Podcasts about Atkins

  • 1,847PODCASTS
  • 3,290EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 21, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Atkins

Show all podcasts related to atkins

Latest podcast episodes about Atkins

On The Bench: An FSU football podcast
Blake Nichelson is a 'Nole, another decision on the horizon, and 1 vs. 1 with Alex Atkins

On The Bench: An FSU football podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 47:29


Florida State went west to land Top150 linebacker Blake Nichelson, beating out Oregon in the process. What are the Seminoles getting in Nichelson? On The Bench provides a scouting report from its live watch party with Coach AB, Kev, Brendan, and Nee.  Then we get into the latest re: WR Hykeem Williams. And finally, a thoughtful and fun 1-on-1 interview with OC Alex Atkins. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

STEM-Talk
Episode 142: Vyvyane Loh discusses weight management, ketogenic diet, and the treatment of metabolic diseases

STEM-Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 63:05


Our interview today is with Dr. Vyvyane Loh, a board-certified physician in obesity and internal medicine. She is the founder and leader of Transform Alliance for Health, a Boston preventive-care practice that  specializes in weight management and the treatment of chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. She and her staff are known for helping people lose 50 pounds or more and getting their type-2 diabetic patients off their many medications. Vyvyane has spent her medical career developing expertise in immunology, metabolic syndrome, fat metabolism, clinical nutrition, and preventive medicine. In today's interview, we discuss how abdominal, or visceral, fat is linked to a wide range of metabolic disorders. Vyvyane goes on to explain how there's a clearcut association between obesity and decreased brain volume that rarely gets discussed. When her overweight patients complain about their behavior around food and how they consistently give in to snacks that patients know are bad for them, Vyvyane explains how the challenges they are facing is often a result of the brain struggling with decreased blood flow and the shrinkage of neurons. Vyvyane also shares how a patient asked Vyvyane if she knew anything about the Atkins diet, and although she didn't, Vyvyane ended up doing the diet along with her patient. This led Vyvyane to start seriously researching whether a ketogenic diet could help people not only lose weight, but also reverse chronic disease. Toward the end of today's interview, we explore Vyvyane's interest in macrophages, which are specialized cells involved in the detection and destruction of bacteria and other harmful organisms. We also have a nice discussion about how Vyvyane took some time off from practicing medicine to enroll in the writing program at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina in 1999. She spent the next two years writing a novel, “Breaking the Tongue.”  Set in Singapore during World War II, her book was nominated for the prestigious International IMPAC Award in fiction and was selected by the New York Public Library as one of its top 25 books of 2004. If you are interested in finding out more about Vyvyane, check out her website, vyvyanelohmd.com. Also, Vyvyane launched a podcast this week, which you also can find on her website. Episode one looks at “Metabolism: What It Is, And How It Affects Your Health.” If you enjoy today's interview with Vyvyane and the many other interviews we've had on STEM-Talk discussing the treatment and prevention of chronic metabolic diseases, you may want to check out the upcoming virtual conference on Targeting Metabesity. Our cohost Dr. Ken Ford will be one of nearly 70 speakers, including many former guests on STEM-Talk, talking about the growing evidence that the major chronic diseases of the day share common metabolic roots and as a result may also share common solutions. To find out more about the conference, follow this link to the Targeting Metabestiy home page where you find a program guide and list of speakers. If you would like a free ticket to the conference, click on this link where you will find instructions on how to receive a code for complimentary admission that is being offered to STEM-Talk listeners. Ken will be moderating a session on emerging research related to endogenous and exogenous ketosis in health and disease as well as the role of ketones in mild traumatic brain injury and the prevention and treatment of cancer. If you have enjoyed the interviews we've had on STEM-Talk with Drs Steven Austad, Colin Champ, James Kirkland, John Newman, Brianna Stubbs, Jeff Volek and Morley Stone, who are all speaking at the conference as well, you should find the talks by the over 70 speakers quite interesting and beneficial. So, send us an email requesting a free registration and we will make sure to send a you a code for a complimentary ticket. Show notes

Philosophy for our times
Is science objective? | Rupert Sheldrake, Peter Atkins, Steve Fuller, Angela Saini

Philosophy for our times

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 44:44 Very Popular


Can empirical observation lead us to the truth?Looking for a link we mentioned? It's here: https://linktr.ee/philosophyforourtimesFrom Newton to Darwin, Curie to Einstein, science has been built on empirical observation. Now the very idea of neutral observation is under threat. In a postmodern world it is claimed all observation is perspectival, everything we see influenced by what we already think. The founder of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg went further arguing that observing reality was not even possible. Are we at sea in a world of competing models? Or is it time to reassert the value of empirical observation, supported perhaps by machine learning and big data, as a means of choosing between incompatible theories?Steve Fuller is an academic studying science and technology. Fuller has published prolifically on such topics as intelligent design, the sociology of academia, and transhumanism. Angela Saini is an award-winning science journalist, author and broadcaster. She regularly presents science programmes for the BBC, and her writing has appeared in publications ranging from New Scientist, Wired and the Guardian.Rupert Sheldrake is a biologist and bestselling author. Best known for his 2012 book 'The Science Delusion' and the controversial, viral TED talk he gave which was banned by the organisation. Peter Atkins is a chemist and Fellow of Lincoln College. He's a Distinguished Supporter of Humanists UK, Atkins is outspoken in his opposition to religion. Danielle Sands hosts.There are thousands of big ideas to discover at IAI.tv – videos, articles, and courses waiting for you to explore. Find out more: https://iai.tv/podcast-offers?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=shownotes&utm_campaign=[iai-tv-episode-title] See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Digiday Podcast
Why Wonder Media Network won't sell its podcast ad inventory programmatically

The Digiday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:59


Advertising is taking a hit from the economic slowdown. For some advertisers with podcast and audio budgets, they want to reach more listeners efficiently rather than invest in expensive custom branded content. For Wonder Media Network, however, programmatic advertising isn't part of its inventory. There are certain instances where programmatic advertising in audio makes sense, according to Shira Atkins, CRO and co-founder of podcast company Wonder Media Network, such as targeting people who are in one specific region versus running national ads. But on the latest episode of the Digiday Podcast, Atkins said she still believes that programmatic is “a tragedy for the podcasting ecosystem at large." Her team does not sell any of its ad space programmatically. Instead, the podcast network uses its branded content studio to make bespoke audio ads, which Atkins said creates memorable ads that listeners are less likely to skip over.

City Lights with Lois Reitzes
“Bernstein's Wall” / Cheers – Atkins Park / Film Crew Files

City Lights with Lois Reitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 51:51


Filmmaker Douglas Tirola discusses his 2021 documentary, "Bernstein's Wall." The film is screening on Wednesday, September 21st, at City Springs Theater as part of the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, and City Lights host Lois Reitzes will introduce Tirola. Then, our new series, "Cheers!" celebrates Atlanta's oldest drinking establishments, and today we look at the 100-year-old tavern, Atkins Park. Plus, location manager and scout Kyle Carey is highlighted in our segment, "Film Crew Files."See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Lexman Artificial
Jeff Atwood: Author, Economist, and Libertarian

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 3:08


In this episode of Lexman Artificial, I interview libertarian writer and blogger Jeff Atwood. We discuss our mutual love of making friends and poking fun at sensitive topics. We also touch on topics such as the Atkins diet, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and evolutionary psychology.

Casefile True Crime
Casefile Presents: Matty

Casefile True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 3:29 Very Popular


When 20-year-old Matthew Leveson failed to return home after a night out clubbing in Sydney, his loved ones were worried sick. Matty was a trustworthy, warm, and caring young man who adored his friends and family, not the type of person who would just take off without a word. Suspicion soon fell on Matt's partner, 45-year-old Michael Atkins, after it was revealed that the pair were fighting on the night of Matt's disappearance. But was that unfortunate timing, or did Atkins have something to hide? Matty is the latest podcast from Casefile Presents, a 10-part series narrated by Loren O'Keeffe from the Missing Persons Advocacy Network. Join Loren as she documents the decade-long struggle faced by Matt's parents, Mark and Faye, who refused to give up on their son. We go behind the headlines for an exclusive insight into how the investigation unfolded, exploring the failures of law enforcement, and the ongoing obstacles faced by the Levesons. At the heart of it all lies the question: how far would you go to bring your loved one home? Listen now, only on Spotify - spotify.link/CasefilePresents

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
A spatiotemporal map of the aging mouse brain reveals white matter tracts as vulnerable foci

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.09.18.508419v1?rss=1 Authors: Hahn, O., Foltz, A. G., Atkins, M., Kedir, B., Moran-Losada, P., Guldner, I. H., Munson, C., Kern, F., Palovics, R., Lu, N., Kaur, A., Hull, J., Huguenard, J., Keller, A., Lehallier, B., Wyss-Coray, T. Abstract: Aging is the key risk factor for loss of cognitive function and neurodegeneration but our knowledge of molecular dynamics across the aging brain is very limited. Here we perform spatiotemporal RNA-seq of mouse brain aging, encompassing 847 samples from 15 regions spanning 7 ages. We identify a brain-wide gene signature representing aging in glia with spatially-defined magnitudes. By integrating spatial and single-nuclei transcriptomics, we reveal that glia aging is profoundly accelerated in white matter compared to cortical areas. We further discover region-specific expression changes in specialized neuronal populations. Finally, we discover distinct clusters of brain regions that differentially express genes associated with 3 human neurodegenerative diseases, highlighting regional aging as potential modulator of disease. Our findings identify molecular foci of brain aging, providing a foundation to target age-related cognitive decline. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by PaperPlayer

Head Shepherd
Meeting Export Market Demands with Atkins Ranch

Head Shepherd

Play Episode Play 37 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 21:24


This week on the Head Shepherd podcast we have Pat Maher, CEO of Atkins Ranch. Atkins Ranch supplies premium New Zealand Lamb to Whole Foods in North America and Canada, supplying 95% of their lamb, plus they supply a handful of other traders such as Trader Joes and Costco from time to time. Mark and Pat discuss the starts of Atkins Ranch, which has great story behind it. Started in 1989 by two farming families frustrated at the returns from the meat works at the time, they came up with the concept of Atkins Ranch. Then they tossed a coin over who would move over to America to start selling their premium product. 33 years later, there are now hundreds of suppliers to Atkins Ranch.A key selling point of Atkins Ranch is supplying grass fed lamb 52 weeks of the year, because New Zealand grows grass year round.Atkins Ranch looks to be ahead of the trends. They were doing antibiotic free 20 years ago before it became a thing. They moved onto "non GMO products", then GAP (Global Animal Partnership) which is an higher animal welfare standards audit, and Atkins Ranch was the first meat company in the world to get that accreditation. "Now we're really looking at regenerative farming very very closely. We've aligned ourselves with an accreditation system called "Land to market verification"... we see that as being the next big thing."Genetics wise, Pat says they like more intramuscular fat because it means theres more chance of the consumer cooking it well. How much IMF? Well, "If the consumer can't see it (IMF), they wont pay a premium for it. So it needs to be visual." Pat says. Atkins Ranch also look for heaver carcasses, around the 25kg range as opposed to the 18kg standard in New Zealand. The whole ethos of the business is to get the market premiums that they generate though their customers, back in into the pockets of the farmers. There tends to be a waitlist to become an Atkins Ranch supplier with processing labour limitations. "There is a definite desire to grow, though, because of how successful the business model is." Pat says.If you would like to learn more about Atkins Ranch, visit their website below:www.atkinsranch.com/

Quest Fishing Adventures Podcast - Carp Pike Barbel Chub Perch Tench Catfish Gotta Catch Them All

So due to the rain, thunderstorms and some cool lighting. Alex and I have decided this week to park up Lily Lake and take our adventure to Atkins Lake due to a much greater chance of us both putting a carp on the bank. So with that gives me a very good chance of taking the trophy off Alex and bringing back to my house where it belongs. So come and have a listen to see how we get and and if I can bring the trophy home again! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/questfishingadventures/support

The Rare Life
99: Family Planning When You Have a Medically-Complex Child w/ Amanda Griffith-Atkins LMFT + 13 Special Guests

The Rare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 91:31


When you have a child with a medical complexity or disability, so many things get flipped on their head. And one of those things is family planning. Something that may have seemed relatively simple and straightforward becomes muddled and complicated. We wonder—rightfully so—if we have the mental and physical capacity to care for an additional human being. And if we choose to move forward with adding to our family, how can we endure the anxiety that would likely flood us during a subsequent pregnancy? And further complicating matters still, what if we're a carrier for our child's condition and could pass it on to other children as well? In this episode, Amanda Griffith-Atkins and I tackle these very reasonable concerns and include the perspective from 13 parents, each one with a different decision and reasoning behind it. Links: Relevant episodes to listen to: -Ep. 19 and Ep. 20 w/ Kate Peterson -Ep. 33 w/ Palliative Social Worker Orley Bills -Ep. 22: It's All My Fault (finding out I was a carrier for my son's condition) -Ep. 50: The Sibling Perspective w/ Katherine Acton -Ep. 47: Siblings w/ Katie Taylor, CCLS -Ep. 40: Wendy + the Sibling Experience -Ep. 98: Siblings | Ways We Can Protect Our Glass Children w/ Melissa Schlemmer Episodes with Amanda Griffith-Atkins: -Ep. 85: Should A Child's Disability be a part of Their Parent's Identity? -Ep. 81: Health Anxiety Join this group of x-linked carriers called Remember the Girls Learn about genetic counselors Find a genetic counselor Connect with us on Instagram! -Madeline Cheney (host) @The_Rare_Life -Amanda Griffith-Atkins @Amanda.Griffith.Atkins -Marci Dunning @FreyasLuckyArm -Maddison Ward @MaddisonJWard -Brea Rainey @thatonegirlbrea -Meg Dawley @Meg.Dawley -Rachel Bennett: @rachglickb -Allison Wolf @AllisonHopes -Taylor @taylorhuss15 -Katie Peterson @KatiebPeterson -Caitlin Castro @SeedyCastro -Emma Bliss @Emma_Blissful -Thea @TheaMoshofsky -Marie Wood @chariskaieirene -Karlita @KarlitaBWell23

HitThatLine.com Audio
Ruscin & Zach Podcast September 15

HitThatLine.com Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 48:49


We visit with Chuck Barrett, get info on the famous Go Hogs Go sign in Atkins, another poem from Razor Bacon, revisit the swimming coach conspiracy theory from 2012 and much more!

Ausmerican Aces Sports Club
Tommy Talks with Dion Prestia & Rory Atkins - NFL Week 2

Ausmerican Aces Sports Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 69:04


This week Tommy sits down with Dion Prestia & Rory Atkins as they go over all the latest news and results from week 1 of the NFL!Bad Beats, Fantasy Busts & Booms and some bets that went down by 1 leg!The lads preview Week 2 of the NFL and give you some of their best bets & players to watch for the massive week ahead.If you love the NFL and laugh, this podcast is for you.To follow some of our best bets for week 2 make sure you have downloaded the app below and are following the boys tips on Dabble via the link below. https://bit.ly/3tRD5MeThis Episode is proudly brought to you by our friends, RIXX & CAPZ.Discount Code: ACESRIXX Eyewear: Eyewear that inspires confidence.Website: https://rixxeyewear.com.au/CAPZ: The hub of US Sports Apparel in Australia. We are for the fans. We stock officially licensed authentic NBA, NFL, MLB, NHL, AFL & NRL apparel, including an elite range of Jerseys, Caps, Hats, T-Shirts, Tracksuits, and more.Website: https://www.cap-z.com.au/Tommy Sheridan: https://instagram.com/tommy_sheridan?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=Dion Prestia: https://instagram.com/dionprestia3?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=Rory Atkins: https://instagram.com/rory.atk?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Obstacle Racing Media Podcast
Ryan Atkins UnFiltered

Obstacle Racing Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 54:29 Very Popular


Atkins' latest episode with us covers a myriad of topics including his future in the sport, how he feels Spartan Race is doing, what other sports he's excited to participate in, and much more. New obstacle racing discord Support Us On Patreon ORM YouTube Channel  Intro  Music – Paul B. Outro Music – Brian Revels Today's show is sponsored by: Barbados Adventure Race – Have an awesome RaceCation on December 3rd in the Caribbean. 3K and 10K options. Code ORM for 10 percent off. Double Black Events – A brand new trail race experience with 3 unique hybrid running events. Listen to your favorite player.

Instant Trivia
Episode 580 - Wow! My Own Label! - Historical Text Messaging - Alloys - Ladies Home Journal - Corporate America

Instant Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 7:56


Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 580, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Welcome to the Instant Trivia podcast episode 580, where we ask the best trivia on the Internet. Round 1. Category: Wow! My Own Label! 1: In the 1970s this "Rocket Man" founded Rocket Records. Elton John. 2: The 3 double CDs of the Beatle "Anthology" series are on this label founded by the Beatles. Apple. 3: He do be the founder of Reprise, yes he do be do be do. Frank Sinatra. 4: Alanis Morissette's "Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie" is on Maverick, this Material Girl's label. Madonna. 5: He's the best seller of all the artists in his own Paisley Park stable. Prince. Round 2. Category: Historical Text Messaging 1: 323 B.C.:chrgd w/impiety. nt ltng thm sin 2x vs. phlsphy. off 2 chalcis. lyceum ltr. Aristotle. 2: 1989:stk @ embassy.u.s. blsting vh @ me.:(ttyl. (Manuel) Noriega. 3: 1670s:dsgnd st. bride's chrch.englnd 4evr!. Christopher Wren. 4: 1981:am canada's pm. dont no zonker r b.d. u kp txtng me abt. pls stp. Pierre Trudeau. 5: 1890:wilhelm ii mkng me quit chnclr gig. off 2 est8s @ friedrichsruh, wch is impsbl 2 abbrv and b undrstd. (Otto von) Bismarck. Round 3. Category: Alloys 1: An alloy called babbitt metal is used to line bearings and bushings to reduce this. friction. 2: Simple carbon steels are just a little carbon and manganese and a lot of this. iron. 3: For this alloy, mix your zinc and copper in a crucible and work with your ingots after they cool. brass. 4: Adding platinum to gold turns it from yellow gold to this. white gold. 5: Osmiridium is, you guessed it, an alloy of this and iridium. osmium. Round 4. Category: Ladies Home Journal 1: It's the detachable part of an advertisement that entitles you to a discount at the supermarket. Coupon. 2: Examples of these include Dr. Atkins, the Macrobiotic and the Scarsdale. Diets. 3: This mild antiseptic with the formula H2O2 can also be used to bleach hair and fabrics. Hydrogen peroxide. 4: From the Latin for "entering", they're the listed things you need to prepare food from a recipe. Ingredients. 5: A housewife is also known as a homemaker or one of these "engineers". Domestic engineer. Round 5. Category: Corporate America 1: Selling "Little Dot" perfume door-to-door in 1886, Mrs. Albee is considered the 1st of these saleswomen. Avon lady. 2: This bookstore chain founded by Larry Hoyt in 1933 was named for an inspirational pond. Waldenbooks. 3: The "Al" in Alcoa stands for this. aluminum. 4: Automaker whose ad campaign centers around "The heartbeat of America". Chevrolet. 5: This company holds the patent on marking the sweetener Aspartame until 1992. NutraSweet. Thanks for listening! Come back tomorrow for more exciting trivia! Special thanks to https://blog.feedspot.com/trivia_podcasts/

Big Band Bash
The Jerry Atkins Collection - Part Two Woody Herman

Big Band Bash

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 59:32


Hello everyone. This is part two of a series I call the Jerry Atkins Collection. Jerry had a show on Saturdays on the radio station I work at called The Enjoyment of Jazz. He played recordings from his massive record collection and entertained us with stories of his meetings and befriending many of the jazz masters. Sadly, Jerry passed away in 2010. His son, who is also a great jazz musician, donated many of the albums and cds in his father's collection to our station. Jerry collected albums by lots of jazz musicians but he liked the more modern big bands. This week I have pulled out several of the Woody Herman albums in the collection. I have digitized them and cleaned up the ticks and pops and background noise as best I could. So as I pay a small tribute to my friend I hope you enjoy this set of recordings from the Jerry Atkins Collection. Please visit this podcast at http://bigbandbashfm.blogspot.com

WAY FM
From the Archives: Stephen Atkins

WAY FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


Stephen is a musician based in Tasmania.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Jennifer Atkins, Senior Vice President Managed Care Strategy, Advocate Aurora Health

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 15:52


Jennifer Atkins, Senior Vice President Managed Care Strategy, Advocate Aurora Health, shares roadblocks she anticipates in the coming years, her key focus for the end of 2022, and a lot more.

This Podcast Burns Fat!
The Case for Keto with Gary Taubes

This Podcast Burns Fat!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 56:08


Over the last fifty years, the medical establishment has supported the same rules for losing weight and staying healthy. Yet in that same time, obesity has skyrocketed. So it is only natural that after repeated failure, it's time to seek out an alternative approach to handle this epidemic. To make the case that Keto should be considered a solution, we invited Gary Taubes to the show. Gary is one of the original pioneers in the low carb movement and is the author of many books, including his latest: The Case For Keto.

Loving Later Life
Dr. Martha Jo Atkins: There's More to Dying Than Meets the Eye

Loving Later Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 55:02


Happy September everyone. I can't believe we're turning the corner to Fall and then the holidays already, again. The seasons we are falling into, pardon the pun, are of things dying annnnd recognizing the beauty that also surrounds it. Finding beauty in dying is usually challenging. For most of my life I had total fear around it, which I think began when I was 13 when my great uncle passed away. It was my first experience with someone I was close with dying. He was bigger than life and everybody loved Uncle Sam. My family flew to Chicago to go to his funeral and we stayed in his home, which really spooked me at the time because all his things and medicine were in place as if he were still there. At the funeral they had his casket open and I'll never forget how scared I was as I saw him under this red-ish light that was hanging above, and my grandfather loudly crying over his brother. It was the only time I had seen my grandpa cry. Needless to say that left quite the impression on me with regard to death and dying. And not a good one. Last year I happened to watch a TEDx talk on this topic with Dr. Martha Jo Atkins from 2013, which has over a million views. And when I heard her say, “When we educate families and the patient about the experiences of dying, there is less fear. And my goodness, we need less fear around death and dying” I grabbed my computer and wrote to ask her to be my guest on Loving Later Life. And I am so thrilled to tell you that she said yes! Dr. Martha Jo Atkins, is a dog-loving, (Ph.D.) end-of-life licensed professional counselor and counselor supervisor (LPC-S), coach, speaker , doula and author. Dr. Atkins has a thirty-year career helping children and adults negotiate end-of-life and grief. She is the founder of the Children's Bereavement Center of South Texas, served as Executive Director of Abode Contemplative Care for the Dying in San Antonio, and is the author of the book Signposts of Dying. She is the founder of Dying School, designed to build community while deepening conversations around end-of-life + aliveness. Now don't touch that dial! I can't wait to share this conversation with you and I do believe that it will have you thinking a little differently about death and dying. And I really want to have her back because there is so much more I want to talk about with her that we just didn't have time for. So get comfy, and let's let Martha Jo help us think about and talk about dying…  

Becker’s Payer Issues Podcast
Jennifer Atkins, Senior Vice President Managed Care Strategy, Advocate Aurora Health

Becker’s Payer Issues Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 15:52


Jennifer Atkins, Senior Vice President Managed Care Strategy, Advocate Aurora Health, shares roadblocks she anticipates in the coming years, her key focus for the end of 2022, and a lot more.

BE MORE SUPER The Podcast
Tabay Atkins joins us to chat about his inspirational journey to becoming the face of Nike yoga!

BE MORE SUPER The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 53:29


Tabay is America's youngest professional yogi (he's 17), not to mention vegan chef, nutritionist, reiki master, and a face of Nike yoga. He's now featured across all of their marketing materials in store and online, and is one of the youngest athletes to partner with Nike (something they rarely do with those under 18). He also just opened a vegan food truck, “Tabay's Mindful Kitchen,” for which he was awarded PETA's HERO TO ANIMALS AWARD. Sit back and enjoy this truly inspirational story. Keep safe and stay super. Also don't forget to check out the video interview on our YouTube channel and support the show with a share and subscribe.

Big Band Bash
The Jerry Atkins Collection - Part One Les Brown

Big Band Bash

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 58:20


Jerry Atkins was a well known musician, jazz historian, and record collector who lived in Texarkana, Texas until his passing in 2010. His record collection was huge and was donated to the the radio station where I work and produce Big Band Bash. Since most of these albums have not been purchased by the station, I have been digitizing some of them. It is amazing how well the software cleans up ticks and pops and eliminates surface noise from the records. I have decided to present four shows from the many albums that Jerry had. Part one features several albums by Les Brown, Part two will be Woody Herman, Parts three and four will be assorted bands. I hope you enjoy the music from the many record albums in the Jerry Atkins Collection. Please visit this podcast at http://bigbandbashfm.blogspot.com

Medora Pentecostal Church
The Perishing Power of Pentecost | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 52:41


Sunday PM, August 25th, 2022 If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

Medora Pentecostal Church
It's Worth More Broken | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 40:56


Sunday Am, August 25th, 2022 If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Jade Atkins, the new curator at Joggins Fossil Cliffs, talks about the increase in the number of significant fossil finds due to climate change. The Westville Fire Dept. gets a new - yet old - truck. And on the phone-in: Preserving

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 52:54


Jade Atkins who's the new curator at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs museum in NS discusses the increase in the number of significant fossil discoveries because of climate change. The Westville Fire Department gets a truck back that left their fleet decades ago. And on the phone-in: Preserving with Ellie Topp & Phil Moscovitch.

The Toby Gribben Show

The voluntary Carbon Credit market in Brazil is expected to reach 750 million tons by 2030. While offset prices are predicted to range between $11-$215/ton by 2030, and $47-$120/ton by 2050, which means that Brazil's voluntary carbon credit market could be worth as much as US$8.2 Billion by 2030.ForestsDAO seeks to enter the enormous Green Economy, by building a community of conscientious investors, interested in protecting the Amazon Rainforest, by levelling the international playing field in the Carbon Credit Markets, for farmers and the culturally rich communities that support them, both willing to forfeit 80% of their livelihoods, to maintain the “Lung's of the World” healthy for the rest of the World.Investors buy our NFTs, each representing an entire acre of rainforest land. Starting in two phases, reaching over 60,000 acres of Rainforest in the first 12 months. Each NFT starts with an acre plus 1.6 Tons in carbon credits, per year, for life. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ausmerican Aces Sports Club
Tommy Talks NFL week 1 with Rory Atkins

Ausmerican Aces Sports Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 56:21


With NFL around the corner we decided to get behind the microphone and give you our early tips for all the NFL week 1 match ups!The NFL season is only 9 sleeps away!Make sure you're using the app Dabble and following our NFL tips this year via the link below.Sign up to Dabble below:https://bit.ly/3tRD5MeFollow:TommysTipsroryatkinsWANT TO JOIN OUR NFL TIPPING COMPETITION?https://nflpickem.com.au/leagues/join/MDKZA4CHCode: MDKZA4CHLETS RIDE!!!!Let your friends know that the winner of our NFL Tipping competition will take home $4000 worth of Milwaukee Tools!!! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Medora Pentecostal Church
You Can Have the Clothes, I'lll Take The Body | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 55:34


Monday, August 22nd, 2022   If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

tv love american new york california history money black canada google hollywood babies man uk mother soul england americans british san francisco canadian child young west dj ms spring girl blood brothers arizona ohio heart toronto murder north america nashville detroit night new orleans fame supreme court reflections mountain stone vietnam states tribute mothers martin luther king jr beatles atlantic navy buffalo sons cd ontario tears cycle rolling stones shadows west coast pirates elvis raw trans rock and roll costa rica apollo parks belong jacksonville shortly claim pacific northwest riot bob dylan hop floyd newman el salvador runaways john lennon invention sweat expecting lsd knife satisfaction ludwig van beethoven carpenter matthews cocaine chess springfield greene neil young winnipeg ventures burned darin luigi other side jimi hendrix motown woody allen tonight show mamas beach boys say goodbye mgm manitoba dime returned sultans mort sinclair flyers jack nicholson parsons eric clapton willie nelson thorns ode mick jagger miles davis expressions atkins joni mitchell buckley lovin nicholson mixcloud tilt ihop sly monterey dewey unsurprisingly tokens eaton little richard papas awol ninety monkees richard pryor bakersfield redding tom wilson clancy san bernardino johnny carson stills mohawk garfunkel rock music roger corman guess who stampede randy newman buddy holly greenwich village bluebird merseyside hollywood bowl phil spector roadrunner kenny loggins sunset boulevard otis redding messina hardin sunset strip coupons steppenwolf rick james roy orbison byrds romani isley brothers spoonful jerry lee lewis bloomfield troubadour broken arrow clapton hillman glen campbell hideaway steve young david crosby fonda corman shakin patsy cline squires bachman havens dizzy gillespie john hopkins blood sweat california dreamin wrecking crew all over lenny bruce lonely hearts club band laurel canyon everly brothers pet sounds davy jones peter fonda james johnson whisk take me out sgt pepper fielder judy collins hoh high flying birds rhinestones mike love hats off scorpios andy griffith show buffalo springfield john peel mundi leadbelly dick dale hollywood boulevard scott young david roberts bobby darin gram parsons sam phillips sly stone fourth dimension chet atkins richie havens nesmith del shannon michael nesmith tim buckley it won banjos elektra records white buffalo radars randy bachman sonny bono warners grace slick micky dolenz richard davis sun studios john sebastian shirelles brother can you spare john kay don felder peter tork splish splash fort william kingston trio roger mcguinn john sinclair atco al kooper tork james burton jimmy reed dunhill absolutely free thelonius monk dillards van dyke parks dream lover baby don bobby rydell scold buddy miles plastic people soul live whisky a go go gene clark merry clayton farmer john comrie travellin barry mcguire mike bloomfield tom paxton chris hillman mitch ryder kooper new buffalo richie furay cashbox mothers of invention bobby fuller owsley bert jansch tim hardin jim messina that sound tim rose mack the knife jim price tom dooley michael garcia british dj standells gloria jones moby grape bruce johnston continentals ahmet ertegun james jamerson medicine ball strawberry alarm clock jack nitzsche david browne faron young jerry wexler ben frank american international pictures blue buffalo dave price bernie leadon fred neil hank marvin noel redding morris levy electric flag pinetop esquires floyd cramer chantels roulette records furay tommy boyce jake holmes monkees tv charlie greene buick roadmaster nashville a team tilt araiza
Medora Pentecostal Church
The Other Side of Broken | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 45:09


Sunday Pm, August 21st, 2022 If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Type 2 Diabetes and How Can Diet Rreduce Amputation Risk

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 46:18


Description: Type 2 diabetes and obesity are epidemics that can lead to amputation due to a common complication known as peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.), which is plaque build-up in mainly the leg arteries that restricts blood flow. But the right diet can help mitigate risk for limb loss. Hosts Kym McNicholas and Interventional Cardiologist Dr. John Phillips are joined by Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith to chat with special guest Dr. Michael Dansinger, Wellness Director for Boston Heart Diagnostics, about diabetes reversal, eating strategies to for P.A.D. prevention, and the secret to weight loss based on USA Network's The Biggest Loser reality show. Dr. Michael Dansinger is Founding Director of the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center in Boston . He also serves on the CDC's Expert Panel for Worksite Wellness Programs and on the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative, a leading international voice for health and wellness. Dr. Dansinger previously served as the Nutrition and Obesity Editor for Medscape Journal of Medicine and was the principal investigator of the Tufts Popular Diet Trial comparing the Atkins, Zone, Weight Watchers and Ornish eating plans for weight loss and heart disease risk-factor reduction (published in JAMA). Dansinger was the nutrition doctor for NBC's The Biggest Loser for 10 years and designer of the Biggest Loser Diet, which won top awards from U.S. News & World Report (including No. 1 Best Diet for Diabetes). Before Dr. Dansinger got into the heart of this episode's feature topic on how diet can reduce a diabetic's risk for vascular complications, the show kicked off with a discussion about obstacles patients face in healthcare. Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith shared her experience in Scotland, spending four hours in pre-operative protocols for a surgery planned for next week, only to have her physician cancel her surgery appointment due to a condition called, atrial fibrillation, that she was never informed of but was written in her medical chart. Kym and Dr. Dansinger weighed in on lessons others can learn from this experience which includes two critical questions all patients should ask following any medical appointment: What are you writing in my chart that I should be aware of so I don't miss any assessment or diagnosis? Can I get a copy of my cases notes for this appointment? This may be available through your facility's medical app or platform. You can also request it through a facility's medical records department. Kym also shared her nightmare experience with her dad falling a second time in two weeks. The first fall was out of their area and resulted in emergency surgery to replace a previous hip replacement and stabalize an elbow fracture with pins and wires. This second fall resulted in an additional hairline fracture in his femur, re-opening of the hip replacement incision, and a displacement of the pins in his elbow. An ambulance trip to the emergency room left Kym and her dad with more questions than answers. The emergency physician and clinicians refused to call the on-call orthopedic surgeon to review his xrays. If they did, they would've learned of his additional hairline fracture in the femur and would've sent him home in a wheelchair. Instead, he was told to get up and walk despite debilitating pain and a continued run of the fracture. Even more, they didn't remove that half pulled off wound dressing, didn't apply temporary steri strips to reseal the wound that opened, and sent him home with only half the wound covered. So, when he arrived home, within 10 minutes the paramedics had to be called as the wound dehiesced further and he had to be taken to a larger hospital facility in Marin County, California with a more experienced trauma team. There, he was scheduled for time in the operating room to properly clean, re-sutre, and dress the incision site. He was also admitted until an orthopedic surgeon could get a physical therapist and occupational therapist to work with him on his new orders for limited weight-bearing. Dr. Dansinger and Dr. Phillips both were horrified by Kym's experience with her dad. They agree that under no circumstances should Kym's dad have been released from the first emergency room without an orthopedic surgeon reviewing the images and without proper wound care. They each expressed the importance of physicians and clinicians taking the time necessary to listen to the patients and fully assess the entire situation and for patients and their advocates to have patience with medical staff. But they were also not surprised due to an overwhelmed healthcare system, especially since the COVID epidemic. Dr. Dansinger says as our population continues to age this will become an even bigger problem of overcrowded hospital facilities and not enough staff to manage them. It's why he shifted from an urgent care doctor to focusing on prevention of chronic illness. That includes diabetes. That's where the hosts transitioned the conversation into focusing more intently on what patients can do to reverse it and mitigate their risk for serious vascular complications such as amputation.

Low Bottom/High Rise with Moira Kucaba
Episode 29: No Excuses with David Atkins

Low Bottom/High Rise with Moira Kucaba

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:04


My guest today is the one and only David Atkins. After a 22 year career in law enforcement in one of the busiest places in the world, New York, David rose through the ranks and retired as a Captain with the New York State Police. But when his best friend was tragically shot and killed it was a water shed moment that fueled him with a sense of urgency to appreciate life to the fullest. David is now a keynote speaker and thought leader who will light a fire under you like no other. If you are looking to breakthrough fear & adversity to play a bigger game in business and life, then this episode is for you.   Order David's Book “The Leveled Up Life” by clicking HERE   Find Out More about David by going to: https://www.davidatkinsspeaks.com   Keep your suggestions coming by emailing me at Moirakucaba8@gmail.com 

Low Profile with Markly Morrison
Scherler Sundays highlights 2: Doug Martsch & John Atkins

Low Profile with Markly Morrison

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 60:58


For the second collection of highlights from the Scherler Sundays 2022 concert and interview series, we have a document from an indie rock lover's dream: Doug Martsch of Built to Spill and John Atkins of 764-HERO, and more recently, his new band Sun Breaks. Doug and John each play intimate acoustic sets behind the old Carnegie Library in Olympia. For this show, I interviewed the two of them together since they have a bit of mutual history in their formative years in their respective music careers- you'll hear about that in a bit. I'm including about 20 minutes from each performance on today's show, and it was really difficult to choose which songs. Doug had a terrific selection of familiar cover tunes, including songs by Cat Stevens and Mazzy Star that aren't included here. If you want to hear the complete, unedited show you can find a link to that at patreon.com/lowprofile.Doug Martsch is best known as the man behind Built To Spill, Boise's undisputed kings of indie rock since the early 1990s, Treepeople before that, and a solo album called “Now You Know” released 20 years ago. Built to Spill also toured as the late Daniel Johnson's backup band, and shortly thereafter released the album "Built to Spill Plays the Songs of Daniel Johnson" in 2020. But my first exposure to his music was through his band with Olympia's Calvin Johnson on K Records, The Halo Benders. His wry lyrics and virtuosity on the guitar have made a life-long fan out of me from day one.Three Magnets Brewing Company, this season's collaborator, has also released several beers inspired by Built to Spill albums/songs, and were absolutely thrilled when Doug agreed to perform at Scherler Sundays! Built To Spill has a new album, When the Wind Forgets Your Name, out this Fall.  He plays a tune from it here, along with some other BTS favorites and a few surprising cover tunes.John Atkins' band 764-HERO toured with Built to Spill in the early 1990s when they were label mates on Up! Records, and this commonality inspired the idea to interview Doug and John together for this show.  John's music is cemented in the minds of indie fans in the Northwest and beyond.  Following 764-HERO, the ever-evolving Atkins' other projects Hush Harbor, and currently, Sun Breaks, have continued to create emotionally charged, contemplative records.  Today, you'll hear some favorite tunes from across the past few decades in John's catalog.This episode was recorded and engineered by Robin Carmosino behind the historic Carnegie Library in Olympia, WA on June 26th, 2022.

Stumbling Through Enlightenment
Episode 108 – Responsibility of Choice

Stumbling Through Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 39:10


Edward is starting to recuperate after his ling stint of overtime. With his healthier mindset Edward has decided to start following a Keto lifestyle. Edward shares with us his success in the past with the Atkins diet and has decided to do something similar, by cutting out simple processed carbs, and sugars. Having reached a weight that was uncomfortable for himself he is excited to have lost weight, gain some regularity in his energy, and finding better sleep. Our Deep Dive this week, explores the responsibility of choices. More specifically the responsibility of putting yourself first with your choices. Edward and Jason have a conversation about choice and how Jason came to be able to put himself first in most things, or at least make informed choices. Edward finds himself ruminating over the idea of putting himself first, especially in his job. Edward discusses his challenges and the trauma that has led him to continually put other's needs and wants ahead of his own more often than not. Edward discusses his trying to change this part of his life, and Jason supports the conversation with insight into how one can do that.

The Sober Edge
Back from Cirrhosis with Karla Atkins

The Sober Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 49:27


Karla Adkins is a Senior This Naked Mind Coach, wife, mother, dog-mom and she is also the face of the dark and dangerous side of drinking. In 2014, Karla found herself in the hospital fighting for her life as her liver was failing. Her drinking to quell her panic attacks had resulted in the terrifying diagnosis of cirrhosis. Karla discovered first hand the shame and stigma associated with this disease and is passionate about opening up the conversation between patient and provider. Her first book “And She Came Tumbling Down” is available for pre-order and will be released on September 7th.  This conversation is raw and real, heartbreaking and triumphant. Karla, by sharing her personal story is breaking the silence that surrounds this disease. Her courage is paving the way for each of us to question our own relationship with alcohol and to open our hearts to others who are struggling for their own freedom.  Full Show Notes

Medora Pentecostal Church
Amasa's Mess | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 50:08


Saturday, August 20th, 2022 If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

Medora Pentecostal Church
Dominion is a Decision | Evangelist Jonathan Atkins

Medora Pentecostal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 40:17


Friday, August 19th, 2022 If you like what you hear, check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and our website.  Instagram @MedoraChurch Facebook @MedoraChurch Youtube @MedoraChurch Website medorachurch.com

Seminole Headlines
Alex Atkins - offensive coordinator, line coach - confident in Norvell Offense

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 13:06


Alex Atkins - offensive coordinator, line coach - confident in Norvell Offense Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tomahawk Nation: for Florida State Seminoles fans
FSU HC Mike Norvell, coordinators preview Seminoles season opener vs. Duquesne Dukes

Tomahawk Nation: for Florida State Seminoles fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 60:45


Florida State Seminoles football is just days away from its season opener. FSU is kicking off the year in “Week 0,” an early start to the 2022 season at home vs. the Duquesne Dukes. The Seminoles are looking to start 1-0 for the first time under head coach Mike Norvell and for the first time as a program since a 2016 win vs. Ole Miss in Orlando. Norvell mentioned in the final days of preseason camp that the team had already begun the early stages of game prep and now, with camp over and the focus fully on the Dukes, he's eager to see his team rise to the opportunity. “We blew it out of the water from years past. I love the competitiveness we saw from our team and I'm really excited about the opportunity we have ahead,” he said during Monday's season-opening press conference, adding that quarterback Jordan Travis has shown a great improvement throughout fall camp. He mentioned that having an extra week of practice really benefited the team, “I love it. It really added to the sense of urgency, we started a week earlier one of the things that was a benefit is that today was the first day of school. we were able to get an extra week of camp.” Offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Alex Atkins, defensive coordinator Adam Fuller as well as special teams coordinator and defensive ends coach John Papuchis all took the podium today to preview the start of the Seminoles' season, speaking on the progress of the team in all phases of the game. Atkins mentioned the position changes on the offensive line and what makes his group unique in regards to depth, “We have true competition where, even there is a depth chart out there, guys are still fighting for those opportunities,” adding that having multiple players cross trained has benefited the team, “Having multiple guys that can go in there and not have that drop-off be steep. Just more competition, I think guys have grown a lot more just answering the bell.” Fuller went over how well he felt his team transitioned from spring to fall camp with the new practice rules in place “Felt really good from spring to the summer to fall camp. Kinda three different sections with new rules and our access to the players. It was the first in my tenure I've had a smooth transition from spring into summer.” John Papuchis spoke about his own evaluation of last season and evaluation throughout the course of spring and fall camp saying that they looked at what they could do better and focused on that. “At the end of every season especially when things don't go as planned in a lot of cases there is a critical self-evaluation from everything to how we teach the fundamentals and what we're doing schematically and after you go through that evaluation you kinda step back and say ‘what do we like about what we did and how we can do better?'” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast
FSU HC Mike Norvell, coordinators preview Seminoles season opener vs. Duquesne Dukes

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 60:45


Florida State Seminoles football is just days away from its season opener. FSU is kicking off the year in “Week 0,” an early start to the 2022 season at home vs. the Duquesne Dukes. The Seminoles are looking to start 1-0 for the first time under head coach Mike Norvell and for the first time as a program since a 2016 win vs. Ole Miss in Orlando. Norvell mentioned in the final days of preseason camp that the team had already begun the early stages of game prep and now, with camp over and the focus fully on the Dukes, he's eager to see his team rise to the opportunity. “We blew it out of the water from years past. I love the competitiveness we saw from our team and I'm really excited about the opportunity we have ahead,” he said during Monday's season-opening press conference, adding that quarterback Jordan Travis has shown a great improvement throughout fall camp. He mentioned that having an extra week of practice really benefited the team, “I love it. It really added to the sense of urgency, we started a week earlier one of the things that was a benefit is that today was the first day of school. we were able to get an extra week of camp.” Offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Alex Atkins, defensive coordinator Adam Fuller as well as special teams coordinator and defensive ends coach John Papuchis all took the podium today to preview the start of the Seminoles' season, speaking on the progress of the team in all phases of the game. Atkins mentioned the position changes on the offensive line and what makes his group unique in regards to depth, “We have true competition where, even there is a depth chart out there, guys are still fighting for those opportunities,” adding that having multiple players cross trained has benefited the team, “Having multiple guys that can go in there and not have that drop-off be steep. Just more competition, I think guys have grown a lot more just answering the bell.” Fuller went over how well he felt his team transitioned from spring to fall camp with the new practice rules in place “Felt really good from spring to the summer to fall camp. Kinda three different sections with new rules and our access to the players. It was the first in my tenure I've had a smooth transition from spring into summer.” John Papuchis spoke about his own evaluation of last season and evaluation throughout the course of spring and fall camp saying that they looked at what they could do better and focused on that. “At the end of every season especially when things don't go as planned in a lot of cases there is a critical self-evaluation from everything to how we teach the fundamentals and what we're doing schematically and after you go through that evaluation you kinda step back and say ‘what do we like about what we did and how we can do better?'” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Shop Stool Podcast
95. Boat Builders ft Nick Atkins

The Shop Stool Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 54:33 Very Popular


Welcome to season 4 of The Shop Stool Podcast, a podcast for woodworkers and the maker community in general. Hosted by Robin Lewis (RobinLewisMakes), Joey Chalk (King Post Timber Works), and Bryan Cush (Sawdust Bureau).Nick Atkins is a 3rd generation boat builder out of Melbourne. His love of modern technology in a traditionally hands on field has given rise to some interesting processes. Oh, and he also makes ant farms.If you would like to donate to the show you can find out more here.Nicks Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/nick_atkins_boatbuilder/Robin Lewis: https://www.instagram.com/robinlewismakes/Joey Chalk: https://www.instagram.com/kingposttimberworks/Bryan Cush: https://www.instagram.com/sawdustbureau/

Unofficial Titans Podcast:  Tennessee Titans
Ep. 112: Previewing the 2022 Houston Texans with Sean Atkins

Unofficial Titans Podcast: Tennessee Titans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 41:00


Our look around the AFC South ahead of the 2022 season continues with our friend Sean Atkins joining the show to break down the Houston Texans with Stoney Keeley and Outspoken Owen Reed.And, while you're here, be sure to go subscribe to our friends at 440 Sports on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/440SportsCheck out our friends at Trouble Spirits: https://troublespirits.com/

Titan Up The Dawg Pound
Hard Knocks episodes 1 & 2 discussion with special guest Sean Atkins

Titan Up The Dawg Pound

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 45:55


SYNC Your Life Podcast
The Leveled Up Life: Interview with David Atkins

SYNC Your Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 43:56


Welcome to the SYNC Your Life podcast episode #65! On this podcast, we will be diving into all things women's hormones to help you learn how to live in alignment with your female physiology. Too many women are living with their check engine lights flashing. You know you feel "off" but no matter what you do, you can't seem to have the energy, or lose the weight, or feel your best. This podcast exists to shed light on the important topic of healthy hormones and cycle syncing, to help you gain maximum energy in your life.  In today's episode, I'm interviewing David Atkins. David is a retired New York State Police Captain after 22 years of service. He ran all State Police operations for the entire County of Westchester NY which averages approximately 400-500,000 911 calls a year. David was the New York State Trooper of the Year in 2003 followed by New York State Police Investigator of the Year in 2007.  He moved up through the ranks during his 22 year career with the New York State Police. He went from patrol to Investigations to leading undercover units involved in Organized Crime, Auto Theft, Money Laundering and large scale drug organizations. David was also a first responder at Ground Zero on 9/11 where he spent weeks working in New York City. Additionally, while working full time with the NY State Police David also built a million dollar direct sales business. Through his success both in law enforcement and business David became a Keynote Motivational Speaker presenting to groups of a few hundred people to over 20,000 people in the NFL Super Dome in New Orleans.  David published his first book, "The Leveled Up Life," this Summer. Most importantly, David is a husband and a father to his three daughters. You can find David on Instagram here. His book, "The Leveled Up Life," can be found here. If you feel like something is "off" with your hormones, check out the FREE hormone imbalance quiz at sync.jennyswisher.com.  To learn more about the SYNC Digital Course, check out jennyswisher.com.  Let's be friends outside of the podcast! Send me a message or schedule a call so I can get to know you better. You can reach out at https://jennyswisher.com/contact-2/. Enjoy the show! Episode Webpage: jennyswisher.com/podcast 

MeatRx
Carnivore Gave Allie A Better Autistic Child | Dr. Shawn Baker & Allie

MeatRx

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 55:37 Very Popular


Allie is a mother and has been researching nutrition since 2002 to treat her life-long medical conditions along with her son's. With a carnivore or carnivore-adjacent diet she been able to reduce and/or eliminate symptoms of bipolar disorder, seizures, PCOS, Crohn's disease and IBS, migraines, and hypoglycemia. Her son's autism is treated with a carnivore-adjacent diet as well. She has coached other people over the years and found that they have been able to reduce or eliminate symptoms of the same or similar conditions with a carnivore diet or,  by increasing animal products in their diet and reducing or eliminating sugars and processed foods.   Instagram: @alliecarnivore Timestamps: 00:00 Bipolar, PCOS, IBS, cervical cancer 08:45 Crohn's disease 10:51 Atkins vs carnivore diet 12:41 Off medications 17:02 Satiety from meat 25:05 Gut issues in autistic children 27:30 Transitioning autistic child to carnivore diet 35:20 Schooling for autistic children  44:00 Increase in autism in the population 46:43 Cutting back on meat  51:30 Mainstream diet recommendations for autism See open positions at Revero: https://jobs.lever.co/Revero/ Join Carnivore Diet for a free 30 day trial: https://carnivore.diet/join/ Book a Carnivore Coach: https://carnivore.diet/book-a-coach/ Carnivore Shirts: https://merch.carnivore.diet Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://carnivore.diet/subscribe/ . ‪#revero #shawnbaker #Carnivorediet #MeatHeals #HealthCreation   #humanfood #AnimalBased #ZeroCarb #DietCoach  #FatAdapted #Carnivore #sugarfree  ‪

Seminole Headlines
OC/OL coach Alex Atkins on scrimmage, freshman standout

Seminole Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 9:45


OC/OL coach Alex Atkins on scrimmage, freshman standout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tomahawk Nation: for Florida State Seminoles fans
FSU football second scrimmage interviews -- Seminoles head coach Mike Norvell, OC/OL coach Alex Atkins, DC Adam Fuller, ST/DE coach John Papuchis

Tomahawk Nation: for Florida State Seminoles fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 51:15


The ‘Noles have shown an exceptional level of competition and focus throughout the summer, growing physically and preparing for a long season ahead. Being able to get a solid look at the team, the scrimmages help the coaching staff learn who knows the playbook, who fits in the best positions, and who's ready to play this season with only two weeks remaining in fall camp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast
FSU football second scrimmage interviews -- Seminoles head coach Mike Norvell, OC/OL coach Alex Atkins, DC Adam Fuller, ST/DE coach John Papuchis

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 51:15


The ‘Noles have shown an exceptional level of competition and focus throughout the summer, growing physically and preparing for a long season ahead. Being able to get a solid look at the team, the scrimmages help the coaching staff learn who knows the playbook, who fits in the best positions, and who's ready to play this season with only two weeks remaining in fall camp. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Projection Booth Podcast
Special Report: Harrison Atkins on The Year Between (2022)

The Projection Booth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 21:38


On this special episode Mike talks with filmmaker Harrison Atkins about his work as a director and editor. Harrison recently edited Jake Wachtel's Karmalink and Alex Heller's The Year Between which is playing festivals now. Learn more about The Year Between at https://www.theyearbetweenfilm.com/ and Harrison Atkins at https://harrisonatkins.com/