Podcasts about Ricky Nelson

Actor, musician, singer

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Ricky Nelson

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Best podcasts about Ricky Nelson

Latest podcast episodes about Ricky Nelson

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show

Way back in 1972, Ricky Nelson, a superstar of 50's and 60s music, played a gig at Madison Square Gardens in New York. A weird thing happened that night. Despite the attendance of other musical stars and celebrities, the crowd was... well... not impressed with the set list Ricky had prepared for the evening. The basically booed him off the stage. A few weeks later, Nelson released what is arguably his most famous song - Garden Party, which contains this line: It's all right now, I learned my lesson well, You see you can't please every one, so you gotta please yourself Now some in our nation are huffing and puffing about the GOPs Speaker "debacle," but reality is that you can't please every one. s what we are seeing a "debacle" or is it... you know... democracy? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/plausibly-live/message

It's Real with Jordan and Demi
Episode 141 - Stephen Sanchez

It's Real with Jordan and Demi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 33:31


Many younger artists are embracing the music of previous decades. 2022 was full of Y2K rock and '80s pop. Few go back as far as Stephen Sanchez. Inspired by his grandparents' record collection, the 20-year-old has embraced the sound of artists like Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, Ricky Nelson, and Elvis. His love for the 1950s and early '60s paid off. "Until I Found You" has racked up over a billion streams and views. Jordan Edwards and Demi Ramos talk to Sanchez about the massive success of "Until I Found You," receiving a phone call from Elton John, and his plans for music in 2023.

Who The Hell Are We?
Two Hosts in Tears

Who The Hell Are We?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 72:15


We're No Angels Rio Bravo (1959) directed and produced by Howard Hawks and starring John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, and Angie Dickinson. Mel and Ed make book recommendations with similar themes. Send podcast comments and suggestions to Melanded@whothehellarewe.com Don't forget to subscribe to the show!

Ray Collins' Podcast
Episode 103: RNI Time Trip - Ray Collins (December 1961)

Ray Collins' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 59:48


Music & Memories (Dec 61) music from: Ricky Nelson, Bobby Vee, Connie Francis, The Marvelettes, Pat Boone, Eddie Cochran, Shirley Bassey, Jim Reeves, Petula Clark, Russ Conway and more.............

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
"The Jordanaires: The Story of the World's Greatest Backup Vocal Group"/Michael Kosser & Alan Stoker [Episode 99]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 47:09


As told by the late great lead tenor Gordon Stoker, this is the story of the greatest backup group in the history of recorded music and that is undoubtedly the Jordanaires, a gospel group of mostly Tennessee boys, formed in the 1940s, that set the standard for studio vocal groups in the '50s, '60s, '70s, and beyond. In their sixty-five-year career, from 1948 through 2013, the recordings they sang on have sold an estimated eight billion copies. They sang on more than 200 of Elvis's recordings, including most of his biggest hits. They were in three of his best-known movies, appeared with him on most of his early nation-wide TV shows, and toured with him for many years. Throughout Elvis's early career, the Jordanaires were his most trusted friends and probably his most positive influence. While the Jordanaires' bread and butter may have been Nashville's burgeoning recording industry, it seemed that there was always a plane waiting to take them cross country to the pop sessions in L.A. They sang on most of Ricky Nelson's biggest hits and over the years backed up Andy Williams, Fats Domino, Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Dinah Shore, The Everly Brothers, Glen Campbell, Patti Page, Neil Young, Perry Como, Loretta Lynn, Ringo Starr, Tom Jones, Andy Griffith, Bobby Vinton, Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline, Billy Ray Cyrus, Clyde McPhatter, and about 2,100 other recording acts.Michael Kosser is a senior editor at American Songwriter magazine, where he has written a column on songwriting called "Street Smarts" for the past twenty years. Since 1979, Kosser's songs have been recorded by George Jones, Barbara Mandrell, Conway Twitty, Tammy Wynette, Charlie Rich, and others. Many of his songs have appeared on the national country music charts. Kosser offers an in-depth, insider's view of Nashville during its ascendancy in his book “How Nashville Became Music City, U.S.A.: Fifty Years of Music Row”.Alan Stoker is the son of Gordon Stoker, of the Jordanaires quartet. He's a Grammy-winning audio engineer, a musician, vocalist, and a music historian. As a musician/vocalist, he's backed up beach music legend Clifford Curry and Sam Moore of the Stax Records duo Sam and Dave. He's also recorded with prog-rock group McKendree Spring and E Street Band bassist Gary Tallent. He's opened shows for Ray Charles and his orchestra, Mary Wilson of the Supremes, Rick Nelson and the Stone Canyon band, the Tams, Crystal Gayle, and others.He's the long-time legendary archivist for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, TN. He's preserved some of the earliest recordings of the biggest names in music. Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash are just a few of the artists whose recordings Stoker has been involved with. His work is credited on close to one hundred commercially released products, including “Hank Williams Mother's Best Flour Show”, “The Patsy Cline Collection”, “The Bristol Sessions: Historic Recordings from Bristol, Tennessee”, and the Grammy award–winning “Night Train to Nashville: Music City Rhythm & Blues 1945–1970”.Stoker has appeared in numerous documentaries as a music historian. He's a twenty-year member of the National Recording Preservation Board at the Library of Congress.Purchase a copy of “The Jordanaires: The Story of the World's Greatest Backup Vocal Group” through Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Jordanaires-Story-Worlds-Greatest-Backup/dp/1493064576/Listen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5tOPsjatmHAt8bvMz5wjwh?si=061deba8ef9848a9Visit the Gordon Stoker Memorial Page: https://www.facebook.com/GordonStokerMemorialPageVisit the Jordanaires website: https://www.jordanaires.netThe Booked On Rock Website: https://www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcastSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (https://www.crowander.com)

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Bruce Belland - The Four Preps: "26 Miles", "Big Man". Talks About Ricky Nelson, Ozzie And Harriet, George Burns, Bob Hope, Nancy Sinatra, Sandra Dee And More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 34:10


Bruce Belland was a member of The Four Preps - America's first boy band. Their 1958 million selling hit “26 Miles Across The Sea” made them into international pop stars. The song influenced Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys and inspired Jimmy Buffett. The Preps were featured on the Ed Sullivan Show and had a recurring role in “Ozzie And Harriet”. They even co-starred in the movie “Gidget” with Sandra Dee. In total they had 8 Gold Singles and 3 Gold Albums. Bruce talks about his fascinating life in the entertainment business including his friend Ricky Nelson, his date with Nancy Sinatra , on tour with George Burns and Bob Hope, and much more!My featured song is “Around The Horn” from the Made In New York album by my band, Project Grand Slam. Spotify link here.“Dream With Robert Miller”. Click here.---------------------------------------------If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here.Bruce and I discuss the following:His Bio - maybe the longest in history!Hollywood High School with so many SuperstarsMeeting Ricky and David NelsonHis date with Nancy SinatraForming The Four PrepsThe Ed Sullivan ShowTouring with George Burns and Bob Hope In the Songfest portion we play and discuss:“26 Miles”“Big Man”“Lazy Summer Night”“Down By The Station” “Live At SteelStacks” is the new 5-song EP by Robert and his band, Project Grand Slam. The release captures the band at the top of their game and shows off the breadth, scope and sound of the band. The EP has been highly praised by musicians and reviewers alike. Elliott Randall, of Steely Dan fame, the guitarist who recorded the unforgettable solos in ‘Reelin' In The Years', calls Live At SteelStacks “Captivating!”. Tony Carey, the incredible multi-talented artist who has produced Joe Cocker, Eric Burden and John Mayall, says “PGS burns down the house!”. Alan Hewitt of the Moody Blues says “Full of life!” Melody Maker says simply “Virtuoso musicians!”, and Hollywood Digest says “Such a great band!”. “Live At SteelStacks” can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple and all the other streaming platforms, and can be downloaded at The PGS Store.“All Of The Time” is Robert's most recent single by his band Project Grand Slam. It's a playful, whimsical love song. It's light and airy and exudes the happiness and joy of being in love. The reviewers agree. Melody Maker gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Pure bliss…An intimate sound with abundant melodic riches!”. Pop Icon also gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Ecstasy…One of the best all-around bands working today!”. And Mob York City says simply “Excellence…A band in full command of their powers!” Watch the video here. You can stream “All Of The Time” on Spotify, Apple or any of the other streaming platforms. And you can download it here.“The Shakespeare Concert” is the latest album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam. It's been praised by famous musicians including Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March, Joey Dee of Peppermint Twist fame, legendary guitarist Elliott Randall, and celebrated British composer Sarah Class. The music reviewers have called it “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE. “The Fall Of Winter” is Robert's single in collaboration with legendary rocker Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March and formerly with Survivor. Also featuring renowned guitarist Elliott Randall (Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers) and keyboard ace Tony Carey (Joe Cocker/Eric Burden). “A triumph!” (The Indie Source). “Flexes Real Rock Muscle!” (Celebrity Zone). Stream it on Spotify or Apple. Watch the lyric video here. Download it here.Robert's “Follow Your Dream Handbook” is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.  Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with Bruce at:www.brucebelland.comLook for Bruce's book “ICONS” coming soon Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:WebsiteFacebookLinkedInEmail RobertYouTube Listen to the Follow Your Dream Podcast on these podcast platforms:CastBoxSpotifyApple Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:WebsiteInstagramPGS StoreYouTubeFacebookSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail

98.5 ONE FM Podcasts
Whatever Happened To? - Ricky Nelson

98.5 ONE FM Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 16:57


One FM presenter Josh Revens and Steve Dowers present 'Whatever Happened To?' This week's topic is singer Ricky Nelson. This program originally aired on Monday the 28th of November, 2022. Contact the station on admin@fm985.com.au or (+613) 58313131 The ONE FM 98.5 Community Radio podcast page operates under the license of Goulburn Valley Community Radio Inc. (ONE FM) Number 1385226/1. PRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association Limited and Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society) that covers Simulcasting and Online content including podcasts with musical content, that we pay every year. This licence number is 1385226/1.

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.11.25 with River Westin

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 128:48


As broadcast November 25, 2022 with like...all the feels.  Tonight we are joined by River Westin, a brilliant young artist out of New York whose latest album The Honeymoon Suite really captured our attention in the lead-up to release last Friday.  A scintillating yet slow motion collection of tunes inspired by lo-fi, classic jazz standards, and ballads, this album is the pop classics of the 50's & 60's (and even earlier) for a new generation of inclusive listener and a bit of a reclamation project for the LGBTQ community.  That is, the record aims to make the songs of Sinatra and the like about love again, but with no exclusion or bigotry but with a stated LGBTQ twist that includes love for all.#feelthegravityTracklist (st:rt)Part I (00:00)Cleo Sol – 23 Billie Eilish - Billie Bossa NovaRicky Rosen - HomeGalimatias - BlowbackBacao Rhythm & Steel Band - XxplosiveRiver Westin - Made in the ShadeRiver Westin - Cinema Part II (34:02)Nat King Cole - The Very Thought of YouBobby Vinton - Blue VelvetThe Flamingos - Mio AmoreRicky Nelson - AgainThe Drifters - Up on the RoofBen E. King - Spanish HarlemEtta James - Stormy WeatherFrank Sinatra - That's Life Part III (61:55)River Westin – Pink Velvet Julie London – I'm In The Mood For LovePaul Anka – Put Your Head On My ShoulderFrank Sinatra – Autumn In New YorkBen E. King – Moon RiverRitchie Valens – We Belong TogetherBobby Vinton – Mr. Lonely Part IV (94:33)River Westin – Flowers Joey Pecoraro – Your EyesArlo Parks – Green EyesLaufey – Like the MoviesLana Del Rey – How to disappearHarry Styles – Music for a Sushi RestaurantNovember Ultra – soft & tender 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago hollywood disney master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north record fame island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone vietnam matrix ocean tribute southern california catholic mothers beatles cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz elvis wizard finland rock and roll xmen pakistan bay area volunteers parks snacks villains garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern americana invention woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad elvis presley pink floyd belgians newsweek republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland rock and roll hall of fame miles davis peace corps spence lovin family tree triumphs carousel buchanan mixcloud tilt charlie chaplin san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt starship national endowment janis joplin headquarters ayn rand schmitt chaplin hippies monkees slick steely dan concierto triad bakersfield old west garfunkel rock music rca elektra runnin sketches buddy holly greenwich village milne white rabbit phil spector village voice get together haskell zappa byrds ravel levis spoonful jerry garcia heartbeats doris day stranger in a strange land jefferson airplane fillmore brian jones glen campbell steve ditko george bernard shaw bolero david crosby my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum harry nilsson superior court methuselah jacques brel judy collins sgt pepper heinlein ed sullivan show dryden tom wolfe buffalo springfield weavers bessie smith rca records great society objectivism robert heinlein altamont jefferson starship ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records grace slick san franciscan ditko bluesman carter family john sebastian tennessee georgia family dog colonel tom parker abbie hoffman mercury records bill thompson town criers roger mcguinn balin tommy oliver charles lloyd jorma fillmore east smothers brothers rickenbacker merry pranksters van dyke parks mystic arts gary davis one flew over the cuckoo hot tuna john wyndham milt jackson monterey pop festival jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon we built this city dave van ronk mothers of invention echoplex cass elliot monterey jazz festival yippies fillmore west mickey thomas moby grape roy buchanan slicks ian buchanan wellingtons jimmy brown jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin kantner casady all worlds jack casady blues project fred neil surrealistic pillow bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence john hammond jr billy roberts jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
All My Favorite Songs
All My Favorite Songs 042 by Stephen King - Favorite songs of all time

All My Favorite Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022


Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of horror, supernatural fiction, suspense, crime, science-fiction, and fantasy novels. Described as the 'King of Horror', a play on his surname and a reference to his high standing in pop culture, his books have sold more than 350 million copies, and many have been adapted into films, television series, miniseries, and comic books. In this episode a list gathered from the many bands and artists Stephen King has professed his love for over the years. Lineup: Spoon, Alejandro Escovedo, Slobberbone, James McMurtry, Alan Jackson, The Beach Boys, Chuck Prophet, Henry Mancini, The Inmates, The Raveonettes, Michael McDermott, Ollabelle, Diesel Doug & the Long Haul Truckers, Tim Easton, Billy Bragg, Wilco, Ryan Adams, The Gothic Archies, Rhett Miller, The Beatles, Judas Priest, Ramones, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Shooter Jennings, Flogging Molly, Ricky Nelson, Al Kooper, Jimmy Vivino, Thelma Houston, KC & The Sunshine Band, LCD Soundsystem, John Mellencamp, ACDC, Danny & The Juniors, Jan & Dean, The Rolling Stones, The Standells, The Kingsmen, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Johnny Rivers, The Searchers, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, The Knack, Iron Butterfly, John Cafferty & the Beaver Brown Band, Chuck Berry, Lyres, The Hollies, Metallica, Anthrax, Pantera, Sex Pistols, Little Richard, The Dominoes And Billie Wand, Elvis Presley, Mickey Hawks, Wanda Jackson, Gary U.S. Bonds, Bruce Springsteen, Eddie Cochran, Connie Francis, Elvis Costello, Rancid, Langhorne Slim, The Tractors, Shawn Mullins, The Rockin' Rebels, Janis Ian, Alvin 'Youngblood' Hart & Teenie Hodges, Sam Cooke, Jimmy Buffett, Phil Vassar, Fred Eaglesmith, Tom Rush, Richard Thompson, The Cramps, The Manhattan Transfer, Tift Merritt, Bright Eyes, Mavis Staples

The Danny Diess Show
Album Spotlight - Stranger Things 4 (Season Four Complete Soundtrack)

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 83:28


Get ready for an awesome ride with host Danny Diess as he presents Stranger Things and the season 4 soundtrack on double vinyl.. If your a fan of his Post Punk New Wave Show you will love this extra bonus episode. Featuring music by Falco, Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, Metallica, Starpoint, Musical Youth, Kate Bush, Talking Heads, The Beach Boys, Journey, Dead Or Alive, Ricky Nelson, Siouxsie & The Banshees, Rick Derringer, and more. Published on November 7th 2022.© Copyright Danny Diess

What's Your Legacy?
Gunnar Nelson: Legacy of a Musical Family

What's Your Legacy?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 26:09


Gunnar Nelson is a singer-songwriter and musician who, with his twin brother Matthew Nelson is a member of the multi-platinum-selling band Nelson. Gunnar shares his family musical legacy with Yvette. He talks about his father, Ricky Nelson, and his grandparents, Ozzie and Harriet Nelson. Nelson is famous for their incredible harmonies, musicianship and humor. They will be performing in Pennsylvania at the Sellersville Theatre on October 7, 2022. DATE: Friday, October 7, 2022 TIME: 8:00 PM TICKETS: $35 VENUE: Sellersville Theatre  24 West Temple Avenue  Sellersville, PA 18960  MORE INFO: https://www.st94.com/events/ricky-nelson-remembered-starring-matthew-gunnar-nelson

Media Path Podcast
A Storyteller, A Renaissance Man & A Show Biz Legacy featuring Bruce Belland and Susie Singer Carter

Media Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 70:28


ruce Belland pioneered boy band hysteria with The Four Preps. Hearts were won and minds were lost as The Preps created teen bedlam touring with Ricky Nelson. The Preps scored massive hits with 26 Miles, Down By The Station and Big Man before Bruce moved on to produce over 1000 hours of television including Wheel of Fortune, Name That Tune and Hollywood Squares. We are also welcoming filmmaker Susie Singer Carter whose award winning short, My Mom and The Girl takes an achingly beautiful look at Alzheimer's Disease while giving us Valerie Harper's final soul moving performance.Plus Fritz and Weezy are recommending Ken Burns' The U.S. and The Holocaust on PBS and Keep This Between Us on Hulu.Path Points of Interest:Bruce BellandThe Four Preps - WikipediaThe Four PrepsMy Mom and the Girl on PrimeSusie Singer Carter - Go Girl MediaSusie Singer Carter - WikipediaSusie Singer Carter - IMDBThe U.S. and The Holocaust - Ken BurnsKeep This Between Us - Hulu and Freeform

Singles Going Around
Singles Going Around- "Luscious Soul Deviation"

Singles Going Around

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 71:17


Singles Going Around- "Luscious Soul Deviation"Pink Floyd- "Astronomy Domine"Charlie Feathers- "I Can't Hardly Stand It"The Monkees "Circle Sky"The Beatles- "Im Only Sleeping"Pretty Things- " Scene One: The Good Mr Square; She Was Tall, She Was High"The Byrds- "Lover of the Bayou"The Beach Boys- " The Trader"Syd Barrett- "No Good Trying"Ricky Nelson- "Lonesome Town"Creedence Clearwater Revival- "Cross-Tie Walker"Public Nuisance- "Magical Music Box"Flying Burrito Brothers- "Sin City"Rolling Stones- "She's A Rainbow"Jimi Hendrix- "Red House"The Beatles- "Lovely Rita"International Submarine Band- "Truck Drivin Man"Captain Beefheart- "Pachuco Cadaver"Syd Barrett- "Octopus"Creedence Clearwater Revival- "It Came Out Of The Sky"The Rolling Stones- "Let It Bleed"*All selections taken from vinyl.

Why I Hate this Album
Prepisode #74 - Gary Puckett & The Union Gap - Young Girl

Why I Hate this Album

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 72:28


This week we're going back to a simpler time, when people could sing hit songs about how much of a pervert they aren't and no one thought that was the least bit suspicious. We're of course talking about the 1968 hit Young Girl by Gary Puckett & the Union Gap. Also in this prepisode music news of the weird, listener emails and we announce next week's album. In this episode we discuss oldies, bananas in books, Ricky Nelson, Van Helsing, tuberculosis, perverts, secret knowledge, blame, OJ Simpson, Corey Feldman, Moby and so much more!  Hatepod.com | TW: @AlbumHatePod | IG: @hatePod | hatePodMail@gmail.com Episode Outline: Quick update on the goings on at the world headquarters Discuss our history with the song/band Song discussion - lyrics and music Music Video How the song did worldwide Amazon reviews Listener email (just 2) Music news of the weird Announce next week's album

El sótano
El sótano - Aquellos maravillosos años (II) - 31/08/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 58:51


Volvemos a zambullirnos en aquellos maravillosos años del pop que fueron los que comprenden la primera mitad de la década de los 60. Años en donde en la música popular confluyen muy diversos estilos, dando forma a canciones breves y sencillas, en donde la melodía cobraba total importancia. Recolectamos otra selección de joyitas de aquellos mágicos años para el pop y el rocknroll. Playlist; (sintonía) THE VENTURES “Blue tango” THE EVERLY BROTHERS “Cathys clown” CARL WAYNE and THE VIKINGS “Your lovin’ ways” CONNIE FRANCIS “Valentino” EYDIE GORME “Blame it on bossa nova” ELVIS PRESLEY “Devil in disguise” NICKY JAMES “My colour is blue” AVONS “Cool and cosy” TOMMY BRUCE and THE BRUISERS “Ain’t misbehaving” BOBBY HENDRICKS “Psycho” DION “Drip drop” ERNIE MARESCA “Shout shout (knock yourself out)” MARTHA REEVES and THE VANDELLAS “Heat wave” ANN MARGRET “Oh lonesome me” RICKY NELSON “I’m all through with you” JOHNNY KIDD and THE PIRATES “Shakin’ all over” THE ROLLING STONES “Little red rooster” MANFRED MANN “Got my mojo workin’” THE SHIRELLES “Will you love me tomorrow” Escuchar audio

All My Favorite Songs
All My Favorite Songs 039 by Lou Reed - What I'm Listening To

All My Favorite Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022


Lewis Allan Reed (March 2, 1942 - October 27, 2013) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and poet. He was the guitarist, singer, and principal songwriter for the rock band the Velvet Underground and had a solo career that spanned five decades. Although not commercially successful during its existence, the Velvet Underground became regarded as one of the most influential bands in the history of underground and alternative rock music. Reed's distinctive deadpan voice, poetic and transgressive lyrics, and experimental guitar playing were trademarks throughout his long career. In this episode a compilation of Reed's final two playlists curated by himself (for a popular online music streaming platform that shall remain unnamed), before he passed in 2013, revealing what he was listening to in his final days. Lineup: Nicki Minaj, Albert Ayler, Roy Orbison, Prince, Fucked Up, The King Khan & BBQ Show, Waylon Jennings, Georgia Anne Muldrow, Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band, of Montreal, Ricky Nelson, Tom Waits, Miles Davis, Deerhoof, Antony and the Johnsons, Howlin' Wolf, Lonnie Johnson, Otis Redding, Emily Haines & The Soft Skeleton, Perfume Genius, Ty Segall, Leonard Cohen, Dr. Dog, Napalm Death, Eddy Current Suppression Ring, Daughter, Robyn

It's A Show About Stuff: The Stephen Davis Show
The Show About Stuff...Audio...Episode 32...Eddie Ray

It's A Show About Stuff: The Stephen Davis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 55:39 Transcription Available


Eddie Ray is a giant, a pioneer in the music industry. He started working at Decca Records in 1943, he worked with such diverse at from R & B giant Fats Domino to teen idol Ricky Nelson to Country Star Slim Whitman. He become Chairman of the US Copyright Royalty Tribunal, appointed by President Ronald Reagan. He was Vice Chairman/ Operation Director of the NC Music hall of Fame. A wonder Video. Mr Ray is join by Logan Westbrooks, Hiliary Johnson, Deborah McPhatter and Michael Frisby Produced, directed, written and hosted by Stephen E Davis.

Don Woods
Hello Mary Lou with Don Woods and James Burton

Don Woods

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022


The heatwave has struck again....so the hosepipe bans are back....not to mention the empty reservoirs....the news is having a field day scaring everyone. Then we have the rising cost of our energy bills with the news telling us we could not only starve because we wont be able to afford food....we will also freeze......how did we survive when we were young with no central heating etc? The main supermarkets are doing their bit....they have stopped selling those disposable barbecues.....which will prevent careless picnickers setting the country on fire.......I wonder which items on their shelves will quietly increase to cover their losses. In between the blanket athletic sport we have the return of the football.....withManchester noted bottom of the table with Everton close by.....I'd rather watch the young lady gymnasts showing the world what REAL talent is......Man U. should sign one of them up as a goalie. I watched a fascinating documentary on ABBA with an in depth chat with Agnetha.....the band produced a lot of masterpieces and for my money were top of the tree. The song this week is a classic which Ricky Nelson recorded back in the 50s.....it was known for it's great guitar solo by James Burton who played on all of Ricky's early hits prior to him joining Elvis in Vegas.....around 2008 James came over here to tour and I had the opportunity to join him in concert singing a selection of Ricky Nelson Hits......he then came over each year and I did 8 concerts with him over the years and we became good mates.....this is a live recording of one of the concerts as we launch into "Hello Mary Lou"

Variety x Armed Forces Radio
Sealtest Variety Hour: Waiting Room (Dorothy Lamour, Gregory Peck, Ozzie & Harriet), 1948

Variety x Armed Forces Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 31:18


Sealtest Variety Hour (aka The Dorothy Lamour Hour) with this episode titled Waiting Room. This episode aired September 9, 1948. Sponsored by: Sealtest. The premiere episode, Waiting Room. Gregory Peck and Dorothy appear in "Waiting Room" by Louis Vittes: Two people are in the waiting room of a heavenly railroad station. Featuring: Dorothy Lamour, Gregory Peck, Ozzie Nelson, Harriet Nelson, David Nelson, Ricky Nelson, Henry Russell and His Orchestra, Tommy Bernard, Henry Blair, Harriet Hilliard, Carlton KaDell My other podcast channels include: MYSTERY x SUSPENSE -- DRAMA X THEATER -- SCI FI x HORROR -- COMEDY x FUNNY HA HA -- THE COMPLETE ORSON WELLES. You can subscribe to my channels to receive new post notifications, it's 100% free to join. If inclined, please leave a positive rating or review on your podcast service. Instagram @duane.otr Thank you for your support. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podtrac - https://analytics.podtrac.com/privacy-policy-gdrp

Random Soundchecks
"Travelin' Man" 2022-07-25 Random Soundcheck

Random Soundchecks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 3:02


Ricky Nelson, Jerry Fuller, and James Burton.

All My Favorite Songs
All My Favorite Songs 038 by Lou Reed - 100 Favorite Songs Of All Time

All My Favorite Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


Lewis Allan Reed (March 2, 1942 - October 27, 2013) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and poet. He was the guitarist, singer, and principal songwriter for the rock band the Velvet Underground and had a solo career that spanned five decades. Although not commercially successful during its existence, the Velvet Underground became regarded as one of the most influential bands in the history of underground and alternative rock music. Reed's distinctive deadpan voice, poetic and transgressive lyrics, and experimental guitar playing were trademarks throughout his long career. In this episode 100 of the songs Reed considered the greatest of all time, as shared with the Helsinki Music Club in 2004. Lineup: Ornette Coleman, Eddie & Ernie, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Ray Charles, Little Richard, The Excellents, Lorraine Ellison, Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Chuck Berry, Billy Lee Riley, Wanda Jackson, Nolan Strong & The Diablos, Roy Orbison, Musical Creations Studio Musicians (Karaoke), Fats Domino, Dion & The Belmonts, Hank Williams, Bo Diddley, Chris Connor, Chet Baker, Jimmy Scott, The Mellows, Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix, Ike & Tina Turner, Sam Cooke, Jerry Lee Lewis, J.J. Cale, Ry Cooder, (question mark) & The Mysterians, Ameritz Top Tracks, Huey 'Piano' Smith, His Clowns, Bobby Charles, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Jimmy Reed, John Lee Hooker, Albert King, Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Wilson Pickett, Sam & Dave, The Youngbloods, The Left Banke, The Students, Jackie & The Starlites, The Easybeats, The Cadillacs, Hank Ballard & The Midnighters, B.B. King, Al Green, Ricky Nelson, James Brown & The Famous Flames, Laurie Anderson, Kate Bush, The Beach Boys, Link Wray, Ann Peebles, Skeeter Davis, Bob Dylan, Peter Gabriel, Carpenters, Charlie Dore, The Rolling Stones, Bobby 'Blue' Bland, Solomon Burke, Sly & The Family Stone, Etta James, Carla Thomas, Clarence Carter, Aretha Franklin, Ameritz Karaoke Entertainment, James & Bobby Purify, Aaron Neville, Lee Dorsey, Detroit, U2, John Lennon, Moe Tucker, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, The Chiffons

Drunk On Movies
The Boiler Maker - Rio Bravo

Drunk On Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 118:36


For our last show we're drinking Shiner Bock Beer with Elijah Craig Small Batch Bourbon and talking Rio Bravo, Howard Hawks 1959 western starring John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson and Angie Dickinson. Eben joins us again to see us off. Thanks for the ride friends!

Coffee Talk with Adika Live
Gunnar Nelson Talks Vinyl & The Legacy of Ricky Nelson

Coffee Talk with Adika Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 103:04


#rickynelson #vinylrecords #gunnarnelsonGuest: Gunnar NelsonGoing Live with Gunnar tonight!The Ricky Nelson Vinyl collection Gunnar Nelson is a American singer-songwriter and musician who, with his twin brother Matthew Nelson, is a member of the multi-platinum-selling band Nelson, which had a #1 hit in 1990 with the single "(Can't Live Without Your) Love and Affection".➜ http://www.matthewandgunnarnelson.com/➜ https://www.cameo.com/thegunnarnelsonMultiplatinum selling, #1 hitmaking 80's Rock Star, MTV VJ, Hair Band Teen Idol & influencer. Band: NELSON. Matthew Nelson's evil twin, Ricky Nelson's son, & Ozzie & Harriet Nelson's grandson! *********************************************************************** The New Website ➜ https://www.adikalive.com/Merch Store ➜ https://adikalive.bigcartel.com/The Ultimate VIP ALL ACCESS BACKSTAGE PASSFull episodes can be seen in Patreon! Get exclusive content and entry into the vinyl games on Patreon: ➜ https://www.patreon.com/The_adika_group?fan_landing=trueYour Donation Helps Support your Favorite Show & Channel ➜ https://www.paypal.me/stephenadika1AMAZON WISHLIST ➜ https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/30GQNR69L9048?ref_=wl_shareCLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ➜  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheAdikaGroup?sub_confirmation=1Artists on Record |  ADIKA Live The PodcastApple ➜ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-talk-with-adika-live/id1529816802?uo=4Spotify ➜ https://open.spotify.com/show/2lXgg3NVdnU3LmXgCrgHwk iHeartRadio ➜ https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-coffee-talk-with-adika-liv-71566693/*Follow ADIKA Live on Tik Tok: ➜https://vm.tiktok.com/TTPdMmEfFm/ADIKA Live on Twitter➜ https://twitter.com/TalkAdikaThank you for your support!_____________________________________________Artists On Record: ➜https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=868952540607953&ref=content_filterTheme Song - Mark SlaughterWebsite:  ➜ https://www.markslaughter.com/Support the show

Coffee Talk with Adika Live
Gunnar Nelson

Coffee Talk with Adika Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 110:44


#gunnarnelson #rickynelson #nelsonGunnar Nelson is a American singer-songwriter and musician who, with his twin brother Matthew Nelson, is a member of the multi-platinum-selling band Nelson, which had a #1 hit in 1990 with the single "(Can't Live Without Your) Love and Affection".➜ http://www.matthewandgunnarnelson.com/➜ https://www.cameo.com/thegunnarnelsonMultiplatinum selling, #1 hitmaking 80's Rock Star, MTV VJ, Hair Band Teen Idol & influencer. Band: NELSON. Matthew Nelson's evil twin, Ricky Nelson's son, & Ozzie & Harriet Nelson's grandson! ******************************************************** The New Website ➜ https://www.adikalive.com/Merch Store ➜ https://adikalive.bigcartel.com/The Ultimate VIP ALL ACCESS BACKSTAGE PASSFull episodes can be seen in Patreon! Get exclusive content and entry into the vinyl games on Patreon: ➜ https://www.patreon.com/The_adika_group?fan_landing=trueYour Donation Helps Support your Favorite Show & Channel ➜ https://www.paypal.me/stephenadika1AMAZON WISHLIST ➜ https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/30GQNR69L9048?ref_=wl_shareCLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ➜  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheAdikaGroup?sub_confirmation=1Artists on Record |  ADIKA Live The PodcastApple ➜ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-talk-with-adika-live/id1529816802?uo=4Spotify ➜ https://open.spotify.com/show/2lXgg3NVdnU3LmXgCrgHwk iHeartRadio ➜ https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-coffee-talk-with-adika-liv-71566693/*Follow ADIKA Live on Tik Tok: ➜https://vm.tiktok.com/TTPdMmEfFm/ADIKA Live on Twitter➜ https://twitter.com/TalkAdikaThank you for your support!_____________________________________________Artists On Record: ➜https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=868952540607953&ref=content_filterTheme Song - Mark SlaughterWebsite:  ➜ https://www.markslaughter.comSupport the show

Classic 45's Jukebox
Gypsy Woman by Ricky Nelson

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022


Label: Decca 31495Year: 1963Condition: M-Last Price: $35.00. Not currently available for sale.Both sides of this single charted, and actually the fine B side was the bigger hit. But the remarkable, Soulful "Gypsy Woman" (check out the mp3 "snippet" of it) charted first and was the intended A side. Well worth seeking out! By this way, the singer is credited here as 'Rick Nelson.' Note: The picture sleeve is a particularly beautiful example...Its only flaw is a single staple in one top corner. The 45 itself looks almost new (Labels, Vinyl) and has pristine Mint sound.

Radio Wilder
RadioWilderLiveDotCom #221 Shortest Day

Radio Wilder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 115:05


We highlighted the longest Day in last week's show, now the Shortest Day for this week's show. It is Wednesday, December 21st - for 2022. I imagine it means the same to the places with winter as the longest does to us. Shorten the days in Phoenix and lengthen in Chicago! We have a cool request this week from Rebecca D. from Mohave Storage. She requested 'The From Fram Sauce' by Louie Armstrong, and Ella Fitzgerald recorded in 1946! Happy to play it for you.  Great Deuces are Wilder goes out to Jeff Helgeson with Def Leppard covering David Essex's 'Rock On.''My buddy Ty Grimes weighs in on his time touring with Ricky Nelson in' Travelin' Man.' All kinds of other good music, New Dollyrots, some Willie Nile, and a brand new one from The Black Keys, 'Burn the Damn Thing Down.'. Shoutouts to Roam RV and Boat Storage, Spanish Springs Boat and RV Storage, and Ultimate Boat and RV Storage. 'Baby Ruth' promises an on-time arrival at 3:00 Eastern. So, get ready to rock! We are still bubbling over our 'Communicator Award of Distinction,' and thank you, fans, for help making it happen!

Your Weekly Dose
Your Weekly Dose Podcast Show 265 (I Love A Strawberry Parade)

Your Weekly Dose

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 97:57


We open show #265 with My Bucket Got a Hole In It by Ricky Nelson. Today's show is all about the Garden Grove Strawberry Festival so sit back and enjoy Link: Ricky Nelson Music  

STAGES with Peter Eyers
'Together Wherever We Go' - An Entertainment Dynasty; Warren and Pam Kermond

STAGES with Peter Eyers

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 89:44


Warren and Pam Kermond belong to a dynasty of performers who have made an indelible mark on the performing arts in Australia and abroad, in a range of theatrical styles - Vaudeville, Comedy, Acrobatics, Musical Theatre and Dance. Their stages have been vast and varied; from the touring tent shows of Sorlies to the majesty of the Tivoli and the global club circuit. “It's experience that counts” And they have it in spades!Pam is one of 11 children. An enthusiastic Aunt suggested that she should take dance lessons; and so began a career in show business. Initially this was in a variety show titled ‘Thanks For The Memories' and then as a magician's assistant to The Great Levante.Growing up as the third, of now five generations of a show business family, Warren gained experience at a very early age in theatre, pantomime, night clubs, television, cabaret and Musical theatre. He has been involved in every aspect of the Entertainment Industry over the past fifty years and it is difficult to express his knowledge, credibility and understanding of the Industry both in Australia and Internationally.Warren and Pam toured internationally with their celebrated double-act. Billed as an Acrobatic Song and Dance Act, they navigated tours and stages, enthralling and delighting audiences with a unique entertainment.As an actor Warren played the role of Custus in the GFO production of Crazy For You and the role of The Rabbi alongside Topol in Fiddler on the Roof for TML Enterprises. He has been seen in numerous television commercials.Pam developed a very successful dance school in which she trained several generations of performers over 41 years.Warren appeared regularly on In Melbourne Tonight and other national television shows. He had his own TV program in Adelaide and was also a regular headliner at Wrestpoint and other major Theatre and Cabaret Venues.Warren and Pam are a prominent fixture in our performing arts heritage. They are a link to an entertainment past that is now a memory - but one that we must acknowledge, investigate and celebrate. This is a conversation that is essential listening.The STAGES podcast is available to access and subscribe from Whooshkaa, Spotify and Apple podcasts. Or from wherever you access your favourite podcasts. A conversation with creatives about craft and career. Recipient of Best New Podcast at 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Follow socials on instagram (stagespodcast) and facebook (Stages).www.stagespodcast.com.au

Ace On The House
OTH: The Ballad of Ricky Nelson

Ace On The House

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 60:23


This week, Stromer has a new hairdo, very reminiscent of the late Ricky Nelson, then Adam shares some more atrocities from Yoko Ono. They also take calls and video questions on a rusting rod iron fence, masonry in winter, and a bathroom sink in need of repair. Thanks for supporting our sponsors: Geico.com JBWeld.com Indeed.com/Ace GoDRPower.com GetRoman.com/Ace MasterSpas.com, promo code: Ace BlindsGalore.com & let them know we sent you

Classic 45's Jukebox
It's Late by Ricky Nelson

Classic 45's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Label: Imperial 5565Year: 1958Condition: M-Price: $20.00Here's a beautiful copy of one of Nelson's very best double-sided hits. The very short (1:55!) B side ranks among his very best Rockabilly rockers, blessed as he was with an excellent backing band. Check out the mp3 "snippet" of it in our online "jukebox"! Collector Nerd Alert: The label says clock time is 1:47 for "It's Late," but my recording of it is 1:55, and that's about the same time listed on the accompanying LP. Note: This 45 record comes in a vintage Imperial Records factory sleeve. It looks almost new (Labels, Vinyl) and has Near Mint sound. The A side has a touch of wear, but the B side sounds almost pristine. (This scan is a representative image from our archives.)

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Yoko Ono vs Linda McCartney + Comedian Luenell (ACS May 12)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:11 Transcription Available


Adam talks about how Eric Stromer's new haircut makes him look like Ricky Nelson, and the gang reviews some terrible performances by Beatles' spouses. Mike August calls in to give his side of the missed Indianapolis flight story and Dawson talks about being in heaven on his cruise. The hysterical comedian, Luenell, comes in the studio to talk about touring with Katt Williams and how she ended up playing the infamous prostitute in ‘Borat'. THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: BlindsGalore.com HyundaiUSA.com BonnerPrivateWines.com/Adam

History & Factoids about today
May 8th-Mothers Day, Enrique Iglesias, Van Halen, Flounder, Ricky Nelson, Don Rickles, Coke Invented

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 14:07


mothers day, pop culture today 2020, coca-cola invented, pelee volcano invented, melissa gilbert, ricky nelson, don rickles, harry s truman, enrique iglesias, toni tonnille, philip bailey-earth,wind&fire, stephen furst, ales van halen

Got Time For a Quick Story?
...About Ricky Nelson

Got Time For a Quick Story?

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 35:51


An interview with Matthew Nelson about his father, Ricky Nelson, on the occasion of what would have been Ricky's 82nd birthday. They talk about how Ricky's career would have progressed to this day and his approach to studio albums and music projects, Ricky's birthday traditions, and even a Luther College connection. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 32 – Bob Brill, An Unstoppable Man Even In The Face Of Terror

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 59:30


Episode Summary Bob Brill has been in radio for over 50 years. Not only has he seen and covered it all live, but as you will hear he has been an unexpectant participant and victim. As a radio newscaster and anchor Bob is known for covering the news for networks and local stations. In 1992 he covered the famous, or infamous riots that took place after the acquittal of four policemen who were accused of beating a black man, Rodney King in Los Angeles. As you will hear in a live segment of Bob's coverage, he was attacked. Talk about unexpected. Bob is an author of a number of books. He tells us about them as he describes his life and treats us to many memories. Thanks for listening and I hope you will let me know your thoughts about our episode and the Unstoppable Mindset podcast by emailing me at michaelhi@accessibe.com.   About the Guest:  Bob Brill is an award winning journalist with a long history in radio as well as print. He is currently a news anchor and reporter at the all news radio station in Los Angeles, KNX News Radio. A former National Correspondent and L-A base bureau chief for the UPI Radio Network, Bob has covered everything from Hollywood to the western White House during the Reagan years, and traveled to 27 countries either for work or pleasure. He is currently applying for dual citizenship with Italy, as he continues to work on his families genealogy (another one of his passions). A sports enthusiast and a life long fan of his home town teams from Pittsburgh, Bob hosts two podcasts. He does a weekly NFL podcast with former NFL Quarterback Erik Kramer while the second is more varied. "Interesting People with Bob Brill" started as a way to introduce everyday people and their jobs to the world. Bob now uses it more for telling stories of his "life on the radio," including radio documentaries he has produced. An accomplished writer, Bob has authored 13 books, written 20 screenplays and pilots and writes a weekly baseball column about baseball in the 1960s. He has written six of the planned 10 books in his western novel series "Lancer; Hero of the West." His latest book, "The Tattoo Murder," is based in Ventura, CA, and is the story of a former Army Ranger who is now a cop in what is a racy detective novel. He has also produced four short films. Bob's claim to fame occurred when he was attacked while reporting from the scene of the 1992 Los Angeles riots at Florence & Normandy. While he has recovered from that beating he still suffers some physical effects of it today. The beating itself is considered an iconic piece of audio which has been heard around the world and continues to be heard on the Internet whenever stories appear about the Rodney King beating and the riots which followed. One of Bob's pleasures as well as a part of his business life is buying and selling baseball cards. He owned a card store at one point and still dabbles in the field, even occasionally brokering a collection. Bob currently lives in the Los Angeles area with his wife Paula. About the Host:  Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/  https://twitter.com/mhingson  https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson  https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links  https://accessibe.com/  https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe  https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening!  Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast  If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review  Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes UM Intro/Outro  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us. Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi, and welcome to unstoppable mindset wherever you may be. We're glad you're here with us. Thanks very much for joining. We have an interesting guest today. I say that all the time, don't I? But anyway, this person is someone I've heard for years on the radio, never had a chance to meet him. And yesterday when we chatted, I asked him why is your name so familiar? And he said, Well, do you listen to KNX and there we are and then just clicked. So Bob Brill, welcome to unstoppable mindset. Bob Brill  01:51 Thanks for Thank you. I appreciate being here. And I appreciate the fact you're also a listener. Michael Hingson  01:58 Well, we try right. And of course, Bob and I have interesting interests in common. We we do know the Twilight Zone and watch it when Bob Brill  02:11 we're zone heads. I guess. Michael Hingson  02:13 That's it. And as I said yesterday, I still remember the Saturday Night Live with Ricky Nelson. That was so much fun. Bob Brill  02:21 What else His funeral was one of the assignments I had it up i Radio Network, and it was a really touching funeral thing. You know, I love covering funerals. Hollywood, I really did. I was head of the obit files that up I radio. And I know we're getting ahead of ourselves here, but you brought it up. So I just mentioned it. And I remember the one thing his daughter Tracy, talking about him. And the one thing that stood out is the fact that she goes and he loved ice cream. And that hit me hard because I love ice cream is one of my favorite foods, you know, and but I remember that and, and the TED night funeral was so great, because we were everybody was waiting at least I was for someone to mention Chuckles The Clown and the chuckles So, and Gavin McLeod could be there. And Gavin sent a letter to be read at the funeral and it was read at the end. He said, Ted, you are a little song, a little dance a little seltzer down your pants, which was Chuckles The Clown famous line? Yeah, very well show. And I was waiting for that hope and I just blessed to be up with them. I'll say that you're laughing in this crowd outside of reporters. If you're looking at me, like no, you had to be there. You had to be there. Michael Hingson  03:35 I get it. Yeah. i Because I remember Chuckles The Clown from the late 1950s. Being a kid and watching. I think it was Channel Five in California. I know Bozo was on no chuckles was on 11 I think and Bozo was on five and BUZZA was on five. Larry Harmon Bob Brill  03:52 was Larry Harmon. The play Bozo. Was it? Michael Hingson  03:56 I think? I think it was. Yeah, I Bob Brill  03:59 interviewed him once. On one of the anniversaries of bozos of the cloud or something. And he gave me his famous laugh, you know, and on tape somewhere around here somewhere anyway. Anyway, of Michael Hingson  04:10 course, of course, the memorable one from the late 1950s. Well, and a lot of the 1950s in the 1960s is a Sheriff John. Bob Brill  04:19 Yes. Yes. And I used to watch Sheriff John as as did you and, and about a billion other kids, I think and he had his problems later on. And but he was he was certainly I think, I don't know if he call me hero to us kids, but I think he was someone we did. I mean, my heroes, Lone Ranger, but I mean, you know, so he wasn't to that level. But you know, it was like, Was he the one? I'm trying to think he had a train did he? Did he have a train and that was engineer bill. Engineer. Bill had the train. That's right. They'll still Yes, and the little train that could you know, but no, I mean, And there's all those guys in the 50s and 60s, who we used to watch every afternoon in Pittsburgh. When I was growing up really in Pittsburgh, there was a show like that. And there was the sidekick was named Ganesh. Okay, obviously a Jewish term, he returned, and conditio was a mop that and the strings from the mop where his hair and he had two eyes on there somewhere, I don't remember, it was the broom or mop payable. And that was Kadesh. And it was every afternoon Kadesh would introduce the cartoons, and it was Popeye, and I forget some of the others. But it was like every little every city had their own version, as well as you know, bozo, and some of the Michael Hingson  05:53 Chicago had Johnny Coons and, and, but Sheriff John had the breakfast brigade and the lunch brigade. So he was on twice and, and really owned for kids K T TV channel, 11. Bob Brill  06:07 And, you know, the other one that I became very good friends with was Tom hat. Tom, I was just gonna say, and Tom passed away a couple of years ago. Yeah. And I talked to his partner who was very, very gracious. And Tom and I worked together at Ken X. And brief story. As as a kid, I was living in Ventura when 1960 or 61. And Tom was making an appearance at a local toy store. And of course, Tom was for sale or used to draw, you know, Popeye and everything. And, yeah, and so I would, my mom and I had planned to go there. We went, and he didn't show canceled, and years later, and they gave me a three by five postcard thing of Tom hat, you know, as a giveaway and things like that as a remembrance, and I kept it all these years. So it kind of rolled up. It was a little bigger than three by five, I guess. And so years later, my son Bobby, was watching the Sunday morning deal that he did on I guess was Channel Five. And he was watching and he sent in his card to be a winner for two tickets, the Breeland they pulled his name. And they said, You know, Bobby Brill wins, you know, blah, blah, blah. And so they he also got one of those cards right? And as part of the deal, so I was working at filling in at KK annex FM, which was upstairs from the Columbia square of K and X. And I went down and I I knew Tom was working down there doing his entertainment reports in the morning. So I got both those cards, and I took him down. And Roger Goodell, who was the assistant news director, was standing five feet away from Tom, I saw Tom sitting there, and very loudly when Roger greevey says, Hey, Bob, how you doing? I said, Well, I came down for a special thing. And I directed my voice over toward Tom. And I said, because I really wanted to show something to Tom Hatton. And Tom looked up from his typewriter. And I said, Tom, how you doing? He goes, Oh, great, Bob, we started talking. And I showed the two pictures over he goes, Oh my gosh. He pointed out that was the only the one inventor was the only personal parents he ever missed. And he always felt really bad about it. That was the only one he ever missed. And I was I was like seven years old at the time. And Tom and I became great friends after that, and we talk and you know, and and they weren't, you know, later it came accident. He left Canada shortly after that and and passed away. He was very big in theater at Pasadena Playhouse and passed away a few years ago. So that was my I had to say that story because I know you'd love it. Michael Hingson  08:58 And for those in those who don't know, we're talking mostly about local personalities in various cities. Typically for most of us around Los Angeles. Engineer Bill was on channel nine Tom Hatton hosted Popeye every night and was very famous for doing squiggles. He could take a turn anything into a drawing. And he would do it right on the air, which was so much fun. And so we we have those and Sheriff John was another one that we mentioned. And there was another one on channel 13. And I cannot remember the person's name but all the kids shows they were they were fun. Bob Brill  09:40 And then of course there was Elvira mistress of the Diane there was that who you fell in love with when you were 13 After you got out of the kid shows? Michael Hingson  09:49 Yeah. Well, and then there was see more alert what Larry Vincent right. And Seymour came to do a a lecturer at UC Irvine when I was there, and he actually hosted five science fiction films. So you were there in the science lecture hall for hours. And he narrated them all. But the fourth one he did was the silent film version of Phantom of the Opera. Oh, and of course, being the guy with a morbid sense of humor that I am. The film started and see more yelled outs, everybody can see it. Okay. And of course, what did I have to do but say no. And somebody must have explained who I was. Because when he described it, and did a good job of describing it, I never did get to meet him, but he did describe it, which was a lot of fun. When actually I think he was before outlier, but Elvira mistress of the dark. Yes, absolutely. Was was all over. Well, how did you say you were a kid in Pittsburgh? And then you moved to California. When did you move to California? Bob Brill  10:58 We moved twice. We moved out in 59. I believe it was and we stayed here. My father was a home delivery milkman and for those who don't know what that is, it's a milkman who delivers the milk to your house every morning or every other morning and our nation are manifold. Yeah, I am actually band full. And then he went a actually in Pittsburgh, he I remember him with menzi dairy, but before that, he did. He did work carnation. And when he came out here, he worked for Arden dairy in Ventura, which went belly up and that's when we moved back to Pittsburgh. And then we came back out he went to work for man full and then a door farms after that. Because I think a door bought man full. But no. He went to a man full Jessup indoor farms because a lot of farms bought Jessup and Justin has purchased manful oil. So all the consolidation is that business started shrinking very badly. But anyway, so he lost his job, the dairy went belly up in Ventura. So we moved back to Pittsburgh, and he went back to work for menzi dairy, and then he couldn't take the winters, he had arthritis and bursitis. And, and just, you know, at that time, it was ice on a truck. And some of the trucks out here had refrigeration. So I didn't have to load up ice every morning, when I was getting when we were getting milk delivered, it was all ice. Yeah. And you know, you'd have to load up the truck in the morning, with all the glass and cartons were starting to come in. And then you would lay these bags of ice on top of it, you had to fill the bags of ice first and then get to lay them on top. And then you go on the route. And out through the day, you know, and then summertime, I'd go with him a couple of days a month. And it was always fun, because I would drink chocolate milk and I would all the kids would follow me and I'd have these chocolate milk samples. And we'd go through the neighborhood. And when my dad would stop the deliver all the kids would come to the back of the truck about him. I hand out samples of chocolate milk, or ice, which if it was really hot out, I give mice you know, and I became this, you know, local hero so to speak. But my first touch at that, but then probably my only touch of that. But so anyway, we moved back to California because my dad's health and and in 63 and here ever since I started my radio jobs where i i moved to Tulsa, El Paso. Weatherford, Oklahoma, Raton New Mexico, Prescott, Arizona, all my radio career, places I've gone to Michael Hingson  13:33 how did you get into radio, so you went to high school out here are willing to Bob Brill  13:37 do it. So my high school and the year before I graduated, I kind of wasn't sure what I wanted to do. I definitely want to play baseball. That was my goal. I wanted to play baseball and and in, I guess the sixth grade. This is done. My teacher asked me we had to write an essay what we wanted to be when we grew up, and I said I want to play baseball. She goes, What's your backup? And I said, I don't know what the what's a backup? And I don't play baseball and she doesn't release them in case it doesn't work. And I said, Oh, okay, well, sure, why not? I'll throw something out there. And I thought, You know what I want to do that would keep me close to baseball. That's all I really ever wanted to do. And so I thought play by play announcer right. So radio. So I put that down. And then my year before I graduated, I saw an ad for Career Academy school of broadcasting. And I said, What kind of probably gotta get serious about this thing. And so I said, I applied, they sent me a letter back saying they couldn't talk to me because I hadn't graduated yet. They can only talk to me if I'm a senior. So I said okay, um, so I set that aside. And then the next year before I graduated, I got a letter from them. And I said, Well, this is cool. You know, they they must really want me right, you know, remember? Yeah, they they remembered me and everything. So I ended up going there was a four month course. I remember I got it. It was $1,000 I got a student loan for the $1,000 and I paid it back $33 a month for three years. That's it At once I got a job. And I basically I got it. I had a Volkswagen van, my father purchased us. And I had $600. And I broadcast your book, and a boatload of tapes that I made in broadcasting School, which was four months long. And I set out and was going to hit every radio station, that my license would let me work outside of the LA market because I knew I would get a job there. And first off was banning California. I went on the air one night, two hours left, the next morning will actually left that night Neverland back there, never got paid. And within a week, I had a job at canto T and Prescott, Arizona, and I was there for four months before I got fired. For probably being me insubordinate, I think is probably the word that the assistant manager who actually was in charge of firing me, probably would have used stronger words than that. But I was, you know, I was a 18 year old kid on it at that point, all now it's almost like to 72 hours 84 piss and vinegar and you know, and I'm gonna set the world on fire and, you know, probably said a few things the System Manager she didn't like, and so I was gone. Get back to LA. Within a week, I had a job as a studio engineer at kV FM, and the panorama towers. And, and the thing was, they were paying me in Panama City. $1.60 an hour. A year earlier, I've been working at country cousins market, getting paid as a boxboard getting paid $1.65 an hour. So I was making less money. But hey, I was in LA radio, right? Michael Hingson  16:49 Start somewhere. Bob Brill  16:51 You got it. But I'll tell you my first words on the air at the K pass and banning, there's no record of it. I know it because there was no tape recorder or anything. But I want it was distract you. And I wanted to call myself by some wild name. You know, you know, all the big guys. Emperor Hudson and Eddie's royal names, right. So I figured what goes with Bob RELLIS. It was a baron, right? Var o n. So I opened the microphone and said, Good evening, the Baron Bobby Brill saying Good evening. First words ever on the air. So anyway, profound. Yes. Michael Hingson  17:31 Baron doesn't stick to this day. Bob Brill  17:34 No, no, I used it for about 10 days when I got the job in Prescott. And they said, drop it. Drop it. And I said, Okay. I also on the weekend, I was playing some some older hits. I play off these all these goodies albums, nowhere to play one of those two of those an hour, and I would introduce some solid gold. Well, Monday morning, I got my rear end handed to me on that one. You can say it's a solid gold record from 1965. But you can't say that ever, whatever word that is you're using? And I said we saw the gold? Yeah, you can't use that. Don't stop it. I don't wanna hear that. Okay. I started by path down the there was enough of those things that kind of got under my skin that was like, okay, yeah, that I let it go one day. So anyway, ancient history, but fun history. Michael Hingson  18:31 What do you do? Of course, then you've got people like George Carlin with wonderful wine. Oh, radio that always talked about solid gold. So Bob Brill  18:38 yes, yes. You know, and that was that was the term for for boss radio at the time, you know, rock and roll radio top 40 radio, which was actually top 30 radio, you know, and that was a term was being used, and I just decided to use it. That's what I knew. And, and the people the radio station in Prescott, Arizona didn't like it. And so I had to conform. And I did. And, you know, there were some things that happened. I think what? Well, that's for another time. It's too long a story. So well, we'll tell another time. Michael Hingson  19:16 Well, but you, you did adapt. And you know, one of the things that that I find when I'm talking to people who are talking about what they did and something didn't work we talked about it on unstoppable mindset. The the idea of the mindset is, though, that you adapt, and you you learn what works, and then you make it happen. And that's of course, what what we all need to do. So you you came back to California eventually. And where did you go from there? You eventually ended up at UPI. Bob Brill  19:51 Yeah, I kind of left la again. I knew I needed to get more CSD and I wasn't going to get a job. I'm in LA. So I ended up going. I worked in Palm Springs that KCM J there. And I was there for less than a year, before I got offered a job at kpsi Across town, which was much more listen to radio station and much more modern, a little bit more pay not a lot. And I was married at this time. And kid on the way, had first kid there. And from there, I moved on. I kind of really I fell in love with news. I was the associate news director and a kpsi as well as disc jockey and I was evening jock. And I'd fill under mornings and stuff, but I really started to fall in love with dudes. And that's when and I still wanted to do play by play. I got offered a job to go to El Paso to work at ke ELP there to be the afternoon or midday news guy. I was gonna do news at midday. And then I was gonna do play by play or do local high school football play by and look at Michael Hingson  21:07 what's happening here. Now, instead of just being the new kid on the block, you're actually being offered jobs. So there Yeah. Bob Brill  21:12 Anyway, so yeah, it was it was a nice feeling. And so I got there and shortly thereafter, the management of Gods get named with a company, it was a pretty big company, they own wo ai and a whole bunch of others. In Texas, it was a change, decided they didn't like the way their direction was going. So they fired everybody who had hired me. And I was kind of left blown in the wind to the the new people coming in who had their friends they wanted to bring in and I was in that sort of nonconformist situation again, and I ended up losing my job. They're going to radio stations across town where I get overnight dis jockeying just till I could find another job and went to toss that offered a job in Tulsa did co anchor morning news there. And from there, I went back to an afternoon anchor job in Bakersfield, moved back to California wanted to get back to California Family. By this time I had two kids. And the family really didn't like living in Tulsa and things were going great at the radio station. So but took the job in Bakersfield came eventually became news director remarked how left and to go to KCBS in San Francisco. Now he went to Fresno. And so I became news directors because and then moved up to Fresno at Coyote, which was the original boss rock station and became news director there and eventually took a job. At the LA Times, the LA Times was starting a new project. It was if you remember the 976 numbers, and they were starting sort of a little radio station using 976. And they had no clue what they were doing. They mismanaged the project terribly. They treated us okay, they kept us on the payroll for like six months after they folded the project. But they got me back to LA. I was doing some stuff part time at UPI, and eventually worked my way into a full time job there. Based on the fact that you may remember when James puberty, went nuts at the McDonald's in San Ysidro Diego and killed a bunch of people I did. They had me do work the phones, I was the only one in the area because everybody else had gone to the Democratic Convention in San Francisco. So it was me. I was staffing the bureau during that time as a part timer. And that probably one of the best jobs ever did. I put out enormous amount of material. And the next morning they call I said, Well, you got a job want to go to Washington or New York. And I said, Well, I don't really want to go to Washington or New York. I want to stay in LA. And they said, well, that's not going to happen, because we're not going to open up another position there. Because we have two people when I said I understand that. And about a year later, I guess they decided to move one of the two people in the LA Bureau to open up bureau in Miami because he was the space dude was Rob Davis. And Rob did all the space stuff. He works at NASA Now. And so to save money, they moved him there, which left an opening and they called me back and I said, Yeah, what do you want me to start? They said tomorrow, I said I'm there. And so I was at UPI with Bob Fosse. Bob eventually moved on. I became bureau chief. And, you know, I was there until like 95 And then I started my own publication and did some other things still did some radio and moved on. And then about 2009 I had opened a baseball card store in the meantime. So I was doing part time radio UPI, and other part time radio and running a baseball card store. And things started really, really getting pretty bad the industry. And so I made a phone call. They call me back. They needed a part time people KX I got they hired me and I've been there 17 years. Michael Hingson  25:30 Wow. So you never did other than the high school experience get to really do play by play I did Bob Brill  25:39 in Fresno. We did in Fresno. Yeah, I did that one season in Fresno. And I still have my tapes. And in fact, they're sitting next to me or I'm doing some audio dubbing, the current month and just doubling off some stuff. And I've had tapes here in front of me. I was actually pretty good to play by play, football play by play. I never got a chance to do why did get a chance to do some pseudo baseball. In my first job in Prescott. I sold a weekend package. I was doing sales as well. And Prescott, Arizona is one of the best places of the country. For men's Top competition, softball Fastpitch softball teams come from all over the country to play their tournaments and everything every weekend. And so I sold this package and I would do the play by play. I do two games one Saturday, one Friday, that one Saturday night. And so I got to do that. And so it's baseball playbook play. I did the football in Fresno. And that was pretty much what I got to do. And then as a correspondent I have to cover, you know, all the major events, World Series, Super Bowls, NFL championships, things like that. Michael Hingson  26:51 You didn't get to do baseball for the Dodgers. Sorry to hear that. But I would prefer the pirates. But that's well, yeah, but that's okay. Bob Brill  26:59 I did love this job when I was 13. There you are. I got it. I still have the letter I got back saying I'm being considered like everybody else. Michael Hingson  27:10 That's all right. When you know, back in the day, when 1968 came around, and I turned 18 We had the lottery for the draft. And the first thing I got was a letter from the government saying your classified one day and I was just waiting for the day they were going to draft the bank. And I was one a for about four months, which was the classification for being drafted. And then somebody caught up to it and they classified me for FiOS thought it was discriminatory. So you know, what do you do? Bob Brill  27:39 I remember what it was at Wired broadcasting school. As the numbers, the lottery numbers were coming up. And mine came up 345, which I was excited about because I didn't want to go with that. And the war was winding down. I mean, if I got drafted, I would obviously were gone. But, and one of our other guys, his number came up number five, and you could have picked him up off the floor after that, you know, and he never went. It was I think it was soul surviving son or something. But we met years later, he works at LAPD now. And we ran into each other just through, you know, doing stories and stuff. But it was like, that was one of those moments. You know, you just kind of your life could change in a heartbeat. But anyway, Michael Hingson  28:25 I did have a number for a while and I don't remember when it came up but I wasn't alone number anyway, even though by that time I was four F so I wasn't gonna go anyway. But, but it's still a fun memory. So you you have written books? Yes, yes, I've Bob Brill  28:42 written 13 I produce short I produce for short films. I've written Oh by 20 scripts I haven't sold any yet still working on that. We're doing a very wonderful podcast. We're working on it now. But latest book is well written six of six books of a 10 book series called Lancer hero the west so it's it's it's enjoy this because it's basically Lancer is to different adventure each time. Lancer is a compilation of 1950s and 60s, TV Western heroes. He's kind of two dimensional, but he's he's a good guy Gunslinger and sort of a combination of those guys. And then some things I threw myself with the latest and that there's going to be 10 of those. There's six out now. And I've got to get right the seventh one but kind of behind on my schedule. But the one that's out now is doing very well. It's called the tattoo murderer. And there are other books called the tattoo murderer but this one is the tattoo murder as well. It's a fictional, racy detective novel. It takes place in Ventura, California, where I spent many years of my life and it's basic Lay he's when it comes to the ladies, he's sort of like a local James Bond. Good looking, you know, that kind of guy has a lot of ladies. But he does things old school he's very reliable a serfs. That's one of his big things. And the tattoo murder is get to unique twist to it. One of the things we did, and people told me, they can't put it down. And I think this is one of the reasons is, when I wrote it, I didn't write it as chapters, although it has chapters now, the publisher put those in, but I wrote it with a timeframe. So every scene in the book, it's like a movie, and like a movie script, and that each scene starts with the time, the date, the day, and the time of day, and where so you know, you're at Ventura pier at 230, in the afternoon, on Monday, the 29th, or whatever. And each scene and low scenes may be two pages long. So I think what happens is people read that, and I think we all would we read, I'm getting tired, but how many pages to the end of the chapter. And so they can read to the end of the next scene, and know it, pick it up again, or things out. Next scene is only two pages long, it's only two pages long, or five pages or whatever. And then the other thing we did, is my wife does photography. And she and I went to Ventura and took pictures of places where the fictional accounts to place the actual places. And in the center of the book, there's 10 photos of actual places you can go to in Ventura, where these fictional crimes took place, and, and other other scenes in the book. And I based some of the characters on people I know, in Ventura. I can't say all of them, I can mention a couple, but it's about 335 pages, I think it's it really is, it's the best thing I've ever written. You can find it on Amazon, you can find it at my website, Bob brill, books.com, which is easy to remember. And, you know, it's, it's just one of those books that I've always dreamed of writing, I wrote it back in 2014. Let my daughter read it and sign it, okay, she can't, she couldn't read the SEC seats, because your dad read it wrote it. Bob Brill  32:27 If you gotta write that stuff, you gotta get show it to your daughter, or your wife, or anybody like that, or cousins or sisters, although I did, and therefore what I did was I toned it down, and I probably needed to tone it down, it's gonna get, and they're still, the sex scenes are still steamy. They're just not as graphic as I originally wrote them. And I get a lot of comments on them positive, no negatives at this point. And it's a, it's a good read. And it's one of those things that I, I feel, it's probably the only book I've ever written. And like I said, I've written 13 that has the possibility of making it to one of the best seller lists, you know, and it's, you know, it's hard in fiction, you know, to get there, and most of that stuff is true life stories, as you know. And, you know, and telltale books and things like that. So, you know, cuz fiction is one of those where you make stuff up, you know, and it's easier. I think it's easier to write fiction than the true stuff, although I've written both. And I think with fiction, your research is easier. With nonfiction. If you're telling somebody's life, you're really always behind the eight ball. Because unless it's your life, you're always am I going to make a mistake? Am I gonna offend somebody? Am I going to get sued? You know, that kind of stuff? Did I misinterpret what they say? Did I forget what they said? You know, so my baseball memoir book was like that. You know, I, it's my recollections. It's called. I'll tell so my baseball tales, my baseball life growing up as a child of the 60s, and it's about playing baseball, in the in the 60s, but it's about relationships, and fathers, brothers, friends, uncles, coaches, whatever, and everything is true in that everything's right down to the tee. Except I miss named one person. I, I meant to mention, the father who was my coach, and I used his son's name as the father's name. I just, I mixed it up. i i i n. You know, it was guiding the coach was Cliff Miller. The son was Glenn Miller, and I call the coach Glenn Miller. Probably somewhere in the back of my mind my my father's favorite band was Glenn Miller. It's bad. But I just I screwed up. And I didn't double check it to the point where I should have caught it. So old age sitting in early, but it's fun, but it really is. It's, I had to get that on down because for posterity for myself and my kids and my grandkids, I was, you know, want to leave them something. And we did a similar thing on my, my interesting people with Bob row podcast, where I talked about, you know, been in radio 50 years, and I wanted to do a month of stories about life on the radio. And so each day I did for the month of March, I did, I told a story about something some tragic, some good, some mostly funny, you know about things I did, or that happened in my radio career, and which isn't over yet. But I wanted to get something down for my grant, my grandkids are getting older. And I wanted to have that for posterity. Michael Hingson  35:54 Well, you know, we can't forget the fact that you do have a broadcast that at least to you, and I think to a lot of people is famous, something that happened to you. And of course, we have to mention that right? Bob Brill  36:09 Sure. No, I have no problem. It's the This year marks the 30th anniversary of the 1992 riots, the LA riots, stemming from the non conviction of the four police officers who attributed to the beating of Rodney King. And I My job was to cover the reaction to the Rodney King verdict, and to go to South Central South LA now. But at the time, it was so central light and long story short, I ended up at Florence and Normandie. I heard my friend Pete Habitrail, who was working for KfW be at the time, say if there's going to be a flashpoint. It's going to be a foreign to Normandy. Well, as a reporter covering that type of story. You hear the word Flashpoint. You know, that's where the story is. That's where you have my assignment was to go to the AME Church, because that's where chief gates and Mayor Bradley and members of the African American community, were going to be meeting and talking, calling for calm calling for peace ship Murray, who was a reverend do who was of that church at the time. And so I checked with the desk and I said, you know, I think I should go to Florence and Normandie. And they said, Do you feel safe? And I said, I was the first white guy at an all black baseball team down here. Of course, I feel safe. You know, little did I think, you know that. How stupid was that to put in into my head. But you know, so I was dressed. I probably look like a cop. I have a UPI blue baseball cap on. I was wearing a blue windbreaker for tennis shoes, jeans, you know. And so I went to Florence in Normandy, and I saw activity taking place in the middle of the intersection. I expected to see yellow tape. I really did. I didn't. By that time, what happened was the cops on the other side of the intersection and fled. They left they were called out, things got too hot. Instead of bringing in more cops and more police, more cars and that kind of stuff. Chief gates pulled everybody out. And so I didn't see yellow tape because there were no cops there. So I made a U turn in the intersection because I saw a payphone on the left hand side. So I parked but 1520 feet away from the payphone, went to the payphone, picked it up, call the desk, said start recording, I'm in the middle arrived, I won't say exactly what I was. I said because I use some different language when I call them. And so they started rolling tape. And I just started describing what I was saying. And it was pretty much anywhere between nine to 14 minutes, I think. I was just planning to get out. Reggie, Reginald Denny drove his truck at the intersection. And I'm probably 40 yards 50 yards away from him and describing that, and then the terrible BDD was taken. I mean, I still see visions of it. I you know, and of course, it's all over the internet. So but it's, it's it was just horrible, just horrible. And I was on the payphone. And it's one of those standard pay phones. It wasn't a Superman change of clothes type of those. You know, it was the one that stand ups and the kind of Superman in the first Superman movie, looked at and said, I can't change my clothes. Yeah. So Bob Brill  39:35 anyway, so I I'm describing it and I was very aware of my surroundings. I was very aware. And I had made my plan to exit how I was going to exit I was will be safe and everything else. Well, I got distracted. A guy dressed very nicely, came up, came toward me and said, What the hell are you doing here and I let my guard down. I stepped away from the phone booth. I said As you can hear on the audio, audio tape, a reporter of, you know, doing my job, whatever I said, and then he looked past me. And thank God, I wasn't 10 years younger, because it was 10 years younger, I would have been quicker. And I would have turned and look to see what he was looking at. But I didn't turn fast enough. And what happened was, there was a guy with a 64 ounce beer bottles in his hand, and he smashed it on my head. If I turned around to get it right in the middle of the face could have been blinded. That was I could have had class all over my face. Any any number of things would have happened. And as it was, I got on the side of my head, punctured eardrum cracked skull, I immediately went down. And then whoever it was started kicking and beating me, and you can hear that on the tape. I stopped, and I grabbed the phone. And I said, Did you get that? And they said, Yes. I said, Well, I just had the crap beat out of me. I'm gonna head to the hospital. I said, go, go, go. And so I I started to leave. My thumb was broken, smashed, difficult to get into my car, turning the key. And I knew as soon as I started the vehicle, there were people coming toward my car. And I knew that soon as I started, I would get a car to get him rocks and bottles and which is exactly what happened. And a guy and I don't know if it's a guy beat me up or what. But there was a guy, I caught a corner, my eye on the right hand side, winding up with a piece of rock junk rock concrete, and he was winding up like a pitcher wood, and was gonna throw it in my car. And immediately, my right rear window exploded, and the rock landed in the backseat. And just, you know, I took off. And I could luckily, I couldn't see anything because was beer and all kinds of stuff on my windshield. And I luckily, there was nobody in front of me when I left. Or if they weren't they they moved pretty quickly. Because I couldn't see I have my glasses were gone. My tape recorder was stolen. I was I couldn't see what was on the road in front of me until I got down the road, about a half mile, call the desk again, then went to the hospital. And but that audio tape, and I always said I still have a rock today, that audio tape is unheard, how many millions of times it's on pretty much almost every internet video of the riots that put people put up on YouTube, they'll play part of that I only copyright to it now than I did. And I even have it on my website. I mean, I don't have any probabilistic to it. It's not. It was my it happened to me, it was my moment. Physically, I've recovered, except I still have some negative effects. My I have caused some pain in my neck, you know, from the early arthritis that the beating brought on. And, and some of the other damage that you know, it's evidently negligible. But when you're dealing with your neck and your spine pain happens? Michael Hingson  43:19 Well, I hear what you're saying. And of course, it's the, in a sense, the same thing that that I experienced and deal with from the World Trade Center. And I can certainly listen to discussions about it. And for the last 20 years, plus, I have been traveling the world talking about it, I give speeches talking about the lessons we should learn and, and talking about my story and my experience. And I think talking about it helps as much as anything does. Bob Brill  43:47 I agree with you very, very much. You know, and like me, you don't mind talking about it. It comes up, you know what's going to come up? You've told the story 1000 times. And, you know, for us, you and me. I mean, that's a piece of history. You know, it's a piece of history that maybe 20 years from now or even today somebody Google's you know, and, you know, there's there's some comfort in that, I think in that, you know, you want your legacy to be something that you leave the world. It's never really up to us what the world chooses to remember us why? Or how to remember us. Hopefully we have some influence on it. But there are times when in our case, is it it wasn't up to us. It happened. Michael Hingson  44:36 If you don't mind. We'll we'll put a little piece of the broadcast in then.  Bob Brill  44:41 Sure.No, go ahead,  Audio Recording  44:42 man. In fact, now he's closer. torinese still bleeding all over the place trying to get back into his truck is getting back into his truck at the transit. Transit mixed truck. He's white he's trying to get to try to drive through this intersection. Now he has enough power to on his own. Just get out of the air. a news reporter on how she smoked something. Michael Hingson  45:17 Here's my question to you. How much do you think we've learned? It's been 30 years and so many things continue to happen. Are we learning anything from lessons like the whole Rodney King riots? Bob Brill  45:29 I think we have. I think a couple of things have happened. I think the black community has become empowered. And while at the same time, I think some things we haven't learned, we still have George Floyd, we still have Breanna Taylor, we still have, you know, constantly, you know, you know, you look back at the incident in LA, and there's blame to go around for everybody. Yeah, you know, we, I think we've learned how better to deal with it. I think Rodney King was the start of something because Rodney King, I think is a reference point. Yes. There were many, many instances before Rodney King, going back into the 17 1800s. I mean, you know, everything from Dred Scott to, you know, I can't think of the guys that Emmet. I can't think of his name off top my head. But many, many cases that nobody ever talks about, especially in the south, when you have the Klan and stuff. If we had had mass media, in the 1800s. Maybe we wouldn't be where we are today. You know, we'd be past it. But Rodney King was the reference point. It sort of everything after Rodney King. And like I said, you know, it still happens today. I mean, how many times during the year do we have to have these incidences that before we wake up? And you know, if you say it's bad apples? Yeah, it is bad apples is people making mistakes. And it's also people doing the wrong thing. Because they haven't learned. They think they're doing the right thing. They're not thinking before reacting, you know, a man runs away, you know, from a traffic stop. Number one, it shouldn't run away. Number two, the cops shouldn't chase them and shoot an unarmed man. Okay. Two wrongs don't make a right in any any case. You know, the guy who ran away looks at it and says, Well, I was afraid I'm a black man in a car being stopped by a cop in front of me we get shot. Okay, well, that's a real possibility, you know? And what is the cop think? So? I mean, these things, probably will never go away. Totally. But they should never be happening even as much as they're happening now. You know, so have we learned? Yeah, I think we've progressed, I don't think we've learned I think we've progressed. And I think empowerment from the victim side has become more powerful. And now there's this movement with our political system being so split, that there's a movement to put that down or change that or keep that from going further. You know, we're so radicalized that, and I don't want to get into politics, but we are so radicalized that, you know, this isn't going well. And I don't expect it to go get any better. You know, in my opinion, over the next five years, I'd be shocked if it got better. I, if it stayed the same, it might be progress, but it's gonna get worse. Michael Hingson  49:05 Yeah. And that's what's so unfortunate and so scary. We have gotten so polarized, and in some senses so radicalized that we're not dealing with this at all now, and it seems that to a large degree, we've lost a moral compass. And somehow we've got to move away from that. Bob Brill  49:24 We know politics is supposed to be all about compromise. It's not supposed to be winner take all. And because you have so many diverse groups, and today, as opposed to let's say when my grandparents came over in 1896 today, so we're, I think we're more diverse, but the other thing is, the diversity has more of a voice. In other words, in 1896, when my grandparents came over, they could vote for one thing. And they didn't have they were surviving. They didn't have they didn't really have a voice in what was being done in the country. If they did, it was put down immediately. Where today, whether you're Asian, Pacific Islander, Indian, black, Muslim, whatever you are, you've got a political voice. And you're organized groups that you're a part of. And all those political voices are so diverse, that it's almost like a parliament. You know, and maybe that's the answer is to go back to go to a parliamentary system, instead of a two party system. I mean, this unique experiment that we have here is just tremendous. And we've been lucky, you know, but and I'm not advocating parliamentary systems. But, you know, the rest of the world does it that way. We don't. And we've been strong for almost 300 years, 250 years, but, you know, it's like, okay, where's this going next? Can this political system survive? Michael Hingson  51:01 The problem is we're much more diverse, but we're not inclusive. And that's what we really need to change and see changed in some way. And until we truly become an inclusive society, we're going to have these problems. You know, Bob Brill  51:22 I had to describe me once that it was chip Marie, that that described it, we've gone from the melting pot to the salad bowl. Now it's the melting pot. We're all Americans, we all blend together. Now, we're the salad bowl, where we're all Americans, but some of us are raisins. Some of us are peanuts, some of us are in dive, some of us are dressing, some of us are carrots, some of us are celery, you know, we're all Americans. But we're individual. And, you know, whether we identify as Italian American, or as American, or we identified as Polish American, or American, you know, and I don't think there's anything wrong with identifying yourself with your heritage. Because, you know, I, I'm an amateur genealogist, I love doing Family Research, I'm thrilled that the 1950 census is now out, and I can look at it, you know, but, you know, at the same time, that does have a tendency to lead to more individualism, as opposed to, when we grew up, growing up in the 50s, and the 60s, we were this melting pot, and we were all, you know, and we have to look to a lot of what we were taught in history was a lie, you know, or fabricated, or stretched, you know, and you start looking at really, who did what and history and it's like, okay, we worship this guy. It's like, Ty Cobb, being in the Hall of Fame. You know, if Ty Cobb were alive today, you probably wouldn't be in the Hall of Fame, because nobody would vote for that blank, blank light, Michael Hingson  53:00 you know. Other side is we never, we're, we're so focused on one part of it that we forget the rest of the accomplishments, okay, people say Woodrow Wilson was a racist. But Woodrow Wilson, also was the President of the United States and did help to accomplish a number of good things. Yep. And, Bob Brill  53:22 and, you know, and that, that is a big part of, I think everything when people talk about this is they forget it real. They forget to realize we all make mistakes. Now, if we atone for those mistakes, or we're truly sorry, and not just publicity. Sorry, I think you can think everybody has to be forgiven for something. And, I mean, you know, we get into religion for that. But, you know, everybody makes mistakes. And if you are truly sorry for those mistakes, you truly correct them or whatever you need to do to make up for them and then start the new path. You know that. That's what I think a lot of people forget people hold grudges for. Ever. It seems like you know, you don't we Michael Hingson  54:12 don't start the new path. And we don't give people the opportunity to start the new path. Yeah, that's true. Exactly. And that's the problem. Well, this has been absolutely fun. It has been we've been trying to we got to do it some more. Bob Brill  54:25 I'm a fort. I definitely know this. This has been just a great time, Michael. I really enjoyed it. Michael Hingson  54:33 How well I do want to do it again. We will have to do it some more. Figure it out and make it happen. We could we could do a whole one on the Twilight Zone and yes, he had most of the twilight zone right. But But how do people learn more about you if they want to get in touch with you and so on and learn about your books and I know some of them are even audio which I'm going to go hunt down and find but how do people reach out to you Bob Brill  54:59 The easiest way is if you Google me, I usually come up if you Google Bob Brill, or Bob Brill reporter, the easiest way just Google Bob Brill. I'll come up. Usually 17 of the top 20 Bob Grill now I'm not Bob Brill, the drummer for Berlin. I'm not Bob Brill, the IP lawyer in Chicago. I'm not Bob Brill, the Tony winning set designer, and I'm definitely not Bob Brill, the bodybuilder. That guy is off the charts. Unbelievable. I wish I had some of his muscles. But anyway, but that's the easiest way or you can go to Bobbrill.com. And for the books, Amazon or you can go to my website, as I mentioned before as Bobbrillbooks.com. And all those things usually come up. Interesting people with Bob Brill comes up and my contact information is that all those places, you can email me and just reach out to me and and I'm on Facebook as well. Facebook, Twitter, and some other websites. But yeah, that's easiest way. I'm always open. So cool. Michael Hingson  56:19 Well, Bob Brill, the reporter thanks very much. You're welcome. Thanks very much for being here. This has been a lot of fun and I hope all of you have enjoyed this. Wherever you're listening, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate that bobble appreciate that too. And, and you can always reach out to me, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this podcast or what we're doing. You can email me at Michaelhi M I C H A E L H A I at accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. And for those who don't know, research accessibe.com It's a company that helps make websites accessible. And you can also go to our podcast page Michaelhingson.com/podcast M I C H A E L H I N G S O N.com/podcast. And check us out there and listen to more episodes, but you can find them wherever you find podcasts episodes. So again, thanks for listening. And Bob, we really appreciate you being here today. Bob Brill  57:20 Thank you. I had a great time, Michael anytime and I appreciate you having me on. Thank you. UM Intro/Outro  57:32 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. 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