their two big hits. They weren’t going to fly from New York to LA just because he said so. Spector needed a new group, in LA, that he could record doing the song before someone else did it. He could use the Crystals’ name — Philles had the right to put out records by whoever they liked and call it the Crystals — he just needed a group. He found one in the Blossoms, a group who had connections to many of the people Spector was working with. Jack Nitzsche’s wife sometimes sang with them on sessions, and they’d also sung on a Duane Eddy record that Lester Sill had worked on, “Dance With the Guitar Man”, where they’d been credited as the Rebelettes: [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, “Dance With the Guitar Man”] The Blossoms had actually been making records in LA for nearly eight years at this point. They’d started out as the Dreamers one of the many groups who’d been discovered by Johnny Otis, back in the early fifties, and had also been part of the scene around the Penguins, one of whom went to school with some of the girls. They started out as a six-piece group, but slimmed down to a quartet after their first record, on which they were the backing group for Richard Berry: [Excerpt: Richard Berry, “At Last”] The first stable lineup of the Dreamers consisted of Fanita James, Gloria Jones (not the one who would later record “Tainted Love”), and the twin sisters Annette and Nanette Williams. They worked primarily with Berry, backing him on five singles in the mid fifties, and also recording songs he wrote for them under their own name, like “Do Not Forget”, which actually featured another singer, Jennell Hawkins, on lead: [Excerpt: The Dreamers, “Do Not Forget”] They also sang backing vocals on plenty of other R&B records from people in the LA R&B scene — for example it’s them singing backing vocals, with Jesse Belvin, on Etta James’ “Good Rocking Daddy”: [Excerpt: Etta James, “Good Rocking Daddy”] The group signed to Capitol Records in 1957, but not under the name The Dreamers — an executive there said that they all had different skin tones and it made them look like flowers, so they became the Blossoms. They were only at Capitol for a year, but during that time an important lineup change happened — Nanette quit the group and was replaced by a singer called Darlene Wright. From that point on The Blossoms was the main name the group went under, though they also recorded under other names, for example using the name The Playgirls to record “Gee But I’m Lonesome”, a song written by Bruce Johnston, who was briefly dating Annette Williams at the time: [Excerpt: The Playgirls, “Gee But I’m Lonesome”] By 1961 Annette had left the group, and they were down to a trio of Fanita, Gloria, and Darlene. Their records, under whatever name, didn’t do very well, but they became the first-call session singers in LA, working on records by everyone from Sam Cooke to Gene Autry.  So it was the Blossoms who were called on in late 1962 to record “He’s a Rebel”, and it was Darlene Wright who earned her session fee, and no royalties, for singing the lead on a number one record: [Excerpt: The “Crystals” (The Blossoms), “He’s a Rebel”] From that point on, the Blossoms would sing on almost every Spector session for the next three years, and Darlene, who he renamed Darlene Love, would become Spector’s go-to lead vocalist for records under her own name, the Blossoms, Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans, and the Crystals. It was lucky for Spector that he decided to go this route rather than wait for the Crystals, not only because it introduced him to the Blossoms, but because  he’d been right about Aaron Schroeder. As Spector and Sill sat together in the studio where they were mastering the record, some musicians on a break from the studio next door wandered in, and said, “Hey man. we were just playing the same goddam song!” Literally in the next room as Spector mastered the record, his friend Snuff Garrett was producing Vicki Carr singing “He’s a Rebel”: [Excerpt: Vicki Carr, “He’s a Rebel”] Philles got their version out first, and Carr’s record sank without trace, while “The Crystals” went to number one, keeping the song’s writer off the top spot, as Gene Pitney sat at number two with a Bacharach and David song, “Only Love Can Break a Heart”: [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, “Only Love Can Break a Heart”] The Crystals were shocked that Spector released a Crystals record without any of them on it, but La La Brooks had a similar enough voice to Darlene Love’s that they were able to pull the song off live. They had a bit more of a problem with the follow-up, also by the Blossoms but released as the Crystals: [Excerpt: “The Crystals”/The Blossoms, “He’s Sure the Boy I Love”] La La could sing that fine, but she had to work on the spoken part — Darlene was from California and La La had a thick Brooklyn accent. She managed it, just about. As La La was doing such a good job of singing Darlene Love’s parts live — and, more importantly, as she was only fifteen and so didn’t complain about things like royalties — the Crystals finally did get their way and have La La start singing the leads on their singles, starting with “Da Doo Ron Ron”. The problem is, none of the other Crystals were on those records — it was La La singing with the Blossoms, plus other session singers. Listen out for the low harmony in “Da Doo Ron Ron” and see if you recognise the voice: [Excerpt: The Crystals, “Da Doo Ron Ron”] Cher would later move on to bigger things than being a fill-in Crystal. “Da Doo Ron Ron” became another big hit, making number three in the charts, and the follow-up, “Then He Kissed Me”, with La La once again on lead vocals, also made the top ten, but the group were falling apart — Spector was playing La La off against the rest of the group, just to cause trouble, and he’d also lost interest in them once he discovered another group, The Ronettes, who we’ll be hearing more about in future episodes. The singles following “Then He Kissed Me” barely scraped the bottom of the Hot One Hundred, and the group left Philles in 1964. They got a payoff of five thousand dollars, in lieu of all future royalties on any of their recordings. They had no luck having hits without Spector, and one by one the group members left, and the group split up by 1966. Mary, Barbara, and Dee Dee briefly reunited as the Crystals in 1971, and La La and Dee Dee made an album together in the eighties of remakes of the group’s hits, but nothing came of any of these. Dee Dee continues to tour under the Crystals name in North America, while La La performs solo in America and under the Crystals name in Europe. Barbara, the lead singer on the group’s first hits, died in 2018. Darlene Love continues to perform, but we’ll hear more about her and the Blossoms in future episodes, I’m sure. The Crystals were treated appallingly by Spector, and are not often treated much better by the fans, who see them as just interchangeable parts in a machine created by a genius. But it should be remembered that they were the ones who brought Spector the song that became the first Philles hit, that both Barbara and La La were fine singers who sang lead on classic hit records, and that Spector taking all the credit for a team effort doesn’t mean he deserved it. Both the Crystals and the Blossoms deserved better than to have their identities erased in return for a flat session fee, in order to service the ego of one man.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 104: "He's a Rebel" by "The Crystals"

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020 41:44


Episode 104 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "He's a Rebel", and how a song recorded by the Blossoms was released under the name of the Crystals.  Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Sukiyaki" by Kyu Sakamoto. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. A lot of resources were used for this episode. The material on Gene Pitney mostly comes from his page on This is My Story. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the Brill Building scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era, including articles on both The Crystals and the Blossoms. I've referred to two biographies of Spector in this episode, Phil Spector: Out of His Head by Richard Williams and He's a Rebel by Mark Ribkowsky. And information on the Wrecking Crew largely comes from The Wrecking Crew by Kent Hartman. There are many compilations available with some of the hits Spector produced, but I recommend getting Back to Mono, a four-CD overview of his career containing all the major singles put out by Philles.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A brief note -- there are some very brief mentions of domestic abuse here. Nothing I think will upset anyone, but you might want to check the transcript if you're at all unsure. Up to this point, whenever we've looked at a girl group, it's been at one that had, to a greater or lesser extent, some control over their own career. Groups like the Marvelettes, the Chantels, and the Bobbettes all wrote their own material, at least at first, and had distinctive personalities before they ever made a record. But today, we're going to look at a group whose identity was so subsumed in that of their producer that the record we're looking at was released under the name of a different group from the one that recorded it. We're going to look at "He's a Rebel", which was recorded by the Blossoms and released by the Crystals. [Excerpt: “The Crystals” (The Blossoms), "He's a Rebel"] The Crystals, from their very beginnings, were intended as a vehicle for the dreams of men, rather than for their own ambitions. Whereas the girl groups we've looked at so far all formed as groups of friends at school before they moved into professional singing, the Crystals were put together by a man named Benny Wells. Wells had a niece, Barbara Alston, who sang with a couple of her schoolfriends, Mary Thomas and Myrna Giraud. Wells put those three together with two other girls, Dee Dee Kenniebrew and Patsy Wright, to form a five-piece vocal group. Wells seems not to have had much concept of what was in the charts at the time -- the descriptions of the music he had the girls singing talk about him wanting them to sound like the Modernaires, the vocal group who sang with Glenn Miller's band in the early 1940s. But the girls went along with Wells, and Wells had good enough ears to recognise a hit when one was brought to him -- and one was brought to him by Patsy Wright's brother-in-law, Leroy Bates. Bates had written a song called "There's No Other Like My Baby", and Wells could tell it had potential. Incidentally, some books say that the song was based on a gospel song called "There's No Other Like My Jesus", and that claim is repeated on Wikipedia, but I can't find any evidence of a song of that name other than people talking about "There's No Other Like My Baby". There is a gospel song called "There's No Other Name Like Jesus", but that has no obvious resemblance to Bates' song, and so I'm going to assume that the song was totally original. As well as bringing the song, Bates also brought the fledgling group a name -- he had a daughter, Crystal Bates, after whom the group named themselves. The newly-named Crystals took their song to the offices of Hill and Range Music, which as well as being a publishing company also owned Big Top Records, the label that had put out the original version of "Twist and Shout", which had so annoyed Bert Berns. And it was there that they ended up meeting up with Phil Spector. After leaving his role at Atlantic, Spector had started working as a freelance producer, including working for Big Top. According to Spector -- a notorious liar, it's important to remember -- he worked during this time on dozens of hits for which he didn't get any credit, just to earn money. But we do know about some of the records he produced during this time. For example, there was one by a new singer called Gene Pitney. Pitney had been knocking around for years, recording for Decca as part of a duo called Jamie and Jane: [Excerpt: Jamie and Jane, "Faithful Our Love"] And for Blaze Records as Billy Bryan: [Excerpt: Billy Bryan, "Going Back to My Love"] But he'd recently signed to Musicor, a label owned by Aaron Schroeder, and had recorded a hit under his own name. Pitney had written "(I Wanna) Love My Life Away", and had taken advantage of the new multitracking technology to record his vocals six times over, creating a unique sound that took the record into the top forty: [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, "(I Wanna) Love My Life Away"] But while that had been a hit, his second single for Musicor was a flop, and so for the third single, Musicor decided to pull out the big guns. They ran a session at which basically the whole of the Brill Building turned up. Leiber and Stoller were to produce a song they'd written for Pitney, the new hot husband-and-wife songwriting team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil were there, as was Burt Bacharach, and so were Goffin and King, who wrote the song that *Spector* was to produce for Pitney. All of them were in the control booth, and all of them were chipping in ideas. As you might expect with that many cooks, the session did not go smoothly, and to make matters worse, Pitney was suffering from a terrible cold. The session ended up costing thirteen thousand dollars, at a time when an average recording session cost five hundred dollars. On the song Spector was producing on that session, Goffin and King's "Every Breath I Take", Pitney knew that with the cold he would be completely unable to hit the last note in full voice, and went into falsetto. Luckily, everyone thought it sounded good, and he could pretend it was deliberate, rather than the result of necessity: [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, "Every Breath I Take"] The record only went to number forty-two, but it resuscitated Pitney's singing career, and forged a working relationship between the two men. But soon after that, Spector had flown back to LA to work with his old friend Lester Sill. Sill and producer/songwriter, Lee Hazelwood, had been making records with the guitarist Duane Eddy, producing a string of hits like “Rebel Rouser”: [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, "Rebel Rouser"] But Eddy had recently signed directly to a label, rather than going through Sill and Hazelwood's company as before, and so Sill and Hazelwood had been looking for new artists, and they'd recently signed a group called the Paris Sisters to their production company. Sill had decided to get Spector in to produce the group, and Spector came up with a production that Sill was sure would be a hit, on a song called "I Love How You Love Me", written by Barry Mann with another writer called Jack Keller: [Excerpt: The Paris Sisters, "I Love How You Love Me"] Spector was becoming a perfectionist -- he insisted on recording the rhythm track for that record at one studio, and the string part at another, and apparently spent fifty hours on the mix -- and Sill was spending more and more time in the studio with Spector, fascinated at his attitude to the work he was doing. This led to a breakup between Sill and Hazelwood -- their business relationship was already strained, but Hazelwood got jealous of all the time that Sill was spending with Spector, and decided to split their partnership and go and produce Duane Eddy, without Sill, at Eddy's new label. So Sill was suddenly in the market for a new business partner, and he and Spector decided that they were going to start up their own label, Philles, although by this point everyone who had ever worked with Spector was warning Sill that it was a bad idea to go into business with him. But Spector and Sill kept their intentions secret for a while, and so when Spector met the Crystals at Hill and Range's offices, everyone at Hill and Range just assumed that he was still working for them as a freelance producer, and that the Crystals were going to be recording for Big Top. Freddie Bienstock of Hill & Range later said, "We were very angry because we felt they were Big Top artists. He was merely supposed to produce them for us. There was no question about the fact that he was just rehearsing them for Big Top—hell, he rehearsed them for weeks in our offices. And then he just stole them right out of here. That precipitated a breach of contract with us. We were just incensed because that was a terrific group, and for him to do that shows the type of character he was. We felt he was less than ethical, and, obviously, he was then shown the door.” Bienstock had further words for Spector too, ones I can't repeat here because of content rules about adult language, but they weren't flattering. Spector had been dating Bienstock's daughter, with Bienstock's approval, but that didn't last once Spector betrayed Bienstock. But Spector didn't care. He had his own New York girl group, one that could compete with the Bobbettes or the Chantels or the Shirelles, and he was going to make the Crystals as big as any of them, and he wasn't going to cut Big Top in. He slowed down "There's No Other Like My Baby" and it became the first release on Philles Records, with Barbara Alston singing lead: [Excerpt: The Crystals, "There's No Other Like My Baby"] That record was cut late at night in June 1961. In fact it was cut on Prom Night -- three of the girls came straight to the session from their High School prom, still wearing their prom dresses. Spector wrote the B-side, a song that was originally intended to be the A-side called "Oh Yeah, Maybe Baby", but everyone quickly realised that "There's No Other Like My Baby" was the hit, and it made the top twenty. While Spector was waiting for the money to come in on the first Philles record, he took another job, with Liberty Records, working for his friend Snuff Garrett. He got a thirty thousand dollar advance, made a single flop record with them with an unknown singer named Obrey Wilson, and then quit, keeping his thirty thousand dollars. Once "There's No Other" made the charts, Spector took the Crystals into the studio again, to record a song by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil that he'd got from Aldon Music. Spector was becoming increasingly convinced that he'd made a mistake in partnering with Lester Sill, and he should really have been working with Don Kirshner, and he was in discussions with Kirshner which came to nothing about them having some sort of joint project. While those discussions fell through, almost all the songs that Spector would use for the next few years would come from Aldon songwriters, and "Uptown" was a perfect example of the new kind of socially-relevant pop songwriting that had been pioneered by Goffin and King, but which Mann and Weil were now making their own. Before becoming a professional songwriter, Weil had been part of the Greenwich Village folk scene, and while she wasn't going to write anything as explicitly political as the work of Pete Seeger, she thought that songs should at least try to be about the real world. "Uptown" was the first example of a theme which would become a major motif for the Crystals' records -- a song about a man who is looked down upon by society, but who the singer believes is better than his reputation. Mann and Weil's song combined that potent teen emotion with an inspiration Weil had had, seeing a handsome Black man pushing a hand truck in the Garment District, and realising that even though he was oppressed by his job, and "a nobody" when he was working downtown, he was still somebody when he was at home. They originally wrote the song for Tony Orlando to sing, but Spector insisted, rightly, that the song worked better with female voices, and that the Crystals should do it. Spector took Mann and Weil's song and gave it a production that evoked the Latin feel of Leiber and Stoller's records for the Drifters: [Excerpt: The Crystals, "Uptown"] By the time of this second record, the Crystals had already been through one lineup change. As soon as she left school, Myrna Giraud got married, and she didn't want to perform on stage any more. She would still sing with the girls in the studio for a little while -- she's on every track of their first album, though she left altogether soon after this recording -- but she was a married woman now and didn't want to be in a group.  The girls needed a replacement, and they also needed something else -- a lead singer. All the girls loved singing, but none of them wanted to be out in front singing lead. Luckily, Dee Dee Kenniebrew's mother was a secretary at the school attended by a fourteen-year-old gospel singer named La La Brooks, and she heard Brooks singing and invited her to join the group. Brooks soon became the group's lead vocalist on stage. But in the studio, Spector didn't want to use her as the lead vocalist. He insisted on Barbara singing the lead on "Uptown", but in a sign of things to come, Mann and Weil weren't happy with her performance -- Spector had to change parts of the melody to accommodate her range -- and they begged Spector to rerecord the lead vocal with Little Eva singing. However, Eva became irritated with Spector's incessant demands for more takes and his micromanagement, cursed him out, and walked out of the studio. The record was released with Barbara's original lead vocal, and while Mann and Weil weren't happy with that, listeners were, as it went to number thirteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The Crystals, "Uptown"] Little Eva later released her own version of the song, on the Dimension Dolls compilation we talked about in the episode on "The Loco-Motion": [Excerpt: Little Eva, "Uptown"] It was Little Eva who inspired the next Crystals single, as well -- as we talked about in the episode on her, she inspired a truly tasteless Goffin and King song called "He Hit Me And It Felt Like A Kiss", which I will not be excerpting, but which was briefly released as the Crystals' third single, before being withdrawn after people objected to hearing teenage girls sing about how romantic and loving domestic abuse is. There seems to be some suggestion that the record was released partly as a way for Spector to annoy Lester Sill, who by all accounts was furious at the release. Spector was angry at Sill over the amount of money he'd made from the Paris Sisters recordings, and decided that he was being treated unfairly and wanted to force Sill out of their partnership. Certainly the next recording by the Crystals was meant to get rid of some other business associates. Two of Philles' distributors had a contract which said they were entitled to the royalties on two Crystals singles. So the second one was a ten-minute song called "The Screw", split over two sides of a disc, which sounded like this: [Excerpt: The Crystals, "The Screw"] Only a handful of promotional copies of that were ever produced. One went to Lester Sill, who by this point had been bought out of his share of the company for a small fraction of what it was worth. The last single Spector recorded for Philles while Sill was still involved with the label was another Crystals record, one that had the involvement of many people Sill had brought into Spector's orbit, and who would continue working with him long after the two men stopped working together. Spector had decided he was going to start recording in California again, and two of Sill's assistants would become regular parts of Spector's new hit-making machine. The first of these was a composer and arranger called Jack Nitzsche, who we'll be seeing a lot more of in this podcast over the next couple of years, in some unexpected places. Nitzsche was a young songwriter, whose biggest credit up to this point was a very minor hit for Preston Epps, "Bongo, Bongo, Bongo": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Bongo Bongo"] Nitzsche would become Spector's most important collaborator, and his arrangements, as much as Spector's production, are what characterise the "Wall of Sound" for which Spector would become famous.  The other assistant of Sill's who became important to Spector's future was a saxophone player named Steve Douglas. We've seen Douglas before, briefly, in the episode on "LSD-25" -- he played in the original lineup of Kip and the Flips, one of the groups we talked about in that episode. He'd left Kip and the Flips to join Duane Eddy's band, and it was through Eddy that he had started working with Sill, when he played on many of Eddy's hits, most famously "Peter Gunn": [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, "Peter Gunn"] Douglas was the union contractor for the session, and for most of the rest of Spector's sixties sessions. This is something we've not talked about previously, but when we look at records produced in LA for the next few years, in particular, it's something that will come up a lot. When a producer wanted to make records at the time, he (for they were all men) would not contact all the musicians himself. Instead, he'd get in touch with a trusted musician and say "I have a session at three o'clock. I need two guitars, bass, drums, a clarinet and a cello" (or whatever combination of instruments), and sometimes might say, "If you can get this particular player, that would be good". The musician would then find out which other musicians were available, get them into the studio, and file the forms which made sure they got paid according to union rules. The contractor, not the producer, decided who was going to play on the session. In the case of this Crystals session, Spector already had a couple of musicians in mind -- a bass player named Ray Pohlman, and his old guitar teacher Howard Roberts, a jazz guitarist who had played on "To Know Him is to Love Him" and "I Love How You Love Me" for Spector already. But Spector wanted a *big* sound -- he wanted the rhythm instruments doubled, so there was a second bass player, Jimmy Bond, and a second guitarist, Tommy Tedesco. Along with them and Douglas were piano player Al de Lory and drummer Hal Blaine. This was the first session on which Spector used any of these musicians, and with the exception of Roberts, who hated working on Spector's sessions and soon stopped, this group put together by Douglas would become the core of what became known as "The Wrecking Crew", a loose group of musicians who would play on a large number of the hit records that would come out of LA in the sixties. Spector also had a guaranteed hit song -- one by Gene Pitney. While Pitney wrote few of his own records, he'd established himself a parallel career as a writer for other people. He'd written "Today's Teardrops", the B-side of Roy Orbison's hit "Blue Angel": [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Today's Teardrops"] And had followed that up with a couple of the biggest hits of the early sixties, Bobby Vee's "Rubber Ball": [Excerpt: Bobby Vee, "Rubber Ball"] And Ricky Nelson's "Hello Mary Lou": [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello, Mary Lou"] Pitney had written a song, "He's a Rebel", that was very strongly inspired by "Uptown", and Aaron Schroeder, Pitney's publisher, had given the song to Spector. But Spector knew Schroeder, and knew that when he gave you a song, he was going to give it to every other producer who came knocking as well. "He's a Rebel" was definitely going to be a massive hit for someone, and he wanted it to be for the Crystals. He phoned them up and told them to come out to LA to record the song. And they said no. The Crystals had become sick of Spector. He'd made them record songs like "He Hit Me and it Felt Like a Kiss", he'd refused to let their lead singer sing lead, and they'd not seen any money from their two big hits. They weren't going to fly from New York to LA just because he said so. Spector needed a new group, in LA, that he could record doing the song before someone else did it. He could use the Crystals' name -- Philles had the right to put out records by whoever they liked and call it the Crystals -- he just needed a group. He found one in the Blossoms, a group who had connections to many of the people Spector was working with. Jack Nitzsche's wife sometimes sang with them on sessions, and they'd also sung on a Duane Eddy record that Lester Sill had worked on, "Dance With the Guitar Man", where they'd been credited as the Rebelettes: [Excerpt: Duane Eddy, "Dance With the Guitar Man"] The Blossoms had actually been making records in LA for nearly eight years at this point. They'd started out as the Dreamers one of the many groups who'd been discovered by Johnny Otis, back in the early fifties, and had also been part of the scene around the Penguins, one of whom went to school with some of the girls. They started out as a six-piece group, but slimmed down to a quartet after their first record, on which they were the backing group for Richard Berry: [Excerpt: Richard Berry, "At Last"] The first stable lineup of the Dreamers consisted of Fanita James, Gloria Jones (not the one who would later record "Tainted Love"), and the twin sisters Annette and Nanette Williams. They worked primarily with Berry, backing him on five singles in the mid fifties, and also recording songs he wrote for them under their own name, like "Do Not Forget", which actually featured another singer, Jennell Hawkins, on lead: [Excerpt: The Dreamers, "Do Not Forget"] They also sang backing vocals on plenty of other R&B records from people in the LA R&B scene -- for example it's them singing backing vocals, with Jesse Belvin, on Etta James' "Good Rocking Daddy": [Excerpt: Etta James, "Good Rocking Daddy"] The group signed to Capitol Records in 1957, but not under the name The Dreamers -- an executive there said that they all had different skin tones and it made them look like flowers, so they became the Blossoms. They were only at Capitol for a year, but during that time an important lineup change happened -- Nanette quit the group and was replaced by a singer called Darlene Wright. From that point on The Blossoms was the main name the group went under, though they also recorded under other names, for example using the name The Playgirls to record "Gee But I'm Lonesome", a song written by Bruce Johnston, who was briefly dating Annette Williams at the time: [Excerpt: The Playgirls, "Gee But I'm Lonesome"] By 1961 Annette had left the group, and they were down to a trio of Fanita, Gloria, and Darlene. Their records, under whatever name, didn't do very well, but they became the first-call session singers in LA, working on records by everyone from Sam Cooke to Gene Autry.  So it was the Blossoms who were called on in late 1962 to record "He's a Rebel", and it was Darlene Wright who earned her session fee, and no royalties, for singing the lead on a number one record: [Excerpt: The "Crystals" (The Blossoms), "He's a Rebel"] From that point on, the Blossoms would sing on almost every Spector session for the next three years, and Darlene, who he renamed Darlene Love, would become Spector's go-to lead vocalist for records under her own name, the Blossoms, Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans, and the Crystals. It was lucky for Spector that he decided to go this route rather than wait for the Crystals, not only because it introduced him to the Blossoms, but because  he'd been right about Aaron Schroeder. As Spector and Sill sat together in the studio where they were mastering the record, some musicians on a break from the studio next door wandered in, and said, "Hey man. we were just playing the same goddam song!" Literally in the next room as Spector mastered the record, his friend Snuff Garrett was producing Vicki Carr singing "He's a Rebel": [Excerpt: Vicki Carr, "He's a Rebel"] Philles got their version out first, and Carr's record sank without trace, while "The Crystals" went to number one, keeping the song's writer off the top spot, as Gene Pitney sat at number two with a Bacharach and David song, "Only Love Can Break a Heart": [Excerpt: Gene Pitney, "Only Love Can Break a Heart"] The Crystals were shocked that Spector released a Crystals record without any of them on it, but La La Brooks had a similar enough voice to Darlene Love's that they were able to pull the song off live. They had a bit more of a problem with the follow-up, also by the Blossoms but released as the Crystals: [Excerpt: "The Crystals"/The Blossoms, "He's Sure the Boy I Love"] La La could sing that fine, but she had to work on the spoken part -- Darlene was from California and La La had a thick Brooklyn accent. She managed it, just about. As La La was doing such a good job of singing Darlene Love's parts live -- and, more importantly, as she was only fifteen and so didn't complain about things like royalties -- the Crystals finally did get their way and have La La start singing the leads on their singles, starting with "Da Doo Ron Ron". The problem is, none of the other Crystals were on those records -- it was La La singing with the Blossoms, plus other session singers. Listen out for the low harmony in "Da Doo Ron Ron" and see if you recognise the voice: [Excerpt: The Crystals, "Da Doo Ron Ron"] Cher would later move on to bigger things than being a fill-in Crystal. "Da Doo Ron Ron" became another big hit, making number three in the charts, and the follow-up, "Then He Kissed Me", with La La once again on lead vocals, also made the top ten, but the group were falling apart -- Spector was playing La La off against the rest of the group, just to cause trouble, and he'd also lost interest in them once he discovered another group, The Ronettes, who we'll be hearing more about in future episodes. The singles following "Then He Kissed Me" barely scraped the bottom of the Hot One Hundred, and the group left Philles in 1964. They got a payoff of five thousand dollars, in lieu of all future royalties on any of their recordings. They had no luck having hits without Spector, and one by one the group members left, and the group split up by 1966. Mary, Barbara, and Dee Dee briefly reunited as the Crystals in 1971, and La La and Dee Dee made an album together in the eighties of remakes of the group's hits, but nothing came of any of these. Dee Dee continues to tour under the Crystals name in North America, while La La performs solo in America and under the Crystals name in Europe. Barbara, the lead singer on the group's first hits, died in 2018. Darlene Love continues to perform, but we'll hear more about her and the Blossoms in future episodes, I'm sure. The Crystals were treated appallingly by Spector, and are not often treated much better by the fans, who see them as just interchangeable parts in a machine created by a genius. But it should be remembered that they were the ones who brought Spector the song that became the first Philles hit, that both Barbara and La La were fine singers who sang lead on classic hit records, and that Spector taking all the credit for a team effort doesn't mean he deserved it. Both the Crystals and the Blossoms deserved better than to have their identities erased in return for a flat session fee, in order to service the ego of one man.

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes
Cooksey and The Coach 8: Aldon Baker Part 2, Follow Up With Robb

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2020 97:48


Following the controversial interview of Aldon Baker, Coach Robb breaks down the conversation. Cooksey knows a little, but Robb knows a lot and he gives us the science that supports or destroy's both Cooksey and Aldons arguments. If you want the science behind the conversation between Cooksey and Aldon, this podcast is for you.

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes
Cooksey and The Coach 7 : The Aldon Baker Interview

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 47:48


This all started when Broc Tickle was fired from the Red Bull KTM team for a positive drug test. Unfortunately, Jason Anderson re-ignited the issue in a post-race interview. I was surprised by Aldon Baker and his implications about James Stewart, but you can make up your own mind about all this drama. Here is the original article:https://www.motoxaddicts.com/2018/05/17/cookseys-hard-truth-the-broc-tickle-screw-job/Here is the Jason Anderson interview that re-ignited the situation: https://youtu.be/vbQXz-KpoZc

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes
Cooksey and The Coach6: Answering back to both Aldon Baker and Steve Matthes

Cooksey's Weekend Cliff Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 72:13


We took this episode to explain FACTS about performance-enhancing drugs and why they exist in Supercross/Motocross, along with other sports. We explain in detail the flaws in the testing system and respond I respond to Steve Matthes's ridiculous claims about me speculating wildly. Here is a link to the story that started the beef and the links to back up our claims:https://www.motoxaddicts.com/2018/05/17/cookseys-hard-truth-the-broc-tickle-screw-job/https://www.wada-ama.org/en/athlete-biological-passporthttps://www.usada.org/news/testing-numbers/https://www.usada.org/news/athlete-test-history/https://www.wada-ama.org/en/questions-answers/epo-detectionhttps://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/athlete-biological-passport/athlete-biological-passport-abp-operating-guidelines

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 96: "The Loco-Motion" by Little Eva

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 36:48


Episode ninety-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "The Loco-Motion" by Little Eva, and how a demo by Carole King's babysitter became one of the biggest hits of the sixties. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Duke of Earl" by Gene Chandler. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of Little Eva, so I've used a variety of sources, including the articles on Little Eva and The Cookies at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King's autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era, including articles on both Little Eva and The Cookies. There are no decent CDs of Eva's material readily available, but I can recommend two overlapping compilations. This compilation contains Little Eva's only sixties album in full, along with some tracks by Carole King, the Cookies, and the Ronettes, while Dimension Dolls is a compilation from 1963 that overlaps substantially with that album but contains several tracks not on it.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before this begins -- there is some mention of domestic violence in this episode. If that's something that might upset you, please check the transcript of the episode at 500songs.com if reading it might be easier than listening. A couple of months back, we talked about Goffin and King, and the early days of the Brill Building sound. Today we're going to take another look at them, and at a singer who recorded some of their best material, both solo and in a group, but who would always be overshadowed by the first single they wrote for her, when she was still working as their childminder. Today, we're going to look at Little Eva and "The Loco-Motion", and the short history of Dimension Records: [Excerpt: Little Eva, "The Loco-Motion"] The story of Little Eva is intertwined with the story of the Cookies, one of the earliest of the girl groups, and so we should probably start with them. We've mentioned the Cookies earlier, in the episode on "What'd I Say", but we didn't look at them in any great detail. The group started out in the mid-fifties, as a group of schoolgirls singing together in New York -- Dorothy Jones, her cousin Beulah Robertson, and a friend, Darlene McRae, who had all been in the choir at their local Baptist Church. They formed a group and made their first appearance at the famous Harlem Apollo talent contests, where they came third, to Joe Tex and a vocal group called the Flairs (not, I think, any of the Flairs groups we've looked at). They were seen at that contest by Jesse Stone, who gave them the name "The Cookies". He signed them to Aladdin Records, and produced and co-wrote their first single, "All-Night Mambo". That wasn't commercially successful, but Stone liked them enough that he then got them signed to Atlantic, where he again wrote their first single for the label. That first single was relatively unsuccessful, but their second single on Atlantic, "In Paradise", did chart, making number nine on the R&B chart: [Excerpt: The Cookies, "In Paradise"] But the B-side to that record would end up being more important to their career in the long run. "Passing Time" was the very first song by Neil Sedaka and Howie Greenfield to get recorded, even before Sedaka's recordings with the Tokens or his own successful solo records: [Excerpt: The Cookies, "Passing Time"] But then two things happened. Firstly, one of the girls, Beulah Robertson, fell out with Jesse Stone, who sacked her from the group. Stone got in a new vocalist, Margie Hendrix, to replace her, and after one more single the group stopped making singles for Atlantic. But they continued recording for smaller labels, and they also had regular gigs as backing vocalists for Atlantic, on records like "Lipstick, Powder, and Paint" by Big Joe Turner: [Excerpt: Big Joe Turner, "Lipstick, Powder and Paint"] "It's Too Late" by Chuck Willis: [Excerpt: Chuck Willis, "It's Too Late"] And "Lonely Avenue" by Ray Charles: [Excerpt: Ray Charles, "Lonely Avenue"] It was working with Ray Charles that led to the breakup of the original lineup of the Cookies -- Charles was putting together his own group, and wanted the Cookies as his backing vocalists, but Dorothy was pregnant, and decided she'd rather stay behind and continue working as a session singer than go out on the road. Darlene and Margie went off to become the core of Charles' new backing group, the Raelettes, and they would play a major part in the sound of Charles' records for the next few years. It's Margie, for example, who can be heard duetting with Charles on "The Right Time": [Excerpt: Ray Charles, "The Right Time"] Dorothy stayed behind and put together a new lineup of Cookies. To make sure the group sounded the same, she got Darlene's sister Earl-Jean into the group -- Darlene and Earl-Jean looked and sounded so similar that many histories of the group say they're the same person -- and got another of her cousins, Margaret Ross, to take over the spot that had previously been Beulah's before Margie had taken her place.  This new version of the Cookies didn't really start doing much for a couple of years, while Dorothy was raising her newborn and Earl-Jean and Margaret were finishing high school. But in 1961 they started again in earnest, when Neil Sedaka remembered the Cookies and called Dorothy up, saying he knew someone who needed a vocal group. Gerry Goffin and Carole King had become hot songwriters, and they'd also become increasingly interested in record production after Carole had been involved in the making of "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" Carole was recording her own demos of the songs she and Goffin were writing, and was increasingly making them fully-produced recordings in their own right. The first record the new Cookies sang on was one that seems to have started out as one of these demos. "Halfway to Paradise" by Tony Orlando sounds exactly like a Drifters record, and Orlando was, at the time, a sixteen-year-old demo singer. My guess, and it is only a guess, is that this was a demo intended for the Drifters, that it was turned down, and so the demo was released as a record itself: [Excerpt: Tony Orlando, "Halfway to Paradise"] That made the lower reaches of the Hot One Hundred, while a British cover version by Billy Fury made number three in the UK. From this point on, the new lineup of the Cookies were once again the premier session singers. They added extra backing vocals to a lot of the Drifters' records at this time, and would provide backing vocals for most of Atlantic's artists, as the earlier lineup had. They were also effectively the in-house backing singers for Aldon Music -- as well as singing on every Goffin and King demo, they were also singing with Neil Sedaka: [Excerpt: Neil Sedaka, "Breaking Up is Hard to Do"] But it was Goffin and King who spent the most time working with the Cookies, and who pushed them as recording artists in their own right. They started with a solo record for Dorothy, "Taking That Long Walk Home", a song that was very much "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" part two: [Excerpt: Dorothy Jones, "Taking That Long Walk Home"] The Cookies were doing huge amounts of session work, working twelve hours a day, seven days a week. Dorothy Jones described being in the studio working on a King Curtis session until literally fifteen minutes before giving birth.  They weren't the only ones working hard, though. Goffin and King were writing from their Aldon offices every single day, writing songs for the Drifters, the Shirelles, Bobby Rydell, Bobby Vee, Gene Pitney, the Crickets, the Everly Brothers, and more. And on top of that they had a child and Carole King was pregnant with a second one.  And, this being the very early 1960s, it never occurred to either Goffin or King that just because Carole King was working the exact same number of hours as Goffin, that might mean she shouldn't also be doing the housework and looking after the children with no help from Goffin. There was only one way they could continue their level of productivity, and that was to get someone in to help out Carole. She mentioned to the Cookies that she was looking for someone to help her with the children, and Earl-Jean mentioned that a nineteen-year-old acquaintance -- her friend's husband's sister -- had just moved to New York from North Carolina to try to become a singer and was looking for any work she could get while she was trying to make it. Eva Narcissus Boyd, Earl-Jean's acquaintance, moved in with Goffin and King and became their live-in childminder for $35 a week plus room and board. Goffin and King had known that Eva was a singer before they hired her, and they discovered that her voice was rather good. Not only that, but she blended well with the Cookies, and was friends with them. She became an unofficial "fourth Cookie", and was soon in the studio on a regular basis too -- and when she was, that meant that Eva's sister was looking after the kids, as a subcontracted babysitter. During this time, Don Kirshner's attitude was still that he was determined to get the next hit for every artist that had a hit. But that wasn't always possible.  Cameo-Parkway had, after the success they'd had with "The Twist", fully jumped on the dance-craze bandwagon, and they'd hit on another dance that might be the next Twist. The Mashed Potato was a dance that James Brown had been doing on stage for a few years, and in the wake of "The Twist", Brown had had a hit with a song about it "(Do the) Mashed Potatoes", which was credited to Nat Kendrick & the Swans rather than to Brown for contractual reasons: [Excerpt: Nat Kendrick and the Swans, "(Do the) Mashed Potatoes"] Cameo-Parkway had picked up on that dance, and had done just what Kirshner always did and created a soundalike of a recent hit -- and in fact they'd mashed up, if you'll pardon the expression, two recent hits. In this case, they'd taken the sound of "Please Mr. Postman", slightly reworked the lyrics to be about Brown's dance, and given it to session singer Dee Dee Sharp: [Excerpt: Dee Dee Sharp, "Mashed Potato Time"] That had gone to number two on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and even inspired its own rip-offs, like "The Monster Mash" by Bobby "Boris" Pickett: [Excerpt: Bobby "Boris" Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers, "The Monster Mash"] So Kirshner just assumed that Sharp would be looking for another dance hit, one that sounded just like "Mashed Potato Time", and got Goffin and King to write one to submit to her.  Unfortunately for him, he'd assumed wrong. Cameo-Parkway was owned by a group of successful songwriters, and they didn't need outside writers bringing them hits when they could write their own. Dee Dee Sharp wasn't going to be recording Goffin and King's song.  When he listened to the demo, Don Kirshner was astonished that they hadn't taken the song. It had "hit" written all over it. He decided that he was going to start his own record label, Dimension Records, and he was just going to release that demo as the single. The Cookies went into the studio to overdub another layer of backing vocals, but otherwise the record that was released was the demo Eva -- now renamed "Little Eva" -- had sung: [Excerpt: Little Eva, "The Loco-Motion"] The record went to number one, and made Little Eva a star. It also made Gerry Goffin a successful producer, because even though Goffin and King had coproduced it, Goffin got sole production credit on this, and on other records the two produced together. According to King, Goffin was the one in the control room for their productions, while she would be on the studio floor, and she didn't really question whether what she was doing counted as production too until much later -- and anyway, getting the sole credit was apparently important to Gerry. "The Loco-Motion" was such a big hit that it inspired its own knockoffs, including one song cheekily called "Little Eva" by a group called "The Locomotions"  -- so the record label would say "Little Eva, The Locomotions", and people might buy it by mistake. You'll be shocked to learn that that one was on a Morris Levy label: [Excerpt: The Locomotions, "Little Eva"] That group featured Leon Huff, who would later go on to make a lot of much better records. Meanwhile, as Little Eva was now a star, Carole King once again had to look for a childminder. This time she insisted that anyone she hired be unable to sing, so she wouldn't keep having to do this. Dimension Records was soon churning out singles, all of them involving the Cookies, and Eva, and Goffin and King. They put out "Everybody's Got a Dance But Me" by Big Dee Irwin, a song that excerpted "The Loco-Motion", "Wah Watusi", "Hully Gully" and "Twist and Shout" among many others, with the Cookies on backing vocals, and with Goffin as the credited producer: [Excerpt: Big Dee Irwin, "Everybody's Got a Dance But Me"] That wasn't a hit, but Dimension soon released two more big hits. One was a solo single by Carole King, "It Might as Well Rain Until September", which went to number twenty even though its only national exposure was a disastrous appearance by King on American Bandstand which left her feeling humiliated: [Excerpt: Carole King, "It Might as Well Rain Until September"] Her solo performing career wouldn't properly take off for a few more years, but that was a step towards it. The Cookies also had a hit on Dimension around this point. Goffin and King had written a song called "Chains" for the Everly Brothers, who had recorded it but not released it: [Excerpt: The Everly Brothers, "Chains"] So they gave the song to the Cookies instead, with Little Eva on additional vocals, and it made the pop top twenty, and the R&B top ten: [Excerpt: The Cookies, "Chains"] Several people have pointed out that that lyric can be read as having an element of BDSM to it, and it's not the only Goffin and King song from this period that does -- there's a 1964 B-side they wrote for Eva called "Please Hurt Me", which is fairly blatant: [Excerpt: Little Eva, "Please Hurt Me"] But the BDSM comparison has also been made -- wrongly, in my opinion -- about one of the most utterly misguided songs that Goffin and King ever wrote -- a song inspired by Little Eva telling them that her boyfriend beat her up. They'd asked her why she put up with it, and she said that he only hit her because he loved her. They were inspired by that to write "He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss)", an utterly grotesque song which, in a version produced by Phil Spector for the Crystals, was issued as a single but soon withdrawn due to general horror. I won't be excerpting that one here, though it's easy enough to find if you want to. (Having said that, I should also say that while people have said that Goffin & King's material at this point flirts with BDSM, my understanding of BDSM, as it has been explained to me by friends who indulge in such activities, is that consent is paramount, so I don't think that "He Hit Me" should be talked about in those terms. I don't want anything I've said here to contribute to the blurring of distinctions between consensual kink and abuse, which are too often conflated). Originally, Eva's follow-up to "The Loco-Motion" was going to be "One Fine Day", another Goffin and King song, but no matter how much Goffin and King worked on the track, they couldn't come up with an arrangement, and eventually they passed the song over to the Tokens, who solved the arrangement problems (though they kept King's piano part) and produced a version of it for the Chiffons, for whom it became a hit: [Excerpt: The Chiffons, "One Fine Day"] Instead, Goffin and King gave Eva "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby". This is, in my opinion, the best thing that Eva ever did, and it made the top twenty, though it wasn't as big a hit as "The Loco-Motion": [Excerpt: Little Eva, "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby"] And Eva also appeared on another Cookies record, "Don't Say Nothing Bad About My Baby", which made the top ten: [Excerpt: The Cookies, "Don't Say Nothing Bad About My Baby"] The Cookies, Eva, and Goffin and King were such a package deal that Dimension released an album called Dimension Dolls featuring the first few hits of each act and padded out with demos they'd made for other artists.  This hit-making machine was so successful for a brief period in 1962 and 63 that even Eva's sister Idalia got in on the act, releasing a song by Goffin, King, and Jack Keller, "Hula Hoppin'": [Excerpt: Idalia Boyd, "Hula Hoppin'"] For Eva's third single, Gerry Goffin and Jack Keller wrote a song called "Let's Turkey Trot", which also made the top twenty. But that would be the last time that Eva would have a hit of her own. At first, the fact that she had a couple of flop singles wasn't a problem -- no artists at this time were consistent hit-makers, and it was normal for someone to have a few top ten hits, then a couple at number 120 or something, before going back to the top. And she was touring with Dick Clark's Caravan of Stars, and still in high demand as a live performer. She also, in 1963, recorded a version of "Swinging on a Star" with Big Dee Irwin, though she wasn't credited on the label, and that made the top forty (and made number seven in the UK): [Excerpt: Big Dee Irwin, "Swinging on a Star"] But everything changed for Little Eva, and for the whole world of Brill Building pop, in 1964. In part, this was because the Beatles became successful and changed the pop landscape, but by itself that shouldn't have destroyed the careers of Eva or the Cookies, who the Beatles admired -- they recorded a cover of "Chains", and they used to play "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby" in their live sets. But Don Kirshner decided to sell Aldon Music and Dimension Records to Columbia Pictures, and to start concentrating on the West Coast rather than New York. The idea was that they could come up with songs that would be used in films and TV, and make more money that way, and that worked out for many people, including Kirshner himself. But even when artists like Eva and the Cookies got hit material, the British Invasion made it hard for them to get a footing. For example, Goffin and King wrote a song for Earl-Jean from the Cookies to record as a solo track just after Dimension was taken over by Columbia. That record did make the top forty: [Excerpt: Earl-Jean, "I'm Into Something Good"] But then Herman's Hermits released their version, which became a much bigger hit. That sort of thing kept happening. The Cookies ended up splitting up by 1967. Little Eva did end up doing some TV work -- most famously, she sang a dance song in an episode of the Hanna-Barbera cartoon Magilla Gorilla: [Excerpt: Little Eva "Makin' With the Magilla"] But Dimension Records was not a priority for anyone -- Columbia already owned their own labels, and didn't need another one -- and the label was being wound down. And then Al Nevins, Don Kirshner's partner in Aldon, died. He'd always been friendly with Eva, and without him to advocate for her, the label sold her contract off to Bell Records. From that point on, she could no longer rely on Goffin and King, and she hopped between a number of different labels, none of them with any great success. After spending seven years going from label to label, and having split up with her husband, she quit the music business in 1971 and moved back to North Carolina. She was sick of the music industry, and particularly sick of the lack of money -- she had signed a lot of bad contracts, and was making no royalties from sales of her records. She worked menial day jobs, survived on welfare for a while, became active in her local church, and depending on which reports you read either ran a soul-food restaurant or merely worked there as a waitress. Meanwhile, "The Loco-Motion" was a perennial hit. Her version re-charted in the UK in the early seventies, and Todd Rundgren produced a version for the heavy metal band Grand Funk Railroad which went to number one in the US in 1974: [Excerpt: Grand Funk Railroad, "The Loco-Motion"] And then in 1988 an Australian soap star, Kylie Minogue, recorded her own version, which went top five worldwide and started Minogue's own successful pop career: [Excerpt: Kylie Minogue, "The Loco-Motion"] That record becoming a hit got a series of "where are they now?" articles written about Eva, and she was persuaded to come out of retirement and start performing again -- though having been so badly hurt by the industry, she was very dubious at first, and she also had scruples because of her strong religious faith. She later said that she'd left the contracts on her table for eight months before signing them -- but when she finally did, she found that her audience was still there for her. For the rest of her life, she was a popular performer on the oldies circuit, performing on package tours with people like Bobby Vee and Brian Hyland, playing state fairs and touring Europe. She continued performing until shortly before her death, even after she was diagnosed with the cancer that eventually killed her, as she once again connected with the audiences who had loved her music back when she was still a teenager. She died, aged fifty-nine, in 2003.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 96: “The Loco-Motion” by Little Eva

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020


Episode ninety-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “The Loco-Motion” by Little Eva, and how a demo by Carole King’s babysitter became one of the biggest hits of the sixties. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Duke of Earl” by Gene Chandler. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of Little Eva, so I’ve used a variety of sources, including the articles on Little Eva and The Cookies at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King’s autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era, including articles on both Little Eva and The Cookies. There are no decent CDs of Eva’s material readily available, but I can recommend two overlapping compilations. This compilation contains Little Eva’s only sixties album in full, along with some tracks by Carole King, the Cookies, and the Ronettes, while Dimension Dolls is a compilation from 1963 that overlaps substantially with that album but contains several tracks not on it.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before this begins — there is some mention of domestic violence in this episode. If that’s something that might upset you, please check the transcript of the episode at 500songs.com if reading it might be easier than listening. A couple of months back, we talked about Goffin and King, and the early days of the Brill Building sound. Today we’re going to take another look at them, and at a singer who recorded some of their best material, both solo and in a group, but who would always be overshadowed by the first single they wrote for her, when she was still working as their childminder. Today, we’re going to look at Little Eva and “The Loco-Motion”, and the short history of Dimension Records: [Excerpt: Little Eva, “The Loco-Motion”] The story of Little Eva is intertwined with the story of the Cookies, one of the earliest of the girl groups, and so we should probably start with them. We’ve mentioned the Cookies earlier, in the episode on “What’d I Say”, but we didn’t look at them in any great detail. The group started out in the mid-fifties, as a group of schoolgirls singing together in New York — Dorothy Jones, her cousin Beulah Robertson, and a friend, Darlene McRae, who had all been in the choir at their local Baptist Church. They formed a group and made their first appearance at the famous Harlem Apollo talent contests, where they came third, to Joe Tex and a vocal group called the Flairs (not, I think, any of the Flairs groups we’ve looked at). They were seen at that contest by Jesse Stone, who gave them the name “The Cookies”. He signed them to Aladdin Records, and produced and co-wrote their first single, “All-Night Mambo”. That wasn’t commercially successful, but Stone liked them enough that he then got them signed to Atlantic, where he again wrote their first single for the label. That first single was relatively unsuccessful, but their second single on Atlantic, “In Paradise”, did chart, making number nine on the R&B chart: [Excerpt: The Cookies, “In Paradise”] But the B-side to that record would end up being more important to their career in the long run. “Passing Time” was the very first song by Neil Sedaka and Howie Greenfield to get recorded, even before Sedaka’s recordings with the Tokens or his own successful solo records: [Excerpt: The Cookies, “Passing Time”] But then two things happened. Firstly, one of the girls, Beulah Robertson, fell out with Jesse Stone, who sacked her from the group. Stone got in a new vocalist, Margie Hendrix, to replace her, and after one more single the group stopped making singles for Atlantic. But they continued recording for smaller labels, and they also had regular gigs as backing vocalists for Atlantic, on records like “Lipstick, Powder, and Paint” by Big Joe Turner: [Excerpt: Big Joe Turner, “Lipstick, Powder and Paint”] “It’s Too Late” by Chuck Willis: [Excerpt: Chuck Willis, “It’s Too Late”] And “Lonely Avenue” by Ray Charles: [Excerpt: Ray Charles, “Lonely Avenue”] It was working with Ray Charles that led to the breakup of the original lineup of the Cookies — Charles was putting together his own group, and wanted the Cookies as his backing vocalists, but Dorothy was pregnant, and decided she’d rather stay behind and continue working as a session singer than go out on the road. Darlene and Margie went off to become the core of Charles’ new backing group, the Raelettes, and they would play a major part in the sound of Charles’ records for the next few years. It’s Margie, for example, who can be heard duetting with Charles on “The Right Time”: [Excerpt: Ray Charles, “The Right Time”] Dorothy stayed behind and put together a new lineup of Cookies. To make sure the group sounded the same, she got Darlene’s sister Earl-Jean into the group — Darlene and Earl-Jean looked and sounded so similar that many histories of the group say they’re the same person — and got another of her cousins, Margaret Ross, to take over the spot that had previously been Beulah’s before Margie had taken her place.  This new version of the Cookies didn’t really start doing much for a couple of years, while Dorothy was raising her newborn and Earl-Jean and Margaret were finishing high school. But in 1961 they started again in earnest, when Neil Sedaka remembered the Cookies and called Dorothy up, saying he knew someone who needed a vocal group. Gerry Goffin and Carole King had become hot songwriters, and they’d also become increasingly interested in record production after Carole had been involved in the making of “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” Carole was recording her own demos of the songs she and Goffin were writing, and was increasingly making them fully-produced recordings in their own right. The first record the new Cookies sang on was one that seems to have started out as one of these demos. “Halfway to Paradise” by Tony Orlando sounds exactly like a Drifters record, and Orlando was, at the time, a sixteen-year-old demo singer. My guess, and it is only a guess, is that this was a demo intended for the Drifters, that it was turned down, and so the demo was released as a record itself: [Excerpt: Tony Orlando, “Halfway to Paradise”] That made the lower reaches of the Hot One Hundred, while a British cover version by Billy Fury made number three in the UK. From this point on, the new lineup of the Cookies were once again the premier session singers. They added extra backing vocals to a lot of the Drifters’ records at this time, and would provide backing vocals for most of Atlantic’s artists, as the earlier lineup had. They were also effectively the in-house backing singers for Aldon Music — as well as singing on every Goffin and King demo, they were also singing with Neil Sedaka: [Excerpt: Neil Sedaka, “Breaking Up is Hard to Do”] But it was Goffin and King who spent the most time working with the Cookies, and who pushed them as recording artists in their own right. They started with a solo record for Dorothy, “Taking That Long Walk Home”, a song that was very much “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” part two: [Excerpt: Dorothy Jones, “Taking That Long Walk Home”] The Cookies were doing huge amounts of session work, working twelve hours a day, seven days a week. Dorothy Jones described being in the studio working on a King Curtis session until literally fifteen minutes before giving birth.  They weren’t the only ones working hard, though. Goffin and King were writing from their Aldon offices every single day, writing songs for the Drifters, the Shirelles, Bobby Rydell, Bobby Vee, Gene Pitney, the Crickets, the Everly Brothers, and more. And on top of that they had a child and Carole King was pregnant with a second one.  And, this being the very early 1960s, it never occurred to either Goffin or King that just because Carole King was working the exact same number of hours as Goffin, that might mean she shouldn’t also be doing the housework and looking after the children with no help from Goffin. There was only one way they could continue their level of productivity, and that was to get someone in to help out Carole. She mentioned to the Cookies that she was looking for someone to help her with the children, and Earl-Jean mentioned that a nineteen-year-old acquaintance — her friend’s husband’s sister — had just moved to New York from North Carolina to try to become a singer and was looking for any work she could get while she was trying to make it. Eva Narcissus Boyd, Earl-Jean’s acquaintance, moved in with Goffin and King and became their live-in childminder for $35 a week plus room and board. Goffin and King had known that Eva was a singer before they hired her, and they discovered that her voice was rather good. Not only that, but she blended well with the Cookies, and was friends with them. She became an unofficial “fourth Cookie”, and was soon in the studio on a regular basis too — and when she was, that meant that Eva’s sister was looking after the kids, as a subcontracted babysitter. During this time, Don Kirshner’s attitude was still that he was determined to get the next hit for every artist that had a hit. But that wasn’t always possible.  Cameo-Parkway had, after the success they’d had with “The Twist”, fully jumped on the dance-craze bandwagon, and they’d hit on another dance that might be the next Twist. The Mashed Potato was a dance that James Brown had been doing on stage for a few years, and in the wake of “The Twist”, Brown had had a hit with a song about it “(Do the) Mashed Potatoes”, which was credited to Nat Kendrick & the Swans rather than to Brown for contractual reasons: [Excerpt: Nat Kendrick and the Swans, “(Do the) Mashed Potatoes”] Cameo-Parkway had picked up on that dance, and had done just what Kirshner always did and created a soundalike of a recent hit — and in fact they’d mashed up, if you’ll pardon the expression, two recent hits. In this case, they’d taken the sound of “Please Mr. Postman”, slightly reworked the lyrics to be about Brown’s dance, and given it to session singer Dee Dee Sharp: [Excerpt: Dee Dee Sharp, “Mashed Potato Time”] That had gone to number two on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and even inspired its own rip-offs, like “The Monster Mash” by Bobby “Boris” Pickett: [Excerpt: Bobby “Boris” Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers, “The Monster Mash”] So Kirshner just assumed that Sharp would be looking for another dance hit, one that sounded just like “Mashed Potato Time”, and got Goffin and King to write one to submit to her.  Unfortunately for him, he’d assumed wrong. Cameo-Parkway was owned by a group of successful songwriters, and they didn’t need outside writers bringing them hits when they could write their own. Dee Dee Sharp wasn’t going to be recording Goffin and King’s song.  When he listened to the demo, Don Kirshner was astonished that they hadn’t taken the song. It had “hit” written all over it. He decided that he was going to start his own record label, Dimension Records, and he was just going to release that demo as the single. The Cookies went into the studio to overdub another layer of backing vocals, but otherwise the record that was released was the demo Eva — now renamed “Little Eva” — had sung: [Excerpt: Little Eva, “The Loco-Motion”] The record went to number one, and made Little Eva a star. It also made Gerry Goffin a successful producer, because even though Goffin and King had coproduced it, Goffin got sole production credit on this, and on other records the two produced together. According to King, Goffin was the one in the control room for their productions, while she would be on the studio floor, and she didn’t really question whether what she was doing counted as production too until much later — and anyway, getting the sole credit was apparently important to Gerry. “The Loco-Motion” was such a big hit that it inspired its own knockoffs, including one song cheekily called “Little Eva” by a group called “The Locomotions”  — so the record label would say “Little Eva, The Locomotions”, and people might buy it by mistake. You’ll be shocked to learn that that one was on a Morris Levy label: [Excerpt: The Locomotions, “Little Eva”] That group featured Leon Huff, who would later go on to make a lot of much better records. Meanwhile, as Little Eva was now a star, Carole King once again had to look for a childminder. This time she insisted that anyone she hired be unable to sing, so she wouldn’t keep having to do this. Dimension Records was soon churning out singles, all of them involving the Cookies, and Eva, and Goffin and King. They put out “Everybody’s Got a Dance But Me” by Big Dee Irwin, a song that excerpted “The Loco-Motion”, “Wah Watusi”, “Hully Gully” and “Twist and Shout” among many others, with the Cookies on backing vocals, and with Goffin as the credited producer: [Excerpt: Big Dee Irwin, “Everybody’s Got a Dance But Me”] That wasn’t a hit, but Dimension soon released two more big hits. One was a solo single by Carole King, “It Might as Well Rain Until September”, which went to number twenty even though its only national exposure was a disastrous appearance by King on American Bandstand which left her feeling humiliated: [Excerpt: Carole King, “It Might as Well Rain Until September”] Her solo performing career wouldn’t properly take off for a few more years, but that was a step towards it. The Cookies also had a hit on Dimension around this point. Goffin and King had written a song called “Chains” for the Everly Brothers, who had recorded it but not released it: [Excerpt: The Everly Brothers, “Chains”] So they gave the song to the Cookies instead, with Little Eva on additional vocals, and it made the pop top twenty, and the R&B top ten: [Excerpt: The Cookies, “Chains”] Several people have pointed out that that lyric can be read as having an element of BDSM to it, and it’s not the only Goffin and King song from this period that does — there’s a 1964 B-side they wrote for Eva called “Please Hurt Me”, which is fairly blatant: [Excerpt: Little Eva, “Please Hurt Me”] But the BDSM comparison has also been made — wrongly, in my opinion — about one of the most utterly misguided songs that Goffin and King ever wrote — a song inspired by Little Eva telling them that her boyfriend beat her up. They’d asked her why she put up with it, and she said that he only hit her because he loved her. They were inspired by that to write “He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss)”, an utterly grotesque song which, in a version produced by Phil Spector for the Crystals, was issued as a single but soon withdrawn due to general horror. I won’t be excerpting that one here, though it’s easy enough to find if you want to. (Having said that, I should also say that while people have said that Goffin & King’s material at this point flirts with BDSM, my understanding of BDSM, as it has been explained to me by friends who indulge in such activities, is that consent is paramount, so I don’t think that “He Hit Me” should be talked about in those terms. I don’t want anything I’ve said here to contribute to the blurring of distinctions between consensual kink and abuse, which are too often conflated). Originally, Eva’s follow-up to “The Loco-Motion” was going to be “One Fine Day”, another Goffin and King song, but no matter how much Goffin and King worked on the track, they couldn’t come up with an arrangement, and eventually they passed the song over to the Tokens, who solved the arrangement problems (though they kept King’s piano part) and produced a version of it for the Chiffons, for whom it became a hit: [Excerpt: The Chiffons, “One Fine Day”] Instead, Goffin and King gave Eva “Keep Your Hands Off My Baby”. This is, in my opinion, the best thing that Eva ever did, and it made the top twenty, though it wasn’t as big a hit as “The Loco-Motion”: [Excerpt: Little Eva, “Keep Your Hands Off My Baby”] And Eva also appeared on another Cookies record, “Don’t Say Nothing Bad About My Baby”, which made the top ten: [Excerpt: The Cookies, “Don’t Say Nothing Bad About My Baby”] The Cookies, Eva, and Goffin and King were such a package deal that Dimension released an album called Dimension Dolls featuring the first few hits of each act and padded out with demos they’d made for other artists.  This hit-making machine was so successful for a brief period in 1962 and 63 that even Eva’s sister Idalia got in on the act, releasing a song by Goffin, King, and Jack Keller, “Hula Hoppin'”: [Excerpt: Idalia Boyd, “Hula Hoppin'”] For Eva’s third single, Gerry Goffin and Jack Keller wrote a song called “Let’s Turkey Trot”, which also made the top twenty. But that would be the last time that Eva would have a hit of her own. At first, the fact that she had a couple of flop singles wasn’t a problem — no artists at this time were consistent hit-makers, and it was normal for someone to have a few top ten hits, then a couple at number 120 or something, before going back to the top. And she was touring with Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars, and still in high demand as a live performer. She also, in 1963, recorded a version of “Swinging on a Star” with Big Dee Irwin, though she wasn’t credited on the label, and that made the top forty (and made number seven in the UK): [Excerpt: Big Dee Irwin, “Swinging on a Star”] But everything changed for Little Eva, and for the whole world of Brill Building pop, in 1964. In part, this was because the Beatles became successful and changed the pop landscape, but by itself that shouldn’t have destroyed the careers of Eva or the Cookies, who the Beatles admired — they recorded a cover of “Chains”, and they used to play “Keep Your Hands Off My Baby” in their live sets. But Don Kirshner decided to sell Aldon Music and Dimension Records to Columbia Pictures, and to start concentrating on the West Coast rather than New York. The idea was that they could come up with songs that would be used in films and TV, and make more money that way, and that worked out for many people, including Kirshner himself. But even when artists like Eva and the Cookies got hit material, the British Invasion made it hard for them to get a footing. For example, Goffin and King wrote a song for Earl-Jean from the Cookies to record as a solo track just after Dimension was taken over by Columbia. That record did make the top forty: [Excerpt: Earl-Jean, “I’m Into Something Good”] But then Herman’s Hermits released their version, which became a much bigger hit. That sort of thing kept happening. The Cookies ended up splitting up by 1967. Little Eva did end up doing some TV work — most famously, she sang a dance song in an episode of the Hanna-Barbera cartoon Magilla Gorilla: [Excerpt: Little Eva “Makin’ With the Magilla”] But Dimension Records was not a priority for anyone — Columbia already owned their own labels, and didn’t need another one — and the label was being wound down. And then Al Nevins, Don Kirshner’s partner in Aldon, died. He’d always been friendly with Eva, and without him to advocate for her, the label sold her contract off to Bell Records. From that point on, she could no longer rely on Goffin and King, and she hopped between a number of different labels, none of them with any great success. After spending seven years going from label to label, and having split up with her husband, she quit the music business in 1971 and moved back to North Carolina. She was sick of the music industry, and particularly sick of the lack of money — she had signed a lot of bad contracts, and was making no royalties from sales of her records. She worked menial day jobs, survived on welfare for a while, became active in her local church, and depending on which reports you read either ran a soul-food restaurant or merely worked there as a waitress. Meanwhile, “The Loco-Motion” was a perennial hit. Her version re-charted in the UK in the early seventies, and Todd Rundgren produced a version for the heavy metal band Grand Funk Railroad which went to number one in the US in 1974: [Excerpt: Grand Funk Railroad, “The Loco-Motion”] And then in 1988 an Australian soap star, Kylie Minogue, recorded her own version, which went top five worldwide and started Minogue’s own successful pop career: [Excerpt: Kylie Minogue, “The Loco-Motion”] That record becoming a hit got a series of “where are they now?” articles written about Eva, and she was persuaded to come out of retirement and start performing again — though having been so badly hurt by the industry, she was very dubious at first, and she also had scruples because of her strong religious faith. She later said that she’d left the contracts on her table for eight months before signing them — but when she finally did, she found that her audience was still there for her. For the rest of her life, she was a popular performer on the oldies circuit, performing on package tours with people like Bobby Vee and Brian Hyland, playing state fairs and touring Europe. She continued performing until shortly before her death, even after she was diagnosed with the cancer that eventually killed her, as she once again connected with the audiences who had loved her music back when she was still a teenager. She died, aged fifty-nine, in 2003.

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #436 - Justin Barcia, Brandon Hartranft, Aldon Baker, Tim Ritchie with Cade Clason In-Studio

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 317:09


Barcia had himself a Moto for the ages during the second half of 450 Moto 2 at Ironman and he's on to talk about it and the progress they've made on the YZ450. Brandon Hartranft scored his first overall MX podium in Indiana and he walks us through those feels. Aldon Baker is on to talk about his training program and some RV stories for sure. Time Ritchie of Red Bud is on to talk about the historic double-header coming up for the next round of MX. Cade Clason is in studio!

SPNDX Stampede Stories
EP 6 | Aldon Baker

SPNDX Stampede Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2020 60:48


Aldon Baker is a current trainer in the Motocross / Supercross world where he has trained some of the best riders from Ricky Carmichael, James Stewart, Ryan Villopoto & much more. In this episode we talk his early beginnings as he came over to the states with no real plan in place and how he turned that into the successful training career he has had thus far. @SPNDXstampede

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 89: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2020 37:37


Episode eighty-nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles, and at the beginnings of the Brill Building sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Tom Dooley" by the Kingston Trio. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of the Shirelles in print, so I've used a variety of sources, including the articles on the Shirelles and Luther Dixon at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King's autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era. And Here Comes The Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues by Joel Selvin goes into some detail about Scepter Records. I also referred to the liner notes of this CD, which contains most of the Shirelles tracks worth owning.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them?   Transcript   We're currently in a patch of rock and roll history that is ludicrously undocumented. There is book after book about the major stars of the early rock and roll era -- while you won't find much out there on a lot of truly important artists, you can find out enough about Elvis and Ray Charles and Johnny Cash and Little Richard and Chuck Berry and the rest -- these are all romantic figures of legend, the Titans who were defeated in the Titanomachy that was the mid-sixties Beat boom. And of course, there are many many, books on almost every band of the mid to late sixties to even have a minor hit. But the period from 1958 through 1964 is generally summed up by "and there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon". Occasionally, in some of the books, there is a slightly more subtle approach taken, and the summary is "there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon, and also Roy Orbison and one or two others made a decent record". But there were many other people making great records -- people who made hits that are still staples of oldies radio in a way that a lot of records from a few years later aren't; records that still sound like they're fresh new records made by people who have ideas. Today we're going to talk about a few of those people, and about one of those great records. We're going to look at the Brill Building, and some of the songwriters who worked there, and at the great record producer Luther Dixon, and at the Shirelles, and their record "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?": [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?"] It's been a little while since we looked at any of the early girl groups, but if you remember the episodes on the Bobettes and the Chantels, girl groups in the early years were largely a phenomenon based in New York, and that's more or less the case with the Shirelles, who didn't come from New York itself, but from Passaic New Jersey, about sixteen miles away. Shirley Owens, Doris Coley, Addie Harris and Beverly Lee met at school, and formed a group called the Poquellos, which is apparently Spanish for "little birds". As we've discussed previously, most of the early doo-wop groups were named after birds, and these girls were forming their group before girl groups became regarded as something separate from male vocal groups. Oddly, the group that became the most successful of the early girl groups, and the one that more than any other set the template for all those that would follow, never wanted to become professional singers, and almost had to be forced against their will at every stage. Their first public performance, in fact, was as a punishment. They had been singing with each other in gym class, and not paying attention to the teacher, and so the teacher told them that, as a punishment, they would have to perform in the school talent contest, which they didn't want to do. They performed at the show, singing a song they'd made up themselves, "I Met Him on a Sunday", and went down a storm with the kids at the school. In particular, one of the girls there, Mary Jane Greenberg, insisted that the girls come and meet her mother, Florence. Florence Greenberg was a bored suburban housewife, who until her mid-forties had concentrated on being a homemaker for her husband, who was an executive at a potato chip firm, and for her two children. In her spare time she mostly did things like run fundraisers for the local Republican party. But her son was interested in getting into the music business in some way, and her husband was friends with Freddy Bienstock, who worked for Hill and Range at the Brill Building, and whose job was choosing the songs that Elvis Presley would record. Bienstock invited Greenberg to come and visit him at Hill and Range's offices, and after spending a little time around the Brill Building, Greenberg became convinced that she should start her own record label, despite having no experience in the field whatsoever. She would often just go and hang around at a restaurant near the Brill Building to soak in the atmosphere. The Poquellos were actually not at all interested in making a record, but Mary Jane kept insisting that they should meet with her mother anyway. It got to the point that the girls used to try to avoid her at school and hide from her, but she was insistent and eventually they relented, and went to see Mrs Greenberg. They auditioned for her in her front room, singing the same song they'd performed at the school talent contest. Mrs Greenberg decided that they were going to be the first group signed to her new label, Tiara Records, and they recorded the song they'd written, with Greenberg's musical son Stan producing and arranging, under the name Stan Green: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "I Met Him On A Sunday (Ronde Ronde)"] Stan wasn't the only person with a new name. The Poquellos were also renamed, to the Shirelles -- after Shirley Owens, but with the "el" ending to be reminiscent of the Chantels, and that was the name they would be known by from that point on. "I Met Him On A Sunday" was a minor local success, and was picked up by Decca Records, who bought the girls' contract out from Greenberg. They managed to get it to number fifty on the charts, but the two singles they recorded for Decca after that didn't have any success, and the label dropped them. That might have been the end of the Shirelles, but Greenberg had remained their manager, and she had started up a new record label, Scepter Records, and signed them up to that instead of Tiara. Their first few singles for Scepter did nothing, but then a change in Scepter's staffing changed everything, not just for the Shirelles, but for the world of music. Greenberg was not a particularly musical person -- and indeed several of the people who worked for her would later mock some decisions she'd made when she'd used her own judgment about songs. But she surrounded herself with people who were musical. The director of A&R for Scepter was Wally Roker, who had originally been the bass singer in the Heartbeats, who'd had a top five hit with "A Thousand Miles Away" in 1956: [Excerpt: The Heartbeats, "A Thousand Miles Away"] Roker in turn introduced Greenberg to a friend of his, Luther Dixon. Greenberg and Dixon's initial meeting was just the length of one elevator ride, but that was long enough for them to exchange numbers and arrange to meet again. Soon Dixon was working for Greenberg at Scepter, and was also her lover. Dixon had started out as a singer, joining a minor group called The Buddies, who had recorded singles like "I Stole Your Heart": [Excerpt: The Buddies, "I Stole Your Heart"] But he had soon moved into songwriting. Dixon was a collaborator by nature, and his first big hit was written with a writing partner called Larry Harrison. "Why Baby Why" went to number five for Pat Boone in 1957: [Excerpt: Pat Boone, "Why Baby Why"] He spent some time writing with Otis Blackwell, with whom he wrote "All the Way Home" for Bobby Darin: [Excerpt: Bobby Darin, "All the Way Home"] And at the time he met Greenberg, he had just written "Sixteen Candles" with Allyson Khent, a number two hit for the Crests: [Excerpt: The Crests, "Sixteen Candles"] Greenberg took him on as a staff writer and producer, and gave him a cut of the publishing rights for his songs -- almost unheard of at that time. The first record he worked on for the Shirelles was also the group's first top forty hit. With Shirley Owens, Dixon wrote "Tonight's the Night". It was intended as a B-side to a song with a lead by Doris, but "Tonight's the Night" was an unexpected success and established Shirley firmly in the role of the group's lead singer: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Tonight's the Night"] That went to number thirty-nine, and a competing version by the Chiffons also made the Hot One Hundred: [Excerpt: The Chiffons, "Tonight's the Night"] The Shirelles were a hit group, and they needed a follow-up. And that's where Goffin and King enter our story... Carole King had, from a very early age, been a child prodigy with a particular talent for music. In her autobiography she talks about how when she was a child, her dad would have her, as a party trick, turn to the wall while he played notes on the piano and she called out which one he was playing. Apparently her father would claim she had perfect pitch, and this was not quite true -- she had relative pitch, which meant that once she heard one note she knew, she could tell all the rest of the notes from that, so her father would always start with middle C. But that sense of relative pitch is in itself an amazing talent for a tiny child -- I still can't do that with any great accuracy in my forties, and I've spent most of my life studying and playing music. By the age of eight she had appeared in a couple of shows, including Ted Mack's Amateur Hour, which was a nationally broadcast show, performing in a duo with a friend, but she didn't know exactly what it was she wanted to do until she was thirteen, when she went on a date with Joel Zwick, who would later become known as the director of My Big Fat Greek Wedding among others -- one thing that seems to happen a lot in King's early life is getting to know people who would go on to become very successful. Zwick took her to an Alan Freed show at the Paramount in Brooklyn, where she saw LaVern Baker, BB King, Mickey Baker, the Moonglows, and several other R&B stars of the period. It wasn't, though, seeing the musicians themselves that made Carol Klein, as she then was, want to go into rock and roll music, though that was certainly an inspiration, and she talks a lot about how that Freed show was her introduction to a whole world of music that was far from the whitebread pop on which she had grown up. Rather, it was almost a chance event. She and her date hung around the stage door to see if they could see any of the performers and get autographs. The group they were in accidentally got drawn in through the stage door when some people who were meant to be there were let in, and she got to see the performers hanging around backstage. She knew then, not that she wanted to be a performer herself, but that she wanted to be part of that world, someone that those performers knew and respected. She started attending a stage school, where one of her classmates was Al Pacino, but after a short while she left, deciding that she wasn't cut out for the non-musical aspects of the school, and went back to a normal high school, where she formed her first group, the Cosines. along with Zwick. She started writing songs when she heard a group from a rival local high school, Neil Sedaka and the Linc-Tones, singing a song called "While I Dream": [Excerpt: The Tokens "While I Dream"] Sedaka had briefly dated her, and had co-written that song himself, with Howard Greenfield, and his group got a record deal under the name The Tokens. King figured that if he could do that, so could she. She started writing songs, and found she was good at melodies but not particularly great at lyrics. But she still thought she was good enough to do something. She decided that she was going to go and see Alan Freed, and play him some of her songs. Freed listened to her politely, and explained to her how, at the time, one went about becoming a professional songwriter for the R&B market. He told her to get the addresses of record labels from the phone book, go and try to play her songs to them, and explained how a publishing contract would work. The record label he mentioned to her specifically was Atlantic Records, so she tried that one first. Jerry Wexler and Ahmet Ertegun listened to her, and told her she had talent and to come back when she had more songs. It wasn't a rejection, but it wasn't the instant acceptance she'd hoped for. The second label she went to was ABC-Paramount, where she saw Don Costa. Costa was head of A&R at the label, but also a musician himself. Around this time he had released a cover version of Bill Justis' "Raunchy", under the name Muvva Guitar Hubbard: [Excerpt: Muvva "Guitar" Hubbard, "Raunchy"] Costa would later go on to arrange and conduct for Frank Sinatra, and he also had a respectable career as a session guitarist, but Carol didn't know any of this when she went into his office and played through her songs for him. She was flabbergasted to find that, rather than just sign her to a publishing contract, he asked her to sign a recording contract as well. She was disappointed that he wasn't interested in signing the rest of her group -- he thought she was good enough by herself, without needing to hear the other three -- but not so disappointed that she didn't sign with him straight away. Her first few singles were solo compositions, and didn't do very much in terms of sales, partly because she still didn't consider herself especially good as a lyricist: [Excerpt: Carole King, "The Right Girl"] So while she was trying to have a music career, she also went off to college, aged sixteen -- she had skipped multiple years in school -- where she met someone else who had had a minor hit. The boy who performed under the name Jerry Landis had released "Hey! Schoolgirl", an Everly Brothers knockoff, with a friend, as Tom and Jerry: [Excerpt: Tom and Jerry, "Hey! Schoolgirl"] Landis and King started working together, recording demos for other writers, though never writing together. For some of those demos, they re-used the Cosines name, like on this one for a song by Marty Kalfin: [Excerpt: The Cosines, "Just to Be With You"] They were quite proud when the arrangement they came up with for that demo was copied exactly for the finished record, which made the lower regions of the Hot One Hundred: [Excerpt: The Passions, "Just to Be With You"] They didn't work together for very long, and Jerry Landis went on to record under other names like "True Taylor" and "Paul Kane", before getting back together with Tom, and deciding to work together under their real names. We'll be hearing more of Paul Simon and his partner Art Garfunkel in future episodes. Someone else she met while at college was the man who was to become her first husband, another Gerry -- Gerry Goffin. Goffin impressed her with his looks the first time she saw him -- he looked exactly like a drawing she had clipped out of a magazine, which looked to her like the perfect boyfriend. Goffin impressed her less, though, with his studied dislike of rock and roll music, but was suddenly keen to write a song with her when she mentioned that she'd been selling songs. He'd been trying to write a musical, but he was primarily a lyricist, and couldn't do much with music. King mentioned that she knew that Atlantic were looking for a new song for Mickey and Sylvia, and the two of them worked on a song based on the style of "Love is Strange", which they completed very quickly, and took to Atlantic. Unfortunately, when they got there, they were told that Mickey and Sylvia had split up, but that their song would be suitable for the new duo they'd put together to continue the act -- Mickey and Kitty: [Excerpt: Mickey and Kitty, "The Kid Brother"] That was released as a B-side. The A-side, "Ooh Sha La La" was written by Neil Sedaka and Howie Greenfield: [Excerpt: MIckey and Kitty, "Ooh Sha La La"] Sedaka and Greenfield had become hot songwriters, and around this time Sedaka was also becoming a successful performer. His first hit as a performer, "Oh Carol", was in fact written about Carole King: [Excerpt: Neil Sedaka, "Oh Carol"] And King herself recorded an answer record to that, with new lyrics by Goffin: [Excerpt: Carole King, "Oh Neil"] By the time she was seventeen, King was married to Goffin, and pregnant with his child. Goffin was working a day job, and they were treating the occasional twenty-five dollar advance they got from writing songs as windfalls. But then, when she was on one of her visits to 1650 Broadway to sell songs, King bumped into Sedaka, who told her she should come and meet Al Nevins and Don Kirshner, the owners of Aldon Music. Aldon is the publisher who, more than any single other company, was responsible for what became known as the Brill Building sound. Even though they weren't based in the actual Brill Building, which was at 1619 Broadway, but in 1650 Broadway, the companies in that second building were so associated with the Brill Building sound that you'll find almost every history of music misattributes them and places them there, and in most interviews, when you see people talking about the Brill Building, even people who worked in one or other building, they're as likely to be talking about 1650 as 1619. Kirshner is someone we've met briefly before. He'd started out as a songwriter, working with his friend Bobby Darin on songs like "I Want Elvis For Christmas", which had been recorded by the Holly Twins with Eddie Cochran impersonating Elvis: [Excerpt: The Holly Twins and Eddie Cochran, "I Want Elvis For Christmas"] However, as Darin had moved into performance, Kirshner had gone into music publishing. He'd scored early success when working for Vanderbilt Music by bringing Al Lewis out of retirement. Lewis had been a hit songwriter in the thirties and forties, but hadn't done much for a while. But then Fats Domino had had a hit with "Blueberry Hill", a song Lewis had cowritten decades earlier, and Kirshner decided to pair Lewis with a black musician, Sylvester Bradford, and the two started writing hits together, notably "Tears on My Pillow" for Little Anthony and the Imperials: [Excerpt: Little Anthony and the Imperials, "Tears on My Pillow"] Kirshner had then formed his own publishing company. He'd first approached Pomus and Shuman, and then Leiber and Stoller, to go into business with him, but he ended up with Al Nevins, who had been a musician and had also co-written "Twilight Time" with Buck Ram, which had been a hit in the forties and then later revived by the Platters: [Excerpt: The Platters, "Twilight Time"] Kirshner and Nevins were looking for talented new songwriters, and they had signed up Sedaka and Greenfield, and also signed Paul Simon around this time, as well as another couple, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weill. When Carole King played them a few of the songs she'd co-written with Goffin, they signed Goffin and King to a three-year contract, with advances of one thousand dollars for the first year, two thousand for the second, and three thousand for the third, to be offset against their royalties. This was a fortune for the young couple, and so they went from soul-crushing day jobs to... a day job, working in a cubicle. Aldon had a very regimented system. Every writing team had a tiny cubicle, containing a piano and a couple of chairs, in which they would work during normal office hours. Kirshner's system was simple -- any time any new act had a hit, he would get all the songwriters in his office to try to write a follow-up to the hit, in the same style. Of the efforts to find a follow-up to "Tonight's the Night", Kirshner decided on one that Goffin and King had written. "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" had lyrics that had rather more depth than most of the songs that were charting at the time. Goffin's initial dislike of rock and roll music had been because of what he perceived as its lyrical vacuity, and in "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" he found a lyrical formula that would define girl groups from that point on -- a look at a kind of female adolescent emotion that had previously not been discussed in pop music. In this case the lyrics were from the point of view of a woman worrying that she's just a one-night stand, not someone the man cares about, and struck a chord with millions. But King's music is at least as impressive. She modelled the song on "There Goes My Baby", and when Luther Dixon accepted the song for the Shirelles, she decided she would write a string arrangement for it like the one the Drifters had used. She'd never written for an orchestra before, so she got a book on arrangement out of the library, and looked through it quickly before writing the string arrangement overnight. The group didn't like the song, thinking it sounded like a country song, but Luther Dixon insisted, and the result went to number one: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?"] The B-side to that single, a Luther Dixon song called "Boys", would also become a well-known track itself: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Boys"] Two more top ten hits followed, and then the group's singles started doing less well again. To reverse the downward trend, Dixon brought in a song by another new writer, Burt Bacharach. Bacharach had written a song with Mack David -- the brother of his usual lyricist Hal David -- called "I'll Cherish You". Dixon liked the song, but thought the lyrics were a bit too sickly. He changed the lyrics around, making them instead about someone who still loves her boyfriend despite her friends telling her how bad he is, and retitling it "Baby It's You". For the record itself, he just used Bacharach's original demo and stuck Shirley's voice on top -- Shirley was the only member of the group to sing on the record, though it was still released as by the Shirelles. You can still hear Bacharach singing on the "sha la la"s: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Baby It's You"] That returned them to the top ten, and the follow-up, "Soldier Boy", written by Dixon and Greenberg, became their second number one. Unfortunately, it would be their last. Dixon and Greenberg ended their relationship, and Dixon went on to a new job at Capitol Records. Various other people produced recordings for the Shirelles at Scepter, but none had the same success with them that Dixon did. It didn't help that the girls were starting families, and at various times one or other member had to be replaced on the road while they were on maternity leave. The singer who replaced them for those shows was a session singer who Bacharach was producing for Scepter, named Dionne Warwick. To make matters worse, the Shirelles discovered that Greenberg had been lying to them. They'd been told that their royalties were being put into a trust for them, for when they turned twenty-one, but they discovered that no such trust existed, and Greenberg had just been keeping their money. They entered into lawsuits against Scepter, but remained signed to the label, and so couldn't record for anyone else. Their career was destroyed. They remained together in one lineup or another, with members coming and going, until the early eighties, when they all went their separate ways, though they all started their own lineups of Shirelles. These days Shirley tours under her married name as Shirley Alston Reeves and Her Shirelles, while Beverly Lee owns the rights to tour as The Shirelles with no modifiers. Addie Harris died in 1982, and Doris Coley in 2000. The Shirelles were badly treated by their record company, and by history. They made some of the most important records of the sixties, and it was their success that led to the great boom in girl groups of the next few years -- the Supremes, the Marvelettes, the Crystals, the Ronettes, and the rest, all were following in the Shirelles' footsteps. Because they had their greatest success in that period between 1958 and 1964 which most rock historians treat as having nothing of interest in, they're almost ignored despite their huge influence on the musicians who followed them. But without them, the sound of sixties pop would have been vastly different, and to this day their greatest records sound as fresh and inspiring as the day they were recorded.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 89: “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” by the Shirelles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2020


Episode eighty-nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” by the Shirelles, and at the beginnings of the Brill Building sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Tom Dooley” by the Kingston Trio. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of the Shirelles in print, so I’ve used a variety of sources, including the articles on the Shirelles and Luther Dixon at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King’s autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era. And Here Comes The Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues by Joel Selvin goes into some detail about Scepter Records. I also referred to the liner notes of this CD, which contains most of the Shirelles tracks worth owning.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them?   Transcript   We’re currently in a patch of rock and roll history that is ludicrously undocumented. There is book after book about the major stars of the early rock and roll era — while you won’t find much out there on a lot of truly important artists, you can find out enough about Elvis and Ray Charles and Johnny Cash and Little Richard and Chuck Berry and the rest — these are all romantic figures of legend, the Titans who were defeated in the Titanomachy that was the mid-sixties Beat boom. And of course, there are many many, books on almost every band of the mid to late sixties to even have a minor hit. But the period from 1958 through 1964 is generally summed up by “and there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon”. Occasionally, in some of the books, there is a slightly more subtle approach taken, and the summary is “there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon, and also Roy Orbison and one or two others made a decent record”. But there were many other people making great records — people who made hits that are still staples of oldies radio in a way that a lot of records from a few years later aren’t; records that still sound like they’re fresh new records made by people who have ideas. Today we’re going to talk about a few of those people, and about one of those great records. We’re going to look at the Brill Building, and some of the songwriters who worked there, and at the great record producer Luther Dixon, and at the Shirelles, and their record “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?”: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?”] It’s been a little while since we looked at any of the early girl groups, but if you remember the episodes on the Bobettes and the Chantels, girl groups in the early years were largely a phenomenon based in New York, and that’s more or less the case with the Shirelles, who didn’t come from New York itself, but from Passaic New Jersey, about sixteen miles away. Shirley Owens, Doris Coley, Addie Harris and Beverly Lee met at school, and formed a group called the Poquellos, which is apparently Spanish for “little birds”. As we’ve discussed previously, most of the early doo-wop groups were named after birds, and these girls were forming their group before girl groups became regarded as something separate from male vocal groups. Oddly, the group that became the most successful of the early girl groups, and the one that more than any other set the template for all those that would follow, never wanted to become professional singers, and almost had to be forced against their will at every stage. Their first public performance, in fact, was as a punishment. They had been singing with each other in gym class, and not paying attention to the teacher, and so the teacher told them that, as a punishment, they would have to perform in the school talent contest, which they didn’t want to do. They performed at the show, singing a song they’d made up themselves, “I Met Him on a Sunday”, and went down a storm with the kids at the school. In particular, one of the girls there, Mary Jane Greenberg, insisted that the girls come and meet her mother, Florence. Florence Greenberg was a bored suburban housewife, who until her mid-forties had concentrated on being a homemaker for her husband, who was an executive at a potato chip firm, and for her two children. In her spare time she mostly did things like run fundraisers for the local Republican party. But her son was interested in getting into the music business in some way, and her husband was friends with Freddy Bienstock, who worked for Hill and Range at the Brill Building, and whose job was choosing the songs that Elvis Presley would record. Bienstock invited Greenberg to come and visit him at Hill and Range’s offices, and after spending a little time around the Brill Building, Greenberg became convinced that she should start her own record label, despite having no experience in the field whatsoever. She would often just go and hang around at a restaurant near the Brill Building to soak in the atmosphere. The Poquellos were actually not at all interested in making a record, but Mary Jane kept insisting that they should meet with her mother anyway. It got to the point that the girls used to try to avoid her at school and hide from her, but she was insistent and eventually they relented, and went to see Mrs Greenberg. They auditioned for her in her front room, singing the same song they’d performed at the school talent contest. Mrs Greenberg decided that they were going to be the first group signed to her new label, Tiara Records, and they recorded the song they’d written, with Greenberg’s musical son Stan producing and arranging, under the name Stan Green: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “I Met Him On A Sunday (Ronde Ronde)”] Stan wasn’t the only person with a new name. The Poquellos were also renamed, to the Shirelles — after Shirley Owens, but with the “el” ending to be reminiscent of the Chantels, and that was the name they would be known by from that point on. “I Met Him On A Sunday” was a minor local success, and was picked up by Decca Records, who bought the girls’ contract out from Greenberg. They managed to get it to number fifty on the charts, but the two singles they recorded for Decca after that didn’t have any success, and the label dropped them. That might have been the end of the Shirelles, but Greenberg had remained their manager, and she had started up a new record label, Scepter Records, and signed them up to that instead of Tiara. Their first few singles for Scepter did nothing, but then a change in Scepter’s staffing changed everything, not just for the Shirelles, but for the world of music. Greenberg was not a particularly musical person — and indeed several of the people who worked for her would later mock some decisions she’d made when she’d used her own judgment about songs. But she surrounded herself with people who were musical. The director of A&R for Scepter was Wally Roker, who had originally been the bass singer in the Heartbeats, who’d had a top five hit with “A Thousand Miles Away” in 1956: [Excerpt: The Heartbeats, “A Thousand Miles Away”] Roker in turn introduced Greenberg to a friend of his, Luther Dixon. Greenberg and Dixon’s initial meeting was just the length of one elevator ride, but that was long enough for them to exchange numbers and arrange to meet again. Soon Dixon was working for Greenberg at Scepter, and was also her lover. Dixon had started out as a singer, joining a minor group called The Buddies, who had recorded singles like “I Stole Your Heart”: [Excerpt: The Buddies, “I Stole Your Heart”] But he had soon moved into songwriting. Dixon was a collaborator by nature, and his first big hit was written with a writing partner called Larry Harrison. “Why Baby Why” went to number five for Pat Boone in 1957: [Excerpt: Pat Boone, “Why Baby Why”] He spent some time writing with Otis Blackwell, with whom he wrote “All the Way Home” for Bobby Darin: [Excerpt: Bobby Darin, “All the Way Home”] And at the time he met Greenberg, he had just written “Sixteen Candles” with Allyson Khent, a number two hit for the Crests: [Excerpt: The Crests, “Sixteen Candles”] Greenberg took him on as a staff writer and producer, and gave him a cut of the publishing rights for his songs — almost unheard of at that time. The first record he worked on for the Shirelles was also the group’s first top forty hit. With Shirley Owens, Dixon wrote “Tonight’s the Night”. It was intended as a B-side to a song with a lead by Doris, but “Tonight’s the Night” was an unexpected success and established Shirley firmly in the role of the group’s lead singer: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “Tonight’s the Night”] That went to number thirty-nine, and a competing version by the Chiffons also made the Hot One Hundred: [Excerpt: The Chiffons, “Tonight’s the Night”] The Shirelles were a hit group, and they needed a follow-up. And that’s where Goffin and King enter our story… Carole King had, from a very early age, been a child prodigy with a particular talent for music. In her autobiography she talks about how when she was a child, her dad would have her, as a party trick, turn to the wall while he played notes on the piano and she called out which one he was playing. Apparently her father would claim she had perfect pitch, and this was not quite true — she had relative pitch, which meant that once she heard one note she knew, she could tell all the rest of the notes from that, so her father would always start with middle C. But that sense of relative pitch is in itself an amazing talent for a tiny child — I still can’t do that with any great accuracy in my forties, and I’ve spent most of my life studying and playing music. By the age of eight she had appeared in a couple of shows, including Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour, which was a nationally broadcast show, performing in a duo with a friend, but she didn’t know exactly what it was she wanted to do until she was thirteen, when she went on a date with Joel Zwick, who would later become known as the director of My Big Fat Greek Wedding among others — one thing that seems to happen a lot in King’s early life is getting to know people who would go on to become very successful. Zwick took her to an Alan Freed show at the Paramount in Brooklyn, where she saw LaVern Baker, BB King, Mickey Baker, the Moonglows, and several other R&B stars of the period. It wasn’t, though, seeing the musicians themselves that made Carol Klein, as she then was, want to go into rock and roll music, though that was certainly an inspiration, and she talks a lot about how that Freed show was her introduction to a whole world of music that was far from the whitebread pop on which she had grown up. Rather, it was almost a chance event. She and her date hung around the stage door to see if they could see any of the performers and get autographs. The group they were in accidentally got drawn in through the stage door when some people who were meant to be there were let in, and she got to see the performers hanging around backstage. She knew then, not that she wanted to be a performer herself, but that she wanted to be part of that world, someone that those performers knew and respected. She started attending a stage school, where one of her classmates was Al Pacino, but after a short while she left, deciding that she wasn’t cut out for the non-musical aspects of the school, and went back to a normal high school, where she formed her first group, the Cosines. along with Zwick. She started writing songs when she heard a group from a rival local high school, Neil Sedaka and the Linc-Tones, singing a song called “While I Dream”: [Excerpt: The Tokens “While I Dream”] Sedaka had briefly dated her, and had co-written that song himself, with Howard Greenfield, and his group got a record deal under the name The Tokens. King figured that if he could do that, so could she. She started writing songs, and found she was good at melodies but not particularly great at lyrics. But she still thought she was good enough to do something. She decided that she was going to go and see Alan Freed, and play him some of her songs. Freed listened to her politely, and explained to her how, at the time, one went about becoming a professional songwriter for the R&B market. He told her to get the addresses of record labels from the phone book, go and try to play her songs to them, and explained how a publishing contract would work. The record label he mentioned to her specifically was Atlantic Records, so she tried that one first. Jerry Wexler and Ahmet Ertegun listened to her, and told her she had talent and to come back when she had more songs. It wasn’t a rejection, but it wasn’t the instant acceptance she’d hoped for. The second label she went to was ABC-Paramount, where she saw Don Costa. Costa was head of A&R at the label, but also a musician himself. Around this time he had released a cover version of Bill Justis’ “Raunchy”, under the name Muvva Guitar Hubbard: [Excerpt: Muvva “Guitar” Hubbard, “Raunchy”] Costa would later go on to arrange and conduct for Frank Sinatra, and he also had a respectable career as a session guitarist, but Carol didn’t know any of this when she went into his office and played through her songs for him. She was flabbergasted to find that, rather than just sign her to a publishing contract, he asked her to sign a recording contract as well. She was disappointed that he wasn’t interested in signing the rest of her group — he thought she was good enough by herself, without needing to hear the other three — but not so disappointed that she didn’t sign with him straight away. Her first few singles were solo compositions, and didn’t do very much in terms of sales, partly because she still didn’t consider herself especially good as a lyricist: [Excerpt: Carole King, “The Right Girl”] So while she was trying to have a music career, she also went off to college, aged sixteen — she had skipped multiple years in school — where she met someone else who had had a minor hit. The boy who performed under the name Jerry Landis had released “Hey! Schoolgirl”, an Everly Brothers knockoff, with a friend, as Tom and Jerry: [Excerpt: Tom and Jerry, “Hey! Schoolgirl”] Landis and King started working together, recording demos for other writers, though never writing together. For some of those demos, they re-used the Cosines name, like on this one for a song by Marty Kalfin: [Excerpt: The Cosines, “Just to Be With You”] They were quite proud when the arrangement they came up with for that demo was copied exactly for the finished record, which made the lower regions of the Hot One Hundred: [Excerpt: The Passions, “Just to Be With You”] They didn’t work together for very long, and Jerry Landis went on to record under other names like “True Taylor” and “Paul Kane”, before getting back together with Tom, and deciding to work together under their real names. We’ll be hearing more of Paul Simon and his partner Art Garfunkel in future episodes. Someone else she met while at college was the man who was to become her first husband, another Gerry — Gerry Goffin. Goffin impressed her with his looks the first time she saw him — he looked exactly like a drawing she had clipped out of a magazine, which looked to her like the perfect boyfriend. Goffin impressed her less, though, with his studied dislike of rock and roll music, but was suddenly keen to write a song with her when she mentioned that she’d been selling songs. He’d been trying to write a musical, but he was primarily a lyricist, and couldn’t do much with music. King mentioned that she knew that Atlantic were looking for a new song for Mickey and Sylvia, and the two of them worked on a song based on the style of “Love is Strange”, which they completed very quickly, and took to Atlantic. Unfortunately, when they got there, they were told that Mickey and Sylvia had split up, but that their song would be suitable for the new duo they’d put together to continue the act — Mickey and Kitty: [Excerpt: Mickey and Kitty, “The Kid Brother”] That was released as a B-side. The A-side, “Ooh Sha La La” was written by Neil Sedaka and Howie Greenfield: [Excerpt: MIckey and Kitty, “Ooh Sha La La”] Sedaka and Greenfield had become hot songwriters, and around this time Sedaka was also becoming a successful performer. His first hit as a performer, “Oh Carol”, was in fact written about Carole King: [Excerpt: Neil Sedaka, “Oh Carol”] And King herself recorded an answer record to that, with new lyrics by Goffin: [Excerpt: Carole King, “Oh Neil”] By the time she was seventeen, King was married to Goffin, and pregnant with his child. Goffin was working a day job, and they were treating the occasional twenty-five dollar advance they got from writing songs as windfalls. But then, when she was on one of her visits to 1650 Broadway to sell songs, King bumped into Sedaka, who told her she should come and meet Al Nevins and Don Kirshner, the owners of Aldon Music. Aldon is the publisher who, more than any single other company, was responsible for what became known as the Brill Building sound. Even though they weren’t based in the actual Brill Building, which was at 1619 Broadway, but in 1650 Broadway, the companies in that second building were so associated with the Brill Building sound that you’ll find almost every history of music misattributes them and places them there, and in most interviews, when you see people talking about the Brill Building, even people who worked in one or other building, they’re as likely to be talking about 1650 as 1619. Kirshner is someone we’ve met briefly before. He’d started out as a songwriter, working with his friend Bobby Darin on songs like “I Want Elvis For Christmas”, which had been recorded by the Holly Twins with Eddie Cochran impersonating Elvis: [Excerpt: The Holly Twins and Eddie Cochran, “I Want Elvis For Christmas”] However, as Darin had moved into performance, Kirshner had gone into music publishing. He’d scored early success when working for Vanderbilt Music by bringing Al Lewis out of retirement. Lewis had been a hit songwriter in the thirties and forties, but hadn’t done much for a while. But then Fats Domino had had a hit with “Blueberry Hill”, a song Lewis had cowritten decades earlier, and Kirshner decided to pair Lewis with a black musician, Sylvester Bradford, and the two started writing hits together, notably “Tears on My Pillow” for Little Anthony and the Imperials: [Excerpt: Little Anthony and the Imperials, “Tears on My Pillow”] Kirshner had then formed his own publishing company. He’d first approached Pomus and Shuman, and then Leiber and Stoller, to go into business with him, but he ended up with Al Nevins, who had been a musician and had also co-written “Twilight Time” with Buck Ram, which had been a hit in the forties and then later revived by the Platters: [Excerpt: The Platters, “Twilight Time”] Kirshner and Nevins were looking for talented new songwriters, and they had signed up Sedaka and Greenfield, and also signed Paul Simon around this time, as well as another couple, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weill. When Carole King played them a few of the songs she’d co-written with Goffin, they signed Goffin and King to a three-year contract, with advances of one thousand dollars for the first year, two thousand for the second, and three thousand for the third, to be offset against their royalties. This was a fortune for the young couple, and so they went from soul-crushing day jobs to… a day job, working in a cubicle. Aldon had a very regimented system. Every writing team had a tiny cubicle, containing a piano and a couple of chairs, in which they would work during normal office hours. Kirshner’s system was simple — any time any new act had a hit, he would get all the songwriters in his office to try to write a follow-up to the hit, in the same style. Of the efforts to find a follow-up to “Tonight’s the Night”, Kirshner decided on one that Goffin and King had written. “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” had lyrics that had rather more depth than most of the songs that were charting at the time. Goffin’s initial dislike of rock and roll music had been because of what he perceived as its lyrical vacuity, and in “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” he found a lyrical formula that would define girl groups from that point on — a look at a kind of female adolescent emotion that had previously not been discussed in pop music. In this case the lyrics were from the point of view of a woman worrying that she’s just a one-night stand, not someone the man cares about, and struck a chord with millions. But King’s music is at least as impressive. She modelled the song on “There Goes My Baby”, and when Luther Dixon accepted the song for the Shirelles, she decided she would write a string arrangement for it like the one the Drifters had used. She’d never written for an orchestra before, so she got a book on arrangement out of the library, and looked through it quickly before writing the string arrangement overnight. The group didn’t like the song, thinking it sounded like a country song, but Luther Dixon insisted, and the result went to number one: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?”] The B-side to that single, a Luther Dixon song called “Boys”, would also become a well-known track itself: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “Boys”] Two more top ten hits followed, and then the group’s singles started doing less well again. To reverse the downward trend, Dixon brought in a song by another new writer, Burt Bacharach. Bacharach had written a song with Mack David — the brother of his usual lyricist Hal David — called “I’ll Cherish You”. Dixon liked the song, but thought the lyrics were a bit too sickly. He changed the lyrics around, making them instead about someone who still loves her boyfriend despite her friends telling her how bad he is, and retitling it “Baby It’s You”. For the record itself, he just used Bacharach’s original demo and stuck Shirley’s voice on top — Shirley was the only member of the group to sing on the record, though it was still released as by the Shirelles. You can still hear Bacharach singing on the “sha la la”s: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, “Baby It’s You”] That returned them to the top ten, and the follow-up, “Soldier Boy”, written by Dixon and Greenberg, became their second number one. Unfortunately, it would be their last. Dixon and Greenberg ended their relationship, and Dixon went on to a new job at Capitol Records. Various other people produced recordings for the Shirelles at Scepter, but none had the same success with them that Dixon did. It didn’t help that the girls were starting families, and at various times one or other member had to be replaced on the road while they were on maternity leave. The singer who replaced them for those shows was a session singer who Bacharach was producing for Scepter, named Dionne Warwick. To make matters worse, the Shirelles discovered that Greenberg had been lying to them. They’d been told that their royalties were being put into a trust for them, for when they turned twenty-one, but they discovered that no such trust existed, and Greenberg had just been keeping their money. They entered into lawsuits against Scepter, but remained signed to the label, and so couldn’t record for anyone else. Their career was destroyed. They remained together in one lineup or another, with members coming and going, until the early eighties, when they all went their separate ways, though they all started their own lineups of Shirelles. These days Shirley tours under her married name as Shirley Alston Reeves and Her Shirelles, while Beverly Lee owns the rights to tour as The Shirelles with no modifiers. Addie Harris died in 1982, and Doris Coley in 2000. The Shirelles were badly treated by their record company, and by history. They made some of the most important records of the sixties, and it was their success that led to the great boom in girl groups of the next few years — the Supremes, the Marvelettes, the Crystals, the Ronettes, and the rest, all were following in the Shirelles’ footsteps. Because they had their greatest success in that period between 1958 and 1964 which most rock historians treat as having nothing of interest in, they’re almost ignored despite their huge influence on the musicians who followed them. But without them, the sound of sixties pop would have been vastly different, and to this day their greatest records sound as fresh and inspiring as the day they were recorded.

Neon Goblin
Disengaged : Aldon Eberhart

Neon Goblin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2020 20:19


Producer Erika Mims interviews players from Neon Goblin podcasts in this new show to learn more about them personally and to gain some insight into their creative process. This week is Aldon Eberhart, whose life long love affair with Fantasy and all things nerdy began at the tender age of 6 when he first watched the cult classic Willow. It was all downhill from there as he consumed all things nerdy from The Hobbit to Dragonlance to Warhammer 40K. He was first introduced to D&D in high school, playing one shots with his marching band friends. It wasn't until college however that he was able to play a full campaign. The sweet seduction of collaborative story telling stuck with him long afterwards and so when he was invited (foolishly!) to play with his friends on the Neon Goblin network he leapt at the chance!Aldon Eberhart @aldoneberhartErika Mims @mimsmuse

49ers Brawl
Episode 15

49ers Brawl

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2020 43:47


JBB and JD back again with another pod, here to talk about new uniforms, Aldon Smith and our WR rankings for the ever approaching NFL Draft.

About Them Cowboys
Dez & Dak, Acquiring Aldon & Rex Bashes Amari

About Them Cowboys

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 44:15


Why did Rex Ryan randomly bash Amari Cooper? Could Dez and Dak working out together actually mean something? Why go after Aldon Smith? About Them Cowboys tackles these topics and more on an all-new episode on The Athletic.Get 40% off your subscription to The Athletic with our link! theathletic.com/aboutthemcowboys

The JAYREELZ Podcast
A Return To Sports Coming Sooner? Later? Status Of AJ Hinch, Luhnow & Betts. Aldon Smith's Improbable Comeback. '20 Hoops HOF Class. Duncan: NBA Top 10 Ever? MJ: Best College Player? And HORSE?

The JAYREELZ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2020 53:40


Ready to fill your cup with the latest that's happening in the world of sports? Look no further as I'll entertain and inform on Episode 122. On deck: (2:08) Zooming through the sports landscape to see if there is any light at the end of the tunnel regarding games being played. President Donald Trump & Clemson coach Dabo Sweeney say NFL & college football will begin in August/September, but the NBA is preparing for the season NOT to resume. I'll share my thoughts on both sides of this coin. (15:49) The sports gods took a shot at me on Sunday as they tested my patience and tormented me with a couple of classic games shown simultaneously. I'll explain. (21:08) I'll update why MLB will let former Astros manager and GM, AJ Hinch & Jeff Luhnow back into the game next season even if a pitch isn't thrown in 2020. Same for the free agent status of Mookie Betts. Also, is Betts worth up to $400 million dollars? (24:45) Aldon Smith is back in the NFL after a four year hiatus. Why this is a tremendous gamble for the Dallas Cowboys? (30:03) The Basketball Hall of Fame will enshrine the late Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett among others. Is this the best entry class of all time? Why Tim Duncan's career is better than Kobe Bryant's? Is Duncan an all-time top 10 NBA player? A few words on the Chicago Bulls ESPN documentary, The Last Dance. Why Michael Jordan isn't the greatest college player of all time? And the NBA thinking of broadcasting games of HORSE? (45:45) Plus, my Hero and Zero of the Week. Please subscribe, leave a rating and post a review on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spreaker, Stitcher, Spotify, Luminary and iHeartRadio or wherever you get your podcasts. If you'd like to contribute to the production of the podcast, please visit my Patreon page at: www.patreon.com/TheJAYREELZPodcast Many thanks for all of your love and support. Music by Bensound.

Ants Sports
Breaking Down Aldon Smith's Contract

Ants Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2020 12:20


In this episode I break down Aldon Smith's contract details. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anthony-shen/support

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans
The Ocho: NFL Agent Ron Slavin

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 40:00


Whaddup World! Happy Friday here on The Ocho! The Dallas Cowboys made quite the move on Thursday night when they signed defensive end Aldon Smith and as a result many people have a lot of questions. On today's episode we bring in someone who can answer them all as NFL Agent Ron Slavin joins us. Ron, who represents Aldon Smith, talks about Aldon's road back to the NFL, how things came together with the Cowboys, and also provides us with an update on one of his other clients... Leighton Vander Esch. Huzzah! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Daily Ticket With Sean Brace
Mark Drumheller Interview 4/2

The Daily Ticket With Sean Brace

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 23:08


Our sports wagering wizard Mark Drumheller joined the #DailyTicket to talk about the #Cowboys signing Aldon Smith, where Cam Newton may end up, and the chances the #Eagles pick a LB in the first round of this year's draft.

NFL Live
Possibilities

NFL Live

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 39:15


Josina Anderson, Ryan Clark, Field Yates and Mike Tannenbaum join to discuss Antonio Brown and Lamar Jackson working out, the Cowboys signing Aldon Smith and Dak Prescott's contract situation.

JaM Session
What is Different About Aldon Smith? The Expectations? His Agent Ron Slavin tells JaM Session

JaM Session

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 13:37


Jean-Jacques Taylor and Matt McClearin spoke with the agent for new Cowboys end Aldon Smith, Ron Slavin. In this interview we found out what is different about Aldon, what the expectations are, and what is going on with another Slavin client in Cowboys LB Leighton Vander Esch 

In This League
4/2: Aldon Back in the NFL, AB to the Ravens, & More

In This League

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 57:30


Scott Bogman and Chris Welsh discuss One Hit Wonders for each MLB team! Aldon back in the NFL and AB to the Ravens Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 2 (Ep. 50, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 29:41


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. presents the conclusion of a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University, author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology, and president-elect of the American Sociological...

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 2 (Ep. 50, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 29:41


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. presents the conclusion of a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University, author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology, and president-elect of the American Sociological […]

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 2 (Ep. 50, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 29:41


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. presents the conclusion of a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University, author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology, and president-elect of the American Sociological...

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 1 (Ep. 49, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 29:44


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. begins a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology.

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 1 (Ep. 49, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 29:44


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. begins a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology.

KUT » In Black America
Dr. Aldon D. Morris, pt. 1 (Ep. 49, 2019)

KUT » In Black America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 29:44


This week on In Black America, producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. begins a conversation with Dr. Aldon D. Morris, the Leon Forrest professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and author of The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Dubois: The Birth of Modern Sociology.

Vital MX
Aldon Baker | The Inside Line, Presented by Thor

Vital MX

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2019 67:18


If you were going to pick the most successful motocross trainer of the last 20 years or so, it'd be pretty much impossible to not to select Aldon Baker. From individual riders like Ricky Carmichael, James Stewart, Ryan Villopoto, and Ryan Dungey, to nearly the whole current Red Bull KTM and Rockstar Energy Racing Husqvarna rosters, he's been helping build winners for a long time.In here he talks about how he got started, the difference between training an individual rider versus a whole stable full of talent, the struggles of starting his own facility, and a whole lot more.

Shifting Gears: The Zach Osborne Podcast

Zach Osborne sits down with his trainer (and the most successful trainer in the history of SX/MX) Aldon Baker to talk about his younger days, how he ended up in America, what motivates him as a trainer and many other topics including how he manages four top level riders at the same time.

From the Battlefield to the Boardroom
Episode 79: Rewarding Careers for Veterans with HSB

From the Battlefield to the Boardroom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2019 41:16


Orion has partnered with Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & Insurance Company (HSB) for nearly 15 years. Through this partnership, HSB has provided careers for more than 200 Veterans into Inspector and Inspector Trainee roles across the country. In addition to rewarding technical careers, HSB provides outstanding benefits and a work environment where you’ll be surrounded by other veterans. If you’d like to learn more about HSB and apply for an open position, visit us online at www.oriontalent.com/HSB. In today’s episode I am joined by Ron Barche and Aldon Eberhart, Navy Veterans and HSB Employees. Ron and Aldon were both hired through Orion into Inspector roles. In this podcast we’ll discuss: • Ron and Aldon’s military transitions • Their careers with HSB • Why HSB is a great place for veterans to work

MaliceCast TV Talk Reaction Cast
MaliceCast TV Talks: The Walking Dead 9×9 – Adaptation

MaliceCast TV Talk Reaction Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2019 51:01


The Walking Dead S09xE09:Adaptation Recapping the main storylines of the episode: - Michonne's group returns to Hilltop with a deceased friend and a prisoner. - Luke and Aldon set out on a two man adventure only to find what they aren't looking for. - The Rosita love triangle is getting really crowded. - Negan goes on a walk about. Comic Bokk Vs. Show Comparison: - How did everything play out in the epsisode versus the comic book? TWD Headlines: - Could Lauren Cohan's Maggie have her own spin-off series? - Is the showing setting up Aldon and Luke to be the head's on sticks from the Whisperer's at the Fair? - Danai Gurriera is leaving the show in season 10. Despite all efforts of the writers and show runners. Are we looking at a end to the series?

The Annex Sociology Podcast
ASA Election 2019: Aldon Morris

The Annex Sociology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2019 18:19


Introducing ASA Presidential candidate Aldon Morris of Northwestern University. Photo Credit By National Museum of American History - From the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution in the Vote: The Machinery of Democracy exhibit., Public Domain, Link

Sociocast
ASA Election 2019: Aldon Morris

Sociocast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2019 18:19


Introducing ASA Presidential candidate Aldon Morris of Northwestern University. Photo Credit By National Museum of American History – From the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution in the Vote: The Machinery of Democracy exhibit., Public Domain, Link

The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX
Guest: Aldon Baker

The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2019 68:14


Baker, the most successful trainer in the sport, talks to Matthes about each of his riders starts to the season, goes down memory lane about RC, Stew, RV and Dungey, Tickle's situation and more.

The Racer X Podcast Network
Exhaust #33: Aldon Baker

The Racer X Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2018 28:26


We made a mistake last year. We heard that Jason Anderson was spending more of his off-season in California and less of it riding motos with Marvin Musquin in Florida, and we all believed it was a sign that Anderson was slacking from the traditional Aldon Baker-style program, which means as much Florida time as possible and motos with your workmates, like it or not. Well, we were wrong, because the changes Anderson made last off-season made him better, and he emerged as Monster Energy Supercross Champion. To avoid making the same mistake again, Jason Weigandt called Baker to see how the off-season has gone for all his troops. Is Anderson working just as hard even though he already has a title? Is Musquin going to be okay after a knee injury? How is Cooper Webb dealing with the program? Is Zach Osborne transferring his 250 success to a 450? Let's find out from the man himself. The Racer X Exhaust podcast is presented by Yoshimura.

BigMx Radio
Episode 643: Aldon Baker

BigMx Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2018 44:35


Motocross’ fitness guru. The most decorated trainer in the sport. Aldon Baker.

Historia Polski dla dzieci
16 - Koronacja Kazimierza Wielkiego i Aldony

Historia Polski dla dzieci

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2018 7:07


Witam w 16 odcinku Historii Polski dla Dzieci oraz według Dzieci.Link do konta na Patronite: https://patronite.pl/historia-dla-dzieciLink do iTunes:https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/historia-polski-dla-dzieci/id1344761794?mt=2Link do grupy na Facebooku:https://www.facebook.com/groups/historia.dla.dzieciGdy nagrywaliśmy ten odcinek 25 kwietnia 2018 roku wypadała pewna rocznica. Ale czy wiecie co to jest rocznica? Wasze urodziny są rocznicą waszego urodzenia. Niektórzy obchodzą rocznicę ślubu, a państwa świętują rocznice wielkich bitew. Tego samego dnia czyli 25 kwietnia ale w roku 1333 była koronacja.Syn Władysława Łokietka czyli Kazimierz Wielki został królem. Tego samego dnia, jego żona Aldona Anna została królową. Czy moglibyście policzyć ile lat minęło od tamtego wydarzenia?Jak to policzyliśmy. Trzeba np. na kalkulatorze odjąć od naszego roku czyli 2018 tamten rok czyli 1333.Tak więc w 2018 roku wypadała 685 rocznica koronacji Kazimierza i Aldony. Teraz w telewizji można oglądać serial o nich. Aldona była Litwinką i nie była chrześcijanką, ale tata Kazimierza, czyli Władysław Łokietek kazał mu się z nią ożenić. Dlaczego?Aldona przybyła do Polski i została ochrzczona czyli została chrześcijanką. Dostała też nowe imię Anna. Dlatego nazywa się ją i Aldoną, i Anną.W filmie “Korona królów” w odcinku 16 możecie zobaczyć jak wyglądała taka koronacja. Kazimierz i Aldona klęczeli, a biskup dał Kazimierzowi miecz jego pradziada Bolesława Chrobrego. Ten miecz nazywał się Szczerbiec i każdy król po Bolesławie Chrobrym dostawał go podczas koronacji.Tak więc także Kazimierz Wielki dostał miecz Szczerbiec podczas swojej koronacji. Później biskup dał mu złote jabłko i złote berło oraz włożył na jego głowę koronę. Potem powiedział:Potem także Aldona dostała koronę. Do tego podkastu będzie ilustracja przedstawiająca tą scene z filmu gdy Kazimierz i Aldona zostali koronowani.Czyli najpierw królem był Władysław Łokietek, a królową jego żona Jadwiga. Gdy jednak Władysław umarł królem został Kazimierz oraz jego żona Aldona. Jadwiga była trochę zła, że teraz już nie będzie królową.Kazimierz i Aldona wzięli ślub aby Polska i Litwa razem pokonały Krzyżaków. W ich czasach to się nie udało, ale później powiemy sobie o tym jak właśnie Polacy i Litwini razem pokonali Krzyżaków w bitwie pod Grunwaldem. Ale o tym trochę później.Na dzisiaj już zakończymy. Chciałbym bardzo podziękować wam za słuchanie naszych podkastów. Wesprzeć te audycje możecie wspierając je na patronite. Możecie też dzielić się nimi ze znajomymi rodzinami z dziećmi. Zapraszam do naszej grupy na facebooku, a gdy już w niej jesteście to może dodajcie tam swoich znajomych z dziećmi. Jeszcze raz dziękuję za wysłuchanie i do usłyszenia za tydzień.

Historia Polski dla dzieci
16 - Koronacja Kazimierza Wielkiego i Aldony

Historia Polski dla dzieci

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2018 7:07


Witam w 16 odcinku Historii Polski dla Dzieci oraz według Dzieci.Link do konta na Patronite: https://patronite.pl/historia-dla-dzieciLink do iTunes:https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/historia-polski-dla-dzieci/id1344761794?mt=2Link do grupy na Facebooku:https://www.facebook.com/groups/historia.dla.dzieciGdy nagrywaliśmy ten odcinek 25 kwietnia 2018 roku wypadała pewna rocznica. Ale czy wiecie co to jest rocznica? Wasze urodziny są rocznicą waszego urodzenia. Niektórzy obchodzą rocznicę ślubu, a państwa świętują rocznice wielkich bitew. Tego samego dnia czyli 25 kwietnia ale w roku 1333 była koronacja.Syn Władysława Łokietka czyli Kazimierz Wielki został królem. Tego samego dnia, jego żona Aldona Anna została królową. Czy moglibyście policzyć ile lat minęło od tamtego wydarzenia?Jak to policzyliśmy. Trzeba np. na kalkulatorze odjąć od naszego roku czyli 2018 tamten rok czyli 1333.Tak więc w 2018 roku wypadała 685 rocznica koronacji Kazimierza i Aldony. Teraz w telewizji można oglądać serial o nich. Aldona była Litwinką i nie była chrześcijanką, ale tata Kazimierza, czyli Władysław Łokietek kazał mu się z nią ożenić. Dlaczego?Aldona przybyła do Polski i została ochrzczona czyli została chrześcijanką. Dostała też nowe imię Anna. Dlatego nazywa się ją i Aldoną, i Anną.W filmie “Korona królów” w odcinku 16 możecie zobaczyć jak wyglądała taka koronacja. Kazimierz i Aldona klęczeli, a biskup dał Kazimierzowi miecz jego pradziada Bolesława Chrobrego. Ten miecz nazywał się Szczerbiec i każdy król po Bolesławie Chrobrym dostawał go podczas koronacji.Tak więc także Kazimierz Wielki dostał miecz Szczerbiec podczas swojej koronacji. Później biskup dał mu złote jabłko i złote berło oraz włożył na jego głowę koronę. Potem powiedział:Potem także Aldona dostała koronę. Do tego podkastu będzie ilustracja przedstawiająca tą scene z filmu gdy Kazimierz i Aldona zostali koronowani.Czyli najpierw królem był Władysław Łokietek, a królową jego żona Jadwiga. Gdy jednak Władysław umarł królem został Kazimierz oraz jego żona Aldona. Jadwiga była trochę zła, że teraz już nie będzie królową.Kazimierz i Aldona wzięli ślub aby Polska i Litwa razem pokonały Krzyżaków. W ich czasach to się nie udało, ale później powiemy sobie o tym jak właśnie Polacy i Litwini razem pokonali Krzyżaków w bitwie pod Grunwaldem. Ale o tym trochę później.Na dzisiaj już zakończymy. Chciałbym bardzo podziękować wam za słuchanie naszych podkastów. Wesprzeć te audycje możecie wspierając je na patronite. Możecie też dzielić się nimi ze znajomymi rodzinami z dziećmi. Zapraszam do naszej grupy na facebooku, a gdy już w niej jesteście to może dodajcie tam swoich znajomych z dziećmi. Jeszcze raz dziękuję za wysłuchanie i do usłyszenia za tydzień.

The Racer X Podcast Network
Exhaust #4: Aldon Baker's Power of Paranoia

The Racer X Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2018 59:44


Jason Weigandt gets a tour of Aldon Baker's Florida facility and also goes in depth to explain what he's learned watching Aldon and his athletes operate through the years. Aldon's record is amazing: he's trained 13 supercross champions during his 17 years in the sport. Yet he still believes he's only as good as his last race, and he operates as if he's still trying to prove himself, not one of the most accomplished trainers in the sport's history. Perhaps it's that power—the power of paranoia—that allows him to stay motivated and transfer that effort into his athletes. Enjoy this conversation with Jason and Aldon, episode 4 of the Racer X Exhaust Podcast, brought to you by Yoshimura.

The Social Breakdown
SOC117 - The Forgotten Founding Father: W.E.B. Du Bois

The Social Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2018 34:55


Ever wonder where fieldwork, quantitative research, participant observation came from? Or who challenged the notion of the ‘armchair theorist'? In recognizing Black History Month, we pay homage to the often ignored, great modern sociologist, W.E.B. Du Bois. Using the book, The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology (2015) by Dr. Aldon D. Morris, we discuss the legacy and contribution of Du Bois and retell the story of the origins of modern sociology. While faculty and students are gradually incorporating the work of Du Bois in their research and syllabi, the overall discipline of sociology has not yet fully acknowledged Du Bois' work and contribution as the father of modern American sociology. Tune in to hear the convo!

Heartland Conference IPHC
Dr. Aldon Preston — Doing Personal Devotions

Heartland Conference IPHC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2017 60:23


Dr. Aldon Preston, pastor of Starlight Ministries in Stillwater, Oklahoma, shares liberating insights on the need for a personal devotion and clearly defines how that is different than preparing a lesson or message to share with others.

BigMx Radio
Aldon Baker

BigMx Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2017 49:51


To pick the brain of a legend is to unfold the road map to legendary status. I could have chatted with Aldon for hours on end and that’s why we’ll have Aldon on again.  

BigMx Radio
Aldon Baker

BigMx Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2017 49:51


To pick the brain of a legend is to unfold the road my to success. Aldon Baker sit down with me for 30 minutes of great chat about fitness within motocross.

Brooklyn Free Speech Radio
BSEC Interview with Author Aldon Morris

Brooklyn Free Speech Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2017 36:01


Beryl Benbow hosts a podcast as introduction and announcement for the May 7 Charley Horwitz Memorial Platform at Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture.The main thrust of the program, however, would be the conversation between two scholars of W.E.B. Du Bois: Dr. John Flateau, DuBois Bunche Center for Public Policy, Professor Aldon Morris, from Northwestern University and Professor Michael Schwartz from Medgar Evers College.Professor Morris, speaks about The Lessons of W.E.B. Du Bois in an Age of Trumpism.Guided exchange between Morris, Flateau and Michael Schwartz.

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #295 - Dean Wilson, Aldon Baker, Jeff Ward, David Bailey, Tyler Enticknap and Kris Keefer in-studio

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2017 289:00


Dean Wilson has managed to stick in the 450 series and that's a big step so we're glad to have him on to talk about it. Aldon Baker had a great night in NY and comes on to talk about the Baker's Factory. David Bailey and Jeff Ward, legends by any measure, come on to talk about a crazy cycling race and give their thoughts on this Supercross Series.

Touchdowns and Tangents
Touchdowns and Tangents: Aldon Got Freed About A Week Ago

Touchdowns and Tangents

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2017 44:31


Super Bowl Backlash, NFL in Las Vegas, Aldon Smith and whatever topical tangents come up.

Touchdowns and Tangents
Touchdowns and Tangents: Aldon Got Freed About A Week Ago

Touchdowns and Tangents

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2017 44:31


Super Bowl Backlash, NFL in Las Vegas, Aldon Smith and whatever topical tangents come up.

BigMx Radio
Anahiem 2 2017 Pre-Race Interviews Blake Baggett, Marvin Musquin, Aldon Baker, Rick Johnson and Jason Weigandt

BigMx Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2017 21:41


Pre race interviews at A2. Multiple point of views and perspectives.

Office Hours
Aldon Morris on The Scholar Denied

Office Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2016


Northwestern University professor Aldon Morris discusses W.E.B. Du Bois and the status of his work in the sociological canon. In this special hour-long episode, we explore the ongoing tension between social justice activism and the scientific features of contemporary sociology, especially as it is experienced by many black scholars today. Morris’ new book is called The Scholar Denied: W. E. B. Du Bois […]

Americarnage
Americarnage #140: Pappy Dan is Real?!

Americarnage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2016 79:46


After a bit of a break caused by a combination of things (yes, HdP lost the keys to the studio and went on a three-week haribo binge to try to drown his sorrows) Nat and Dan rock up in Camden to find three things have happened: Mike is still away, the fabulous Mr Marek Larwood has turned up and finally that Pappy Dan is real and owns the LA Clippers... In other news: Dan ran a marathon or something; Marek talks films; racism gets discussed a bit, for a change; the 2014 NBA playoffs are go and the Pacers held off the Heat for first spot in the East; the Hawks beat out the resurgent Knicks for the last spot; in the West the Spurs finished first, setting up a match up with Dalla; OKC set up a match up with last year’s conference finalists the Grizzlies; in the run-up the NFL draft we know some of these things: Earl Thomas is now the highest paid safety in the NFL; Cj2k is a New York Jet; Aldon smith has been arrested again; Johnn Manziel is going to Bucs; NHL-wise, in the East the Montreal Canadiens swept the Tampa Bay Lightning, who were in the playoffs for the first time since 2011; out West the Ducks went back and forth with the Dallas Stars, but with Ryan Getzlaff looking like a Hart Trophy winner, Anaheim took it in 6; elsewhere, with Malkin and Crosby again leading the line the Penguins beat out the Columbus Blue Jackets in 6; they’ll play the winners of New York Philadelphia, which is 3-2 going into tonights game 6; loads of Bodeans Mailbag goodness; Dan makes up some more characters who may or may not ocme true and much, much more...

MylesTSportz's Podcast
MylesTSportz Ep 1: Floyd Mayweather vs Who? Aldon Smith in more trouble! NFL Preseason Players to watch.

MylesTSportz's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2015 44:19


MylesTSportz Episode 1 by your host Myles Thomas. (@Realmylesthomas) Myles discusses Sports hottest topics, and even a little more. Check out our website Mylestsportz.com to see all of the link to our weekly episodes. New episodes every Monday & Fridays! Connect with us through all of the Social Media profiles below! Thanks for listening! Mylestsportz.com Twitter: Mylestsportz Instagram: Mylestsportz Facebook: Mylestsportz Google+: Mylestsportz Tumblr: Mylestsportz

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #216 - RJ Hampshire, Frederik Noren, Aldon Baker and Keefer in Studio

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2015 285:59


RJ comes on after a great first moto and painful second in High Point. Frederik Noren joins to talk about his fill-in ride with Factory Honda. Aldon Baker reprimands Steve for his waining mountain bike rides and Keefer is back to talk about his Canadian adventure! Remember to listen live Monday's at 6pm PST!

Więcej Niż Zdrowe Odżywianie | Zdrowy Tryb Życia | Rozwoj osobisty i zawodowy
WNZO 013: Zioła w kuchni i nie tylko – część 2

Więcej Niż Zdrowe Odżywianie | Zdrowy Tryb Życia | Rozwoj osobisty i zawodowy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2015 15:17


Zioła to nie tylko przyprawy i napary, które stosujemy w kuchni. Okazuje się, że z tego, co mamy na półkach kuchennych i grządkach, przy odrobinie chęci i wiedzy można wyczarować skuteczne preparaty do poprawy naszej urody i samopoczucia. Jak tego dokonać dowiesz się z podcastu nagranego z fitoterapeutką – Aldoną Adamską-Szewczyk. To już drugi odcinek podcastu, który nagrałem z Aldoną o ziołach, link do pierwszego (jeżeli jeszcze go nie słuchałeś) znajdziesz w notatkach na końcu tego wpisu. Jak możesz słuchać podcastu? na blogu - wszystkie podcasty z naszego bloga, na dowolnym odtwarzaczu mp3, pliki możesz pobrać z bloga i przegrać [...] Post WNZO 013: Zioła w kuchni i nie tylko – część 2 pojawił się poraz pierwszy w Więcej Niż Zdrowe Odżywianie.

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #195 - Weston Peick, Tyler Bowers, Aldon Baker and Jason Thomas in Studio

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2015 293:59


A1. Just. Happened. Peick comes on to debate Matthes' journalistic skills, Tyler Bowers defends himself and says he's here to win a title, Aldon Baker's guys finished one, two at A1 and we pick his brain to see what his formula is based on and JT$ holds down the cohost gig. Remember to listen live Monday's at 6pm PST!

Comparative Literature Lunch - Videos
"On Transtromer," Aldon Nielsen, Penn State, and Douglas Messerli, poet and the Director of The Contemporary Arts Educational P

Comparative Literature Lunch - Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2014 65:00


"On Transtromer," Aldon Nielsen, Penn State, and Douglas Messerli, poet and the Director of The Contemporary Arts Educational Project, Inc., Monday, April 2, 2012...

Play D Podcast
Episode 8-Too Much Profanity, Douchebag?

Play D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2014 68:45


Apologies in advance for the swearing, we'll behave better in episode 9 This edition features more NFL chat as we discuss free agency progress and the 49ers problems with negative publicity the past week. In the Turnstiles, we chat Premier League, including some rare coverage for Liverpool and the fate of their captain Steven Gerrard. Down In Front encapsulates Game of Thrones, Nebraska and South Park: The Stick of Destiny. Onside kick is as intriguing as ever. Thanks once again for taking the time to listen.

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #156 - Nick Wey, Ken Roczen, Zach Osborne, Aldon Baker and Tony Berluti in Studio

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2014 270:03


A1 has came and gone, we go the winner, the winners trainer, a podium-achieving Zachary Osborne and friend of the show, Nick Wey who struggled with the track and gave us his honest thoughts on A1 2014. Thanks for listening and all the support. Remember to listen live Monday's at 6pm PST!

NESN.com Podcast
Colin Kaepernick's Speed, Scrambling Ability Could Plague Ravens' Defense

NESN.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2013 21:05


NESN.com's Doug Kyed and Luke Hughes discuss all the headlines leading up to the Super Bowl, including which quarterback has the biggest advantage, each defense's strengths and weaknesses and Ray Lewis' PED scandal.

Football Nation
Stat Pack: 2011 Draft Class Owns the Best Defensive Hogs

Football Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2012 37:45


In this week's edition, host Adam Dobrowolski explains why the 2011 NFL Draft class owns the best front seven in league history. Also, he introduces the LOL's of the week and discusses which team proved their truly contenders in the past few weeks.

The PulpMX.com Show
Show #97 - Trey Canard, Phil Nicoletti, Aldon Baker, Bobby Kiniry and Tyler Keefe

The PulpMX.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2012 252:02


Last show before a two week break, diverse guests bring the thunder. Remember to listen live Monday nights at 6:00 p.m. PST!

Haberman and Middlekauff
NFL Super League, 49ers Know?, Mac Jones Tumble?, Aldon, Tomlin, PGA $$

Haberman and Middlekauff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 1970 92:55


https://wineaccess.com/ham 20% OFF 1st Order Is NFL a Super League (7:30)... Pro Days are over, do the 49ers have their pick? (23:20)... If 49ers pass on Mac Jones how far would he fall? (39:35)... 55:00 Aldon Smith, Mike Tomlin and PGA Big Money idea followed by YouTube comments. * Time Stamps Approx Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy