Podcasts about Gao

Urban commune and town in Mali

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All of the Above Podcast
#98 - Truly Terrific Teaching Today with CA Teacher of the Year Jason Torres-Rangel!

All of the Above Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 73:40


Here at All of the Above we loooove teachers, especially super-dope ones. We're also, perhaps, a tad bit partial to California. That being the case, it should come as no surprise to our AOTA Family that we'd bring on yet another super-dope teacher from California–Jason Torres-Rangel!! Jason is a California State Teacher of the Year and a California nominee for the National Teacher of the Year competition, and he joins us to discuss the present and future of the teaching profession. But first, Jeff and Manuel take a look at recent headlines in education including a new study showing the benefits of small emergency grants for college students and a bit of shade being thrown at the Department of Education from the Government Accountability Office. → Get your Teach the Truth T-Shirt here! → View this episode on YouTube! AGENDA 0:00 - Welcome! 6:46 - Emergency grants boost college success 21:22 - GAO calls out Dept of Ed 35:55 - CA Teacher of the Year Jason Torres-Rangel 1:08:09 - Students walk out to protest CRT ban DO-NOW STORIES: Study shows small emergency grants can help college students stay in school Missing an opportunity: Ed Dept. criticized by GAO for teacher shortage strategy More about our guest: Los Angeles Unified AP English teacher is California nominee for national Teacher of the Year State Superintendent Tony Thurmond Announces 2023 California Teachers of the Year CLASS DISMISSED: Temecula students walk out to protest critical race theory ban Get MORE All of the Above: - Website - Podcast on multiple platforms via Anchor - Podcast via Apple Podcast - Podcast via Spotify - Twitter - Facebook Page Theme Music by its tajonthabeat --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/aota/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/aota/support

The UAV Digest
421 Cargo Drone

The UAV Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2023 35:42


An autonomous blended-wing cargo drone and a smaller electric cargo drone, Eaglet takes flight, taser drones at public schools, GAO recommendations for FAA strategy, the Dronut, two MQ-9 Reapers for a Dollar, BVLOS inspection solution.

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast
Lula, Russland und die Kampfjets

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 14:35


Der stellvertretende Pioneer-Chefredakteur Gordon Repinski hat den Kanzler auf seiner Reise nach Argentinien, Chile und Brasilien begleitet. Dort erfährt Scholz für seine Ukraine-Politik weniger Zuspruch als er womöglich gehofft hatte. Besonders Brasiliens Präsident Lula da Silva überrascht den Kanzler mit bemerkenswerten Aussagen zum russischen Angriff auf die Ukraine. Derweil hat den Kanzler nach der Panzer-Diskussion es nun mit einer Debatte über mögliche Lieferungen von Kampfflugzeugen zu tun. Eine Analyse dazu zusammen mit Pioneer-Investigativ-Reporter Christian Schweppe. Mit Pioneer-Editor Maximilian Stascheit geht es um die Probleme des deutschen Bildungssystems: Wie lässt sich der Lehrermangel am sinnvollsten bekämpfen und was muss sich ändern, damit unsere Schüler bei Bildungsstudien wieder besser abschneiden? Im Interview der Woche dazu: Bildungs- und Forschungsministerin Bettina Stark-Watzinger (FDP) über das Startchancen-Programm, mit dem sozial benachteiligte Schüler gefördert werden sollen, Zuständigkeiten in der Bildungspolitik zwischen Bund und Ländern und den im März anstehenden Bildungsgipfel. Die weiteren Themen: Zwischen Amt und Wahlkampf: Nancy Faeser und ihre Doppelrolle als Innenministerin und SPD-Spitzenkandidatin in Hessen. Reise nach Afrika: Finanzminister Christian Lindner im Interview bei Rasmus Buchsteiner im Bundeswehr-Camp in Gao, Mali. Wahlwiederholung in Berlin: Die letze Wahlkampf-Woche beginnt. Im kürzesten Interview der Berliner Republik: Nils Schmid, SPD-Bundestagsabgeordneter aus Baden-Württemberg.

The Bridge
From Colombia to ‘honorary citizen' of China's Dongguan city: 20 years in China as a media star

The Bridge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 54:13


From YouTube to Bilibili to CGTN and documentary making and more, today's guest literally rewrote the signs in Dongguan. Listen in as an English, Chinese, and Spanish influencer tells personal tales of travelling in a RV across China to produce an all-encompassing documentary. Mr. Gao also shares with us his sky-diving, scuba-diving, strongman-competition-finishing stories that are too good to miss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

UN News
Mali's power ‘vacuum' leaves civilians targeted by extremists, warns refugee agency

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 0:04


The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, has warned that every day in Mali, civilians are being attacked by extremists who are forcing them from their homes and in some cases following them to displacement camps, to target them once again.This is what has happened recently to more than 3,700 Burkinabé refugees and Malians who fled N'Tillit village for Gao, the nearest city, located 120 kilometres away. With more on this alarming situation, here's UNHCR Representative in Mali, Mohamed Touré, who's been speaking to UN News' Daniel Johnson.

Government Accountability Office (GAO) Podcast: Watchdog Report

Commercial and personal use of drones is expected to grow rapidly over the next several years. How is the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responding to this increase and making sure drones are being used safely? We'll find out from GAO…

FedHeads
Episode 235: The CDO Council

FedHeads

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 12:23


FedHeads, including returning cohost Loren DeJonge Schulman, heard about the work of the CDO Council from CDO Chair Ted Kaouk and Vice Chair Dan Morgan. And they both shared the secret to a pristine GAO report card!

Two Minutes in Trade
Two Minutes in Trade - GAO's and Public Interest Test

Two Minutes in Trade

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 3:36


AD/CVD investigations are abundant in the US. A new GAO study looked at the trade remedies but made no recommendations. Listen for more on today's Two Minutes In Trade.

The Business of Government Hour
Transforming the Way Government Procures Goods and Services: A Conversation with Sonny Hashmi

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 58:44


How is the GAO's Federal Acquisition Service (FAS) leveraging technology to transform how it operates? What is the Federal Marketplace Strategy? How does FAS play a role in managing the federal supply chain. Join host Michael Keegan as he explores this question and more with Sonny Hashmi, Commissioner, Federal Acquisition Service within the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA). 

Probable Causation
Episode 3: Analisa Packham on syringe exchange programs (REBROADCAST)

Probable Causation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 54:57


Analisa Packham talks about the effects of syringe exchange programs on HIV rates, opioid abuse, and crime. This episode was first posted in May 2019. "Are Syringe Exchange Programs Helpful or Harmful? New Evidence in the Wake of the Opioid Epidemic" by Analisa Packham. *** Probable Causation is part of Doleac Initiatives, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. If you enjoy the show, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution. Thank you for supporting our work! *** OTHER RESEARCH WE DISCUSS IN THIS EPISODE: “Effectiveness of sterile needle and syringe programming in reducing HIV/AIDS among injecting drug users” — World Health Organization report. “Needle exchange programs and drug injection behavior” by Jeff DeSimone. “Needle exchange programs: Research suggests promise as an AIDS prevention strategy” — GAO report. “Syringe exchange programs around the world: The global context” — GMHC report. “The Effects of Naloxone Access Laws on Opioid Abuse, Mortality, and Crime” by Jennifer L. Doleac and Anita Mukherjee

Be Crazy Well
Broken Promises ~ Retired Marine Corps Lt Col Ted Blickwedel

Be Crazy Well

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 53:28


Broken Promises ~ Compromised Mental Health Care, Counselor Burnout & Retaliation at VAOur Veterans are not numbers! Suzi is joined by Ted Blickwedel, Retired Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel, combat veteran and Licensed Clinical Social Worker, about compromised mental health care and counsel burnout in VA Vet Centers. Ted's journey from clinical social worker employed by the VA to today has been quite a road of discovery, hardship and disappointment in the VA system. Ted's expectation of quality care for his fellow men and women of service who need the support and mental health care from the VA was and is one top tier. Ted experienced first hand the lack of support as a clinician, lack of quality care for his patients and sadly the retaliation of speaking up about the injustice to both veterans needing help and those providing the help. Ted's BioRetired Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel and combat veteran who became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker after he retired from the military. He worked as a counselor at the VA VET Center in Warwick, RI from 2009 to 2018 where he provided mental health care for fellow veterans. In 2017, during his tenure at the VET Center, he began to ‘speak truth to power' in an effort to have VA VET Center Management revise their clinical productivity policies that were harmful to counselors and compromising quality care for veterans. His subsequent whistleblowing campaign came at great price, personally, professionally, financially and health wise. He is currently urging the United States Congress to pass legislation that has been introduced to the House and Senate Veterans Affairs Committees, as a result of a federal GAO investigation he helped instigate which substantiated his allegations.  This legislation will protect the quality of services to our veterans and their families, as well as safeguard the welfare of counselors who care for them at over 300 VET Centers nationwide. Blickwedel's crusade to rectify compromised mental health care and counselor well-being within the VA VET Center program has been featured on NBC and NPR, to include the Military Times, other publications and local news broadcasts.Energy Psychology (EP)Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology (ACEP)www.energypsych.orgveterans.energypsych.orghttps://www.vabreakingpromises.com/Senate: S. 1944 - Vet Center Improvement Act of 2021Music credit to Kalvin Love for the podcast's theme song “Bee Your Best Self”Contact Suzi at suzigma@gmail.com or (818) 470-2013 and share your story.vetsandplayers.orgwildhorserescue.org Visit our webpage at cominghomewell.comInterested in sponsoring our podcasts email us at cominghomewell@gmail.comFollow us on our socialsYouTube @cominghomewellbehindtheserviceInstagram @cominghomewell_btsFacebook at Coming Home WellLinkedIn at Coming Home WellTwitter @ComingHomeWellThank you for listening!

The Business of Government Hour
Overseeing Crosscutting Governance Issues: A Conversation with Michelle Sager, Managing Director, Strategic Issues Team, GAO

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023


What is the mission of the Government Accountability Office's (GAO) Strategic Issues team? What is the goal of GAO's High-Risk Series? What are the fiscal, management and performance challenges facing today's government executive? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Michelle Sager, Managing Director GAO’s Strategic Issues team. Listen to […]

The Business of Government Hour
Overseeing crosscutting governance issues: A conversation with Michelle Sager

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 58:44


What is the mission of the Government Accountability Office's (GAO) Strategic Issues team? What is the goal of GAO's High-Risk Series? What are the fiscal, management and performance challenges facing today's government executive? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Michelle Sager, Managing Director GAO's Strategic Issues team.

Feds At The Edge by FedInsider
S2 Ep2 How to Prioritize During a Continuing Resolution

Feds At The Edge by FedInsider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 60:25


In the commercial world companies estimate annual sales and make a budget. Hard to apply basic management 101 to the Continuous Resolution situation that many federal agencies have found themselves in the past few years. Today's interview brings together several experienced federal professionals who give guidance on the new world of budgeting. Issues brought up include critical timing concerns, technical definitions, and the impact of shortened periods to accomplish annual goals. Timing. An agency can set a budget, then not know when, or how much, they will get funded. Somehow, agencies manage to get by, but most of the lessons learned are part of institutional knowledge of each respective agency and are not shared. For example, what if an agency plans an expenditure, then only gets 75% of what was planned? If a chunk of a budget is eliminated, how does an administrator prioritize what projects to continue and which ones to cut? Definition. Under a CR, an agency cannot begin any projects. This leads to the legal parsing of the meaning of “new.” If a system replaces an existing system, is it new? When a system is maintained, is this a new project? If a vulnerability is found, can it be remedied with a new patch? Compressed year. How long will the CR last? 30, 60, 90 days? Does this mean that each agency must produce an administrative plan for each shortened year? The interview ends on a bright note. Elizabeth Field shows the GAO understands the challenges this presents. They have issued a report called Selected Agencies and Programs Used Strategies to Manage Constrains of Continuing Resolutions.  

Congressional Dish
CD266: Contriving January 6th

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 134:58 Very Popular


The January 6th Committee investigation is over and four criminal charges against former President Donald Trump have been referred to the Justice Department by the Committee. In this episode, hear a summary of 23 hours of testimony and evidence presented by the Committee which prove that former President Trump went to extraordinary and illegal lengths to remain President, despite losing the 2020 Election. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd266-contriving-january-6th Executive Producer Recommended Sources “PREPARED REMARKS: Sanders Files Amendment on Microchip Legislation to Restrict Blank Check Corporate Welfare.” Jul 19, 2022. U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders. Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD228: The Second Impeachment Trial of Donald Trump The Final Committee Report “Final Report of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the Capitol,” [House Report 117-663] 117th Congress Second Session. Dec 22, 2022. U.S. Government Publishing Office. The January 6th Committee “Inside the Jan. 6 Committee.” Robert Draper and Luke Broadwater. Dec 23, 2022. The New York Times Magazine. 2020 Election Litigation “Litigation in the 2020 Election.” Oct 27, 2022. The American Bar Association. “‘Trump Won Two-Thirds of Election Lawsuits Where Merits Considered.'” Daniel Funke. Feb 9, 2021. PolitiFact. January 6th Security Failures “Capitol Attack: The Capitol Police Need Clearer Emergency Procedures and a Comprehensive Security Risk Assessment Process,” [GAO-22-105001] February 2022. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Electors and Vote Certification Process “Who Are Electors And How Do They Get Picked?” Domenico Montanaro. Dec 14, 2020. NPR. “About the Electors.” May 11, 2021. U.S. National Archives. John Eastman “Who is John Eastman, the Trump lawyer at the center of the Jan. 6 investigation?” Deepa Shivaram. Jun 17, 2022. NPR. “About Us.” The Federalist Society. “The Eastman Memo.” Trump and Georgia “The Georgia criminal investigation into Trump and his allies, explained.” Matthew Brown. Nov 22, 2022. The Washington Post. “Here's the full transcript and audio of the call between Trump and Raffensperger.” Amy Gardner and Paulina Firozi. Jan 5, 2021. The Washington Post. AG Bill Barr Interview “In exclusive AP interview, AG Barr says no evidence of widespread election fraud, undermining Trump.” Mike Balsamo. Dec 11, 2020. “Barr tells AP that Justice Dept. hasn't uncovered widespread voting fraud that could have changed 2020 election outcome.” Dec 1, 2020. The Associated Press. Past Electoral Vote Challenges “Post Misleadingly Equates 2016 Democratic Effort to Trump's 2020 ‘Alternate Electors.'” Joseph A. Gambardello. Jun 29, 2022. FactCheck.org. “Democrats challenge Ohio electoral votes.” Ted Barrett. Jan 6, 2005. CNN. Fake Electors “What you need to know about the fake Trump electors.” Amy Sherman. Jan 28, 2022. PolitiFact. “Exclusive: Federal prosecutors looking at 2020 fake elector certifications, deputy attorney general tells CNN.” Evan Perez and Tierney Sneed. Jan 26, 2022. CNN. “American Oversight Obtains Seven Phony Certificates of Pro-Trump Electors.” Mar 2, 2021. American Oversight. Censure of Cheney & Kinzinger “Read the Republican Censure of Cheney and Kinzinger.” Feb 4 2022. The New York Times. Audio Sources 12/19/22 Business Meeting December 19, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol 10/13/22 Business Meeting October 13, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Featured speakers: Kayleigh McEnany, Former White House Press Secretary Molly Michael, Former Executive Assistant to the President Pat Cipollone, Former White House Counsel Clips Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Why would Americans assume that our Constitution, and our institutions, and our Republic are invulnerable to another attack? Why would we assume that those institutions will not falter next time? A key lesson of this investigation is this: Our institutions only hold when men and women of good faith make them hold, regardless of the political cost. We have no guarantee that these men and women will be in place next time. Any future president inclined to attempt what Donald Trump did in 2020 has now learned not to install people who could stand in the way. And also please consider this: The rulings of our courts are respected and obeyed, because we as citizens pledged to accept and honor them. Most importantly, our President, who has a constitutional obligation to faithfully execute the laws, swears to accept them. What happens when the President disregards the court's rulings is illegitimate. When he disregards the rule of law, that my fellow citizens, breaks our Republic. January 6 Committee Lawyer: To your knowledge, was the president in that private dining room the whole time that the attack on the Capitol was going on? Or did he ever go to, again only to your knowledge, to the Oval Office, to the White House Situation Room, anywhere else? Kayleigh McEnany: The the best of my recollection, he was always in the dining room. January 6 Committee Lawyer: What did they say, Mr. Meadows or the President, at all during that brief encounter that you were in the dining room? What do you recall? Gen. Keith Kellogg: I think they were really watching the TV. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Do you know whether he was watching TV in the dining room when you talked to him on January sixth? Molly Michael: It's my understanding he was watching television. January 6 Committee Lawyer: When you were in the dining room in these discussions, was the violence of capital visible on the screen on the television? Pat Cipollone: Yes. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): A federal appeals court in Pennsylvania wrote, quote, "charges require specific allegations and proof. We have neither here." A federal judge in Wisconsin wrote, quote, "the court has allowed the former President the chance to make his case and he has lost on the merits." Another judge in Michigan, called the claims quote, "nothing but speculation and conjecture that votes for President Trump were either destroyed, discarded or switched to votes for Vice President Biden." A federal judge in Michigan sanctioned nine attorneys, including Sidney Powell, for making frivolous allegations in an election fraud case, describing the case as a historic and profound abuse of the judicial process. Recently, a group of distinguished Republican election lawyers, former judges and elected officials issued a report confirming the findings of the courts. In their report entitled "Lost, Not Stolen," these prominent Republicans analyzed each election challenge and concluded this: Donald Trump and his supporters failed to present evidence of fraud or inaccurate results significant enough to invalidate the results of the 2020 Presidential Election. On December 11, Trump's allies lost a lawsuit in the US Supreme Court that he regarded as his last chance of success in the courts. Alyssa Farah: I remember maybe a week after the election was called, I popped into the Oval just to like, give the President the headlines and see how he was doing and he was looking at the TV and he said, "Can you believe I lost to this effing guy?" Cassidy Hutchinson: Mark raised it with me on the 18th and so following that conversation we were in the motorcade ride driving back to the White House, and I said, like, "Does the President really think that he lost?" And he said, "A lot of times he'll tell me that he lost, but he wants to keep fighting it and he thinks that there might be enough to overturn the election, but, you know, he pretty much has acknowledged that he, that he's lost. 07/12/22 Select Committee Hearing July 12, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Jason Van Tatenhove, Former Oath Keepers Spokesperson Stephen Ayres, January 6th Defendant Clips Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-FL): According to White House visitor logs obtained by the Committee, members of Congress present at the White House on December 21 included Congressmen Brian Babin (TX), Andy Biggs (AZ), Matt Gaetz (FL), Louie Gohmert (TX), Paul Gosar (AZ), Andy Harris (MD), Jody Hice (R-GA), Jim Jordan (OD), and Scott Perry (PA). Then Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene (GA) was also there. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-FL): We've asked witnesses what happened during the December 21 meeting and we've learned that part of the discussion centered on the role of the Vice President during the counting of the electoral votes. These members of Congress were discussing what would later be known as the "Eastman Theory," which was being pushed by Attorney John Eastman. 06/28/2022 Select Committee Hearing June 28, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Cassidy Hutchinson, Former Special Assistant to the President and Aide to the Chief of Staff Clips 9:10 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Today's witness, Ms. Cassidy Hutchinson, is another Republican and another former member of President Trump's White House staff. Certain of us in the House of Representatives recall that Ms. Hutchinson once worked for House Republican whip Steve Scalise, but she is also a familiar face on Capitol Hill because she held a prominent role in the White House Legislative Affairs Office, and later was the principal aide to President Trump's Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows. 10:10 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): In her role working for the White House Chief of Staff, Miss Hutchinson handled a vast number of sensitive issues. She worked in the West Wing, several steps down the hall from the Oval Office. Miss Hutchinson spoke daily with members of Congress, with high ranking officials in the administration, with senior White House staff, including Mr. Meadows, with White House Counsel lawyers, and with Mr. Tony Ornato, who served as the White House Deputy Chief of Staff. She also worked on a daily basis with members of the Secret Service who were posted in the White House. In short, Miss Hutchinson was in a position to know a great deal about the happenings in the Trump White House. 24:20 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): On January 3, the Capitol Police issued a special event assessment. In that document, the Capitol Police noted that the Proud Boys and other groups planned to be in Washington DC on January 6, and indicated that quote, "unlike previous post election protests, the targets of the pro-Trump supporters are not necessarily the counter protesters, as they were previously, but rather, Congress itself is the target on the Sixth. 27:45 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Of course the world now knows that the people who attacked the Capitol on January 6 had many different types of weapons. When a President speaks, the Secret Service typically requires those attending to pass through metal detectors known as magnetometers, or mags for short. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): The Select Committee has learned about reports from outside the magnetometers and has obtained police radio transmissions identifying individuals with firearms, including AR-15s near the Ellipse on the morning of January 6. Let's listen. Police Officer #1: Blue jeans and a blue jean jacket and underneath the blue jacket complaintants both saw the top of an AR 15. Police Officer #2: Any white males brown cowboy boots, they had Glock-style pistols in their waistbands. Police Officer #3: 8736 with the message that subject weapon on his right hip. Police Officer #4: Motor one, make sure PPD knows they have an elevated threat in the tree South side of Constitution Avenue. Look for the "Don't tread on me" flag, American flag facemask cowboy boots, weapon on the right side hip. Police Officer #5: I got three men walking down the street in fatigues and carrying AR-15s. Copy at Fourteenth and Independence. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): We're going to show now an exchange of texts between you and Deputy Chief of Staff Ornato, and these text messages were exchanged while you were at the Ellipse. In one text, you write, "but the crowd looks good from this vantage point, as long as we get the shot. He was f---ing furious." But could you tell us, first of all, who it is in the text who was furious? Cassidy Hutchinson: The he in that text that I was referring to was the President. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): And why was he furious, Miss Hutchinson? Cassidy Hutchinson: He was furious because he wanted the arena that we had on the Ellipse to be maxed out at capacity for all attendees. The advanced team had relayed to him that the mags were free flowing. Everybody who wanted to come in had already come in, but he still was angry about the extra space and wanted more people to come in. Cassidy Hutchinson: And that's what Tony [Ornato] had been trying to relate to him [President Trump] that morning. You know, it's not the issue that we encountered on the campaign. We have enough space. They don't want to come in right now, they have weapons they don't want confiscated by the Secret Service. They're fine on the Mall, they can see you on the Mall and they want to march straight to the Capitol from the Mall. But when we were in the off stage announced tent, I was part of a conversation -- I was in the, I was in the vicinity of a conversation -- where I overheard the President say something to the effect of you know, "I don't think that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me take the effing mags away. Let my people in, they can march to the Capitol from here. Let the people in, take the effing mags away." Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): On December 1, 2020, Attorney General Barr said in an interview that the Department of Justice had now not found evidence of widespread election fraud, sufficient to change the outcome of the election. Ms. Hutchinson, how did the President react to hearing that news? Cassidy Hutchinson: I left the office and went down to the dining room, and I noticed that the door was propped open in the valet was inside the dining room changing the tablecloth off of the dining room table. The valet had articulated that the President was extremely angry at the Attorney General's AP interview and had thrown his lunch against the wall. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Miss Hutchinson, Attorney General Barr described to the Committee the President's angry reaction when he finally met with President Trump. Let's listen. Former Attorney General Bill Barr: And I said, "Look, I I know that you're dissatisfied with me and I'm glad to offer my resignation" and then he pounded the table very hard. Everyone sort of jumped and he said "Accepted." Reporter: Leader McCarthy, Do you condemn this violence? Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA): I completely condemn the violence in the Capitol. What we're currently watching unfold is un-American. I'm disappointed, I'm sad. This is not what our country should look like. This is not who we are. This is not the First Amendment. This has to stop and this has to stop now. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Did White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ever indicate that he was interested in receiving a Presidential Pardon related to January 6? Cassidy Hutchinson: Mr. Meadows did seek that pardon. Yes, ma'am. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): While our committee has seen many witnesses, including many Republicans, testify fully and forthrightly, this has not been true of every witness. And we have received evidence of one particular practice that raises significant concern. Our committee commonly asks witnesses connected to Mr. Trump's administration or campaign whether they'd been contacted by any of their former colleagues, or anyone else who attempted to influence or impact their testimony, without identifying any of the individuals involved. Let me show you a couple of samples of answers we received to this question. First, here's how one witness described phone calls from people interested in that witness's testimony. "What they said to me is, as long as I continue to be a team player, they know I'm on the right team, I'm doing the right thing, I'm protecting who I need to protect, you know, I'll continue to stay in good graces in Trump World. And they have reminded me a couple of times that Trump does read transcripts and just keep that in mind as I proceed through my interviews with the committee." Here's another sample in a different context. This is a call received by one of our witnesses. "A person let me know you have your deposition tomorrow. He wants me to let you know that he's thinking about you. He knows you're loyal, and you're going to do the right thing when you go in for your deposition." I think most Americans know that attempting to influence witnesses to testify untruthfully presents very serious concerns. 06/23/22 Select Committee Hearing June 23, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Jeffrey A. Rosen, Former Acting Attorney General Richard Donoghue, Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Steven Engel, Former Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel Eric Herschmann, Former White House Senior Advisor Clips Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): From the time you took over from Attorney General Barr until January 3, how often did President Trump contact you or the Department to push allegations of election fraud? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: So between December 23 and January 3, the president either called me or met with me virtually every day, with one or two exceptions like Christmas Day Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ): Again, I join my colleagues in calling on Attorney General Barr to immediately let us know what he's doing. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): We're already working on challenging the certified electors. And what about the court? How pathetic are the courts? Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL): January 6, I'm joining with the fighters in the Congress, and we are going to object to electors from states that didn't run clean elections. Democracy is left undefended if we accept the result of a stolen election without fighting with every bit of vigor we can muster. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH): The ultimate date of significance is January 6. This is how the process works. The ultimate arbiter here, the ultimate check and balance, is the United States Congress. And when something is done in an unconstitutional fashion, which happened in several of these states, we have a duty to step forward and have this debate and have this vote on the 6th of January. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: So both the Acting Attorney General [Rosen] and I tried to explain to the President on this occasion, and on several other occasions that the Justice Department has a very important, very specific, but very limited role in these elections. States run their elections. We are not quality control for the states. We are obviously interested in and have a mission that relates to criminal conduct in relation to federal elections. We also have related civil rights responsibilities. So we do have an important role, but the bottom line was if a state ran their election in such a way that it was defective, that is to the state or Congress to correct. It is not for the Justice Department to step in. And I certainly understood the President, as a layman, not understanding why the Justice Department didn't have at least a civil role to step in and bring suit on behalf of the American people. We tried to explain that to him. The American people do not constitute the client for the United States Justice Department. The one and only client of the United States Justice Department is the United States government. And the United States government does not have standing, as we were repeatedly told by our internal teams. Office of Legal Counsel, led by Steve Engel, as well as the Office of the Solicitor General researched it and gave us thorough clear opinions that we simply did not have standing and we tried to explain that to the President on numerous occasions. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Let's take a look at another one of your notes. You also noted that Mr. Rosen said to Mr. Trump, quote, "DOJ can't and won't snap its fingers and change the outcome of the election." How did the President respond to that, sir? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: He responded very quickly and said, essentially, that's not what I'm asking you to do. What I'm just asking you to do is just say it was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican Congressmen. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: There were isolated instances of fraud. None of them came close to calling into question the outcome of the election in any individual State. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And was representative Gaetz requesting a pardon? Eric Herschmann: Believe so. The general tone was, we may get prosecuted because we were defensive of, you know, the President's positions on these things. A pardon that he was discussing, requesting, was as broad as you could describe, from the beginning of time up until today, for any and all things. He had mentioned Nixon and I said Nixon's pardon was never nearly that broad. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And are you aware of any members of Congress seeking pardons? Cassidy Hutchinson: I guess Mr. Gaetz and Mr. Brooks, I know, both advocated for, there to be a blanket pardon for members involved in that meeting and a handful of other members that weren't at the December 21 meeting as the preemptive pardons. Mr. Gaetz was personally pushing for a pardon and he was doing so since early December. I'm not sure why. Mr. Gaetz had reached out to me to ask if he could have a meeting with Mr. Meadows about receiving a Presidential pardon. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Did they all contact you? Cassidy Hutchinson: Not all of them, but several of them did. January 6 Committee Lawyer: So you'd be mentioned Mr. Gaetz and Mr. Brooks. Cassidy Hutchinson: Mr. Biggs did. Mr. Jordan talks about congressional pardons but he never asked me for one. It was more for an update on whether the White House is going to pardon members of Congress. Mr. Gohmert asked for one as well. Mr. Perry asked for a pardon too, I'm sorry. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Mr. Perry, did he talk to you directly? Cassidy Hutchinson: Yes, he did. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Clark was the acting head of the Civil Division and head of Environmental and Natural Resources Division at the Department of Justice. Do either of those divisions have any role whatsoever in investigating election fraud, sir? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: No. And and to my awareness, Jeff Clark had had no prior involvement of any kind with regard to the work that the department was doing. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Is there a policy that governs who can have contact directly with the White House? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Yes. So across many administrations for a long period of time, there's a policy that particularly with regard to criminal investigations restricts at both the White House and the Justice Department and those more sensitive issues to the highest ranks. So for criminal matters, the policy for a long time has been that only the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General from the DOJ side can have conversations about criminal matters with the White House, or the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General can authorize someone for a specific item with their permission. But the idea is to make sure that the top rung of the Justice Department knows about it, and is in the thing to control it and make sure only appropriate things are done. Steven Engel: The purpose of these these policies is to keep these communications as infrequent, and at the highest levels as possible, just to make sure that people who are less careful about it who don't really understand these implications, such as Mr. Clark, don't run afoul of those contact policies. Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: He acknowledged that shortly before Christmas, he had gone to a meeting in the Oval Office with the President. That, of course, surprised me. And I asked him, How did that happen? And he was defensive, he said it had been unplanned, that he had been talking to someone he referred to as "General Perry," but I believe is Congressman Perry, and that, unbeknownst to him, he was asked to go to a meeting and he didn't know it, but it turned out it was at the Oval -- he found himself at the Oval Office. And he was apologetic for that. And I said, Well, you didn't tell me about it. It wasn't authorized. And you didn't even tell me after the fact. You know, this is not not appropriate. But he was contrite and said it had been inadvertent and it would not happen again and that if anyone asked him to go to such a meeting, he would notify [Former Acting Deputy Attorney General] Rich Donohue and me. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): On the same day Acting Attorney General Rosen told Mr. Clark to stop talking to the White House, Representative Perry was urging Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to elevate Clark within the Department of Justice. You can now see on the screen behind me a series of tasks between representative Perry and Mr. Meadows. They show that Representative Perry requested that Mr. Clark be elevated within the department. Representative Perry tells Mr. Meadows on December 26, that quote, "Mark, just checking in as time continues to count down, 11 days to January 6 and 25 days to inauguration. We've got to get going!" Representative Perry followed up and says quote, "Mark, you should call Jeff. I just got off the phone with him and he explained to me why the principal deputy won't work especially with the FBI. They will view it as not having the authority to enforce what needs to be done." Mr. Meadows responds with "I got it. I think I understand. Let me work on the deputy position." Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Mr. Donohue on December 28, Mr. Clark emailed you and Mr. Rosen a draft letter that he wanted you to sign and send to Georgia State officials. This letter claims that the US Department of Justice's investigations have quote, "identified significant concerns that may have impacted the outcome of the election in multiple States, including the state of Georgia." The letter also said this: quote, "in light of these developments, the Department recommends that the Georgia General Assembly should convene in special session," end quote, and consider approving a new slate of electors. Steven Engel: The States had chosen their electors, the electors had been certified, they'd cast their votes, they had been sent to Washington DC. Neither Georgia nor any of the other States on December 28, or whenever this was, was in a position to change those votes. Essentially, the election had happened. The only thing that hadn't happened was the formal counting of the votes. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: I had to read both the email and the attached letter twice to make sure I really understood what he was proposing because it was so extreme to me, I had a hard time getting my head around it initially. But I read it and I did understand it for what he intended and I had to sit down and sort of compose what I thought was an appropriate response. In my response, I explained a number of reasons this is not the Department's role to suggest or dictate to State legislatures how they should select their electors. But more importantly, this was not based on fact, that this was actually contrary to the facts, as developed by Department investigations over the last several weeks and months. So I responded to that. And for the Department to insert itself into the political process's way, I think would have had grave consequences for the country. It may very well have spiraled us into a Constitutional crisis. And I wanted to make sure that he understood the gravity of the situation because he didn't seem to really appreciate it. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): President Trump rushed back early from Mar-a-Lago on December 31, and called an emergency meeting with the Department's leadership. Mr. Donohue, during this meeting, did the President tell you that he would remove you and Mr. Rosen because you weren't declaring there was election fraud? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: Toward the end of the meeting, the President, again was getting very agitated. And he said, "People tell me I should just get rid of both of you. I should just remove you and make a change in the leadership, put Jeff Clark and maybe something will finally get done." Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Rosen during a January 2 meeting with Mr. Clark, did you confront him again about his contact with the President? And if so, can you describe that? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: We had -- it was a contentious meeting where we were chastising him that he was insubordinate, he was out of line, he had not honored his own representations of what he would do. And he raised again, that he thought that letter should go out. And we were not receptive to that. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): So in that meeting, did Mr. Clark say he would turn down the President's offer if you reversed your position and sign the letter? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Yes. Subsequently, he told me that on the on Sunday the 3rd. He told me that the timeline had moved up, and that the President had offered him the job and that he was accepting it. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): White House Call Logs obtained by the Committee show that by 4:19pm, on January 3, the White House had already begun referring to Mr. Clark as the Acting Attorney General. Let's ask about that, what was your reaction to that? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Well, you know, on the one hand, I wasn't going to accept being fired by my subordinate. So I wanted to talk to the President directly. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: So the four of us knew, but no one else, aside from Jeff Clark of course, knew what was going on until late that Sunday afternoon. We chose to keep a close hold, because we didn't want to create concern or panic in the Justice Department leadership. But at this point, I asked the Acting AG [Rosen], what else can I do to help prepare for this meeting in the Oval Office, and he said, You and Pat [Cipollone] should get the Assistant Attorney Generals on the phone, and it's time to let them know what's going on. Let's find out what they may do if there's a change in leadership, because that will help inform the conversation at the Oval Office. We got most, not all, but most of the AAGs on the phone. We very quickly explained to them what the situation was. [They] essentially said they would leave, they would resign en mass if the President made that change in the department leadership. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): DOJ leadership arrived at the White House. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: The conversation this point was really about whether the President should remove Jeff Rosen and replace him with Jeff Clark. And everyone in the room, I think, understood that that meant that letter would go out. And at some point, the conversation turned to whether Jeff Clark was even qualified, competent to run the Justice Department, which in my mind, he clearly was not. And it was a heated conversation. I thought it was useful to point out to the President that Jeff Clark simply didn't have the skills, the ability and the experience to run the Department. And so I said, "Mr. President, you're talking about putting a man in that seat who has never tried a criminal case, who's never conducted a criminal investigation, he's telling you that he's going to take charge of the department, 115,000 employees, including the entire FBI, and turn the place on a dime and conduct nationwide criminal investigations that will produce results in a matter of days. It's impossible. It's absurd. It's not going to happen, and it's going to fail. He has never been in front of a trial jury, a grand jury. He's never even been to Chris Wray's office." I said at one point, "if you walked into Chris Wray's office, one, would you know how to get there and, two, if you got there, would he even know who you are? And you really think that the FBI is going to suddenly start following you orders? It's not going to happen. He's not competent." And that's the point at which Mr. Clark tried to defend himself by saying, "Well, I've been involved in very significant civil and environmental litigation. I've argued many appeals and appellate courts and things of that nature." And then I pointed out that, yes, he was an environmental lawyer, and I didn't think that was appropriate background to be running in the United States Justice Department. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Did anybody in there support Mr. Clark? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: No one. Along those lines, he [former President Trump] said, "so suppose I do this, suppose I replace him, Jeff Rosen, with him, Jeff Clark, what would you do?" And I said, "Mr. President, I would resign immediately. I'm not working one minute for this guy [Clark], who I just declared was completely incompetent." And so the President immediately turned to to Mr. Engel. Steven Engel: My recollection is that when the President turned to me and said, "Steve, you wouldn't leave, would you?" I said, "Mr. President, I've been with you through four Attorneys General, including two Acting Attorneys General, but I couldn't be part of this." Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: And I said, and we're not the only ones. No one cares if we resign. If Steve and I go, that's fine, it doesn't matter. But I'm telling you what's going to happen. You're gonna lose your entire Department leadership, every single AAG will walk out on you. Your entire Department of leadership will walk out within hours." And I said, "Mr. President, within 24...48...72 hours, you could have hundreds and hundreds of resignations of the leadership of your entire Justice Department because of your actions. What's that going to say about you?" Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: And then the other thing that I said was that, you know, look, all anyone is going to sort of think about when they see this...no one is going to read this letter....all anyone is going to think is that you went through two Attorneys General in two weeks until you found the environmental guy to sign this thing. And so the story is not going to be that the Department of Justice has found massive corruption that would have changed results of the election. It's going to be the disaster of Jeff Clark. I think at that point Pat Cipollone said, "Yeah, this is a murder suicide pact, this letter." Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Cipollone, the White House Counsel, told the Committee that Mr. Engels response had a noticeable impact on the President, that this was a turning point in the conversation. Mr. Donohue, towards the end of this meeting, did the President asked you what was going to happen to Mr. Clark? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: He did. When we finally got to, I'd say, the last 15 minutes of the meeting, the President's decision was apparent, he announced it. Jeff Clark tried to scrape his way back and asked the President to reconsider. The President double down said "No, I've made my decision. That's it. We're not going to do it." And then he turned to me and said, "so what happens to him now?" Meaning Mr. Clark. He understood that Mr. Clark reported to me. And I didn't initially understand the question. I said, "Mr. President?" and he said, "Are you going to fire him?" And I said, "I don't have the authority to fire him. He's the Senate confirmed Assistant Attorney General." And he said, "Well, who has the authority to fire him?" And I said, "Only you do, sir." And he said, "Well, I'm not going to fire him." I said, "Alright, well, then we should all go back to work." 06/21/22 Select Committee Hearing June 21, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Rusty Bowers, Arizona House Speaker Brad Raffensperger, Georgia Secretary of State Gabriel Sterling, Georgia Secretary of State Chief Operating Officer Wandrea ArShaye, “Shaye” Moss, former Georgia election worker Ronna Romney McDaniel, RNC Chair Justin Clark, former Trump Campaign lawyer Robert Sinners, former Trump campaign staffer Andrew Hitt, Former Wisconsin Republican Party Chair Laura Cox, Former Michigan Republican Party Chair Josh Roselman, Investigative Counsel for the J6 Committee John Eastman, Former Trump Lawyer Mike Shirkey, Majority Leader of the Michigan Senate Angela McCallum, Trump Campaign caller Rudy Giuliani Clips Josh Roselman: My name is Josh Roselman, I'm an Investigative Counsel for the House Select Committee to investigate the January 6 attack on the United States Capitol. Beginning in late November 2020. The President and his lawyers started appearing before state legislators, urging them to give their electoral votes to Trump, even though he lost the popular vote. This was a strategy with both practical and legal elements. The Select Committee has obtained an email from just two days after the election, in which a Trump campaign lawyer named Cleata Mitchell asked another Trump lawyer, John Eastman, to write a memo justifying the idea. Eastman prepared a memo attempting to justify this strategy, which was circulated to the Trump White House, Rudy Giuliani's legal team, and state legislators around the country and he appeared before the Georgia State Legislature to advocate for it publicly. John Eastman: You could also do what the Florida Legislature was prepared to do, which is to adopt a slate of electors yourself. And when you add in the mix of the significant statistical anomalies in sworn affidavits and video evidence of outright election fraud, I don't think it's just your authority to do that, but quite frankly, I think you have a duty to do that to protect the integrity of the election here in Georgia. Josh Roselman: But Republican officials in several states released public statements recognizing that President Trump's proposal was unlawful. For instance, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp called the proposal unconstitutional, while Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bowers wrote that the idea would undermine the rule of law. The pressure campaign to get state legislators to go along with this scheme intensified when President Trump invited delegations from Michigan and Pennsylvania to the White House. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Either you or speaker Chatfield, did you make the point to the President, that you were not going to do anything that violated Michigan law? Mike Shirkey: I believe we did. Whether or not it was those exact words or not, I think the words that I would have more likely used is, "we are going to follow the law." Josh Roselman: Nevertheless, the pressure continued. The next day President Trump tweeted quote, "hopefully the Courts and/or Legislatures will have the COURAGE to do what has to be done to maintain the integrity of our Elections, and the United States of America itself. THE WORLD IS WATCHING!!!!" He posted multiple messages on Facebook, listing the contact information for state officials and urging his supporters to contact them to quote "demand a vote on decertification." These efforts also involves targeted outreach to state legislators from President Trump's lawyers and from Trump himself. Angela McCallum: Hi, my name is Angela McCallum, I'm calling from Trump campaign headquarters in Washington DC. You do have the power to reclaim your authority and send us a slate of Electors that will support President Trump and Vice President Pence. Josh Roselman: Another legislator, Pennsylvania House Speaker Brian Cutler, received daily voicemails from Trump's lawyers in the last week of November. Cutler felt that the outreach was inappropriate and asked his lawyers to tell Rudy Giuliani to stop calling, but Giuliani continued to reach out. Rudy Giuliani: I understand that you don't want to talk to me now. I just want to bring some facts to your attention and talk to you as a fellow Republican. Josh Roselman: These ads were another element in the effort. The Trump campaign spent millions of dollars running ads online and on television. Commercial Announcer: The evidence is overwhelming. Call your governor and legislators demand they inspect the machines and hear the evidence. Fake electors scheme Casey Lucier: My name is Casey Lucier. I'm an Investigative Counsel for the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the United States Capitol. On November 18, a lawyer working with the Trump campaign named Kenneth Chesebro wrote a memo arguing that the Trump campaign should organize its own electors in the swing states that President Trump had lost. The Select Committee received testimony that those close to President Trump began planning to organize fake electors for Trump in states that Biden won in the weeks after the election. At the President's direct request, the RNC assisted the campaign in coordinating this effort. January 6 Committee Lawyer: What did the President say when he called you? Ronna Romney McDaniel: Essentially, he turned the call over to Mr. Eastman, who then proceeded to talk about the importance of the RNC helping the campaign gather these contingent electors in case any of the legal challenges that were ongoing change the result of any dates, I think more just helping them reach out and assemble them. But the My understanding is the campaign did take the lead, and we just were helping them in that in that role. Casey Lucier: As President Trump and his supporters continued to lose lawsuits, some campaign lawyers became convinced that convening electors in states that Trump lost was no longer appropriate. Justin Clark: I just remember I either replied or called somebody saying, unless we have litigation pending this, like in the states, like, I don't think this is appropriate, or no, this isn't the right thing to do. I'm out. Matt Morgan: At that point, I had Josh Findlay email Mr. Chesebro, politely, to say, "This is your task. You are responsible for the Electoral College issues moving forward". And this was my way of taking that responsibility to zero. Casey Lucier: The Committee learned the White House Counsel's Office also felt the plan was potentially illegal. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And so to be clear, did you hear the White House Counsel's office saying that this plan to have alternate electors meet and cast votes for Donald Trump in states that he had lost was not legally sound? Cassidy Hutchinson: Yes, sir. Casey Lucier: The Select Committee interviewed several of the individual fake electors, as well as Trump campaign staff who helped organize the effort. Robert Sinners: We were just, you know, kind of useful idiots or rubes at that point. You know, a strong part of me really feels that it's just kind of as the road continued, and as that was failure, failure, failure that that got formulated as what do we have on the table? Let's just do it. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And now after what we've told you today about the Select Committee's investigation about the conclusion of the professional lawyers on the campaign staff, Justin Clark, Matt Morgan and Josh Findlay, about their unwillingness to participate in the convening of these electors, how does that contribute to your understanding of these issues? Robert Sinners: I'm angry, I'm angry. Because I think in a sense, you know, no one really cared if people were potentially putting themselves in jeopardy. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Would you have not wanted to participate in this any further, as well? Robert Sinners: I absolutely would not have had I know that the three main lawyers for the campaign that I've spoken to in the past, and were leading up, we're not on board. Yeah. Andrew Hitt: I was told that these would only count if a court ruled in our favor. So that would have been using our electors. Well, it would have been using our electors in ways that we weren't told about and we wouldn't have supported. Casey Lucier: Documents obtained by the Select Committee indicate that instructions were given to the electors in several states that they needed to cast their ballots in complete secrecy. Because the scheme involved fake electors, those participating in certain states had no way to comply with state election laws, like where the electors were supposed to meet. One group of fake electors even considered hiding overnight to ensure that they could access the State Capitol, as required in Michigan. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Did Mr. Norton say who he was working with at all on this effort to have electors meet? Laura Cox: He said he was working with the President's campaign. He told me that the Michigan Republican electors were planning to meet in the Capitol and hide overnight so that they could fulfill the role of casting their vote per law in the Michigan chambers and I told him in no uncertain terms that that was insane and inappropriate. Casey Lucier: In one state, the fake electors even asked for a promise that the campaign would pay their legal fees if they got sued or charged with a crime. Ultimately, fake electors did meet on December 14, 2020 in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Nevada and Wisconsin. At the request of the Trump campaign, the electors from these battleground states signed documents falsely asserting that they were the quote, "duly elected" electors from their state and submitted them to the National Archives and to Vice President Pence in his capacity as President of the Senate. In an email produced to the Select Committee, Dr. Eastman told the Trump campaign representative that it did not matter that the electors had not been approved by a state authority. Quote, "the fact that we have multiple slates of electors demonstrates the uncertainty of either. That should be enough." He urged that Pence "act boldly and be challenged." Documents produced to the Select Committee show that the Trump campaign took steps to ensure that the physical copies of the fake electors' electoral votes from two states were delivered to Washington for January 6. Text messages exchanged between Republican Party officials in Wisconsin show that on January 4, the Trump campaign asked for someone to fly their fake electors' documents to Washington. A staffer for Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson texted a staffer for Vice President Pence just minutes before the beginning of the Joint Session. This staffer stated that Senator Johnson wished to hand deliver to the Vice President the fake electors' votes from Michigan and Wisconsin. The Vice President's aide unambiguously instructed them not to deliver the fake votes to the Vice President. Even though the fake elector slates were transmitted to Congress and the Executive Branch, the Vice President held firm and his position that his role was to count lawfully submitted electoral votes. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Brad Raffensperger is the 29th Secretary of State of Georgia, serving in this role since 2019. As an elected official, and a Republican Secretary, Raffensperger is responsible for supervising elections in Georgia and maintaining the state's public records. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Speaker Bowers, thank you for being with us today. You're the speaker of the Arizona House and a self-described conservative Republican. You campaigned for President Trump and with him during the 2020 election. Is it fair to say that you wanted Donald Trump to win a second term in office? Please? Rusty Bowers: Yes, sir. Thank you. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): And is it your understanding that President Biden was the winner of the popular vote in Arizona in 2020? Rusty Bowers: Yes, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Before we begin with the questions that I had prepared for you, I want to ask you about a statement that former President Trump issued, which I received just prior to the hearing. Former President Trump begins by calling you a RINO, Republican in Name Only. He then references a conversation in November 2020, in which he claims that you told him that the election was rigged, and that he had won Arizona. To quote the former President, "during the conversation, he told me the election was rigged and that I won Arizona," unquote. Is that false? Rusty Bowers: Anywhere, anyone, anytime that has said that I said the election was rigged, that would not be true. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And when the former President, in his statement today, claimed that you told him that he won Arizona, is that also false? Rusty Bowers: That is also false. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Mr. Bowers, I understand that after the election, you received a phone call from President Trump and Rudy Giuliani, in which they discussed the result of the presidential election in Arizona. If you would, tell us about that call. Rusty Bowers: Mr. Giuliani came on first. And niceties...then Mr. Trump, President Trump, then-President Trump came on. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): During the conversation did you ask Mr. Giuliani for proof of these allegations of fraud that he was making? Rusty Bowers: On multiple occasions, yes. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And when you asked him for evidence of this fraud, what did he say? Rusty Bowers: He said that they did have proof. And I asked him, "Do you have names?" [He said] for example, we have 200,000 illegal immigrants, some large number, five or six thousand, dead people, etc. And I said, "Do you have their names?" Yes. "Will you give them to me?" Yes. The President interrupted and said, "Give the man what he needs Rudy." He said, "I will." And that happened on at least two occasions, that interchange in the conversation. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you ever receive from him that evidence either during the call, after the call, or to this day? Rusty Bowers: Never. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): What was the ask during this call? Rusty Bowers: The ones I remember, were first, that we would hold -- that I would allow an official committee at at the Capitol so that they could hear this evidence, and that we could take action thereafter. I said, "to what end? To what end the hearing." He said, well, we have heard by an official high up in the Republican legislature that there is a legal theory or a legal ability in Arizona, that you can remove the the electors of President Biden and replace them. And we would like to have the legitimate opportunity, through the committee, to come to that end and and remove that. And I said that's, that's something that's totally new to me. I've never heard of any such thing. And I would never do anything of such magnitude without deep consultation with qualified attorneys. And I said, I've got some good attorneys, and I'm going to give you their names. But you're asking me to do something against my oath and I will not break my oath. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you also receive a call from US Representative Andy Biggs of Arizona on the morning of January 6? Rusty Bowers: I did. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And what did Mr. Biggs asked you to do? Rusty Bowers: I believe that was the day that the vote was occurring in each state to have certification or to declare the certification of the electors. And he asked if I would sign on both to a letter that had been sent from my State, and/or that I would support the decertification of the electors. And I said I would not. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Speaking Bowers, did the President call you again later in December? Rusty Bowers: He did, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you tell the president in that second call that you supported him, that you voted for him, but that you are not going to do anything illegal for him? Rusty Bowers: I did, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Nevertheless, his lawyer John Eastman called you some days later, and what did Dr. Eastman want you to do? Rusty Bowers: That we would, in fact, take a vote to overthrow -- or I shouldn't say overthrow -- that we would decertify the electors, and that we had plenary authority to do so. But I said, "What would you have me do?" And he said, "Just do it and let the court sorted out." And I said, "You're asking me to do something that's never been done in history, the history of the United States. And I'm going to put my state through that without sufficient proof? And that's going to be good enough with me? That I would, I would put us through that, my state that I swore to uphold, both in Constitution and in law? No, sir." Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): I want to look even more deeply at the fake electoral scheme. Every four years, citizens from all over the United States go to the polls to elect the President. Under our Constitution, when we cast our votes for president, we are actually voting to send electors pledged to our preferred candidate to the Electoral College. In December, the electors in each state meet, cast their votes, and send those votes to Washington. There was only one legitimate slate of electors from each state. On the Sixth day of January, Congress meets in a joint session to count those votes, and the winner of the Electoral College vote becomes the president. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Secretary Raffensburger, thank you for being here today. You've been a public servant in Georgia since 2015, serving first as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, and then since January 2019, as Georgia Secretary of State as a self described conservative Republican. Is it fair to say that you wanted President Trump to win the 2020 election? Brad Raffensperger: Yes, it is. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Secretary Raffensperger, did Joe Biden win the 2020 presidential election in Georgia and by what margin? Brad Raffensperger: President Biden carried the state of Georgia by approximately 12,000 votes. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Bear in mind as we discuss this call today that by this point in time, early January, the election in Georgia had already been certified. But perhaps more important, the President of the United States had already been told repeatedly by his own top Justice Department officials that the claims he was about to make to you about massive fraud in Georgia were completely false. 06/16/22 Select Committee Hearing June 16, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Greg Jacob, Former Counsel to Vice President Mike Pence J. Michael Luttig, Retired judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and informal advisor to Mike Pence Julie Radford, Former Chief of Staff for Ivanka Trump Eric Herschmann, Former White House Senior Advisor Nicholas Luna, Former Assistant to President Trump Gen. Keith Kellogg, Former National Security Advisor to VP Pence Clips 16:45 Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Greg Jacob was Counsel to Vice President Pence. He conducted a thorough analysis of the role of the Vice President in the Joint Session of Congress under the Constitution, the Electoral Count Act, and 230 years of historical practice. But he also has firsthand information about the attack on the Capitol because he lived through it. He was with the Vice President and his own life was in danger. 31:05 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Eastman was, at the time, a law professor at Chapman University Law School. He prepared a memo outlining the nonsensical theory that the Vice President could decide the outcome of the election at the Joint Session of Congress on January 6. 32:50 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Dr. Eastman himself admitted in an email that the fake electors had no legal weight. Referring to the fake electors as, quote "dead on arrival in Congress" end quote, because they did not have a certification from their States. 46:40 Greg Jacob: We had a constitutional crisis in 1876 because in that year, multiple slates of electors were certified by multiple slates [sic]. And when it came time to count those votes, the antecedent question of "which ones?" had to be answered. That required the appointment of an independent commission. That commission had to resolve that question. And the purpose of the Electoral Count Act of 1887 had been to resolve those latent ambiguities. Now I'm in complete agreement with Judge Luttig. It is unambiguous that the Vice President does not have the authority to reject electors. There is no suggestion of any kind that it does. There is no mention of rejecting or objecting to electors anywhere in the 12th amendment. And so the notion that the Vice President could do that certainly is not in the text. But the problem that we had and that John Eastman raised in our discussions was, we had all seen that in Congress in 2000, in 2004, in 2016, there had been objections raised to various states. And those had even been debated in 2004. And so, here you have an Amendment that says nothing about objecting or rejecting. And yet we did have some recent practice of that happening within the terms of the Electoral Count Act. So we started with that. 1:20:45 Greg Jacob: He again tried to say, but I don't think the courts will get involved in this. They'll invoke the political question doctrine and so if the courts stay out of it, that will mean that we'll have the 10 days for the States to weigh in and resolve it. And then, you know, they'll send back the Trump slates of electors, and the people will be able to accept that. I expressed my vociferous disagreement with that point, I did not think that this was a political question. Among other things, if the courts did not step in to resolve this, there was nobody else to resolve it. You would be in a situation where you have a standoff between the President of the United States and, counterfactually, the Vice President of the United States saying that we've exercised authorities that, Constitutionally, we think we have by which we have deemed ourselves the winners of the election. You would have an opposed House and Senate disagreeing with that. You would have State legislatures that, to that point, I mean, Republican leaders across those legislatures had put together, had put out statements, and we collected these for the Vice President as well, that the people had spoken in their States and that they had no intention of reversing the outcome of the election. We did receive some signed letters that Mr. Eastman forwarded us by minorities of leaders in those States, but no State had any legislative house that indicated that added any interest in it. So you would have had just a an unprecedented Constitutional jump ball situation with that standoff. And as I expressed to him, that issue might well then have to be decided in the streets. Because if we can't work it out politically, we've already seen how charged up people are about this election. And so it would be a disastrous situation to be in. So I said, I think the courts will intervene. I do not see a commitment in the Constitution of the question, whether the Vice President has that authority to some other actor to resolve there. There's arguments about whether Congress and the Vice President jointly have a Constitutional commitment to generally decide electoral vote issues. I don't think that they have any authority to object or reject them. I don't see it in the 12th Amendment, but nonetheless. And I concluded by saying, "John, in light of everything that we've discussed, can't we just both agree that this is a terrible idea?" And he couldn't quite bring himself to say yes to that. But he very clearly said, "Well, yeah, I see we're not going to be able to persuade you to do this." And that was how the meeting concluded. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): We understand that the Vice President started his day on January 4 with a rally in Georgia for the Republican candidates in the US Senate runoff. When the Vice President returned to Washington, he was summoned to meet with the President regarding the upcoming Joint Session of Congress. Mr. Jacob, during that meeting between the President and the Vice President, what theories did Dr. Eastman present regarding the role of the Vice President in counting the electoral votes? Greg Jacob: During the meeting on January 4, Mr. Eastman was opining there were two legally viable arguments as to authorities that the Vice President could exercise two days later on January 6. One of them was that he could reject electoral votes outright. The other was that he could use his capacity as Presiding Officer to suspend the proceedings and declare essentially a 10-day recess during which States that he deemed to be disputed, there was a list of five to seven states, the exact number changed from conversation to conversation, but that the Vice President could sort of issue and demand to the State Legislatures in those States to re-examine the election and declare who had won each of those States. So he said that both of those were legally viable options. He said that he did not recommend, upon questioning, he did not recommend what he called the "more aggressive option," which was reject outright, because he thought that that would be less politically palatable. The imprimatur of State Legislature authority would be necessary to ultimately have public acceptance of an outcome in favor of President Trump. And so he advocated that the preferred course of action would be the procedural route of suspending the Joint Session and sending the election back to the States. And again, the Vice President's first instinct here is so decisive on this question, there's just no way that the framers of the Constitution who divided power and authority, who separated it out, who had broken away from George III, and declared him to be a tyrant, there was no way that they would have put in the hands of one person, the authority to determine who was going to be President of the United States. And then we went to history. We examined every single electoral vote count that had happened in Congress since the beginning of the country. And critically, no Vice President, in 230 years of history, had ever claimed to have that kind of authority, hadn't claimed authority to reject electoral votes, had not claimed authority to return electoral votes back to the States. In the entire history of the United States, not once had a Joint Session, ever returned electoral votes back to the States to be counted. So the history was absolutely decisive. And again, part of my discussion with Mr. Eastman was, if you were right, don't you think Al Gore might have liked to have known in 2000, that he had authority to just declare himself President of the United States? Did you think that the Democrat lawyers just didn't think of this very obvious quirk that he could use to do that? And of course, he acknowledged Al Gore did not and should not have had that authority at that point in time. So at the conclusion of the meeting on the 4th, the President had asked that our office meet with Mr. Eastman the next day to hear more about the positions he had expressed at that meeting, and the Vice President indicated that....offered me up as his counsel, to fulfill that duty. We had an extended discussion an hour and a half to two hours on January 5. What most surprised me about that meeting was that when Mr. Eastman came in, he said, "I'm here to request that you reject the electors." So on the 4th, that had been the path that he had said, "I'm not recommending that you do that." But on the 5th, he came in and expressly requested that. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): Mr. Jacob did you, Mr. Short, and the Vice President have a call later that day, again, with the President and Dr. Eastman? Greg Jacob: So, yes, we did. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): And what did Dr. Eastman requested on that call? Greg Jacob: On that phone call, Mr. Eastman stated that he had heard us loud and clear that morning, we were not going to be rejecting electors. But would we be open to considering the other course that we had discussed on the 4th, which would be to suspend the Joint Session and request that State Legislatures reexamine certification of the electoral votes? Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): Trump issued a statement claiming the Vice President had agreed that he could determine the outcome of the election, despite the fact that the Vice President had consistently rejected that position. Mr. Jacob, how did the Vice President's team reacts to the stat

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Pro-Life America
Episode 129 | Population Control & Eugenics Efforts Disguised as “Aid”

Pro-Life America

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 20:36


This week on the Pro-Life America podcast, we cover the scandal that most Americans have no idea they are footing the bill for.  This episode will have your blood boiling as we reveal and provide proof of how eugenics and population control efforts are being thrust on foreign countries under the guise of “aid.” Links Mentioned:The United States Announces $43.5 Million To Support Youth Empowerment In South Sudan - USAID Press ReleaseGAO Finds USAID-Funded Organization Pushed Pro-Abortion Language in Kenya Constitution - Rep. Chris Smith Press ReleaseWHO and UN Exploit Coronavirus to Push Abortion on Third-World Nations - Life NewsThe UN, the IMF, the World Bank, and abortion - The InterimApproach paper: Evaluation of the World Bank's Assistance for Health, Nutrition, and Population - Independent Evaluation GroupBiden rescinds abortion restrictions on US foreign aid - AP NewsUnited Nations Population Fund and the CLIMATE CRISISUSAID Climate Strategy PolicyStudy on: Donor Commitments and Disbursements for Sexual and Reproductive Health Aid in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and ZambiaUnited Nations 2030 Agenda For Sustainable DevelopmentReport Highlights Lack of Access to SRHR Information in Kenya - Center For Reproductive RightsUNFPA Kenya announces £500,000 funding from UKAID to strengthen reproductive health commodity security - UNFPA Press ReleaseThe Population Control Holocaust - The New AtlantisContraceptive Imperialism and Third World Poverty - Catholic Education Resource CenterWatch Maafa 21Rate & Review Our Podcast Have a topic you want to see discussed on the show? [Submit it here.]To learn more about what Life Dynamics does, visit: https://lifedynamics.com/about-us/Support Our Work Be Sure To Follow Life Dynamics:Our WebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeRumble 

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
One thing modern governments need more than ever: resilience

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 19:22


So-called black swan events seem to be happening in flocks. The pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, earthquakes and floods. For government, it all adds up to the need for resilience and preparation. And, according to new research by the IBM Center for the Business of Government, a technological approach is also needed. For more on this, Federal Drive host Tom Temin talked with Syracuse University professor and Government Accountability Office managing director, Chris Mihm.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
How the Agriculture Department put the snap program on overdrive

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 17:49


In doing economic analyses leading to changes in federal benefits, agencies are obligated to do them a certain way. During the pandemic, the Agriculture Department redid an index resulting in a big boost in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The Government Accountability Office finds, USDA didn't quite proceed properly. To get more on this, Federal Drive host Tom Temin spoke with Kathryn Larin, GAO's Director of Education, Workforce and Income Security.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
The Justice department lags in a strategy required by law

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 18:32


Maybe it's lack of leadership. Or lack of attention. But the Justice Department has failed on a critical congressional mandate, that's according to the Government Accountability Office. Justice has been required to update a national strategy to deal with exploitation of children every two years. For what has actually happened, the Federal Drive turned to the GAO's director of Homeland Security and Justice issues, Gretta Goodwin.

Revue de presse Afrique
À la Une: les jihadistes ne désarment pas au Sahel

Revue de presse Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 4:04


Tout d'abord au Burkina Faso, un « Noël de sang : un drame de plus, un drame de trop ! », s'exclame WakatSéra. Dimanche 25 décembre, relate le journal, « sur la RN 4, axe Fada-Kantchari, un minibus de transport en commun a heurté une mine. Le bilan est catastrophique : 10 morts, 5 blessés, sans compter les passagers portés disparus ». Pourtant, soupire WakatSéra, « ces derniers temps, les Burkinabè avaient l'impression qu'ils bénéficiaient comme d'une bouffée d'oxygène, au regard des prouesses récentes des Forces de défenses et de sécurité et des Volontaires pour la défense de la patrie […]. La reprise, dans la province du Mouhoun, de Solenzo, ville restée de longs jours sous le joug et la férule des terroristes, en est, pour l'instant, l'illustration emblématique. Mais les faits sont têtus !, pointe WakatSéra. Il faut se rendre à l'évidence : les terroristes qui écument le Burkina peuvent être sonnés et groggy par endroits, mais force est de reconnaitre qu'ils n'ont pas abdiqué ». ►À lire aussi : Au Burkina Faso, au moins dix passagers d'un bus tués par l'explosion d'une mine artisanale Démonstration de force dans le nord-est du Mali Au Mali, à présent, « les jihadistes affichent leur force » : c'est du moins ce qu'affirme Le Monde Afrique. « À l'offensive depuis mars dans la région de Ménaka puis dans celle de Gao, dans le nord-est du pays, l'État islamique dans le grand Sahara a publié, récemment, une vidéo de près de dix minutes mettant en scène sa capacité de frappe. Des centaines d'hommes armés de fusils d'assaut ou de lance-roquettes en rangs serrés, quelques pick-up équipés de mitrailleuses lourdes, des motos par dizaines […]. Preuve, estime Le Monde Afrique, que les mouvements jihadistes peuvent désormais rassembler leurs unités, en temps normal dispersées par petits groupes d'une trentaine de combattants, sans crainte de frappes aériennes. » Commentaire d'une source officielle française, citée par le journal : « le coup de com' est réussi. Comme il n'est plus question pour nous d'intervenir au Mali, ils peuvent désormais y faire ce qu'ils veulent. Du temps de Barkhane, cela aurait été impossible. » Et Le Monde Afrique d'affirmer en outre que « les forces armées maliennes et le millier de mercenaires russes présents dans le pays ne mènent aucune opération militaire d'envergure dans cette zone du Nord-est ». Expulsion de la coordinatrice de l'ONU au Burkina Faso À ces tensions sécuritaires s'ajoutent aussi des tensions diplomatiques. Et on revient au Burkina Faso avec la récente expulsion par les autorités militaires de la coordinatrice des Nations unies sur place, Barbara Manzi. Les militaires au pouvoir lui reprochent d'avoir jeté le discrédit sur le pays en appelant à l'évacuation des familles du personnel des Nations unies au Burkina et également d'avoir des liens avec des chefs terroristes. Commentaire de L'Observateur Paalga : « cet incident inédit dans les annales de la diplomatie du Burkina Faso intervient dans un contexte où bon nombre de nos partenaires, occidentaux en l'occurrence, ne sont plus en odeur de sainteté avec une frange de la population et même des plus hautes autorités. (…) Tout cela, sur fond de rapprochement à petits pas avec la Russie de Poutine. […] On a le sentiment que le capitaine Ibrahim Traoré marche doucettement, mais résolument sur les pas du colonel Assimi Goïta du Mali. » Autre son de cloche pour Le Pays : « Barbara Manzi a elle-même donné des verges pour se faire flageller. Non seulement en raison d'une attitude qui frise à la fois la condescendance et le mépris, mais aussi en raison d'une collaboration dont la franchise est sujette à caution. Son expulsion est donc perçue comme un coup de sang à la hauteur des griefs à elle reprochés. De ce point de vue, on ne peut pas faire le reproche aux autorités burkinabè d'avoir pris leurs responsabilités. » Lâcher la bride ? « Mali, Guinée, Burkina… Comment sortir de l'impasse ? », s'interroge pour sa part Jeune Afrique. « Face au blocage total de la situation politique à Bamako, Conakry et Ouaga, une seule solution, affirme le site panafricain : faire preuve de pragmatisme et tendre la main aux pouvoirs putschistes locaux […]. Ne plus ostraciser les autorités de ces trois pays, de les traiter donc comme des dirigeants "normaux" en réintégrant le Mali, le Burkina et la Guinée dans toutes les instances sous-régionales, mais aussi de leur lâcher la bride localement, en les laissant mener leurs réformes et plus largement leur politique. Bref, de les réintégrer dans le concert des nations africaines et de leur faire confiance. Non sans contrepartie, estime encore Jeune Afrique. Ils devront enfin accepter de prendre des engagements, ou de respecter ceux déjà pris, à commencer par celui de ne pas aller au-delà de 2024 pour rendre le pouvoir aux civils à travers des élections libres et transparentes. »

The Loop
Mid-Day Report: Sunday, December 25, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 5:07


Dangerously low temperatures stretch across the United States. Ukraine celebrates Christmas in the midst of the Russian invasion. Shoppers race for last-minute gifts for the holidays. Five minutes of news to keep you in the Loop.

The Loop
Mid-Day Report: Saturday, December 24, 2022

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 7:10


A Roxbury apartment fire claims the life of at least one person. More than 15,000 Massachusetts customers remain without power as a result of Friday's storm. A huge crowd is expected to recreate George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River. Five minutes of news to keep you in the Loop.

Rich Zeoli
Zelenskyy Visits the White House…in a Sweatshirt???

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 51:02


The Rich Zeoli Show- Hour 2:  Justin Goodman—Senior Vice President for Advocacy & Public Policy at White Coat Waste Project—joins The Rich Zeoli Show to discuss one silver lining of the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill: it will cut funding for foreign labs like the Wuhan Institute of Virology. Astoundingly, as of now, the institute remains eligible to receive U.S. tax-payer money. On Wednesday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy visited President Joe Biden in the Oval Office—but why was he wearing a sweatshirt? Shouldn't he have thrown on a jacket and tie? In a new Wall Street Journal editorial, journalist Simone Goa hypothesized that Chinese officials may suddenly be embracing less strict COVID lockdown policies because the government is “running out of money.” Gao calculates that the annual cost of “nucleic-acid testing” could potentially “exceed $240 billion.” While speaking at a school board training event, Governor Ron DeSantis vowed to work tirelessly to get more conservatives elected to school boards throughout Florida. DeSantis also introduced an updated version of the “Freedom Blueprint”—which would end the automatic withdrawal of union dues for teachers.

Rich Zeoli
Biden's Fiscal Philosophy: Just Keep Spending!

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 183:38


The Rich Zeoli Show- Full Episode (12/21/2022): 3:05pm- On Tuesday evening, the U.S. Senate advanced a massive $1.7 trillion spending package with a bipartisan 70 to 25-vote—less than one day after it was unveiled. At 4,155 pages, how was any Senator able to read the bill in its entirety before voting? 3:25pm- According to The Daily Wire, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) “requested at least 19 earmarks totaling more than $60 million in the $1.7 trillion bill.” Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) called the process by which the omnibus bill was advanced in the Senate an “abomination.”  3:40pm- Vincent Kolber—Chairman of RESIDCO, a transportation equipment leasing company—joins The Rich Zeoli Show to discuss his recent Wall Street Journal opinion editorial, “How Much Washington Really Owes: $100 Trillion.” Kolber writes that, according to calculations from the U.S. Treasury, “[t]otal liabilities were $34.8 trillion at the end of fiscal 2021. The Treasury reported assets at $4.9 trillion. Simple arithmetic brings us to the net position, negative $29.9 trillion. But this accounting leaves a lot out. Social insurance net expenditures calculates the difference between the expected future liabilities of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and similar programs over the next 75 years and the income these programs are expected to generate during the same period under current law. The Treasury reported these unfunded liabilities at $71 trillion at the end of fiscal 2021. That brings us to the alarming milestone. Add the net position of $29.9 trillion to the social insurance net expenditures of $71 trillion, and you find that they topped $100 trillion.” Read the full article at: https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-much-washington-really-owes-100-trillion-debt-social-insurance-expenditure-medicare-medicaid-treasury-11671571955?mod=opinion_lead_pos7 4:05pm- Justin Goodman—Senior Vice President for Advocacy & Public Policy at White Coat Waste Project—joins The Rich Zeoli Show to discuss one silver lining of the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill: it will cut funding for foreign labs like the Wuhan Institute of Virology. Astoundingly, as of now, the institute remains eligible to receive U.S. tax-payer money.  4:30pm- On Wednesday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy visited President Joe Biden in the Oval Office—but why was he wearing a sweatshirt? Shouldn't he have thrown on a jacket and tie?  4:40pm- In a new Wall Street Journal editorial, journalist Simone Goa hypothesized that Chinese officials may suddenly be embracing less strict COVID lockdown policies because the government is “running out of money.” Gao calculates that the annual cost of “nucleic-acid testing” could potentially “exceed $240 billion.”  4:55pm- While speaking at a school board training event, Governor Ron DeSantis vowed to work tirelessly to get more conservatives elected to school boards throughout Florida. DeSantis also introduced an updated version of the “Freedom Blueprint”—which would end the automatic withdrawal of union dues for teachers. 5:00pm- Dr. E.J. Antoni—Research Fellow for Regional Economics in the Center for Data Analysis at The Heritage Foundation—joins The Rich Zeoli Show to break down the most egregious earmarks (and there are many) in the $1.7 trillion omnibus bill advanced by the U.S. Senate.  5:10pm- On Wednesday, U.S. President Joe Biden held a joint press conference with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. Biden has promised to supply Ukraine with a $1.86 billion security assistance package. During the press conference, Biden emphasized the package would include defensive weapons only.  5:35pm- Listeners weigh-in on funding war between Ukraine and Russia—what's the limit? And what's our end goal?  6:00pm- If the Biden Administration is as committed to stifling Russian aggression as they claim, why aren't they doing more to expand the production of domestic oil? It would undoubtedly damage Russia's economy and limit their ability to spend militarily.  6:20pm- The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board noted that embedded within the 4,155-page omnibus bill is authorization to further empower the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—specifically giving it expanded control over the cosmetics industry.  6:45pm- Senator Rand Paul released his own, hilarious version of “Twas the Night Before Christmas.”

Marketplace All-in-One
Attention, adults who dig Legos, action figures and other toys: Companies see you.

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 7:47


First, Twitter boss Elon Musk said he’ll abide by the results of a poll that showed a majority of users wanting him to step down. Elsewhere, a GAO report shows the tribal struggles with federal funding. Also, nostalgia among adults is boosting the toy industry.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
A tool for stronger identity management to make things proper

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 18:10


The government-wide Improper Payment Rate dropped by more than 2% in fiscal 2022. One of the biggest ways agencies can keep it headed downward is stronger identity management. Beryl Davis is the Managing Director of the Financial Management and Assurance team at the Government Accountability Office and Tim Persons is the GAO's Chief Scientist. They tell Federal News Network's Jason Miller about a new tool developed by the Joint Financial Management Improvement Program.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
The Judiciary branch is urged to tighten up its oversight

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 9:14


Judges are suppose to be above the law. But even in the federal judicial branch, ethical and legal transgressions occur. The Government Accountability Office has found that the judiciary doesn't follow best practices for addressing waste, fraud and abuse. To get the details, Federal News Networks Eric White spoke with GAO's director of information and cybersecurity, Carol Harris.

maayot | Learn Mandarin Chinese with Stories
Beginner | 我跟着网上的视频学习过理发 | I learned to cut hair by following videos on the Internet | Mandarin Chinese Story

maayot | Learn Mandarin Chinese with Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 1:07


Li Yang lamented that the price of getting a haircut at the barbershop has become more and more expensive. Gao Jin suggested that they try cutting their own hair. Li Yang thought it was a good idea, but he didn't think they had any experience cutting hair. Gao said he followed online videos to learn.Join other motivated learners on your Chinese learning journey with maayot. Receive a daily Chinese reading in Mandarin Chinese in your inbox. Full text in Chinese, daily quiz to test your understanding, one-click dictionary, new words, etc.Got a question or comment? Reach out to us at contact[at]maayot.com

Strange Recon Podcast
Strange Recon - Me Saying Things 12/8/22

Strange Recon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 126:14


SOURCES https://www.gao.gov/products/gao-01-975thttps://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/hyderabad/2022/dec/08/ufo-cry-villagers-as-tifr-space-capsule-lands-in-mogiligidda-2526056.htmlhttps://eurasiantimes.com/chinas-tb-001-twin-tailed-scorpion-combat-uav-spotted/https://breakingdefense.com/2022/07/air-forces-sixth-gen-fighter-downselect-not-all-that-far-away-says-kendall/https://weather.com/en-IN/india/news/news/2022-12-08-mysterious-white-object-spotted-flying-in-hyderabad-skyhttps://www.gao.gov/assets/gao-01-975t.pdf

Invité Afrique
Guillaume Soto-Mayor: «L'EIGS menace l'unité du Mali et la stabilité de toute l'Afrique de l'Ouest»

Invité Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 6:11


La région de Ménaka subit depuis mars les assauts de la branche sahélienne du groupe État islamique (EIGS) qui tente de s'installer durablement dans cette partie du nord-est du Mali, proche du Niger et du Burkina Faso. Une région jusqu'alors sécurisée par des groupes armés maliens signataires de l'accord de paix de 2015 et alliés des autorités de Bamako, mais où les jihadistes du Groupe de soutien à l'Islam et aux musulmans (GSIM ou Jnim en arabe), lié à al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique, contrôlent également certaines parties du territoire. C'est principalement à ses rivaux d'al-Qaïda que l'EIGS s'attaque depuis des mois, massacrant au passage des centaines de civils. Des affrontements sont régulièrement signalés, et l'assise de l'EIGS semble se renforcer inéluctablement, menaçant la sécurité de ces régions du nord du Mali et, plus globalement, du Niger, du Burkina Faso, et de toute la sous-région. Guillaume Soto-Mayor est chercheur associé au Middle East Institute, spécialiste des groupes jihadistes au Sahel et en Afrique de l'Ouest. Il estime que c'est un tournant majeur, pour l'unité du Mali et la sécurité de toute l'Afrique de l'Ouest, qui est en train de se jouer. Depuis mars, le groupe État islamique est à l'offensive dans le nord-est du Mali, il contrôle deux cercles sur trois dans la région de Ménaka et mène des attaques de plus en plus près de la ville de Ménaka et même, tout récemment, de Gao. Est-ce que vous pourriez nous donner un aperçu de l'état des forces actuelles de l'EIGS ? Guillaume Soto-Mayor : Pour évaluer la présence et la force du groupe, il est intéressant de mesurer sa capacité simultanée d'action et de présence, aussi bien dans les régions de Gao et de Ménaka, mais également de plus en plus dans l'Oudalan, dans la région des Trois frontières, au nord du Burkina Faso, dans laquelle le groupe EI qui avait été chassé par al-Qaïda il y a deux ans, met de nouveau pied, et dans lequel il affronte la branche d'al-Qaïda qui s'appelle Ansarou al-Islam, mais également dans les régions de Tombouctou, dans les communes de Gossi et de Hombori, près de Douentza, où l'État islamique est actuellement à l'offensive contre la Katiba Macina et la Katiba Serma. C'est-à-dire que le groupe se sent suffisamment fort pour affronter Al-Qaïda, principalement, dans toutes ces régions à la fois.  On a une idée du nombre d'hommes, du matériel ? Des images récentes de l'allégeance de la province de l'État islamique au Sahel, au nouveau leader de l'État islamique, à Andéramboukane, montre environ 150 à 200 combattants présents, rien que dans cette zone qui est donc à l'est de la région de Ménaka. Et les différentes constitutions de katibas, dans les différentes régions que je viens d'évoquer, indiqueraient que le groupe a une capacité de déployer environ 1 000 à 1 200 combattants, mais c'est très compliqué à évaluer, donc ce sont des estimations. En tout cas, on est passé en quelques mois d'un groupe qui était désorganisé, éparpillé et désargenté, à l'été 2021, à un groupe qui est capable de réaliser une offensive multiple, d'avoir une progression territoriale extrêmement rapide, et tout ça pose véritablement question. Et ce renforcement de la branche sahélienne du groupe État islamique est synonyme de tragédie pour les civils : on parle, selon les estimations des communautés locales, de plus de 900 morts depuis mars. Sa présence et le contrôle territorial de l'État islamique s'accompagnent de violences accrues contre les civils. À chaque fois qu'ils arrivent dans de nouveaux territoires, ils lancent des ultimatums aux populations civiles : « vous êtes avec nous ou vous êtes contre nous ». C'est une vision sans compromis du jihad. On voit les cycles de représailles se multiplier, les exécutions sommaires dans toutes leurs zones d'opérations. Mais également les vols de bétail, les destructions de villages, etc. Les humanitaires sont également considérés comme des cibles légitimes, et donc dans ces zones où l'État malien est absent depuis des années, ce sont des milliers de personnes qui vont souffrir et qui souffrent déjà.   Face aux jihadistes du groupe État islamique, le MSA et le Gatia – deux groupes armés locaux signataires de l'accord de paix de 2015 – tentent de défendre les populations avec, plus récemment, les ex-rebelles de la CMA. Il y a aussi les jihadistes du Jnim, liés à al-Qaïda, qui ne veulent pas laisser leurs rivaux de l'EIGS s'implanter durablement dans ces régions de Ménaka et de Gao. En revanche, l'armée malienne est tout à fait absente. Comment est-ce que vous l'expliquez ?    C'est très difficile. On peut s'interroger peut-être sur la faiblesse ou les capacités réelles de l'armée malienne à intervenir. On peut évoquer un manque de confiance, ou de coopération entre les groupes armés présents dans cette zone et l'armée malienne. En tout cas, cette absence, notamment avec la présence de l'armée malienne à Ménaka, pose véritablement question, elle interroge… À Ménaka où les supplétifs russes de l'armée sont également déployés… Absolument. Cette coopération militaire est un choix souverain qu'il faut respecter, en tout cas, pour le moment, ce qui est certain, c'est que les groupes jihadistes progressent et que l'armée malienne ne semble pas avoir la volonté, et c'est ça qui interroge le plus, de répondre à cette progression. Ce que cela laisse aux populations, c'est un sentiment d'abandon total, d'un laisser-faire ou en tout cas d'un désintérêt de Bamako face à leur sort. ►À lire aussi : Grand Reportage - Mali : quand il ne reste que la fuite, récits de victimes Donc que l'EIGS prenne le contrôle de ces régions, où que des groupes locaux les repoussent, il y a selon vous un risque pour l'unité du Mali. Je serais prudent sur ces dimensions, mais oui, je pense que c'est un risque réel. Le conflit date maintenant de nombreuses années, les populations ont énormément souffert, et actuellement, il y a un appel général de toute la population du Nord, à combattre ces groupes. Et donc face au sentiment d'abandon de l'État malien, on remarque que même un général de l'armée malienne, le général Ag Gamou qui est aussi le responsable du Gatia, en appelle aux Touaregs de toute la région, c'est-à-dire également à des combattants étrangers au Mali, à venir les aider face à cette menace encore une fois existentielle pour les communautés. Le risque est donc immense pour le Mali, mais aussi pour le Niger, le Burkina et les autres pays ouest-africains ? Le pourquoi de ces capacités opérationnelles vient de la capacité du groupe EI à s'être renforcé d'un point de vue humain, avec la présence de combattants nigérians, mais aussi de combattants de la Libye, en plus petit nombre. Et deuxièmement, d'avoir récupéré de l'argent, d'avoir récupéré un soutien logistique, via un couloir de transmission très efficace, reliant le sud-est du Mali et la zone des Trois frontières, au nord-est du Nigeria, au nord de la région de Sokoto. Et ce couloir, la viabilité de cette transmission entre l'État islamique en Afrique de l'Ouest et l'État islamique au Sahara, montre la capacité du groupe à opérer conjointement, de concerts, dans son expansion opérationnelle. C'est véritablement un tournant pour la sous-région. C'est un tournant, car là, pour la première fois, vous avez un groupe qui est très bien interconnecté, qui est fort tactiquement, qui est capable d'affronter al-Qaïda sur l'ensemble de son territoire, et donc qui menace aussi bien l'Algérie que la Mauritanie, et également le reste du Burkina Faso. C'est une menace régionale que l'expansion de l'État islamique. C'est une double menace pour la région parce que c'est aussi une menace qui s'accompagne de l'expansion d'Al-Qaïda vers le sud, il ne faut jamais oublier ça ! Trois exemples très récents : une opération à la frontière togolaise et béninoise, une présence également dans la région de Kayes au Mali, dans cette région qui s'approche de la frontière sénégalaise et de la frontière mauritanienne, et une présence également de plus en plus signalée au nord du Ghana et au nord de la Côte d'Ivoire. Donc le retour en force de l'État islamique au centre du Sahel est accompagné malheureusement d'une expansion d'Al-Qaïda qui pourrait menacer les capitales aussi bien du centre au Sahel, que les populations du nord des pays côtiers dans les prochains mois, dans les prochaines années. ►À lire aussi : Le nord du Togo, une région davantage ciblée par les terroristes

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
Why railroads avoid a federal safety incident reporting system

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 24:25


A lot more accidents and near misses occur on the nation's railroads than you might realize. The Federal Railroad Administration tracks incidents using what's known as the Confidential Close Call Reporting System or C3RS. But the Government Accountability Office found that only a handful of railroads participate, so there's a big gap in safety data. To get more on this, Federal Drive host Tome Temin spoke with GAO's Director of Physical Infrastructure Issues, Elizabeth Repko.

Future U Podcast
From the Archives: Misleading Financial Aid

Future U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 23:49


About 91% of colleges understate or don't include the net price in their financial-aid offers to would-be students, the U.S. Government Accountability Office has found in a new report. We go into the archives for a 2019 episode when Rachel Fishman from New America joined us to discuss her research. With support from Ascendium Education Group and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.Relevant Links:Report from GAO: https://www.gao.gov/assets/gao-23-104708.pdf Wall Street Journal article: https://www.wsj.com/articles/most-colleges-give-inaccurate-price-details-in-financial-aid-letters-federal-report-finds-11670273500 Decoding the Cost of College: https://www.newamerica.org/education-policy/policy-papers/decoding-cost-college/ Design Principles for Financial Aid Offers: https://www.newamerica.org/education-policy/reports/design-principles-financial-aid-offers/ Nothing Has Changed Much With Financial Aid Offers. Congress Must Act: https://www.newamerica.org/education-policy/edcentral/nothing-has-changed-with-financial-aid-offers-congress-must-act/

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist
Preparing for the electrical grid of the future.

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 38:43


Podcast: Control Loop: The OT Cybersecurity Podcast (LS 28 · TOP 10% what is this?)Episode: Preparing for the electrical grid of the future.Pub date: 2022-11-30The US Government Accountability Office issues a report on offshore oil and gas cybersecurity. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to secure power grids. Boa web server vulnerabilities used to target energy organizations. CISA updates its Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework. And CISA issues advisories for ICS vulnerabilities. Guests Mara Winn and Guohui Yuan join us from the Department of Energy to discuss their report, "Cybersecurity Considerations for Distributed Energy Resources on the U.S. Electric Grid.” In Part 1 of 2 on the Learning Lab, Mark Urban and Dragos' CISO Steve Applegate talk about starting an OT cybersecurity program.Control Loop News Brief.GAO issues report on offshore oil and gas cybersecurity.Offshore Oil and Gas: Strategy Urgently Needed to Address Cybersecurity Risks to Infrastructure (US Government Accountability Office)ORNL seeks to secure power grids.DarkNet: Lighting up a secure grid communication network (ORNL)Boa web server vulnerabilities.Vulnerable SDK components lead to supply chain risks in IoT and OT environments (Microsoft)Continued Targeting of Indian Power Grid Assets by Chinese State-Sponsored Activity Group (Recorded Future)Sandworm renews ransomware activity against Ukrainian targets.New ransomware attacks in Ukraine linked to Russian Sandworm hackers (BleepingComputer)CISA updates its Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework.Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework (CISA)CISA issues ICS advisories.CISA Releases Eight Industrial Control Systems Advisories (CISA)CISA Releases Seven Industrial Control Systems Advisories (CISA)Control Loop Interview.Guests Mara Winn and Guohui Yuan from the Department of Energy discuss their report, "Cybersecurity Considerations for Distributed Energy Resources on the U.S. Electric Grid.”Control Loop Learning Lab.In Part 1 of 2 on the Learning Lab, Mark Urban and Dragos' CISO Steve Applegate talk about starting an OT cybersecurity program.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from CyberWire Inc., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

The Daily Scoop Podcast
Year two of the PMA; Cyber advice for Pentagon leaders; A plan for zero-emission vehicles by 2027

The Daily Scoop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 30:52


The President's Management Agenda is just over a year old today. The Office of Management and Budget released it November 18, 2021. Terry Gerton, president and CEO of the National Academy of Public Administration, discusses the progress government has made implementing the agenda and what's next. The Department of Defense has set a target for FY2027 to implement its new Zero Trust Strategy and Roadmap. The plan outlines four high-level strategic goals for the department. Andy Stewart, national security and government senior strategist for cybersecurity at Cisco, gives some key recommendations for cybersecurity leaders in the Pentagon. This interview is underwritten by Cisco. Federal agencies have a 2027 deadline to move to zero-emission light-duty vehicles, according to an executive order from the Biden administration. The Government Accountability Office sees some roadblocks to making that deadline. Catina Latham, acting director for physical infrastructure at GAO, breaks down her team's findings. The Daily Scoop Podcast is available every weekday afternoon. If you want to hear more of the latest from Washington, subscribe to The Daily Scoop Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher. And if you like what you hear, please let us know in the comments.

Control Loop: The OT Cybersecurity Podcast
Preparing for the electrical grid of the future.

Control Loop: The OT Cybersecurity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 38:43


The US Government Accountability Office issues a report on offshore oil and gas cybersecurity. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to secure power grids. Boa web server vulnerabilities used to target energy organizations. CISA updates its Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework. And CISA issues advisories for ICS vulnerabilities. Guests Mara Winn and Guohui Yuan join us from the Department of Energy to discuss their report, "Cybersecurity Considerations for Distributed Energy Resources on the U.S. Electric Grid.” In Part 1 of 2 on the Learning Lab, Mark Urban and Dragos' CISO Steve Applegate talk about starting an OT cybersecurity program. Control Loop News Brief. GAO issues report on offshore oil and gas cybersecurity. Offshore Oil and Gas: Strategy Urgently Needed to Address Cybersecurity Risks to Infrastructure (US Government Accountability Office) ORNL seeks to secure power grids. DarkNet: Lighting up a secure grid communication network (ORNL) Boa web server vulnerabilities. Vulnerable SDK components lead to supply chain risks in IoT and OT environments (Microsoft) Continued Targeting of Indian Power Grid Assets by Chinese State-Sponsored Activity Group (Recorded Future) Sandworm renews ransomware activity against Ukrainian targets. New ransomware attacks in Ukraine linked to Russian Sandworm hackers (BleepingComputer) CISA updates its Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework. Infrastructure Resilience Planning Framework (CISA) CISA issues ICS advisories. CISA Releases Eight Industrial Control Systems Advisories (CISA) CISA Releases Seven Industrial Control Systems Advisories (CISA) Control Loop Interview. Guests Mara Winn and Guohui Yuan from the Department of Energy discuss their report, "Cybersecurity Considerations for Distributed Energy Resources on the U.S. Electric Grid.” Control Loop Learning Lab. In Part 1 of 2 on the Learning Lab, Mark Urban and Dragos' CISO Steve Applegate talk about starting an OT cybersecurity program.

Transition Virginia
Offshore Wind, Pipeline Transparency, Uranium in Virginia, and Upcoming Elections

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 28:59


IN THE NEWS:The end of fossil fuels is blowing in the wind. The Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind proposal would be a massive new wind farm off the coast of Virginia Beach. But only if state regulators approve it. That decision is expected in the next month or so, even the membership of the three-member commission is in flux. Do a better fracking job: That's the message from the Government Accountability Office, which says the federal agency responsible for regulating pipelines needs to do a better job with availability of data and consistency of enforcement. Opponents of pipelines say a lack of transparency and inconsistency of enforcement go way beyond the problems outlined in the GAO report. The Golden Goose. Virginia is sitting on one of the largest uranium deposits in the world in. Plus the recent discovery of gold in Buckingham County is reopening old discussions about commercial mining operations. Lawmakers are about to considering a ban on gold mining in Virginia that would be similar to the longstanding ban on uranium mining in Virginia, which dates back to the early 1980s.At the Watercooler: Former Congressman Tom Garrett is seeking a return to the House of Delegates, while Delegate Sally Hudson is running for the state Senate against Senator Creigh Deeds.Learn more at http://linktr.ee/JacklegMediaSponsored by the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia

Progressive Voices
The Leslie Marshall Show - 11/18/22 - How Healthcare Workers Are Taking Safety Into Their Own Hands

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 40:50


Leslie is joined by Tamara Lefcowitz, International Coordinator for the USW Health Care Workers Council. Tamara provides support to the union's more than 50,000 health care workers across the United States and Canada. Tamara got her start as a community organizer in 2006, investigating police misconduct for the City of Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board. In 2009, she began working with organized labor advocating for health care workers. She now proudly bargains contracts, trains activists, and organizes workers to advocate for themselves, their patients, and our communities. The two discuss how healthcare workers are taking safety into their own hands. Health care workers made incredible sacrifices to help their communities during the Covid-19 pandemic, relying on each other to protect their patients and themselves. Now, they're using that same solidarity to make huge improvements to their jobs, their workplaces and America's care system. Even before the pandemic, health care workers faced urgent threats to their workplace health and safety. Workplace violence has long been a problem for health care workers. In 2016 the GAO found that health care workers were at least five times more likely to experience violence on the job as workers in other industries. Now, threats against health care workers are rising. Legislation like the Workplace Violence Prevention for Healthcare and Social Service Workers Act would help provide meaningful protections, like compelling OSHA to establish an enforceable workplace violence standard. Unfortunately, it's been twice held up in the Senate. Longstanding problems with maintaining appropriate staffing levels were also exacerbated by the pandemic and also jeopardize health care workers' health. Nursing shortages are a real and urgent concern. But turnover in other positions like environmental services and dietary also hurts workers across the board and the care they can provide. The pandemic created additional hazards for health care workers, like a lack of adequate PPE and exposed glaring holes in the safety net, like the lack of OSHA guidance on infectious diseases. More than 3,600 health care workers died in the first year of the pandemic alone. And more than half are still reporting symptoms of burnout. This ended up putting not only health care workers at risk, but their patients and communities as well. Now, workers are taking matters into their own hands. One of the big things health care workers are doing is organizing. New research from the AFL-CIO shows that 71 percent of health care workers would join a union if they had the chance. Late last year roughly 500 Pittsburgh area health care workers voted unanimously to join the USW for a voice on the job. Unionized health care workers are also winning good contracts. Approximately 800 USW members at Oroville Hospital in Oroville, Calif., this fall ratified a contract that not only provides significant wage increases, but also establishes a labor-management safety committee that gives a real voice to the front-line workers who best know how to address the hazards they and their patients face every day. USW members at Copper Country Mental health in Houghton, Mich., just this week ratified a contract that includes hard-fought workplace violence language. Nurses at three Steward Health Care hospitals in Florida achieved protections from unsafe scheduling and the creation of an infectious disease task force in their new agreement, while workers at Kaleida Health in New York successfully fought for wages increases, a health and safety committee and the health system's commitment to create 500 new positions to address unsafe staffing issues. The website for the USW is www.USW.org and their handle on both Twitter and Instagram is @steelworkers. Tamara's Twitter handle is @TLefcowitz.

The Leslie Marshall Show
How Healthcare Workers Are Taking Safety Into Their Own Hands

The Leslie Marshall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 40:50


Leslie is joined by Tamara Lefcowitz, International Coordinator for the USW Health Care Workers Council. Tamara provides support to the union's more than 50,000 health care workers across the United States and Canada. Tamara got her start as a community organizer in 2006, investigating police misconduct for the City of Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board. In 2009, she began working with organized labor advocating for health care workers. She now proudly bargains contracts, trains activists, and organizes workers to advocate for themselves, their patients, and our communities. The two discuss how healthcare workers are taking safety into their own hands. Health care workers made incredible sacrifices to help their communities during the Covid-19 pandemic, relying on each other to protect their patients and themselves. Now, they're using that same solidarity to make huge improvements to their jobs, their workplaces and America's care system. Even before the pandemic, health care workers faced urgent threats to their workplace health and safety. Workplace violence has long been a problem for health care workers. In 2016 the GAO found that health care workers were at least five times more likely to experience violence on the job as workers in other industries. Now, threats against health care workers are rising. Legislation like the Workplace Violence Prevention for Healthcare and Social Service Workers Act would help provide meaningful protections, like compelling OSHA to establish an enforceable workplace violence standard. Unfortunately, it's been twice held up in the Senate. Longstanding problems with maintaining appropriate staffing levels were also exacerbated by the pandemic and also jeopardize health care workers' health. Nursing shortages are a real and urgent concern. But turnover in other positions like environmental services and dietary also hurts workers across the board and the care they can provide. The pandemic created additional hazards for health care workers, like a lack of adequate PPE and exposed glaring holes in the safety net, like the lack of OSHA guidance on infectious diseases. More than 3,600 health care workers died in the first year of the pandemic alone. And more than half are still reporting symptoms of burnout. This ended up putting not only health care workers at risk, but their patients and communities as well. Now, workers are taking matters into their own hands. One of the big things health care workers are doing is organizing. New research from the AFL-CIO shows that 71 percent of health care workers would join a union if they had the chance. Late last year roughly 500 Pittsburgh area health care workers voted unanimously to join the USW for a voice on the job. Unionized health care workers are also winning good contracts. Approximately 800 USW members at Oroville Hospital in Oroville, Calif., this fall ratified a contract that not only provides significant wage increases, but also establishes a labor-management safety committee that gives a real voice to the front-line workers who best know how to address the hazards they and their patients face every day. USW members at Copper Country Mental health in Houghton, Mich., just this week ratified a contract that includes hard-fought workplace violence language. Nurses at three Steward Health Care hospitals in Florida achieved protections from unsafe scheduling and the creation of an infectious disease task force in their new agreement, while workers at Kaleida Health in New York successfully fought for wages increases, a health and safety committee and the health system's commitment to create 500 new positions to address unsafe staffing issues. All of these successes come down to building relationships and working together – another way the USW is tackling workplace health and safety concerns in the health care sector – including a pilot program aimed at worker education and empowerment. This collective action is now resulting in better patient outcomes, more inspections for workplace hazards and better access to personal protective equipment (PPE), among many other advantages, making it good not only for workers but for whole communities. The website for the USW is www.USW.org and their handle on both Twitter and Instagram is @steelworkers. Tamara's Twitter handle is @TLefcowitz.

Fastest 5 Minutes, The Podcast Government Contractors Can't Do Without
Fastest 5 Minutes: GAO and ASBCA Annual Reports, Climate-Related Disclosures

Fastest 5 Minutes, The Podcast Government Contractors Can't Do Without

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 5:15


This week's episode covers annual reports from GAO and the ASBCA, a proposed rule regarding disclosure of greenhouse gas emissions and climate-related financial risk, and new requirement to refer any suspected instances of human trafficking to suspension and debarment officials, and is hosted by Peter Eyre and Yuan Zhou. Crowell & Moring's "Fastest 5 Minutes" is a biweekly podcast that provides a brief summary of significant government contracts legal and regulatory developments that no government contracts lawyer or executive should be without.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
The GAO ponders a steady drop in bid protests coming its way

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 22:04


For the 5th year in a row, the number of bid protests presented for adjudication by the Government Accountability Office has dropped. In 2018, GAO heard more then 2,600 cases. Last year, that number was only 1,600. To find out what might be going on, Federal Drive host Tom Temin spoke with Edward Goldstein, GAO's associate general counsel.