Podcast appearances and mentions of Nancy Sinatra

American singer

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Nancy Sinatra

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Best podcasts about Nancy Sinatra

Latest podcast episodes about Nancy Sinatra

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Bruce Belland - The Four Preps: "26 Miles", "Big Man". Talks About Ricky Nelson, Ozzie And Harriet, George Burns, Bob Hope, Nancy Sinatra, Sandra Dee And More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 34:10


Bruce Belland was a member of The Four Preps - America's first boy band. Their 1958 million selling hit “26 Miles Across The Sea” made them into international pop stars. The song influenced Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys and inspired Jimmy Buffett. The Preps were featured on the Ed Sullivan Show and had a recurring role in “Ozzie And Harriet”. They even co-starred in the movie “Gidget” with Sandra Dee. In total they had 8 Gold Singles and 3 Gold Albums. Bruce talks about his fascinating life in the entertainment business including his friend Ricky Nelson, his date with Nancy Sinatra , on tour with George Burns and Bob Hope, and much more!My featured song is “Around The Horn” from the Made In New York album by my band, Project Grand Slam. Spotify link here.“Dream With Robert Miller”. Click here.---------------------------------------------If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here.Bruce and I discuss the following:His Bio - maybe the longest in history!Hollywood High School with so many SuperstarsMeeting Ricky and David NelsonHis date with Nancy SinatraForming The Four PrepsThe Ed Sullivan ShowTouring with George Burns and Bob Hope In the Songfest portion we play and discuss:“26 Miles”“Big Man”“Lazy Summer Night”“Down By The Station” “Live At SteelStacks” is the new 5-song EP by Robert and his band, Project Grand Slam. The release captures the band at the top of their game and shows off the breadth, scope and sound of the band. The EP has been highly praised by musicians and reviewers alike. Elliott Randall, of Steely Dan fame, the guitarist who recorded the unforgettable solos in ‘Reelin' In The Years', calls Live At SteelStacks “Captivating!”. Tony Carey, the incredible multi-talented artist who has produced Joe Cocker, Eric Burden and John Mayall, says “PGS burns down the house!”. Alan Hewitt of the Moody Blues says “Full of life!” Melody Maker says simply “Virtuoso musicians!”, and Hollywood Digest says “Such a great band!”. “Live At SteelStacks” can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple and all the other streaming platforms, and can be downloaded at The PGS Store.“All Of The Time” is Robert's most recent single by his band Project Grand Slam. It's a playful, whimsical love song. It's light and airy and exudes the happiness and joy of being in love. The reviewers agree. Melody Maker gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Pure bliss…An intimate sound with abundant melodic riches!”. Pop Icon also gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Ecstasy…One of the best all-around bands working today!”. And Mob York City says simply “Excellence…A band in full command of their powers!” Watch the video here. You can stream “All Of The Time” on Spotify, Apple or any of the other streaming platforms. And you can download it here.“The Shakespeare Concert” is the latest album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam. It's been praised by famous musicians including Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March, Joey Dee of Peppermint Twist fame, legendary guitarist Elliott Randall, and celebrated British composer Sarah Class. The music reviewers have called it “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE. “The Fall Of Winter” is Robert's single in collaboration with legendary rocker Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March and formerly with Survivor. Also featuring renowned guitarist Elliott Randall (Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers) and keyboard ace Tony Carey (Joe Cocker/Eric Burden). “A triumph!” (The Indie Source). “Flexes Real Rock Muscle!” (Celebrity Zone). Stream it on Spotify or Apple. Watch the lyric video here. Download it here.Robert's “Follow Your Dream Handbook” is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.  Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with Bruce at:www.brucebelland.comLook for Bruce's book “ICONS” coming soon Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:WebsiteFacebookLinkedInEmail RobertYouTube Listen to the Follow Your Dream Podcast on these podcast platforms:CastBoxSpotifyApple Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:WebsiteInstagramPGS StoreYouTubeFacebookSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail

Entrez sans frapper
Entrez sans frapper 21/11/2022 - Spéciale Comte de Lautréamont avec Jean-Luc Sreinmetz/Éric Russon

Entrez sans frapper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 41:47


« Les inconnus connus » d'Éric Russon : Bien dans ses bottes. Spéciale Comte de Lautréamont, l'auteur des Chants de Maldoror, disparu le 24 novembre 1870. On en parle avec Jean-Luc Steinmetz, qui a géré l'édition de ses Œuvres complètes, sorties à La Pléiade en 2009. Toutes les notions qui permettent de penser la littérature – auteur, lecteur, texte, genre, plagiat, parodie, humour, ironie – sont mises à la question par Lautréamont. Il nous requiert d'abord par une révolte majeure. Il nous intrigue non moins par les procédés auxquels il a recouru pour la dire : sa technique de combat. Et il nous aide à concevoir ce qu'est la fiction moderne. Mais combien de lecteurs a-t-il touché en son temps? Une dizaine peut-être. Ouvrages non diffusés, mort précoce : les conditions d'un oubli définitif étaient réunies. Il y eut pourtant renaissance, grâce à des entremetteurs avisés, et à des rééditions, comme celle des Poésies dont André Breton alla recopier à la Bibliothèque nationale les seuls exemplaires alors connus. Au fil des ans, le nombre des lecteurs s'est accru. Et parmi eux des écrivains, accompagnateurs distants ou prosélytes inconditionnels, ont reconstruit Lautréamont en édifiant leur œuvre propre. C'est pourquoi ce volume leur fait place : il propose une édition nouvelle de l'œuvre – parue sous l'anonyme en 1868 (le Chant premier), sous pseudonyme en 1869 (Les Chants de Maldoror par «le comte de Lautréamont»), sous patronyme en 1870 (Poésies I et Poésies II d'Isidore Ducasse) ; puis, dans un dossier de Lectures, il donne la parole aux écrivains : les premiers médiateurs, les surréalistes ensuite, pour qui Lautréamont représente le phénomène littéraire absolu, et enfin tous ceux qui, de Césaire à Le Clézio, de Ponge à Sollers, virent en Ducasse une pierre de touche. D'autres consciences, dans l'avenir, approcheront ces textes. Le mauvais esprit des Chants ne peut que provoquer une riposte. Et le ton formulaire des Poésies en fait un vocabulaire pour le futur. Un tel «Grand Combat» n'a pas de raisons de cesser. L'œuvre, pourtant, «s'échappe quand même» (Le Clézio). Sa violence, ses blasphèmes, ses perversions, son «cri d'ironie immense» couvrent à jamais Ducasse, irrégulier devenu régulateur, d'une enveloppe d'authentique mystère.

Coffee Talk with Adika Live
DON RANDIE STORIES OF THE WRECKING CREW & THE MUSIC OF THE 60'S

Coffee Talk with Adika Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 80:09


Guest Don RandiDon Randi's experiences behind-the-scenes, in-the-studio as a member of the Wall of Sound/Wrecking Crew and on-tour, both hilarious and emotional, with some of the most admired music artists and producers of all time like Nancy Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Phil Spector, Jimmy Bowen, Dean Martin, the Jackson 5, Brian Wilson, Linda Ronstadt, Sammy Davis Jr., Glen Campbell and many more.http://donrandi.com/* The New Website ➜ https://www.adikalive.com/Merchandise ➜ https://adikalive.bigcartel.com/The Ultimate VIP ALL ACCESS BACKSTAGE PASSFull episodes can be seen in Patreon! Get exclusive content and entry into the vinyl games on Patreon: ➜ https://www.patreon.com/The_adika_group?fan_landing=trueYour Donation Helps Support your Favorite Show & Channel ➜ https://www.paypal.me/stephenadika1AMAZON WISHLIST ➜ https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/30GQNR69L9048?ref_=wl_shareCLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ➜  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheAdikaGroup?sub_confirmation=1Artists on Record |  ADIKA Live The PodcastApple ➜ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-talk-with-adika-live/id1529816802?uo=4Spotify ➜ https://open.spotify.com/show/2lXgg3NVdnU3LmXgCrgHwk iHeartRadio ➜ https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-coffee-talk-with-adika-liv-71566693/*Follow ADIKA Live on Tik Tok: ➜https://vm.tiktok.com/TTPdMmEfFm/ADIKA Live on Twitter➜ https://twitter.com/TalkAdikaThank you for your support!_____________________________________________Artists On Record: Support the show

Soul Shenanigans
Episode 646: EP 646 ::: Soul Shenanigans ::: 2022 October 24th

Soul Shenanigans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 139:45


Playlist:  1. The Kinks - Tired Of Waiting For You 2. Supergrass - What Went Wrong (In Your Head) 3. Teenage Fanclub - Pet Rock 4. Sloan - Magical Thinking 5. Jesse Malin - In The Modern World 6. The Sadies - Stop & Start 7. Mo Troper - Waste Away 8. The Anomalys - Ready To Die 9. Neutrals - Pressures Of Life 10. Titus Andronicus - I Can Not Be Satisfied 11. Pete Astor - Fine & Dandy 12. Flowertruck - Pretending 13. Peel Dream Magazine - Pictionary 14. Courtney Marie Andrews - Loose Future 15. Pilot - Just A Smile 16. Michel Pagliaro - Some Sing, Some Dance 17. Field Medic - Weekends 18. Dungen - Skövde 19. The Unthanks - The Royal Blackbird 20. Arctic Monkeys - I Ain't Quite Where I Think I Am 21. Rockin' Horse - Don't You Ever Think I Cry 22. Lenny Kravitz - I Build This Garden For Us 23. Electric Light Orchestra - Here Is The News 24. Devo - Too Much Paranoias 25. Blurt - The Fish Needs A Bike 26. Goat - Do The Dance 27. Mediators - Monotony 28. Oh Sees, Osee - Fucking Kill Me 29. Psychedelic Porn Crumpets - Lava Lamp Pisco 30. Faith No More - A Small Victory 31. October Drift - Webcam Funerals 32. Winter - Atonement 33. Just Mustard - In Shade 34. Pale Blue Eyes - Sing It Like We Used To 35. CAN - Outside My Door 36. A Place To Bury Strangers - In Your Heart 37. The Lounge Society - No Driver 38. Gilla Band - Backwash 39. Crack Cloud - Please Yourself 40. Dry Cleaning - Kwenchy Kups 41. Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood - I've Been Down So Long (It Looks Like Up To Me) 42. The Yardarm - Summer Comes October Image: After school, Kiltimagh 80s/90s Podomatic: https://soulshenanigans.podomatic.com Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3fYzstV Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/331g0tM Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/32OIqGI TuneIn Radio: https://bit.ly/30UUPIu Mixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/soulshenanigans  Twitter: @soulshenanigans Facebook: soulshenanigans Email: soulshenanigans(at)gmail.com 

Rock N Roll Pantheon
AllMusicMovies: "The Wrecking Crew" with Denny Tedesco”

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 38:26


You may not know the musician's names, but The Wrecking Crew was a group of studio musicians in Los Angeles in the 1960s who played on hits for the Beach Boys, Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, The Monkees, Mamas and Papas, Herb Alpert and who were Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound." Director Denny Tedesco, son of guitarist Tommy Tedesco, talks to us about these unsung stars who played on so many records that everyone knows by heart. Tune in to hear more about these amazing, funny, and charming men and women who defined rock'n'roll in Los Angeles in the '60s and '70s.

Deep Dive: An AllMusicBooks Podcast
AllMusicMovies: "The Wrecking Crew" with Denny Tedesco

Deep Dive: An AllMusicBooks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 38:26


You may not know the musician's names, but The Wrecking Crew was a group of studio musicians in Los Angeles in the 1960s who played on hits for the Beach Boys, Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, The Monkees, Mamas and Papas, Herb Alpert and who were Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound." Director Denny Tedesco, son of guitarist Tommy Tedesco, talks to us about these unsung stars who played on so many records that everyone knows by heart. Tune in to hear more about these amazing, funny, and charming men and women who defined rock'n'roll in Los Angeles in the '60s and '70s.

Prairie Surfin'
Prairie Surfin’ - Episode October 10, 2022

Prairie Surfin'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022


Enjoying the feeling out there. Hop in the water and enjoy some Fall radio waves my friends :)Playlist: Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood - Arkansas CoalRahil - HaenimThe Garry's - Come OnNelson Angelo E Joyce - Sete CahorrosCountry Pumpkin - Hanarete Ite Mo (離れていても)Mac Demarco - Goodbye WeekendNeil Young - On the Way HomeCameron Brown - Painting a Paper CupWorkhorse - LetterDream Whip - LazyCool Ghouls - Gord's HorseThe Savages - Gone to the MoonBlume - Earth ShakerThe Uplifting Bell Ends - Dear FriendBunny Clarke - Come On Party

Soul Shenanigans
Episode 645: EP 645 ::: Soul Shenanigans ::: 2022 October 7th

Soul Shenanigans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 126:52


Playlist: 1. The Police - Invisible Sun 2. The Umbrellas - Autumn 3. Whipping Boy - Twinkle 4. Emperor Of Ice Cream - Weather Vane 5. Teenage Fanclub - Fallen Leaves 6. The Beths - Change In The Weather 7. Dendrons - New Outlook 8. The Comet Is Coming - Code 9. 1990s - Fassbinder Would Have Loved Techno 10. The Chesterfields - Bitesize 11. Half Man Half Biscuit - Every Time A Bell Rings 12. Hawkwind - Hurry On Sundown 13. Atlantis - I Ain't Got The Time 14. Flowertruck - Sing Along To Your Life 15. The House Of Love - Light Of The Morning 16. Pete Astor - Time On Earth 17. Wilco - War On War 18. Prefab Sprout - Goodbye Lucille #1 19. Supergrass - Beautiful People 20. The Coral - Eyes Of The Moon 21. The Kinks - Autumn Almanac 22. Paul Weller - Birth Of An Accidental Hipster 23. Dana Gavanski - Bend Away and Fall 24. Emma Tricca - Mars Is Asleep 25. Cassandra Jenkins - It's You26. Björk - Like Someone In Love27. Portishead - The Rip 28. Elaine Howley - Autumn Speak 29. Stereolab - Miss Modular 30. Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood - Love Is Strange 31. Tim Burgess - Typical Music 32. Pixies - There's A Moon On 33. R.E.M. - The Wake-Up Bomb 34. Pavement - Loretta's Scars 35. Loretta Lynn - Who's Gonna Miss Me?Image: Kiltimagh Kruising 80s/90sPodomatic: https://soulshenanigans.podomatic.com Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3fYzstV Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/331g0tM Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/32OIqGI TuneIn Radio: https://bit.ly/30UUPIu Mixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/soulshenanigans  Twitter: @soulshenanigans Facebook: soulshenanigans Email: soulshenanigans(at)gmail.com      

Light on Leeds
Episode 71: SAS Specialist Autism Services

Light on Leeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 49:07


I had a grand old chat with Dave, Daniel and Tony of SAS - Specialist Autism Services."Specialist Autism Services has worked exclusively for and with adults (18+) on the autism spectrum and their families since 1999. We are a non-profit organisation that works with the charity Sacar to provide autism specific services across the Yorkshire region.We provide a range of services including group social skills workshops (through an autism-specific learning programme), information and guidance, autism-specific counselling, employment support, autism awareness training and community outreach support. Under the name Autism First we also provide bespoke support for adults with autism and additional needs."Tel: 0113 2 775 656info.leeds@specialistautismservices.orgGreat Northern House, Junction 7 Business Park, Stourton, Leeds, LS10 3DQThe featured track is "Chainsaws" by brilliant Leeds band Perspex who describe themselves as "lurking somewhere between Nancy Sinatra & Dr Feelgood".  I love the song and can't stop playing it - enjoy!https://www.specialistautismservices.org/https://www.facebook.com/SASautism/https://twitter.com/SASautismhttps://perspex3000.bandcamp.com/track/chainsawshttps://www.instagram.com/perspex3000/

Sofá Sonoro
La infancia de Nancy Sinatra: clases, famosos y un secuestro

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:16


La infancia de la hija del cantante más famoso del mundo no fue al uso, pero desde muy pequeña Nancy se preparó para triunfar. Lucía Taboada nos cuenta los orígenes de Nancy. Escucha el programa completo dedicado a Nancy Sinatra.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 127: Tango Alpha Lima: Health and Wellness with U.S. Army Veteran Jonathan Wechter

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 65:40


IN THE NEWS Jeff and Ashley discuss the threats China and Russia pose to U.S. dominance in space and Jeff tries to figure out the Space Force "battle zone". THIS WEEK'S GUEST Our guest Jonathan talks about his work as a personal trainer and nutritionist, competing as an elite athlete, and his advocacy for mental wellness and therapeutic use of psychedelics to recover from trauma. RAPID FIRE  WWII veteran joins Legion post before 100th birthday Big Navy investigating SEAL basic training Special Guest: Jonathan Wechter.

Playlist? YEAH
EP016: Reflect the Quality of the Tunes

Playlist? YEAH

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 61:18


Could you appearing on a relatively small podcast endanger your career and respectability? If yes then you're likely to be this episode's guest DJ Bendy. It might sound like we're swearing inappropriately at him at times but this is just to protect him... similarly to how we protected Ed Sheeran that one time. Amongst defining ourselves, Mike's singing and Pat Lash, we also touch on big topics like Sharting, small Burger Kings and The Netherlands. ENJOY YOURSELVES!!! Listen to the full Playlist? YEAH playlist HERE (ALL) or this just this episode's tracks and references HERE (EP016) Featured Artists: Arthea Franklin, Bob & Earl, Sam & Dave, Nancy Sinatra, Shaft, DJ Jean, Serge Gainsbourg/Jane Birkin, Peaches - - - - - CONTACT www.playlistyeah.com hello@playlistyeah.com Facebook - Twitter - Instagram - TikTok - - - - - GUEST LINKS DJ Bendy Man of Internet Mystery aka No LINKS - - - - - OTHER LINKS Artwork Ryan Hunt Facebook - Twitter - Instagram - YouTube - Esty Susa Maule Instagram - Website - Etsy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/playlistyeah/message

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Ledge #536: Covers

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022


As I have stated quite often during these cover tune broadcasts, I have a special folder where I place remakes as I come across them. Once that folder is full, it's time to do a show. This time around, that folder grew at a pretty rapid pace. Of course I'm going to air Ultrabomb's version of “Sonic Reducer”. I don't think anybody is surprised by the inclusion of “Borstal Breakdown” from that new live Replacements album. But many may be shocked by the inclusion of two tracks from the 1968 collaboration between Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood. Honestly, I had never heard these bonkers tunes until one day I hung out in my friend's record store. Seriously, that version of “You've Lost That Loving Feeling” is something everybody should check out. But what made it essential that I do this theme this very week are two special records that arrived a few days ago. The first is All The Covers (And More) by The Streetwalkin' Cheetahs. Released on September 30 on Rum Bar Records, this 38 track compilation gathers together all of the remakes the band has recorded in their 25 year history. The other is the latest project by Geoff Palmer. Standing In […]

The Ledge (mp3)
The Ledge #536: Covers

The Ledge (mp3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 141:38


As I have stated quite often during these cover tune broadcasts, I have a special folder where I place remakes as I come across them. Once that folder is full, it’s time to do a show. This time around, that folder grew at a pretty rapid pace. Of course I’m going to air Ultrabomb’s version of “Sonic Reducer”. I don’t think anybody is surprised by the inclusion of “Borstal Breakdown” from that new live Replacements album. But many may be shocked by the inclusion of two tracks from the 1968 collaboration between Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood. Honestly, I had never heard these bonkers tunes until one day I hung out in my friend’s record store. Seriously, that version of “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling” is something everybody should check out. But what made it essential that I do this theme this very week are two special records that arrived a few days ago. The first is All The Covers (And More) by The Streetwalkin’ Cheetahs. Released on September 30 on Rum Bar Records, this 38 track compilation gathers together all of the remakes the band has recorded in their 25 year history. The other is the latest project by Geoff Palmer. Standing In […]

Punks in Parkas
Episode 49: Punks in Parkas - September 15, 2022

Punks in Parkas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 58:11


Join Captain Dan and Penny Lane for a low key, chilled out episode of Punks in Parkas!Hear tracks from the likes of Dusty Springfield, Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood, Serge Gainsbourg and more!

PopMaster
Nancy Sinatra, Womack & Womack and Nicole Scherzinger

PopMaster

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 16:23


Tracey plays Christy in a memorable edition of the PopMaster Podcast, hosted by Ken Bruce

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Come To The Sunshine
Episode 190: Come To The Sunshine - Song Of Summer

Come To The Sunshine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 171:01


In an episode first aired September 5, 2022: DJ Andrew Sandoval surveys the five summer editions of his show and selects his favorite tracks alongside a handful of more recent discoveries. Artists include: Bruce & Terry; The Ragamuffins; Mark Eric; The Stephen Crane Village; Freddie Cannon; Brian Hyland; Harmony Grass; The Higher Elevation; The Hot Dog Stand; Teddy & The Pandas; The Fresh Windows; The Gibsons; The Chocolate Watch Band (UK); The Bystanders; Los Iberos; The Pyramid; The Love Generation; Nancy Sinatra with Lee Hazlewood; Johnny Rivers; The Two Of Each; The Kinks; Love; The Monkees; Little Anthony & The Imperials; The 5th Dimension; The Six Pents; Jan & Dean; The Shangri-Las; Skeeter Davis; The Street Corner Society; Lesley Gore; The Beach Boys; The Dave Clark Five; David Kerr; The California Poppy Pickers; The Fortunes; The Imaginations; Floyd & Jerry with The Counterpoints; Toast; The Peppermint Trolley Company; The Seeds; The Bonzo Dog Band; Bill Fay; Ray Chafin; Sonny & Cher; Mournin' Do; Marianne Faithfull; Reparata & The Delrons; Saturday's Photograph; Tuesday's Children; Twice As Much; The Bee Gees; Del Shannon; Chad & Jeremy and Dusty Springfield

dHarmic Evolution
344 Down Under With Singer Songwriter Cass Eager, It's The Way She Feels About You!

dHarmic Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 61:41


  Cass is a modern soul singer with a sound that embodies old-school cool with bold sexy optimism. Her sound takes its cue from a vintage sonic swagger a-la Amy Winehouse, but she'd be just as much at home drinking martinis with Andra Day, Brittany Howard and Nancy Sinatra at her favourite lounge bar in LA.Cass's soul-leaning, sun-seeking songs remind you that if the champagne glass isn't already full,then it's at least half-full (and definitely never empty). Her signature chocolate-coated vocals are drenched in a feel-good vibe, and her megawatt smile and natural charisma draw you in with gravitational force.It isn't just Cass' new single “The Way I Feel About You” and its crowd-sourced video that have captured the imagination of her fans and industry. Cass's acclaimed last single “Ain't No Stopping Me '' hit over 1.7M streams on a recent US Hyundai commercial. Her music has also been featured on a US McDonalds ad, as well as multiple TV shows on Amazon Prime, Nine Network, and the E channel. So strap up your seatbelts, and let's take a ride to Australia by way of LA California on this episode of the dHarmic Evolution podcast. As a Preview In this episode, we have soulful singer Cass Eager discuss her two latest singles and a behind the scenes of “the way I feel about you”. A lot of introspection, we talk about Cass' experience in co-writing, from dislike to joy. We talk about family, her agent husband and motherhood. We also talk about pushing ourselves when we have a supporter, a producer like Billy Elfer. Trust us, this episode is definitely one of a kind. Wanna know the Australian word for hiking? Get it all here on the dHarmic evolution podcast. Quotes ‘I always found myself feeling more like a mom than a musician so I had to find a way to make music more fun again'-Cass ‘Co-writing is one of those things the more you do, the more you get comfortable with it and you can recognize what a good fit is'-Cass ‘One note can have everything in it'-Cass ‘It's more about the character than the impression'-Cass ‘You need new experiences to spark new emotion'-Cass ‘The song knows everything, you have to follow it and let it teach you what you should be doing.'-James ‘Ideas are everywhere, we have to remind ourselves to tune that again and get our vibe back on'-James ‘We're here to grow, expand and be joyful'-Cass     Timestamps 03:15 How did Cass end up in LA? 06:07 How Cass' view on co-writing changed 08:57 Working with Billy Lefler(producer) 13:10 If you were my king by Cass plays 16:45 Behind If you were my king. 18:05 Cass' early influences 20:45 Voice or Instrument? 21:54 Cass' first song 23:00 Where is Cass based now? LA or Australia 24:12 Cass' first experience in LA 25:52 Cass' eclectic taste in soul and music 29:20 Getting deeper into If you were my king 31:19 The way I feel about you by Cass plays 35:44 The way I feel about you production with Billy 40:40 Behind the video of the way I feel about you 43:30 What is downtime for Cass? 45:33 Being alone as a writer 54:51 Album title? 55:10 Where can we find Cass mostly? 55:43 Last words from Cass 58:00 Ride on by James Kevin O'Connor plays   Spotify Playlist:  Make sure you're not missing out on all our “Rising dHarmic Stars Spotify Playlists”. We already have four (4) playlists where you can find over a hundred songs from our very own dHarmic Evolution alumni. Don't forget to share them with your family and friends, and let the world support these fantastic indie artists! Check out the links here:   dHarmic Rising Stars: Aquila   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4loDaYF0OuWRjZeMXvEjK4   dHarmic Rising Stars: Orion   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5CnL9tl0xbU4oDh6jtJBZx   dHarmic Rising Stars: Lyra   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1ov0OqNMJmPhHrxZjsXthS   dHarmic Rising Stars: Scorpius   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5oQ4Sc4LAJSexsDgDcixt8   dHarmic Evolution links:   Stay up-to-date with our new releases! You just need to go to dharmicevolution.com and subscribe to your favourite podcast platform – there is much to choose from! Let me know what you think as well by leaving comments or reviews! And if you're digging this show, please share it with somebody on social media or just forward it to a friend and let them join the growing community of dHarmic Evolution!   Hey, do you know someone who is suffering from anxiety and depression? Please help them out by suggesting the book “7 Steps to Mental Freedom.” It will be an excellent read for them. You can easily find it as well on the main page of the website, or you can just send them to 7stepstomentalfreedom.com.   Keep yourself updated with what's going on with dHarmic evolution; check out our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/dharmicevolution. If you are an artist, an author, or a keynote speaker, who is trying to find a safe place to post your content, you can check out our own Facebook community page and let the world support you! Check out the link here: dHarmic Evolution Community.    Connect with Cass   Website Instagram Youtube Facebook Special Links and Mentions Billy Lefler Rick Franklin Ride On by James Kevin O'Connor The way I feel about you If you were my king Bush walking Elizabeth Gilbert

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Big Takeover Show – Number 397 – August 29, 2022

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


This week, after Jim plays & sings 1996 Sloan: brand new Damned, Tony Molina, Black Nite Crash, Brian Jonestown Massacre, Valery Trails, Archers of Loaf, and Salim Nourallah, plus Shocking Blue, Esquerita, Nancy Sinatra, Lee Hazelwood, Johnny Fortune, ...

The Last Bohemians
S4 Ep5: Lynn Castle: LA's first lady barber on Elvis, the LSD-soaked Sixties and her secret music career

The Last Bohemians

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:22


In the north of Los Angeles, in a neighbourhood called Glendale, an unassuming bungalow is home to one of the first women in Hollywood to cut men's hair. Today she goes by the glitziest of names, Madelynn von Ritz, but back in the 60s she was called Lynn Castle and hung out with key people of the era, lopping off Jim Morrison, the Byrds, Sonny Bono and Neil Young's locks. She was also a secret musician. But despite her childhood friends being musical svengalis like Phil Spector – who she once dated – as well as Jack Nietzcshe and Lee Hazlewood, it took her a while to reveal her talent. Eventually, however, she cut a number of intimate, melancholy demos in the hazy 60s with Hazlewood, who later famously teamed up with Nancy Sinatra and helped define the decade's psychedelic sound. Lynn is now 83 (going on 53!) and still writes music to this day, with a home studio tucked in the corner of her living room. Those old demos, meanwhile, were found by the label Light in the Attic and reissued as Rose Coloured Corner in 2017 – an album 50 years in the making – including her signature song, pop gem The Lady Barber.  In this episode of The Last Bohemians: LA, supported by Audio-Technica, Lynn discusses her 'friendship' with Elvis, her series of almost-famous moments with Bob Dylan and the Stones, her positive outlook and life, and unexpectedly digs out letters from an old flame... CREDITS Presenter/Exec-Producer: Kate Hutchinson Producer: Holly Fisher Photography: Lisa Jelliffe Theme music: Pete Cunningham, Ned Pegler and Caradog Jones With thanks to Light in the Attic Records. ABOUT AUDIO-TECHNICA In 1962, with a vision of producing high-quality audio for everyone, Audio-Technica's founder Hideo Matsushita created the first truly affordable phono cartridge, the AT-1 in Shinjuku, Japan. Since then, Audio-Technica has grown into a world-renowned company devoted to Audio Excellence at every level, expanding the product range to include headphones, microphones and turntables. Audio-Technica's commitment to the user experience and their devotion to high quality design, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution has placed them at the forefront of the industry for the last 60 years. ABOUT THE LAST BOHEMIANS Journalist and broadcaster Kate Hutchinson launched The Last Bohemians in 2019, pairing the audio with stunning portraits by photographer Laura Kelly. It stole hearts with 86-year-old Molly Parkin's stories of self-pleasuring, LSD countess Amanda Feilding's trepanning tales and Pamela Des Barres' reflections on supergroupiedom. It won silver for Best New Podcast at the 2020 British Podcast Awards and was a finalist at the 2021 Audio Production Awards. Series two featured folk legend Judy Collins; British fashion icon Zandra Rhodes, dealing with the aftermath of losing her lover while celebrating 50 years in fashion; anarcho-punk innovator and illustrator Gee Vaucher; and the controversial witch at the heart of the 1970s occult boom, Maxine Sanders. In 2021, The Last Bohemians launched a lockdown special with performance artist Marina Abramović; it returned in 2022 with the UK's greatest living painter, Maggi Hambling, as well as Bowie's former best friend Dana Gillespie and theatre actor Cleo Sylvestre. thelastbohemians.co.uk patreon.com/thelastbohemians instagram.com/thelastbohemianspod twitter.com/thelastbohospod 

The Popcast
#16 - Don Randi & Anjelah Johnson

The Popcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:07


Don Randi of the legendary "Wrecking Crew" shares a few stories of performing with Elvis Presley, Frank & Nancy Sinatra & more. Plus: Comedian Anjelah Johnson.

Zig at the gig podcasts

Ben Vaughn On Zig At The Gig Ben Vaughn grew up in the Philadelphia area on the New Jersey side of the river. At age 6, his uncle gave him a Duane Eddy record and forever changed his life. In 1983, he formed the Ben Vaughn Combo. The band was together five years, releasing two albums and touring the U.S. several times. They received rave reviews in Rolling Stone and People magazine and video airplay on MTV. The attention inspired Marshall Crenshaw to record Ben's "I'm Sorry (But So Is Brenda Lee)" for his "Downtown" album. Ben embarked on a solo career in 1988, recording several critically acclaimed albums, touring extensively in Europe and the U.S. and receiving more MTV exposure. During that period he produced three records for the Elektra Records American Explorer series (Memphis rockabilly legend Charlie Feathers, Muscle Shoals country soul singer Arthur Alexander) and recorded "Cubist Blues," a collaboration with Alan Vega and Alex Chilton. He also scored two films ("Favorite Mopar" and "Wild Girl's Go-Go Rama"), as well as appearing as a frequent guest commentator on nationally syndicated radio shows “Fresh Air” and "World Cafe." In 1995, Ben moved to L.A. and released "Instrumental Stylings," an album of instrumentals in a variety of styles. A guest appearance on KCRW's "Morning Becomes Eclectic" led directly to being hired as the composer for the hit TV sitcom "3rd Rock From The Sun." "That 70s Show" soon followed, and for the next ten years Ben would provide award-winning music for a dozen other TV shows and pilots ("Men Behaving Badly," "Normal, Ohio," "Grounded For Life"). He also provided scores for several films ("Psycho Beach Party," "The Independent," "Scorpion Spring") and continued producing records (Ween, Los Straitjackets, Mark Olson of the Jayhawks, Nancy Sinatra, and the "Swingers" soundtrack CD). Somehow Ben found time to create the legendary "Rambler '65." Recorded entirely in his car, this much-publicized album (and subsequent short film) is still considered by many to be a classic document of a man and his dream. Since then, Ben has released “Designs In Music," “Vaughn Sings Vaughn Vols. 1-3,” “Texas Road Trip” (recorded in Austin, Texas with Doug Sahm's band) , "Five By Five" and "Piece de Resistance" by the Ben Vaughn Quintet and the solo acoustic album, “Imitation Wood Grain And Other Folk Songs.” Add to that an Italian dance hit (a DJ re-mix of “Hey Romeo”), airplay of “Jerry Lewis in France” on Bob Dylan's radio show (complete with Dylan's recitation of Ben's resume), and two recent tours in France and you're looking at what continues to be a very interesting career. Occasionally, Ben takes a break from his syndicated radio show (“The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn”) to perform live in the US and Europe. The dates are randomly planned so catch him while you can! Ben's Info http://benvaughn.org www.facebook.com/benvaughnmusic www.instagram.com/benvaughnmusic  

Unholy Vaults
Sundown Part1

Unholy Vaults

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022


Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood tracks. njoy the Sounds U.V

Soul Shenanigans
Episode 639: EP 639 ::: Soul Shenanigans ::: 2022 July 29th

Soul Shenanigans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 143:43


Playlist:  1. Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood - Summer Wine 2. New Order - Love Vigilantes 3. Happy Mondays - Little Matchstick Owen 4. Mush - Northern Safari 5. Automatic - Venus Hour 6. Virgin Prunes - Pagan Lovesong 7. Sonic Youth - Swimsuit Issue 8. Japanese Television - Bumble Rumble 9. Pugwash - The Perfect Summer 10. Ash - Oh Yeah 11. Momma - Speeding 72 12. The Smashing Pumpkins - 1979 13. The 4 Of Us - Drag My Bad Name Down 14. INXS - New Sensation (Nick 7”) 15. Fine Young Cannibals - I'm Not Satisfied 16. Piper - Summer Breeze 17. The Style Council - Shout To The Top 18. Blow Monkeys - Digging Your Scene 19. Field Music - Is This The Picture? 20. Divinyls - Science Fiction 21. Katy J Pearson - Talk Over Town 22. Belle & Sebastian - Another Sunny Day 23. Sing-Sing - Feels Like Summer 24. Gwenno - An Stevel Nowydh 25. Laura Veirs - Seaside Haiku 26. Adorable - Summerside 27. Kathryn Williams - Radioactive 28. Jessie Buckley & Bernard Butler - The Eagle & The Dove 29. Nina Nastasia - Afterwards 30. Brigid Mae Power - On A City Night 31. Síomha - Spéir Rua 32. Jamiroquai - Too Young To Die 33. Konk - Elephant 34. Heaven 17 - Crushed By The Wheels Of Industry 35. The Dance - Do Dada 36. Can - Can Can 37. Black Midi - Welcome To Hell 38. 808 State - Cubik (Original Mix) 39. PM Dawn - Set Adrift On Memory Bliss 40. Art Brut - Ignorance Is Bliss Image: Kiltimagh Summer 1987Podomatic: https://soulshenanigans.podomatic.com Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3fYzstV Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/331g0tM Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/32OIqGI TuneIn Radio: https://bit.ly/30UUPIu Mixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/soulshenanigans  Twitter: @soulshenanigans Facebook: soulshenanigans Email: soulshenanigans(at)gmail.com 

The Brothers Grim Punkcast
The Brothers Grim Punkcast #350

The Brothers Grim Punkcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


Episode 350... Gender bending with a special of all female fronted bands this week. The undeniable punkness the ladies bring to the table is just the tip of the iceberg in this episode. A bunch of 2022 Bandcamp tunes and a mix of the usual! Enjoy! Download and stream here (iTunes and Google Podcasts as well):Bros All Female Fronted 350!!!Airing Wednesdays 7pm PST on PUNK ROCK DEMONSTRATION & Fridays 7pm PST on RIPPER RADIO.Send us stuff  to brothersgrimpunk@gmail.com.A wad of good Punkering...Over 1:01 Romantic Gorilla ST 19981 1:30 Nuklear Blast Suntan Demo 2019Fresno O'Douls 0:30 Straight Edge Kegger Fuck The KidsS.I.M.P.L.E. 0:22 Rad This Is Not A Final War demo 2012Bros Intro Song by Jeff from Loopy Scoop TapesThese Boots Are Made For Walkin' (bkgrd) 2:41 Nancy Sinatra BootsSanta Rosa SEEN NOT HEARD 1:22 RUT DEMOL.A. YOUR BOSS DOESN'T CARE 2:13 FUTURA E.C. #013 - FUTURA 3030Walk The Talk 1:06 Common Ignorance ControlArgentina MUNDO INMUNDO 1:23 FARMACO Educacion Cinica #014 - DESCOLONIZARWarning 1:32 Disaffect Discography CDAPPALACHIAN TERROR UNIT - endless bloodshed (bkgrd) 2:58 va - WE'RE STILL PISSED!!! an international female fronted hc-punk compilationPhoenix Energy 1:34 Bad Image Bad ImagePoland Fuck your categories 1:08 Pänika Pänika EPSpokane Internet 1:28 Psychic Death OP#22: Psychic Death 2UK Drown 1:38 Comeback Clit Ättestor / Comeback Clit splitNYC Free Your Mind! 0:40 PERSONⒶ Free Your Mind!UK Redux I 1:27 F.Emasculata Hail MulderChicago Lust for Pleasure 1:50 Stress Positions OP#21: Walang HiyaIndiana The World is Burning Up 1:25 Counter Control OP#14: The World is Burning Up EPSACRILEGE - bloodlust (bkgrd) 3:11 va - WE'RE STILL PISSED!!! an int. female fronted hardcore-punk compilation-80's flashback vol. 2This Won't Hurt A Bit 1:53 Guttermouth Live From The PharmacySlutBomb - Get it Right 1:13 SlutBomb Split with Body FarmJACK KNIFE BEAT DOWN 0:55 JACK KNIFE BEAT DOWN JACK KNIFE BEAT DOWNSalt Lake City Swallow a Bullet 0:44 NARC A Waste of Good Suffering20/20 1:03 BODY FARM 3" LatheVigilante 1:58 INYECCION Demo CS_Discos Enfermos 92Connection (bkgrd) 2:20 Elastica ElasticaStockton Girl's Club 1:55 SISSYFIT Make Em PayRotten Thing 1:21 Exit Order Demo (2013)ENEMY 1:13 Mutant Strain Possessed By Noise (CS)Never Adjust 1:17 Last Words Last Words LPMenace 1:10 Leather Daddy Leather Daddy s/t 7"NAKED AGRESSION - revolt (bkgrd) 1:53 va - WE'RE STILL PISSED!!! an international female fronted hc-punk compilation vol. 1Sycophant 0:43 Replica DemoBlack Hole 2:16 Provoked Profane Existence 15th year anniversary compilationGood Luck Get Fucked 1:28 Feed Them Fucking Glass DemoHuman Pesticide 1:08 ARAME CHRISTOPHOBIANerd in the Pit 1:38 Zombie Dogs Zombie Dogs40 Boys In 40 Nights (bkgrd) 2:28 The Donnas Early Years_Lookout!The History Of My Future 2:14 7 Year Bitch Gato Negro

Pudding on the Wrist
The Who's The Boss Question?!?!

Pudding on the Wrist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 99:38


Tonight's episode of Pudding On The Wrist include tasty treats (of the sonic variety) from Nancy Sinatra, The Magick Heads, Opal, St. Thomas, The Munsters, Bob Lind, and many more.

Sofá Sonoro
Nancy Sinatra y el peso de un apellido de leyenda

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 59:02


Nancy Sinatra lo tuvo todo para triunfar. La hija del eterno Frank Sinatra recibió siendo muy pequeña una educación orientada la arte. Frank no sabía si su hija sería cantante, pero tenía claro que él pondría todo de su parte para que la niña fuese lo que quisiese.Nancy pronto demostró talento para la música y su padre se volcó en ella. Pero nada resultaría sencillo y quizá lo más complejo de todo para la chica fuese cargar con un apellido tan pesado como el suyo.Tras unos inicios poco prometedores, Frank puso la carrera de su hija en las manos de Lee Hazlewood, un tipo con mucho más talento que reconocimiento. El compañero ideal, un músico, productor, arreglista y compositor que además sabía cantar pero que no tenía suficiente nombre para hacer sombra a Nancy.Juntos trabajaron duro y fueron dando pasos en la dirección correcta. Cambiaron el tipo de música, el estilo de Nancy y apuntaron hacía otra dirección. De pronto todo explotó con These Boots Are Made for Walkin', el primer gran éxito de Nancy.Tras algunos sencillos y los primeros álbumes de Nancy, producidos por Lee, la pareja dio un paso más y grabaron junto Nancy & Lee, un disco de duetos que es una maravilla y que fue el primero de una trilogía fantástica a la que dedicamos el Sofá Sonoro de esta semana junto a Fernando Navarro y Lucía Taboada.

Let's Talk To Lucy
Frank Sinatra

Let's Talk To Lucy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 13:10


"Old Blue Eyes" invites Lucy to the movie set for a quick-catch up as the discuss his children's foray into showbusiness, his preference for movies, and what makes a good director.Let's Talk To Lucy is produced by SiriusXM.  Click here for a special SiriusXM subscription offer!https://www.siriusxm.com/offers/lets-talk-to-lucy

The Last Bohemians
S4 Ep3: Linda Ramone: the NYC punk in LA on love triangles, legacies and keeping rock'n'roll alive

The Last Bohemians

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 30:50


The Last Bohemians returns with a brand new series set in Tinseltown, supported by Audio-Technica. From forgotten feminist artists to Sunset Strip sexpots and from punk performers to subversive style disruptors (and one Californian arts dynasty!): these are some of the most maverick women in LA, whose stories each say something different about the city. In episode two, Team TLB head up to the valley and to the incredible home of Linda Ramone, wife of the late Johnny Ramone – guitarist in one the greatest punk bands there ever was – and custodian of the Linda and Johnny Ramone Ranch, a paradise of countercultural curios, movie memorabilia and Elvis collectables. Over a morning aperitif, Linda talks about growing up with NYC punk, dating bandmates and younger men, what Lisa-Marie Presley thinks of her themed Elvis room, the importance of fandom, her musical obsessions, how she maintains rock'n'roll's legacy and the best way to silence your critics. CREDITS Presenter/exec producer: Kate Hutchinson Editor: Georgie Rogers Recording and additional production: Holly Fisher Additional production: Colour It In. Photography: Lisa Jelliffe Theme music: Pete Cunningham, Ned Pegler and Caradog Jones With thanks to Nancy Sinatra. ABOUT AUDIO-TECHNICA In 1962, with a vision of producing high-quality audio for everyone, Audio-Technica's founder Hideo Matsushita created the first truly affordable phono cartridge, the AT-1 in Shinjuku, Japan. Since then, Audio-Technica has grown into a world-renowned company devoted to Audio Excellence at every level, expanding the product range to include headphones, microphones and turntables. Audio-Technica's commitment to the user experience and their devotion to high quality design, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution has placed them at the forefront of the industry for the last 60 years. ABOUT THE LAST BOHEMIANS Journalist and broadcaster Kate Hutchinson launched The Last Bohemians in 2019, pairing the audio with stunning portraits by photographer Laura Kelly. It stole hearts with 86-year-old Molly Parkin's stories of self-pleasuring, LSD countess Amanda Feilding's trepanning tales and Pamela Des Barres' reflections on supergroupiedom. It won silver for Best New Podcast at the 2020 British Podcast Awards and was a finalist at the 2021 Audio Production Awards.  Series two featured folk legend Judy Collins; British fashion icon Zandra Rhodes, dealing with the aftermath of losing her lover while celebrating 50 years in fashion; anarcho-punk innovator and illustrator Gee Vaucher; and the controversial witch at the heart of the 1970s occult boom, Maxine Sanders. In 2021, The Last Bohemians launched a lockdown special with performance artist Marina Abramović; it returned in 2022 with the UK's greatest living painter, Maggi Hambling, as well as Bowie's former best friend Dana Gillespie and theatre actor Cleo Sylvestre. thelastbohemians.co.uk patreon.com/thelastbohemians instagram.com/thelastbohemianspod twitter.com/thelastbohospod 

Women World Leaders' Podcast
303. Celebrating God's Grace, Lost and Found in Tinseltown

Women World Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 25:34


Today's reading of “Lost and Found in Tinseltown,” an article from the First Edition of Voice of Truth, tells the story of Tina Gallo's step into acting and showcases God's glory in her life. ***** Welcome to Celebrating God's Grace, a Women World Leaders podcast. My name is Julie Jenkins and it's my honor today to share with you reading from Voice of Truth. Many of you know the name Tina Gallo. Tina is an award-winning actress, a best-selling author, speaker, and acting coach. She's best known for her role as DiDi on the soap opera General Hospital. She's the founder of the National Studio of Method Acting, and she traveled with Frank Sinatra, selling his merchandise for two and a half years. Tina is currently writing her next book, Unfiltered, and has made appearances in the Christian Broadcast Network and Daystar television, sharing her testimony of God's faithfulness. What you may not know about Tina is that she is currently battling an illness and she needs our prayers. Tina is fighting a yet unknown infection. And we are asking that you join us as we storm the heavens for God's healing and provision for her. Dear Heavenly Father, we love our sister Tina so much, but we know that you love her even more. We lift her to you today God give her strength and fuse her with your healing power as only you can. Father give her doctors wisdom as they treat her. We thank you in advance for your complete provision and protection of Tina and Jesus mighty name I pray. Amen. Well, Tina Gallo has been a huge part of Women World Leaders for several years and she's been a writer in Voice of Truth since the very first edition. Today I'd like to read her first article, “Lost and Found in Tinseltown.” This appeared in our January 2021 edition of Voice of Truth.   The Lord plants dreams in our hearts at a very early age fearfully and wonderfully creating every detail of our lives with plans for redemption in all things, in all our ways at all times, even if we don't profess faith in him just yet. These dreams are like fitted garments of clothing tailored uniquely to us carefully spun and wrapped upon us, dressing us in colorful visions for the future. The desires that the Lord birthed into my life as a young girl were promises he was already planning for my future. I just didn't know it yet. The early age of three years old, my whole hearts vast dream was a one-way ticket to Hollywood. My tiny blueish green eyes were set upon acting and Hollywood movies firmly fixed on an ambition that seemed unobtainable, yet written in my deemed a destiny. Although the shifting sands of family instability made it seem like an impossibility, deeply embedded in my heart was the will of determination. My heart was screaming an epic dialogue. I can do this. My mother was much younger than my dad and came from a very unstable childhood with a family of 12 brothers and sisters. Alcoholism was a vehicle of destruction that ran rampant in her family basked in constant affliction my mom and her siblings were responsible to care for one another. I have no idea if my mom knew that what ravaged her childhood would be what would ravage my own.   During my mother's child-rearing years, she carried that same generational alcoholism right into our very home. It seemed at least once a month routinely, my mom would binge on beer until she couldn't see straight, numbing her inner turmoil. She was running from her past into a sea of alcoholism. All the while my aching heart needed her Are the core of my childhood yearned for a mother's love. Stolen was my mother her absence in my life left me with words that cut deep. My tiny little heart could never comprehend why my brothers and I, her children, weren't important enough to care for and invest in. Gnarling from the ashes of addictions, seeded lies of abandonment grew wildly into my hungry heart. On the contrary, my dad was Italian and most of his family came from Calabria. They loved each other and were very close to one another, depicting what a stable family should look like. He did not drink alcohol except on special occasions and only then he might take a sip as a salute of goodwill. He was a good provider, a faithful dad, and I knew that he loved me. We were raised in a nice middle-class suburban neighborhood and a lovely home with an in-ground pool. In the 1960s and early 70s, divorce was an abnormality. There certainly weren't any families that I knew of who are divorced except mine. inwardly I longed to be cherished and nurtured the same way I saw all of the other little girls were by their moms who always seem to adore and fuss over them. My eyes peered into the lives of my friends with desires to grasp a mother's love such as this. The absence of my mother harbored feelings of inadequacy that had planted its deep, ugly roots deep within the filters that I saw myself through irradiated unprocessed pain, blurring the truth as my reality now framed with lies of distorted images that were marked upon my soul. In my teens, my dad decided to move us to Fort Lauderdale, Florida. I was extremely upset because I didn't want to go, nor did I want to leave my friends. Even though they weren't the best crowd I was accepted and comfortable in friendships with them. Little that I know how that move would change my life and eventually put me on the path to fulfilling my Hollywood acting dream. Internally, I was a lost soul and very skilled at putting on the right mask to hide behind when I needed to. Or so I thought. The truth is, there was a war raging inside of me between God's truth in the devil's lies. The Bible teaches us that the thief the devil comes to kill, steal and destroy. But Jesus came that they may have life and have it in abundance John 1010. Daily I battled internally against the negatives that distorted my perception with an illusion of false truths. I desperately needed validation and affirmation. And mostly I was in search of simple, unconditional love. At 18 years of age, I took a job as a cocktail waitress in Sunrise musical theater in Sunrise, Florida. Just so happened that Frank Sinatra was performing there the same weekend, I began. I was extremely excited about that. You see, as a child, I was always compared to Shirley Temple, probably because I was always performing and my hair was blonde and curly just like hers. I loved adorable Shirley, but Nancy Sinatra is who I wanted to be. So I'd put a towel on my head and make believe my hair was long. Put on my little red shimmy dress and wait, go-go boots. Hold a hairbrush in my hand as my microphone and wallah, all jazzed up. singing these boots are made to walk in. I'd put on a show all day long for anyone who would endure and watch. Somehow as a gift for my sixth birthday. My dad arranged a phone call from Nancy Sinatra to sing happy birthday to me. I was elated. It was the most special present I've ever received. The new job of waiting tables revealed a distant dream that was waiting for me. In fact, I can remember the weekend that marked the momentum of the opportunity of bright and shining lights that was coming to fruition. I was given a private table of 20 to service that evening. I did my very best as I waited on them before and after the show Everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves and I was astonished at how large of a tip I received from my table. It was a great first night. When I came back to work the next night, I was given the same table with the same exact people. I thought this was strange because who comes to the same show a second night. My manager then called me to the side to inform me that I had been waiting on Mr. Sinatra's personal friends, and that they were so pleased with my service that they requested me as their server again, while fear and pure excitement rushed through my veins with anticipation. Later that evening, Bobby Marks, Mr. Sinatra's stepson, and Lester Lewis approached me and asked me if I would like to travel on the road with a Sinatra entourage to sell his merchandise before and after his shows. Well, with no hesitation, of course, I said yes. I couldn't wait to tell my dad I knew I was about to embark on a big adventure. And maybe this was my answer to my big dream of making it as a Hollywood star. In my mind, I thought who I knew is all that it would take. Indeed, it was a fabulous two and a half years journeying on the road with some of the world's best, I traveled all over, first-class, and stayed in top-notch fancy hotels. Rapidly my new life consisted of lavish events and parties, meeting and entertaining with some of the world's finest in the entertainment industry. Even got to thank Nancy in person for that very wonderful birthday gift so many years before, yet I wasn't any closer to my own acting dream being fulfilled. Hungry for more I asked Mr. Sinatra's best friend, Julie Rizzo the big question, how do I become an actress? What do I need to do? I told him I thought getting to know all these famous people would be my ticket in. His response was, you need to go to school to study acting and find out if you have any talent kid Who you know can help open doors but only talent will sustain. At that time, I didn't even know that there were schools that concentrated on teaching acting. This was all new to me. I was excited to begin researching schools and finally decided to make my move to New York City to study with some of the best teachers in the industry. Now I had a solid plan. Lights Camera Action. I studied in acting school for years while waiting tables at night, pounding the pavement with a workload I'd been given. Avidly I began to get some acting gigs some under five work on soap operas and landed a few commercials. When I felt I had enough experience under my belt I decided it was time to head to Los Angeles with my sights on getting a role on the most popular soap opera at the time. General Hospital. I did just that when I was offered the role of DD So here I was, I had landed in the vision of my dreams. I had arrived despite the opposition that riddled and streamed through my life. Now I was living my dream on the mountaintop as an actress in Hollywood. I made decent money and lived in a cute little cottage right on the beach and Marina del Rey. Can't get any better than that right. Except the battle of unworthiness still raged inside of me, leaving an empty, gaping hole. unresolved pain still resting inwardly, and the absence of God in my life. Nothing was ever enough. My need to seek more success only led me into a state of anxiety that was utterly discouraging and exhausting. The more I achieved, the more peace I thought I would have. Boy was I wrong. All the glitz, Glamour, wealth and famous friends didn't have the power to change the inward war raging in my heart. I would find myself often in the acting role, carefully putting on my Hollywood mask, giving way to another cocktail drink until I felt the uncomfortable feelings in my heart fade away. I was escaping the reality of it all, I was becoming easily swept up in the Hollywood happenings. In the 1980s, cocaine was considered to be a glamorous drug, promising the movie industry that it would shed camera pounds and boost energy. My heart spiraled downward into the experimental claws of cocaine, believing it may help me, too. Shallow promises swarmed the sets and scenes of the Hollywood industry all buttoned up pretty on the outside, primped and ready for the best shot, yet dying and decaying on the inside. Everything was about outward appearances and Tinseltown and my identity was all wrapped up and what I did and what I had, if it were all taken away, I would have crumbled, glamour and glitz fashion wealth accolades, achievements, all were hidden in the masks we willingly wore to hide the prevailing laments internally. All those feelings of shame, guilt, fear and unworthiness that I buried deep inside were pushing through harder and faster than ever to the surface of my soul. The lens I was seeing through was marred by all the acting to muddle to see through any more, filtering the lies through the beauty of the world. My days were doomed to be derailed. Lies of constant approval and rejection flooded me continually igniting more and more downward spirals. In circling me the lies spoke over and over on the movie reel that I often listened to, you're only as good as your last show. You don't have the right look for the part. You're too heavy, too small, too short, too tall. You didn't get the audition, we need someone with more credits, and so on. I needed a new lens to focus through. One that wasn't distorted by the lies that caused me to have a constant need for approval from people. The Lord had a better plan for my life and he does for you too. God tells us in His Word, I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not harm you, plans to give you a hope, and a future. (Jeremiah 2911, NIV)   He was going to provide me with a new lens illuminated by truth and bring me out of confusion into clarity. Zooming into his heart, I had no knowledge that a few people were praying for me. I was raised Catholic and believed in God, but I never really had a true personal relationship with him. And honestly, didn't know that I could. There were intercessors crying out for my very life. I couldn't remember vividly when I was awakened to the fact that I was surrounded by Christians. Everywhere I turned God would place another one before me that one day I received a card from a distant aunt who mentioned that she saw me on TV and gave me a lovely compliment. She signed the card. God bless you. Aunt Frannie I've heard those words my whole life but this time, there was life in them. God bless you. It jumped right off the page and pierced into my heart. Those words ignited a spark of hope in me like never before. I was searching for something solid and I wanted answers. I dabbled in some new age and read Shirley MacLaine and the power of positive thinking books which always left me feeling just as empty and lost as I was before reading them. After all, if I'm a God with all this power in me, which is the basis of their teaching, then I'm really in trouble. The application of this teaching was draining self-centered and made no sense to me. Thankfully, it didn't bear witness to my spirit. I always knew that God was my Creator and He was so much more powerful and larger than I was. Depression was crushing me and I walked around with sadness wrapped inward. Grasping for newfound freedom. The tyranny of Tinseltown left me thinking I had everything that everyone else would want fame, fortune, acting and outward beauty. But none of it brought true joy. When my contract came to an end, I decided to head back home to my dad's to take a break and process some things. One night while I was wrestling to sleep, I turned on the TV. There was an actress talking on a show and sharing about her relationship with God and all that he had done in her life. There I was in the literal and spiritual dark, wrapped up in a throw blanket intently listening to every word hanging from this woman's testimony. I wanted what she had. When they put the number up on the screen to call for prayer. I started dialing, my fingers moved before I could even process what was happening. An hour passed, and I was about to hang up the phone when a gentleman answered. His trusting, soothing and compassionate voice led me into a prayer to accept Jesus into my heart as my Lord and Savior. I was now a born-again Christian, saved by grace and by making a phone call to the 700 Club hallelujah. What God did that night was a miracle. The next morning I woke up with an unexplained joy and renewed hope. I was on fire and hungry to learn about God, His teachings and all the things that the actress was talking about the night before. I was a new creature in Christ with a passionate desire to be deeply rooted in him. I knew I finally had the answer to what I so desperately was searching for. And I was ready for the journey. My dear sisters, God has a plan for each of us. He wants us to prosper, and he wants to give us an abundant life. We must come out of hiding behind our own masks that we cower under, we must come forward from our own acting and pretending to truly receive what He has for us, adjusting and repositioning our lenses to focus on Jesus, not ourselves. When we seek His plan for our lives and not ours, we will find real peace and true contentment. The Lord gives us the gifts and the talents we need to fulfill our purpose in him. We are called to serve and bring glory to Him. We learn in his word to delight ourselves in the Lord. And He will give us the desires of our hearts, Psalm 37:4 NIV. You see, through so much of my story, the Lord was pursuing me and leading me even when I wasn't following him. He allowed me to taste the riches of success. So I can see clearly the things of this world that will never satisfy my appetite When we wholeheartedly seek the Lord and His will for us. He cultivates our understanding and guides the way for us to see through a lens of truth that will provide us clarity and direction. Ultimately bringing us into a life of freedom, whom the sun sets free is free indeed. John 8:36, NIV My acting days are not over or wasted or lost. I now use all the preparatory gifts, talents and treasures for His glory. I get to act in love in purity, and in truth in the movies for him now. All is redeemed and his hope carries me forward into Victory. Join me in imitating Christ, the star of the show, the center stage of our lives.

Ajax Diner Book Club
Ajax Diner Book Club Episode 212

Ajax Diner Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 179:49


**This Playlist is Incomplete. The Computer was Playing Games During The Show**Mavis Staples "Action"boygenius "Souvenir"The Highwomen "Redesigning Women"Memphis Minnie "Me and My Chauffeur Blues"Soccer Mommy "Bones"Maggie Bell "Souvenirs"Valerie June "Use Me"Loretta Lynn "Hanky Panky Woman"Amanda Shires "Take It Like A Man"Gillian Welch "Revelator"Alberta Hunter "You Reap Just What You Sow"Sister Rosetta Tharpe "Strange Things Happening Every Day"Brenda Patterson "Dance With Me Henry"Nicole Atkins "Darkness Falls so Quiet"Yola "Stand For Myself"Connie Smith "You're Getting Heavy On My Mind"Margo Price "All American Made"Nikki Lane "Highway Queen"Jade Bird "Open up the Heavens"Lilly Hiatt "Trinity Lane"Bonnie Raitt "Bye Bye Baby (Remastered Version)"Lucy Dacus "I Don't Wanna Be Funny Anymore"Koko Taylor "Blow Top Blues"Sandy Kelly "Walking After Midnight"Georgia Sea Island Singers "Sheep, Sheep"Sugar Pie De Santo "Soulful Dress"The Marvelettes "Please Mr. Postman"PJ Harvey "You Said Something"Bobbie Gentry "Fancy"Aimee Mann "Freeway"Dolly Parton "Don't Let It Trouble Your Mind"Eilen Jewell "79 Cents (The Meow Song)"Nina Simone "Work Song"Fiona Apple "On The Bound"The Mynabirds "What We Gained In The Fire"Neko Case "Night Still Comes"Nancy Sinatra "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'"Lucinda Williams "Car Wheels On A Gravel Road"Tina Turner "Workin' Together"Wanda Jackson "Kansas City"The Detroit Cobras "Bye Bye Baby"

Why Will No One Date These Guys?
Episode 63: 500 Days of Summer Review and Discussion (feat. Rj Amzler)

Why Will No One Date These Guys?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 80:54


For all the ranting and raving about media they dislike, the Guy siblings have yet to provide some good examples of relationship media they feel is actually good. Joel finally remedied that by bringing in Rj  to discuss a shared favorite film, 500 Days of Summer, a romantic comedy/drama that has it all, strong characters, great music, subtle themes, and a well-written script full of positive takeaways for people at all stages in their relationships. Anyway, we get together to rant and rave about it for an hour. Check it out!All credit to Regina Spektor, The Pixies, and Nancy Sinatra for the use of their music. All credit to Fox Searchlight for the use of their poster, trailer, and scenes from the film.  We strongly urge our listeners to support the work of Planned Parenthood by donating here. For the indefinite future all Patreon donations will go to them, NARAL, or other orgs doing good work across the nation.Interested in starting your own podcast? Check out our Buzzsprout link to get a $20 giftcard for signing up to host through them. If you're interested but not sold on the merits of the platform, give us a holler and we'll talk about why we chose and continue to use it. Support the show