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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Information technology

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Latest podcast episodes about Information technology

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen
An Immigrant’s Future Work Story

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 45:18


Future of Work Sherpa Dan Smolen discovers Raj Subrameyer's immigrant's future work story. Raj arrived in the United States for graduate study. He was an introverted Southern Indian student who pursued the lofty career goals that others expected him to follow. Astonishingly, he applied for over 1,200 jobs and got but a handful of interviews. That's when he decided to focus on his own happiness; he began a process of discovery which got him unstuck to start his own business. Now, through his brand ChaiLatte Consulting, Raj helps tech careerists get unstuck for the future of work. Full interview starts at 2:55 In a wide-ranging discussion, Raj: Provides the unique value proposition of ChaiLatte Consulting, his own name-change, and the importance of having an “immigrant mindset.” Starts at 4:40 Recalls how he tapped his “inner extrovert” to help careerists. Starts at 8:32 Pushes against the [Southern Indian] cultural tenet of not questioning things. Starts at 13:25 Delves into the WHY of personal (career) branding. Starts at 26:27 Describes how immigrants to the US can overcome their disadvantages. Starts at 31:22 Offers his take on future of work opportunities. Starts at 39:01 Raj also describes his motivation to help others achieve career success: “I wanted to help underdogs like me, who had the skill-sets, but were looking for guidance.” With great cheer, Raj Subrameyer lives a rewarding immigrant's future work story. Full interview starts at 2:55 About our guest: Raj Subrameyer earned a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology from Anna University and a Masters of Science in Software Engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Raj is the author of the book, Skyrocket Your Career. He lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. EPISODE DATE: November 26, 2021 Social media: – Facebook – LinkedIn – Twitter – TEDx Talk (NEW!) – YouTube Please Subscribe to The Dan Smolen Podcast on: – Apple Podcast – Android – Google Podcasts – Pandora – Spotify – Stitcher – TuneIn …or wherever you get your podcasts. You may also click HERE to receive our podcast episodes by email. Image credits: Lady Liberty, Choreograph for iStock Photo; Raj Subrameyer, The Dan Smolen Experience; Podcast button, J. Brandt Studio for The Dan Smolen Experience.

IEA Conversations
Should competition authorities intervene in digital markets?

IEA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:01


Michael Grenfell is the Executive Director, Enforcement, at the Competition and Markets Authority where he is responsible for leading the CMA's enforcement work on Competition Act cases, criminal cartels and consumer enforcement, to provide value to markets and consumers providing strong, visible and dynamic leadership of the CMA's enforcement work. This is a recording of a speech given at a joint Institute of Economic Affairs and Information Technology and Innovation Foundation conference called 'The Meaning of Competition: Assertive Antitrust Enforcement and The Digital Economy' on Thursday 4th November 2021. In May 1946, Hayek delivered the seminal Stafford Little Lecture at Princeton University, laying out his influential ideas of competition as a rivalrous process by which information is discovered. Celebrating the 75th anniversary of the lecture, the conference reinvigorated Hayek's legacy in these times of aggressive antitrust enforcement in the digital economy. Jointly organised by the Schumpeter Project on Competition Policy at the ITIF, and the IEA's Regulatory Affairs Programme, we debated current conceptions and misconceptions of the meaning of competition in the digital era. The Institute of Economic Affairs is recognised as one of the most influential think tanks in the UK, and its history is closely associated with ideas of Friedrich A. Hayek. We are delighted to host our distinguished speakers and guests today. Founded in 2006, the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) is the world's top think tank for science and technology policy in the latest edition of the University of Pennsylvania's authoritative Global Go To Think Tank Index. ITIF's mission is to formulate, evaluate, and promote policy solutions that accelerate innovation and boost productivity to spur growth, opportunity, and progress.   Support the IEA on Patreon, where we give you the opportunity to directly help us continue producing stimulating and educational online content, whilst subscribing to exclusive IEA perks, benefits and priority access to our content https://patreon.com/iealondon   FOLLOW US: TWITTER - https://twitter.com/iealondon​​ INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/ieauk/​​ FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/ieauk​​ WEBSITE - https://iea.org.uk/

Local Matters
Bob Bell & Tennessee College Of Applied Technology Livingston In 2021

Local Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:00


Bob Bell talks with Jeff Slagle, Vice President of Operations and Facilities at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology in Livingston. They discuss what his new roll as Vice President of Operations and Facilities entails at TCAT Livingston, the ins and outs of their Transportation, Distribution, Warehousing, and Logistics Program, and their new facilities to go along the the program, as well as the various types of certifications and diplomas that they offer in the field of Information Technology. Listen to the latest Local Matters Podcast… Presented by Office Mart.

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
Ep#147 From investing passively to investing as a Co-GP with Vinki Loomba

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 20:19


Today's guest is Vinki Loomba, an entrepreneur and strategist with a background in commercial real estate, Information Technology, and academia. Vinki is the CEO & Founder of Loomba Investment Group, which is positioned for exponential growth. In this episode, Rama and Vinki discuss:How Vinki got started with Multifamily investmentsOperator, Market and the deal the 3 fundamentals to investingVinki's Current focus and business modelHow Vinki's experience in academia and IT got translated into multifamily skillsGetting over fears and challengesConnect with Vinki LoombaWebsite: https://loombainvest.com/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vinkiloombaConnect with Rama KrishnaWebsite: www.ushacapital.comEmail: info@ushacapital.com

Interviews: Tech and Business
CIO Strategy: How to Lead Enterprise Data and Analytics?

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:25


Data and analytics should be a core competence for every Chief Information Officer and Information Technology organization. Given the business, technical, and cultural challenges of using data to make informed business decisions, it's no surprise that data science and analytics are hard.So, how do you make your enterprise data and analytics program a success? Bruno Aziza, head of data and analytics for Google Cloud, explains his approach with valuable lessons based on practical experience.The conversation includes these topics:-- CIO Strategy: How to Lead Enterprise Data and Analytics?-- How to choose a meaningful data problem?-- How important is data infrastructure?-- What is a data mesh?-- How can small organizations take advantage of data and analytics?-- Should the CIO own data and analytics?-- Chief financial officer as the data owner?-- Chief Digital Officer as the data owner?-- Value of low-code and no-code products to CIOs?Bruno Aziza is head of data and analytics for Google Cloud. He specializes in scaling businesses & turning them into global leaders. He helped launch Alpine Data Labs (bought by Tibco), AppStream (bought by Symantec), SiSense (bought Periscope Data) & AtScale. He was at Business Objects when they went IPO (after acquiring Acta & Crystal Reports, & before SAP bought them for $7B). He was at Microsoft when they turned the Data & Analytics business into a $1B giant. Bruno has written 2 books on Data Analytics and Enterprise Performance Management. His allegiance is to the Analytics Community worldwide.Subscribe to the CXOTalk newsletter: https://www.cxotalk.com/subscribeRead the complete transcript: https://www.cxotalk.com/episode/google-cloud-how-manage-enterprise-data-science

The CyberWire
How ransomware impacts organizations. [CyberWire-X]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:20


As ransomware attacks rapidly rise in frequency, eye-popping ransom demands grab headlines, and consumers experience product shortages and difficulty accessing services as the organizations they do business with are knocked offline. However, little is reported about the impact of a ransomware attack inside an organization. However, little is reported about the impact of a ransomware attack inside an organization.  In this show, we cover what steps organizations are taking now to prepare for a ransomware attack and what happens to an organization on that especially bad day when ransomware comes calling. The CyberWire's Rick Howard speaks with Hash Table member Don Welch, Vice president for Information Technology and Global Chief Information Officer at New York University, and show sponsor Keeper Security's CEO & Co-Founder Darren Guccione joins The CyberWire's Dave Bittner on this CyberWire-X as they share their expertise on the topic.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
How UCHealth Prepares and Supports Staff for EHR Rollouts and Changes

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:26


In this episode, Bobby Zarr, Senior Director of Healthcare at uPerform, is joined by Kelly Williamson, Director of Information Technology at UCHealth, to discuss what drove UCHealth to rethink its training program, the benefits of uPerform's just-in-time learning and support platform, feedback from clinicians, and more.This episode is sponsored by uPerform.

Screaming in the Cloud
Cutting Cloud Costs at Cloudflare with Matthew Prince

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:08


About MatthewMatthew Prince is co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare. Cloudflare's mission is to help build a better Internet. Today the company runs one of the world's largest networks, which spans more than 200 cities in over 100 countries. Matthew is a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, winner of the 2011 Tech Fellow Award, and serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Information Technology and Privacy Law. Matthew holds an MBA from Harvard Business School where he was a George F. Baker Scholar and awarded the Dubilier Prize for Entrepreneurship. He is a member of the Illinois Bar, and earned his J.D. from the University of Chicago and B.A. in English Literature and Computer Science from Trinity College. He's also the co-creator of Project Honey Pot, the largest community of webmasters tracking online fraud and abuse.Links: Cloudflare: https://www.cloudflare.com Blog post: https://blog.cloudflare.com/aws-egregious-egress/ Bandwidth Alliance: https://www.cloudflare.com/bandwidth-alliance/ Announcement of R2: https://blog.cloudflare.com/introducing-r2-object-storage/ Blog.cloudflare.com: https://blog.cloudflare.com Duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Today, my guest is someone I feel a certain kinship with, if for no other reason than I spend the bulk of my time antagonizing AWS incredibly publicly. And my guest periodically descends into the gutter with me to do the same sort of things. The difference is that I'm a loudmouth with a Twitter account and Matthew Prince is the co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare, which is, of course, publicly traded. Matthew, thank you for deigning to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Corey, it's my pleasure, and appreciate you having me on.Corey: So, I'm mostly being facetious here, but not entirely, in that you have very publicly and repeatedly called out some of the same things I love calling out, which is AWS's frankly egregious egress pricing. In fact, that was a title of a blog post that you folks put out, and it was so well done I'm ashamed I didn't come up with it myself years ago. But it's something that is resonating with a large number of people in very specific circumstances as far as what their company does. Talk to me a little bit about that. Cloudflare is a CDN company and increasingly looking like something beyond that. Where do you stand on this? What got you on this path?Matthew: I was actually searching through really old emails to find something the other day, and I found a message from all the way back in 2009, so actually even before Michelle and I had come up with a name for Cloudflare. We were really just trying to understand the pricing on public clouds and breaking it all down. How much does the compute cost? How much does storage cost? How much does bandwidth cost?And we kept running the numbers over and over and over again, and the storage and compute costs actually seemed relatively reasonable and you could understand it, but the economics behind the bandwidth just made no sense. It was clear that as bandwidth usage grew and you got scale that your costs eventually effectively went to zero. And I think it was that insight that led to us starting Cloudflare. And the self-service plans at Cloudflare have always been unlimited bandwidth, and from the beginning, we didn't charge for bandwidth. People told us at the time we were crazy to not do that, but I think that that realization, that over time and at scale, bandwidth costs do go to zero is really core to who Cloudflare is.Cloudflare launched a little over 11 years ago now, and as we've watched the various public clouds and AWS in particular just really over that same 11 years not only not follow the natural price of bandwidth down, but really hold their costs steady. At some point, we've got a lot of mutual customers and it's a complaint that we hear from our mutual customers all the time, and we decided that we should do something about it. And so that started four years ago, when we launched the Bandwidth Alliance, and worked with almost all the major public clouds with the exception of Amazon, to say that if someone is sending traffic from a public cloud network to Cloudflare's network, we're not going to charge them for the bandwidth. It's going across a piece of fiber optic cable that yeah, there's some cost to put it in place and maybe there's some maintenance costs associated with it, but there's not—Corey: And the equipment at the end costs money, but it's not cloud cost; it just cost on a per second, every hour of your lifetime basis. It's a capital expense that is amortized across a number of years et cetera, et cetera.Matthew: And it's a fixed cost. It's not a variable cost. You put that fiber optic cable and you use a port on a router on each side. There's cost associated with that, but it's relatively de minimis. And so we said, “If it's not costing us anything and it's not costing a cloud provider anything, why are we charging customers for that?”And I think it's an argument that resonated with almost every other provider that was out there. And so Google discounts traffic when it's sent to us, Microsoft discounts traffic when it's sent to us, and we just announced that Oracle has joined this discounting their traffic, which was already some of the most cost-effective bandwidth from any cloud provider.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oracle's fantastic. As you were announced, I believe today, the fact that they're joining the Bandwidth Alliance is both fascinating and also, on some level, “Okay. It doesn't matter as much because their retail starting cost is 10% of Amazon's.” You have to start pushing an awful lot of traffic relative to what you would do AWS before it starts to show up. It's great to see.Matthew: And the fact that they're taking that down to effectively zero if you're using us is even better, right? And I think it again just illustrates how Amazon's really alone in this at being so egregious in how they do that. And it's, when we've done the math to calculate what their markups are, it's almost 80 times what reasonable assumptions on what their wholesale costs are. And so we really do believe in fighting for our customers and being customer-centric, and this seems like a place where—again, Amazon provides an incredible service and so many things, but the data transfer costs are just completely outrageous. And I'm glad that you're calling them out on it, and I'm glad we're calling them out on it and I think increasingly they look isolated and very anti-customer.Corey: What's interesting to me is that ingress to AWS at all the large public tier-one cloud providers is free. Which has led, I think, to the assumption—real or not—that bandwidth doesn't actually cost anything, whereas going outbound, all I can assume is that one day, some Amazon VP was watching a rerun of Meet the Parents and they got to the line where Ben Stiller says, “Oh, you can milk anything with nipples,” and said, “Holy crap. Our customers all have nipples; we can milk them with egress charges.” And here we are. As much as I think the cloud empowers some amazing stuff, the egress charges are very much an Achilles heel to a point where it starts to look like people won't even consider public cloud for certain workloads based upon that.People talk about how Netflix is a great representation of the ideal AWS customers. Yeah, but they don't stream a single byte to customers from AWS. They have their own CDN called Open Connect that they put all around the internet, specifically for that use case because it would bankrupt them otherwise.Matthew: If you're a small customer, bandwidth does cost something because you have to pay someone to do the work of interconnecting with all of the various networks that are out there. If you start to be, though, a large customer—like a Cloudflare, like an AWS, like an Azure—that is sending serious traffic to the internet, then it starts to actually be in the interest of ISPs to directly interconnect with you, and the costs of your bandwidth over time will approach zero. And that's the just economic reality of how bandwidth pricing works. I think that the confusion, to some extent, comes from all of us having bought our own home internet connection. And I think that the fact that you get more bandwidth up in most internet connections, and you get down, people think that there's some physics, which is associated with that.And there are; that turns out just to be the legacy of the cable system that was really designed to send pictures down to your—Corey: It wasn't really a listening post. Yeah.Matthew: Right. And so they have dedicated less capacity for up and again, in-home network connections, that makes a ton of sense, but that's not how internet connections work globally. In fact, you pay—you get a symmetric connection. And so if they can demonstrate that it's free to take the traffic in, we can't figure out any reason that's not simply about customer lock-in; why you would charge to take data out, but you wouldn't charge to put it in. Because actually cost more from writing data to a disk, it costs more than reading it from a disk.And so by all reasonable accounts, if they were actually charging based on what their costs were, they would charge for ingress but they want to charge for egress. But the approach that we've taken is to say, “For standard bandwidth, we just aren't going to charge for it.” And we do charge for if you use our premium routing services, which is something called Argo, but even then it's relatively cheap compared with what is just standard kind of internet connectivity that's out there. And as we see more of the clouds like Microsoft and Google and Oracle show that this is a place where they can be much more customer-centric and customer-friendly, over time I'm hopeful that will put pressure on Amazon and they will eliminate their egress fees.Corey: People also tend to assume that when I talk about this, that I'm somehow complaining about the level of discounting or whatnot, and they yell at me and say, “Oh, well, you should know by now, Corey, that no one at significant scale pays retail pricing.” “Thanks, professor. I appreciate that, but four years ago, or so I sat down with a startup founder who was sketching out the idea for a live video streaming service and said, ‘There's something wrong with my math because if I built this on AWS—which he knew very well, incidentally—it looks like it would cost me at our scale of where we're hoping to hit $65,000 a minute.'” And I checked and yep, sure enough, his math was not wrong, so he obviously did not build his proof of concept on top of AWS. And the last time I checked, they had raised several 100 million dollars in a bunch of different funding rounds.That is a company now that will not be on AWS because it was never an option. I want to talk as well about your announcement of R2, which is just spectacular. It is—please correct me if I get any of this wrong—it's an object store that lives in your existing distributed-points-of-presence-slash-data-centers-slash-colo-slash-a-bunch-of-computers-in-fancy-warehouse-rooms-with-the-lights-are-always-on-And-it's-always-cold-and-noisy. And people can store data there—Matthew: [crosstalk 00:10:23] aisles it's cold; in the other aisles, it's hot. But yes.Corey: Exactly. But it turns out when you lurk around to the hot aisle, that's not where all the buttons are and the things you're able to plug into, so it's freeze or sweat, and there's never a good answer. But it's an object store that costs a fair bit less than retail pricing for Amazon S3, or most other object stores out there. Which, okay, great. That's always good to see competition in the storage space, but specifically, you're not charging any data transfer costs whatsoever for doing this. First, where did this come from?Matthew: So, we needed it ourselves. I think all of the great products at Cloudflare start with an internal need. If you look at why do we build our zero-trust solutions? It's because we said we needed a security solution that was fast and reliable and secure to protect our employees as they were going out and using the internet.Why did we build Cloudflare Workers? Because we needed a very flexible compute platform where we could build systems ourselves. And that's not unique to us. I mean, why did Amazon build AWS? They built it because they needed those tools in order to continue to grow and expand as quickly as possible.And in fact, I think if you look at the products that Google makes that are really great, it ends up being the ones that Google's employees use themselves. Gmail started as Caribou once upon a time, which was their internal email system. And so we needed an object store and the sometimes belligerent CEO of Cloudflare insisted that our team couldn't use any of the public cloud object stores. And so we had to build it.That was the start of it and we've been using it internally for products over time. It powers, for example, Cloudflare Images, it powers a lot of our streaming video services, and it works great. And at some point, we said, “Can we take this and make it available to everyone?” The question that you've asked on Twitter, and I think a lot of people reasonably ask us, “What's the catch?”Corey: Well, in my defense, I think it's fair. There was an example that I gave of, “Okay, I'm going to go ahead and keep—because it's new, I don't trust new object stores. Great. I'm going to do the same experiment twice, keep one the pure AWS story and the other, I'm just going to add Cloudflare R2 to the mix so that I have to transfer out of AWS once.” For a one gigabyte file that gets shared out for a petabyte's worth of bandwidth, on AWS it costs roughly $52,000 to do that. If I go with the R2 solution, it cost me 13 cents, all of which except for a penny-and-a-half are AWS charges. And that just feels—when you're looking at that big of a gap, it's easy to look at that and think, “Okay, someone is trying to swindle me somewhere. And when you can't spot the sucker, it's probably me. What's the catch?”Matthew: I guess it's not really a catch; it's an explanation. We have been able to drive our bandwidth costs down low enough that in that particular use case, we have to store the file, and that, again, that—there's a hard disk in there and we replicate it to make sure that it's available so it's not just one hard disk, but it's multiple hard disks in various places, but that amortized over time, isn't that big a cost. And then bandwidth is effectively zero. And so if we can do that, then that's great.Maybe a different way of framing the question is like, “Why would we do that?” And I think what we see is that there is an opportunity for customers to be able to use the best of various cloud providers and hook the different parts together. So, people talk about multi-cloud all the time, and for a while, the way that I think people thought about that was you take the exact same workload and you run it in Azure and AWS. That turns out not to be—I mean, maybe some people do that, but it's super rare and it's incredibly hard.Corey: It has been a recurring theme of most things I say where, by default, that is one of the dumbest things I can imagine.Matthew: Yeah, that isn't good. But what people do want to do is they want to say, “Listen, there's some really great services that Amazon provides; we want to use those. And there's some really great services that Azure provides, and we want to use those. And Google's got some great machine learning, and so does IBM. And I want to sort of mix and match the various pieces together.”And the challenge in doing that is the egress fees. If everyone just had a detente and said there's going to be no egress fees for us to be able to hook these various [pits 00:14:48] together, then you would be able to take advantage of a lot of the different technologies and we would actually get stronger applications. And so the vision of what we're trying to build is how can we be the fabric that can stitch the various cloud providers together so that you can do that. And when we looked at that, and we said, “Okay, what's the path to getting there?” The big place where there's the just meatiest cost on egress fees is object stores.And so if you could have a centralized object store, and you can say then from that object go use whatever the best service is at Amazon, go use whatever the best service is at Google, go use whatever the best service is at Azure, that then allows, I think, actually people to take advantage of the cloud in a way which is what people really should mean when they talk about multi-cloud. Which is, there should be competition on the various features themselves, and you should be able to pick and choose the best of all of the different bits. And I think we as consumers then benefit from that. And so when we're looking at how we can strategically enable that future, building an object store was a real key part of that, and that's part of what we're doing. Now, how do we make money off of that? Well, there's a little bit off the storage, and again, even [laugh]—Corey: Well, that is the Amazonian answer there. It's like, “Your margin is my opportunity,” is a famous Bezos quote, and I figure you're sitting there saying, “Ah, it would cost $52,000 to do that in Amazon. Ah, we can make a penny-and-a-half.” That's very Amazonian, you could probably get hired over there with that philosophy.Matthew: Yeah. And this is a commodity service, just [laugh] storing data. If you look across the history of what Cloudflare has done, in 2014, we made encryption free because it's absurd to pay for math, right? I mean, it's just crazy right?Corey: Or to pay for security as a value-add. No, that should be baked into whatever you're doing, in an ideal world.Matthew: Domain registration. Like, it's writing something down in a ledger. It's a commodity; of course it should go to whatever the absolute cost is. On the other hand, there are things that we do that aren't commodities where we are able to better protect people because we see so much traffic, and we've built the machine learning models, and we've done those things, and so we charge for those things. So commodities, we think over time, go to effectively, whatever their cost is, and then the value is in the actual intelligent services that are on top of it.But an object store is a commodity and so we should be trying to drive that pricing down. And in the case of bandwidth, it's effectively free for us. And so if we can be that fabric that connects the different class together, I think that makes sense is a strategy for us and that's why R2 made a ton of sense for us to build and to launch.Corey: There seems to be a lack of ability for lots of folks, at least on the internet to imagine a use case other than theirs. I cheated by being a consultant, I get to borrow other people's use cases at a high degree of turnover. But the question I saw raised was, “Well, how many workloads really do that much egress from static objects that don't change? Doesn't sound like there'd be a whole lot of them.” And it's, “Oh, my sweet summer child. Sure, your app doesn't do a lot of that, but let me introduce it to my friends who are hosting videos on their website, for example, or large images that get accessed a whole bunch of times; things that are written once and then read forever by the internet.”Matthew: And we sit in a position where because of the role that Cloudflare plays where we sit in front of a number of these different cloud providers, we could actually look at the use cases and the data, and then build products in order to solve that. And that's why we started with Workers; that's why we then built the KV store that was on top of that; we built object-store next. And so you can see as we're sort of marching through these things, it is very much being informed by the data that we actually see from real customers. And one of the things that I really like about R2 is in exactly the example that you gave where you can keep everything in S3; you can set R2 in front of it and put it in slurp mode, and effectively it just—as those objects get pulled out, it starts storing them there. And so the migration path is super easy; you don't have to actually change anything about your application and will cut your bills substantially.And so I think that's the right thing to enable a multi-cloud world where, again, it's not you're running the exact same workload in different places, but you get to take advantage of the really great tack that all of these companies are building and use that. And then the companies will compete on building that tech well. So, it's not just about how do I get the data in and then kind of underinvest in all of the different services that I provide. It's how can we make sure that on a service-by-service basis, you actually are having real competition over time. And again, I think that's the right thing for customers, and absolutely R2 might not be the right thing for every use case that's out there, but I think that it wi—enabling more competition is going to make the cloud better for everyone.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's always fun hearing it from Amazonians. It's, “You have a service that talks to satellites in orbit. You really think that's a general-purpose thing that every company out there has to deal with?” No. Well, not yet, anyway.It also just feels to me like their transfer approach is antithetical to almost every other aspect of how they have built their cloud. Amazonians have told me repeatedly—I believe them—that their network is effectively magic. The fact that you can get near line rate between any two points without melting various [unintelligible 00:20:14], which shows that there was significant thought, work, effort, planning, technology, et cetera, put into the network. And I don't dispute that. But if I'm trying to build a workload and put it inside of AWS, I can control how it performs tied to budget; I can have a lot of RAM for things that are memory intensive, or I can have a little RAM; I can have great CPU performance or terrible CPU performance.The challenge with data transfer is it is uniformly great. “I want to get that data over there super quickly.” Yeah, awesome. I'm fine paying a premium for that. But I have this pile of data right here. I want to get it over there, ideally by Tuesday. There's no good way to do that, even with their Snowball—or Snow Family devices—when you fill them with data and send them into AWS, yeah, that's great. Then you just pay for the use of the device.Use them to send data out of AWS, they tack on an additional per-gigabyte fee for getting the data out. You're training as a lawyer, you went to the same law school that my wife did, the University of Chicago, which, oh, interesting stories down that path. But if we look at this, my argument is that the way to do an end-run around this is to sue Amazon for something, and then demand access to the data you have living in their environment during discovery. Make them give it to you for free, though, they'd probably find a way to charge it there, too. It's just a complete lack of vision and lack of awareness because it feels like they're milking a cash cow until it dies.Matthew: Yeah, they probably would charge for it and you'd also have to pay a lot of lawyers. So, I'm not sure that's the cost [crosstalk 00:21:44]—Corey: Its only works above certain volumes, I figure.Matthew: I do think that if your pricing strategy is designed to lock people in to prevent competition, then that does create other challenges. And there are certainly some University of Chicago law professors out there that have spent their careers arguing why antitrust laws don't make any sense, but I think that this is definitely one of those areas where you can see very clearly that customers are actually being harmed by the pricing strategy that's there. And the pricing strategy is not tied in any way to the underlying costs which are associated with that. And so I do think that, especially as you see other providers in the space—like Oracle—taking their bandwidth costs to effectively zero, that's the sort of thing that I think will have regulators start to scratch their heads. If tomorrow, AWS took egress costs to zero, and as a result, R2 was not as advantaged as it is today against them, you know, I think there are a lot of people who would say, “Oh, they showed Cloudflare.” I would do a happy dance because that's the best thing [thing they can do 00:22:52] for our customers.Corey: Our long-term goals, it sounds like, are relatively aligned. People think that I want to see AWS reign ascendant; people also say I want to see them burning and crashing into the sea, and neither one of those are true. What I want is, I want someone in a few years from now to be doing a startup and trying to figure out which cloud provider they should pick, and I want that to be a hard decision. Ideally, if you wind up reducing data transfer fees enough, it doesn't even have to be only one. There are stories that starts to turn into an actual realistic multi-cloud story that isn't, at its face, ridiculous. But right now, you have to pick a horse and ride it, for a variety of reasons. And I don't like that.Matthew: It's entirely egress-based. And again, I think that customers are better off if they are able to pick who is the best service at any time. And that is what encourages innovation. And over time, that's even what's good for the various cloud providers because it's what keeps them being valuable and keeps their customers thinking that they're building something which is magical and that they aren't trapped in the decision that they made, which is when we talk to a lot of the customers today, they feel that way. And it's I think part of why something like R2 and something like the Bandwidth Alliance has gotten so much attention because it really touches a nerve on what's frustrating customers today. And if tomorrow Amazon announced that they were eliminating egress fees and going head-to-head with R2, again, I think that's a wonderful outcome. And one that I think is unlikely, but I would celebrate it if it happened.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: My favorite is people who don't do research on this stuff. They wind up saying, “Oh, yeah. Cloudflare is saying that bandwidth is a fixed cost. Of course not. They must be losing their shirt on this.”You are a publicly-traded company. Your gross margins are 76% or 77%, depending upon whether we're talking about GAAP or non-GAAP. Point being, you are clearly not selling this at a loss and hoping to make it up in volume. That's what a VC-backed company does. Is something that is real and as accurate.I want to, on some level, I guess, low-key apologize because I keep viewing Cloudflare through a lens that is increasingly inaccurate, which is as a CDN. But you've had Cloudflare Workers for a while, effectively Functions as a Service that run at the edge, which has this magic aura around it, that do various things, which is fascinating to me. You're launching R2; it feels like you are in some ways aiming at becoming a cloud provider, but instead of taking the traditional approach of building it from the region's outward, you're building it from the outward in. Is that a fair characterization?Matthew: I think that's right. I think fundamentally what Cloudflare is, is a network. And I remember early on in the pandemic, we did a series of fireside chats with people we thought we could learn from. And so was everyone from Andre Iguodala, the basketball player, to Mark Cuban, the entrepreneur, to we had a [unintelligible 00:25:56] governor and all kinds of things. And we these were just internal on off the record.And I got to do one with Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google. And I said, “You know, Eric, one of the things that we struggle with is describing what is Cloudflare.” And without hesitation, he said, “Oh, that's easy. You're the network I plug into and don't have to worry about anything else.” And I think that's better than I could say it, myself, and I think that's what it is that we fundamentally are: we're the network that fits together.Now, it turns out that in the process of being that network and enabling that network, we are going to build things like R2, which start to be an object store and starts to sort of step into some of the cloud provider space. And Workers is really just a way of programming that network in order to do that, but it turns out that there are a bunch of workloads that if you move them into the network itself, make sense—not going to be every workload, but a lot of workloads that makes sense there. And again, I think that you can actually be very bullish on all of the big public cloud providers and bullish on Cloudflare at the same time because what we want to do is enable the ability for people to mix and match, and change, and be the fabric that connects all of those things together. And so over time, if Amazon says, “We're going to drop egress fees,” it may be that R2 isn't a product that exists—I don't think they're going to do that, so I think it's something that is going to be successful for us and get a lot of new users to us—but fundamentally, I think that where the traditional public clouds think of themselves as the place you put data and you process data, I think we think of ourselves as the place you move data. And that's somewhat different.That then translates into it as we're building out the different pieces, where it does feel like we're building from the outside in. And it may be that over time, that put versus move distinction becomes narrower and narrower as we build more and more services like R2, and durable objects, and KV, and we're working on a database, and all those things. And it could be that we converge in a similar place.Corey: One thing I really appreciate about your vision because it is so atypical these days, is that you aren't trying to build the multifunction printer of companies. You are not trying to be all things to all people in every scenario. Which is impossible to do, but companies are still trying their level best to do it. You are staking out the bounds of where you were willing to start and where you're willing to stop, in a variety of different ways. I would be—how do I put it?—surprised if you at some point in the next five years come out with, “And this is our own database that we have built out that directly competes with the following open-source project that we basically have implemented their API and gone down that particular path.” It does not sound like it is in your core wheelhouse at that point. You don't need—to my understanding—to write your own database engine in order to do what you do.Matthew: Maybe. I mean, we actually are kind of working on a database because—Corey: Oh, no, here we go again.Matthew: [laugh]—and yeah—in a couple of different ways. So, the first way is, we want to make sure that if you're using Workers, you can connect to whatever database you want to use anywhere in the world. And that's something that's coming and we'll be there. At the same time, the challenge of distributed computing turns out not to be the computing, it turns out to be the data and figuring out how to—CAP theorem is real, right? Consistency, Availability, and Partition tolerance; you can pick any two out of the three, but you can't get all three.And so you there's always going to be some trade-off that's there. And so we don't see a lot of good examples. There's some really cool companies that are working on things in the space, but we don't see a lot of really good examples of who has built a database that can be run on a distributed workload system, like Cloudflare to it do well. And so our team internally needs that, and so we're trying to figure out how to build it for ourselves, and I would imagine that after we build it for ourselves—if it works the way we expect it will—that that will then be something that we open up.Our motivation and the way we think about products is we need to build the tools for our own team. Our team itself is customer zero, and then some of those things are very specific to us, but every once in a while, when there are functions that makes sense for others, then we'll build them as well. And that does maybe risk being the multifunction printer, but again, I think that because the customer for that starts with ourselves, that's how we think about it. And if there's someone else's making a great tool, we'll use that. But in this case, we don't see anyone that's built a multi-tenant, globally-distributed, ACID-compliant relational database.Corey: I can't let it pass on challenge. Sure they have, and you're running it yourself. DNS: the finest database in the world. You stuff whatever you want to text records, and now you have taken a finely crafted wrench and turned it into a barely acceptable hammer, which is what I love about doing that terrible approach. Yeah, relational is not going to quite work that way. But—Matthew: Yes. That's a fancy key-value store, right? So—and we've had that for a long time. As we're trying to build those things up, the good news is that, again, we've run data at scale for quite some time and proven that we can do it efficiently and reliably.Corey: There's a lot that can be said about building the things you need to deliver your product to customers. And maybe a database is a poor example here, but I don't see that your motivation in this space is to step into something completely outside your areas of expertise solely because there's money to be made over there. Well, yeah, fortune passes everywhere. The question is, which are you best positioned to wind up delivering an actual transformative solution to that space, and what parts of it are just rent-seeking where it's okay, we're going to go and wherever the money is, we're chasing that down.Matthew: Yeah, we're still a for-profit business, and we've been able to grow revenue well, but I think it is that what motivates us and what drives us comes back to our mission, which is how do you help build a better internet? And you can look at every single thing that we've done, and we try to be very long-term-oriented. So, for instance, when we in 2014 made encryption free, the number one reason at the time, when people upgraded for the free version of our service, the paid version of our service is they got encryption for that. And so it was super scary to say, “Hey, we're going to take the biggest feature and give it away for free,” but it was clearly the direction of history and we wanted to be on the right side of history. And we considered it a bug that the internet wasn't built in an encrypted way from the beginning.So, of course, that was going to head that direction. And so I think that we and then subsequently Let's Encrypt, and a bunch of others have said, it's absurd that you're charging for math. And again, I think that's a good example of how we think about products. And we want to continue to disrupt ourselves and take the things that once upon a time were reserved for our customers that spend $10 million-plus with us, and we want to keep pushing those things down because, over time, the real opportunity is if you do right by customers, there will be plenty of ways that you can earn some of their budget. And again, we think that is the long-term winning strategy.Corey: I would agree with this. You're not out there making sneakers and selling them because you see people spend a lot of money on that; you're delivering value for customers. I say this as one of your paying customers. I have zero problem paying you every month like clockwork, and it is the least cloud-like experience because I know exactly what the bill is going to be in advance, which is apparently not how things should be done in this industry, yadda, yadda, yadda. It is a refreshingly delightful experience every time.The few times I've had challenges with the service, it has almost always been a—I'll call it a documentation gap, where the way it was explained in the formal documentation was not how I conceptualize things, which, again, explaining what these complex things are to folks who are not steeped in certain areas of them is always going to be a challenge. But I cannot think back to a single customer service failure I've had with you folks. I can't look back at any point where you have failed me as a customer, which is a strange thing to say, given how incredibly efficient I am at stumbling over weird bugs.Matthew: Terrific to have you as a customer. We are hardly perfect and we make mistakes, but one of the things I think that we try to do and one of the core values of Cloudflare is transparency. If I think about, like, the original sins of tech, a lot of it is this bizarre secrecy which pervades the entire industry. When we make mistakes, we talk about them, and we explain them. When there's an error, we don't throw up a white page; we put up a page that has our logo on it because we want to own it.And that sometimes gets blowback because you're in front of it, but again, I think it's the right thing to do for customers. And it's and I think it's incredibly important. One of the things that's interesting is you mentioned that you know what your bill is going to be. If you go back and look at the history of hosting on the internet, in the early days of internet hosting, it looks a lot like AWS.Corey: Oh, 95th percentile transit billing; go for one five minutes segment over and boom, your bill explodes. Oh, I remember those days. Unkindly.Matthew: And it was super complicated. And then what happened is the hosting world switched from this incredibly complicated billing to much more simplified, predictable, unlimited bandwidth with maybe some asterisks, but largely that was in place. And then it's strange that Amazon came along and then has brought us back to the more complicated world that's out there. I would have predicted that that's a sine wave—Corey: It has to be. I mean—Matthew: —and it's going to go back and forth over time. But I would have predicted that we would be more in the direction of coming back toward simplify, everything included. And again, I think that's how we've priced our things from the beginning. I'm surprised that it has held on as long as it has, but I do think that there's going to be an opportunity for—and I don't think Amazon will be the leader here, but I think there will be an opportunity for one of the big clouds.And again, I think Oracle is probably doing this the best of any of them right now—to say, “How can we go away from that complexity? How can we make bills predictable? How can we not nickel and dime everything, but allow you to actually forecast and budget?” And it just seems like that's the natural arc of history, and we will head back toward that. And, again, I think we've done our part to push that along. And I'm excited that other cloud providers seem to be thinking about that now as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. What I do with fixing AWS bills is the same thing folks were doing in the 70s and 80s with long-distance bills for companies. We're definitely hitting that sine wave. I know that if I were at AWS in a leadership role, I would be actively embarrassed that the company that is delivering a better customer experience around financial things is Oracle of all companies, given their history of audits and surprising people and the rest. It is ridiculous to me.One last topic that I want to cover with you before we call it an episode is, back in college, you had a thesis that you have done an excellent job of effectively eliminating from the internet. And the theme of this, to my understanding, was that the internet is a fad. And I am so aligned with that because I'm someone who has said for years that emerging technologies are fads. I've said it about cloud, about virtualization, about containers. And I just skipped Kubernetes. And now I'm all-in on serverless, which means, of course it's going to fail because I'm always wrong on these things. But tell me about that.Matthew: When I was seven years old in 1980, my grandmother gave me an Apple ][+ computer for Christmas. And I took to it like a just absolute duck to water and did things that made me very popular in junior high school, like going to computer camp. And my mom used to sign up for continuing education classes at the local university in computer science, and basically sneak me in, and I'd do all the homework and all that. And I remember when I got to college, there was a small group of students that would come around and help other students set their computer up, and I had it all set up and was involved. And so, got pretty deeply involved in the computer science program at college.And then I remember there was a group of three other students—so they were four of us—and they wanted to start an online digital magazine. And at the time, this was pre-web, or right in the early days of the web; it was sort of nineteen… ninety-three. And we built it originally on old Apple technology called HyperCard. And we used to email out the old HyperCard stacks. And the HyperCard stacks kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger, and we'd send them out to the school so [laugh] that we—so we kept crashing the mail servers.But the college loved this, so they kept buying bigger and bigger mail servers. But they were—at some point, they said, “This won't scale. You got to switch technologies.” And they introduced us to two different groups. One was a printer company based out in San Francisco that had this technology called PDF. And I was a really big fan of PDF. I thought PDF was the future, it was definitely going to be how everything got published.And then the other was this group of dorky graduate students at the University of Illinois that had this thing called a browser, which was super flaky, and crashed all the time, and didn't work. And so of the four of us, I was the one who voted for PDF and the other three were like, “Actually, I think this HTML thing is going to be a hit.” And we built this. We won an award from Wired—which was only a print magazine at the time—that called us the first online-only weekly publication. And it was such a struggle to get anyone to write for it because browsers sucked and, you know, trying to get students on campus, but no one on campus cared.We would get these emails from the other side of the world, where I remember really clearly is this—in broken English—email from Japan saying, “I love the magazine. Please keep writing more for the magazine.” And I remember thinking at the time, “Why do I care if someone in Japan is reading this if the girl down the hall who I have a crush on isn't?” Which is obviously what motivates dorky college students like myself. And at that same time, you saw all of this internet explosion.I remember the moment when Netscape went public and just blew through all the expectations. And it was right around the time I was getting ready to graduate for college, and I was kind of just burned out on the entire thing. And I thought, “If I can't even get anyone to write for this dopey magazine and yet we're winning awards, like, this stuff has to all just be complete garbage.” And so wrote a thesis on—ehh, it was not a very good [laugh] thesis. It's—but one of the things I said was that largely the internet was a fad, and that if it wasn't, that it had some real risks because if you enabled everyone to connect with whatever their weird interests and hobbies were, that you would very quickly fall to the lowest common denominator. And predicted some things that haven't come true. I thought for sure that you would have both a liberal and conservative search engine. And it's a miracle to this day, I think that doesn't exist.Corey: Now, that you said it, of course, it's going to.Matthew: Well, I don't know I've… [sigh] we'll see. But it is pretty amazing that Google has been able to, again, thread that line and stay largely apolitical. I'm surprised there aren't more national search engines; the fact that it only Russia and China have national search engines and France and Germany don't is just strange to me. It seems like if you're controlling the source of truth and how people find it, that seems like something that governments would try and take over. There are some things that in retrospect, look pretty wise, but there were a lot more things that looked really, really stupid. And so I think at some level, I had to build Cloudflare to atone for that stupidity all those years ago.Corey: There's something to be said for looking back and saying, “Yeah, I had an opinion, and with the light of new information, I am changing my opinion.” For some reason, in some circles, it feels like that gets interpreted as a sign of weakness, but I couldn't disagree more, it's, “Well, I had an opinion based upon what I saw at the time. Turns out, I was wrong, and here we are.” I really wish more people were capable of doing that.Matthew: It's one of the things we test for in hiring. And I think the characteristic that describes people who can do that well is really empathy. The understanding that the experiences that you have lead you to have a unique set of insights, but they also create a unique set of blind spots. And it's rare that you find people that are able to do that. And whenever you do—whenever we do we hire them.Corey: To that end, as far as hiring and similar topics go, if people want to learn more about how you view things, and how you see the world, and what you're releasing—maybe even potentially work with you—where can they find you?Matthew: [laugh]. So, the joke, sometimes, internal at Cloudflare is that Cloudflare is a blogging company that runs this global network just to have something to write about. So, I think we're unlike most corporate blogs, which are—if our corporate blog were typical, we'd have articles on, like, “Here are the top six reasons you need a fast website,” which would just be, you know, shoot me. But instead, I think we write about the things that are going on online and our unique view into them. And we have a core value of transparency, so we talk about that. So, if you're interested in Cloudflare, I'd encourage you to—especially if you're of the sort of geekier variety—to check out blog.cloudflare.com, and I think that's a good place to learn about us. And I still write for that occasionally.Corey: You're one of the only non-AWS corporate blogs that I pay attention to, for that exact reason. It is not, “Oh, yay. More content marketing by folks who just feel the need to hit a quota as opposed to talking about something valuable and interesting.” So, it's appreciated.Matthew: The secret to it was we realized at some point that the purpose of the blog wasn't to attract customers, it was to attract potential employees. And it turns out, if you sort of change that focus, then you talk to people like their peers, and it turns out then that the content that you create is much more authentic. And that turns out to be a great way to attract customers as well.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Thanks for all you're doing. And we're very aligned, and keep fighting the good fight. And someday, again, we'll eliminate cloud egress fees, and we can share a beer when we do.Corey: I will absolutely be there for it. Matthew, Prince, CEO, and co-founder of Cloudflare. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a rambling comment explaining that while data packets into a cloud provider are cheap and crappy, the ones being sent to the internet are beautiful, bespoke, unicorn snowflakes, so of course they cost money.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Cognitive Crucible
#70 Hess on the Information Environment and Adapting the Military

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:51


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, MGySgt William Hess discusses a variety of topics related to the information environment. MGySgt Hess is the Senior Enlisted Advisor for the Deputy Commandant for Information at the Headquarters of the United States Marine Corps. In this capacity, his opinions influence the way the Marine Corps navigates information and cognitive-related challenges. After he provides his national security assessment, he discusses how Russia's 2007 cyber attack on Estonia is informing the Marine Corps' capability build today, as well as talent and educational shifts which are happening within the Marine Corps. Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-71 Guest Bio: MGySgt William Hess, Senior Enlisted Advisor (SEA), for the Deputy Commandant for Information (DC I) at the Headquarters of the United States Marine Corps. He also holds a PhD in Information Technology with an emphasis in Information Assurance and Cybersecurity. Disclaimer--- William Hess graduated in 1998 from Widefield High School in Colorado Springs, CO.  He underwent recruit training at 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, Mike Company, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, CA.  Upon graduation from Recruit Training and Marine Combat Training, he was assigned to Camp Johnson, for Basic Supply Clerk Course, 3043 MOS. In December of 1998, Private First Class Hess was assigned to 3rd Supply Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, Okinawa Japan.  Serving as a Fiscal Clerk, Lance Corporal (LCpl) Hess aided in the consolidation of Supply and Maintenance Battalions to create the newly formed 3rd Material Readiness Battalion. In January of 2000, LCpl Hess was transferred to Marine Air Group-16 (MAG-16), 3rd Marine Air Wing.  Within MAG-16, he served as a Consolidated Memorandum Record (CMR) Clerk.  In June of 2000, LCpl Hess was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron (HQHQSQDN), Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, CA to perform the duties of a Marine Corps Instructor of Water Survival.  During his time at the MCAS Miramar Training Tank, he was meritoriously promoted to the rank of Corporal (Cpl). In May of 2002, Cpl Hess received a lateral move to the 4066 MOS, and was promoted to the Rank of Sergeant (Sgt).  Upon completion of the Entry Level Small Systems Computer Specialist Course he was assigned as the NCOIC of the Field Response Team, HQHQSQDN, MCAS Miramar, CA. In July of 2005, Sgt Hess was assigned to 2nd Marine Division and deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).  Upon returning from deployment, he was promoted to the rank of Staff Sergeant (SSgt).  After returning to 2nd Marine Division he was assigned as the Data Plans Chief for II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Forward in support of OIF.  In June of 2008, SSgt Hess transferred to 7th Communications Battalion and was assigned as the Data Chief for the 31st MEU. In June of 2009, SSgt Hess transferred to Marine Corps Network Operations and Security Center, now the Marine Corps Cyber Operations Group, where he served as the Incident Manager for the Marine Corps.  During this assignment, he was promoted to the rank of Gunnery Sergeant (GySgt) and received a lateral move to the Information Assurance Technician MOS (0689). In June of 2011, GySgt was assigned to 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, CA.  From February to August of 2012, he was deployed with 1st Marine Division Forward in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  In July of 2013, GySgt Hess was selected to receive the Information Assurance Scholarship Program to attend the Naval Post Graduate School.  While in attendance at the Naval Post Graduate School, he was promoted to the rank of Master Sergeant (MSgt). In July of 2015, MSgt Hess was assigned as the Staff Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge and Chief Instructor of the Cybersecurity Technician and Managers School House aboard 29 Palms California.  During this assignment, MSgt Hess was responsible for training and certifying over 200 Cybersecurity Technicians, and ~50 Cybersecurity Managers.  MSgt Hess was frocked to the rank of Master Gunnery Sergeant (MGySgt) in August of 2017. In Sept of 2017, MGySgt Hess assumed his post at I MEF initially serving as the Cybersecurity Chief, and then transitioning into the Cyberspace Operations Chief with the advent of the 17xx Occupational Field.  MGySgt Hess then transitioned to the MEF G-3 Fire and Effects Coordination Center (FECC) to assume the role of the Non-Kinetic Fires and Effects Chief, responsible for coordinating Operations Information Environment (OIE) effects into the Targeting Cycle. MGySgt Hess was selected from the Deputy Commandant of Information (DC I), Information Maneuver Division (IMD), Readiness Branch as the Cyberspace Operations Chief and Branch Chief to assume his current role as the DC I Senior Enlisted Advisor in June of 2021. MGySgt Hess's personal accomplishments and decorations include: The Meritorious Service Medal with one gold star, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with four gold stars, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal with two gold stars, a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management with an emphasis in Information Technology, a Master of Science degree in Cyber Systems and Operations with (6) NSA Certifications, and a PhD in Information Technology with an emphasis in Information Assurance and Cybersecurity. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon
Dave Girouard of Upstart on AI-enabled Lending, Reimagining Credit Scores, and Remote Work (EP.175)

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:37


Dave is the founder and CEO of Upstart, the first consumer lending platform to use Machine Learning (ML) to price credit and automate the borrowing process. Prior to founding Upstart, Dave was President of Google Enterprise and built Google's billion-dollar cloud apps business worldwide, including product development, sales, marketing, and customer support. He started in Silicon Valley as a Product Manager at Apple and was an associate in Booz Allen's Information Technology practice. We cover the joy and glory of building a $25 billion plus company in just about nine years, and as we rarely get a public CEO on, I've got a lot of questions. We talk about business and the markets and lending and interest rates – pretty much how all these things work. Plus we get into remote work, raising venture capital, and the long slug of it all. Enjoy!  Guest - Dave Girouard, Founder and CEO at Upstart  howardlindzon.com, upstart.com  Twitter: @howardlindzon, @davegirouard, @upstart, @knutjensen  linkedin.com/in/davegirouard  #fintech #invest #investment #venturecapital #stockmarket #finance 

Inspired Money
How Sarbjeet Johal Hacked His Way From Economics to Cloud Consultant

Inspired Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 68:03


Cloud influencer, Sarbjeet Johal talks about his path from studying economics to coding to the future of artificial intelligence. Guest Biography Sarbjeet Johal is a thought leader in “Information Technology” with more than 18 years of experience in enterprise IT, SOA, Datacenter Rationalization, Cloud Computing, development/deployment/management of software systems, systems architecture, and services delivery with international exposure. He has traveled to 18 countries and provided services globally while working in USA for last 18 years. In this episode, you'll learn: How growing up on a farm in India formed Sarbjeet's business mindset The marketing strategy behind McDonald's Big Mac The power of Cloud computing and learn more about Snowflake, one of the biggest IPOs of 2020. Show notes: http://www.inspiredmoney.fm/214 Find more from our guest: Twitter LinkedIn www.sjohal.com YouTube Books Principles: Life and Work by Ray Dalio Thanks for Listening! To share your thoughts: Leave a note in the comment section below. Share this show on Twitter or Facebook. Join us at the Inspired Money Makers groups at facebook and LinkedIn To help out the show: Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts, Podchaser.com, or wherever you listen. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and YouTube.

ERProfit - Successful ERP Selections & Implementations
Episode 28 Certainty in an Uncertain World

ERProfit - Successful ERP Selections & Implementations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


It's Crazy Out There! We can't control the outside world, but as Uncertainty reigns externally, Business Equilibrium results when we create better data certainty within our businesses. See how other leading companies have managed the raging seas of uncertainty in the boat of Cloud ERP  ERPodcast - Ranked #3 in Top 15 ERP Podcasts!   Recently - Feedspot.com a digital content aggregator assymbled a Top 15 ERP podcasts list - and the ERPodcast came in at #3 - Unfortunately, we dropped in the recent rankings and today's episode contains the original recording we posted on LinkedIn when the original rankings came out - apologies for any confusion!   About today's ERPodcast MIsaligned incentives - budget shortfalls - tight implementation timelines - How do you conquer the most common pitfalls leading to a failed ERP implementation? The ProfitFromERP methodology bakes in best practices so you end up watching company goals and, like we say, ProfitFromERP, our clients make ERP PAY! E28c ERPodcast - Certainty in an Uncertain World   MFX up and under (but louder than last time)     It's the ERPodcast Episode 28 – The official podcast of ProfitFromERP.com and I'm the Director, Gene Hammons, Over the past 18 months, we've helped about a dozen companies get through challenges we never thought any of us would face.   If you've listened to earlier ERPodcast Episodes, you know what a huge advantage digital companies had dealing with a world gone virtual. The #1 Issue? Uncertainty. The country, the workforce, supply chains, inflation, is covid up or down? Opening up or locking down? - - There's a world of uncertainty out there  - - - if we're going to maintain the right business equilibrium we need to create more certainty within the four walls of our businesses.  We can't control outside uncertainties but we can surely affect the internal workings That's Our ability to respond. That's response – ability – and here's how some of our clients define business responsibility today.   One big uncertainty is in today's workforce. How do we deal with the changes, what are the technology issues that can even stop top talent from joining your firm? So let's talk about how can technology help us get more done with the fewer people we actually do have on staff We'll examine that.   Supply Chain issues? Overseas shipments are bringing back the old phrase Slow Boat from China – which many of you didn't even know was a phrase – tech can't help get your boat unloaded. But we can use demand planning to anticipate shortages long before your ship is just offshore with the parts, raw materials and goods your customers are already waiting for – never mind the trucking     Creating certainty in an uncertain world comes down to the Information in Information Technology – just in case you forgot what IT stood for.  Is your information good enough, timely enough, informative enough? You may be running a traditional ERP system that wasn't ever giving you the reports you need. Or you may have a great baseline ERP but operationally, there's no accurate way to gather data. Or FP&A modeling – can you project your profit margins when gas goes to $5 a gallon? Sometimes it's modular additions to your technology stack – Sometimes it's a complete Digital Transformation – a total software overhaul of your company.   Here's what real world ProfitFromERP clients are doing to create certainty for savvy CFO's and operational teams.   Item One – having a hard time finding enough people?  Maybe your old technology is keeping today's workforce away  - - Item Two It's the end of JIT,

Bharatvaarta
154 - India's Path Towards A $5 Trillion Economy With Dr. Aruna Sharma | Policy | Bharatvaarta

Bharatvaarta

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 87:21


India is the world's largest and most vigorous democracy. Today's new economic balance of power has given the country a chance to reclaim much of its earlier glory when it was one of the world's richest civilizations. In the current context, India's fundamentally vital indicators reflect the country's potential as an economic powerhouse. As Indians, we have proved ourselves in almost every sphere within and outside our country. We have all the ingredients of a resilient society, backed by strong societal support but not social security, a conservative economic system which is to an extent recession-proof but not transparent, and a great talent pool but with limited opportunities for nurturing those skills. What we lack is the right approach to policy making and the development of an ecosystem to harness our immense potential. Dr Aruna Sharma is an Indian Administrative Officer of 1982 batch Madhya Pradesh Cadre retired after her work in Steel and Information Technology in government of India. She has always focused to have holistic approach and establish system in all her postings for ensuring sustainable quality outcomes. She has two books reaching the Last Beneficiary: Resource Convergence Mantra Model (2008) and Impact of Recourse Convergence in Policy Making, Program Design and Execution (2014) released by UNDP. FAO has also published her work on food security.

The Quicky
Will I Be Sucked Into Zuckerberg's Metaverse?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 16:41


Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg recently announced in a 77 minute long video that he is re-branding the company under the new name Meta, which is short for Metaverse - but what is that and how will it impact your life? The Quicky speaks to a tech expert to find out more about Zuckerberg's master plan, which other companies are also planning to join the Metaverse, and how it's going to change our everyday lives in the very near future. Do you want to know how to keep kids safe online? Introducing the Safe on Social Toolkit: the digital ‘survival kit' of everything parents and teachers need to know to keep kids safe on social media right now. Get the toolkit now at www.safeonsocialtoolkit.com CREDITS  Host/Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri Guests: Dr Marcus Carter - Researcher in digital cultures and human-computer interaction based at the University of Sydney and Co-Director of the Socio-Tech Futures Lab addressing the social, ethical and inclusive challenges with emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics and virtual and augmented reality Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
November 6, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 59:04


Optional device driver updates (may not be necessary), commuting with a laptop (on or off), suggested crypto exchanges (Coinbase, Binance, Gemini, Kraken), microwave inference (with WiFi), flying with cell phones (do they really interfere with avioncis), Profiles in IT (Satashi Nakamoto, creator of Bitcoin), the cypto kids (Ethereum vs Cardano), and the oldest computer program still in use (DoD MOCAS). This show originally aired on Saturday, November 6, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
I'm Speaking: Roy White, Veteran and IT Leader

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 52:44


Impact, Air Force, and Information Technology.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to Roy White, a leader in the world of Information Technology. Roy's upbringing, be it tough, was no match for the success he would have throughout his future. Roy speaks on all he's accomplished, including joining The Air Force, obtaining experience in many senior information technology positions, and being a positive mentor to many, including his children. As someone who has been very driven since his childhood, Roy goes into the life experiences that drive him even further and make him the entrepreneur he is today. Roy also talks about what it's like having his busy schedule all while being a good husband and father. Finally, we hear Roy's secret to success, his “why,” and his real thoughts about public speaking!  QUOTES “I did have a lot of trauma. I dealt with a lot of things, but I can say I persevered. A lot of my drive is based upon not having to go back or not wanting to go back to dealing with that and protecting my kids from dealing with whatever I dealt with.” - Roy [15:26] “A lot of the underclassmen started teasing me about “well what are you going to do Roy?... Because I never really voiced my plans of what I was wanting to do and things like that. And I said ‘Well one day I'm going to own my own business' and everybody just busted out laughing, even the coaches and all of that. And so, that's been my fuel for years… To kind of really push me toward business and entrepreneurship and things like that.” - Roy [18:54] “[The secret to success is] being relentless. And understanding that there is no escalator, there's no elevator, you know, there's no catapult or anything like that to the top. You have to take the stairs.” - Roy [34:27]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [01:33] Meet Roy [03:52] Roy's Schedule and Working Out [06:58] Roy and Shana Meeting [09:11] Golf [12:03] Roy's Wife [13:15] Managing Services [14:30] Growing Up [15:43] Ending Up in IT [19:37] Entrepreneurship [20:47] Air Force and Losing Scholarship [24:26] Marriage and Social Life [25:40] Party Promoter [27:55] Consortium [31:56] Wife and Children [34:24] Secret to Success [36:18] Year Plans [37:18] What Roy Would Do Differently [38:26] Roy's Reads and Inky Johnson [42:50] Mentors [43:50] Impact, Opposition, and the “Why” [47:04] Roy's Surprising Fact [50:08] Roy's Ask [52:23] Outro   RESOURCES https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/surface (Microsoft Surface) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365?rtc=1 (Microsoft 365) https://www.google.com/ (Google) https://www.godaddy.com/ (GoDaddy) https://www.apple.com/ (Apple) https://www.webroot.com/us/en/about/events (Webroot) https://www.pax8.com/en-us/ (Pax8) https://www.af.mil/ (United States Air Force) https://www.linkedin.com/in/nathan-turner-9323871/ (Nathan Turner) on LinkedIn https://pentagontours.osd.mil/Tours/ (The Pentagon) https://www.boozallen.com/ (Booz Allen Hamilton) https://park14.com/ (The Park at 14th) https://www.eventbrite.com/ (Eventbrite) https://nitaac.nih.gov/gwacs/cio-sp4 (CIO-SP4) https://www.tiktok.com/en/ (TikTok) https://www.grubhub.com/ (Grubhub) https://www.acq.osd.mil/cmmc/ (Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC)) https://www.amazon.com/Empty-Bucket-Inky-Johnson/dp/B01L800C4O (Empty the Bucket) by Inky Johnson https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0366389/ (Kevin Hart) https://www.mosaicsgroup.com/about-us/leadership/ (Michael Grier with MOSAIC Technologies Group) https://www.linkedin.com/in/angie-lienert-pmp-1a753453/ (Angie Lienert) on LinkedIn https://intelligenesisllc.com/ (IntelliGenesis LLC)   RELEVANT LINKS https://www.linkedin.com/in/rwmbapmp/?trk=public_profile_browsemap (Roy White) on LinkedIn https://nylatechnologysolutions.com/ (Nyla Technology Solutions) I'd love to hear from you -- your feedback is important to me and I read all of it. If you enjoyed the podcast, I...

Turning Hard Times into Good Times
The Most Undervalued Equity Market Sector? Gold Miners!

Turning Hard Times into Good Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 58:13


John Rubino, Gwen Preston and Eric Coffin return. You might be surprised to learn that according to Bloomberg, the only S&P 500 sector (excluding Financials) that is enjoying positive free cash flows after factoring out consumer price inflation is the gold and silver mining sector. Gold & silver miners are enjoying a positive inflation adjusted free cash flow of ~+1.0%. Other sectors cash flows? Materials ~-0.5%, Consumer discretionary ~-1.0%, Energy ~-1.25%, Consumer Staples ~-1.3%, Industrials ~-2.0%, Communications services ~-2.1%, Health Care ~-2.9%, Information Technology ~-3.1%, Real Estate ~-4.75% & Utilities ~-8.5%. Meantime, for the first time since the 1970s, wage inflation is just beginning to spiral upward as labor shortage puts common workers in the driver's seat. Workers are starting to go on strike more aggressively than any time since the 1970s leading to rising wages that lead to higher inflation, that result in still more demands from workers for still higher wages in the form of cost of living adjustments. With gold and silver mining being the only sector (besides Financials) in the S&P 500 that that has a positive inflation-adjusted free cash flow, it is the most undervalued sector in the S&P 500 and figures to be the most able to withstand spiraling labor costs, especially as the real price of gold rises off its historical lows. Those topics and more will be discussed with John. Gwen and Eric will join me to discuss their favorite junior gold and silver exploration stocks some of which they have invited to the November 2021 Metals Investor Forum.

Interviews: Tech and Business
CIO Playbook: Strategic IT 2022

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 43:16


How can Chief Information Officers ensure that information technology investments support core organizational business goals? In 2022, business leaders expect more than ever from CIO strategy. We speak with Satyan Parameswaran, President of Information Technology at (United Parcel Service) UPS to learn more. With $85 billion in revenue, UPS is one of the world's largest package delivery and logistics companies.This conversation includes the following topics:-- What is the role of IT at UPS?-- IT strategy and IT investment at UPS-- Digital twins at UPS-- Aligning CIO investment strategy and corporate business goals-- Forecasting package loads at UPS-- What is the role of technology in the enterprise?-- IT investment planning for 2022Satyan Parameswaran is responsible for all the application technology used in the UPS package centers, hubs, scanning, automation, retail access points, international regulatory compliance, aviation security, automotive, telematics, preload and on-road technology. He is responsible for the technology that helps UPS deliver ~24 million packages every day.CXOTalk website: https://www.cxotalk.com/episode/cio-playbook-strategic-it-2022Newsletter: https://www.cxotalk.com/subscribe

UAB TechKnow
Cybersecurity is a Team Sport with Allanté Jowers

UAB TechKnow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 22:49


Looking to find out more about UAB IT? Visit our website: uab.edu/it   Below you can find links to what we discussed in this episode!   UAB Technology Innovation Center  UAB Anywhere  Duo Upgrade  Research Computing  National Cybersecurity Awareness Month Play Phone Toss Phishing Awareness Keep up with Allanté! Twitch - City Boy Summer Instagram - @CityBoySummerLive Twitter - @CityBoySummer Facebook - City Boy Summer Technology Tips Teams Breakout Rooms Tone Detection in Outlook   Find UAB IT on social!   Facebook   Instagram   Twitter   YouTube     TechKnow is produced by the Communications & Marketing team at UAB Information Technology.     Blippy Trance Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Pamgaea Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)  Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ 

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
October 30, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 59:17


Creating and selling NFTs (OpenSea, Rarible, Mintable, all on Ethereum Blockchain), setting up a private Facebook group (closed vs secret), Profiles in IT (Stewart Brand, founder of the Whole Earth Catalog and The WELL), from The WELL to Facebook (where did we go wrong), and the first MP3 song (Toms Diner by Suzanne Vega, used to optimize compression). This show originally aired on Saturday, October 30, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

Radwell's Automation Nation
Episode 18: Waste Management Tips for IT Assets

Radwell's Automation Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 19:31


Today's topic is definitely important in the business world and especially in the manufacturing world. All those PLCs that are in use in an industrial automation environment may, at some point, need to be disposed of. Do you know the proper way to manage your manufacturing IT assets when it's time to dispose of them?Joining us for today's episode is Chris Regan, President and Founder of CLR Solutions. CLR Solutions is a specialized electronic recycling/refurbishing and data security services firm. When it comes to data security, having peace of mind is important. CLR Solutions has a mission: to be a trusted partner in data management and security for their customers. Chris has had a passion for technology and a mouse in his hand since he was six years old. According to his bio, the only thing he is more passionate about than technology is helping his clients recover as much of their investment in IT assets as possible. For the majority of his career, Chris has worked in various areas of IT. He has a B.A. in Information Technology and Management Information Systems, and an M.S. in Organization Management – both from NJIT. Chris established CLR Solutions in 2008, and quickly achieved status as an official Microsoft Registered Refurbisher. CLR is also NAID and Department of Defense certified. As a result of Chris' passion, dedication, and leadership, CLR Solutions has emerged as a leader in IT Asset Management, Data Security, and Investment Recovery.In this episode, Chris discusses waste management security for IT equipment in a manufacturing environment. He provides some tips for plant managers to help manage this sensitive but important area of operations.Email for Podcast Questions or Feedback: automationnation@radwell.comGuest: Chris Regan, President and Founder of CLR Solutionscregan@clrsolutionsnj.com862-397-3259CLR Solutions http://www.clrsolutionsnj.com877-CLR-SOLUHosts: Julie Basello       jbaselloholt@radwell.com                   Robert Tiedeken  rtiedeken@radwell.comProduction: Julie Basello and Patrick StewartMarketing and Promotion: Julie BaselloLinks: Radwell Automation Nation Podcast http://podcast.radwell.comRadwell International http://www.radwell.com

Interdependence
The Cold War For Information Technology with former Director of Iskra Delta Janez Skrubej

Interdependence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 78:02


 In conjunction with this years Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts titled "Iskra Delta "curated by Tjaša Pogačar we interviewed Janez Skrubej, the author of "The Cold War For Information Technology: the Inside Story". Inside indeed, as Janez was the former CEO of Iskra Delta, a major contender on the world stage for not only personal computers, but also large scale networked IT systems. Based within Tito's Yugoslavia it was caught in the crosshairs in the cold war, working between the US, Soviet Union, China, and India, with each corresponding intelligence agency pushing their own agenda. Janez was the managing director during this time, and was personally paid visits by the presidents of the Soviet Union, China and India, as well as the CIA and KGB. Ultimately the conflicting interests overpowered the small IT company and it closed, leaving Europe without a major contender in the global IT race. It's a treat to speak to Janez about this extraordinary situation, and to imagine an alternative history where Iskra Delta might have had a fighting chance.Read The Cold War for Information Technology: The Inside Story: https://www.amazon.com/Cold-War-Information-Technology-Inside-ebook/dp/B00C1NWL2EFollow Janez Skrubej updates: http://sbpra.com/janezskrubej/We cannot wait to see this film! http://senca-studio.si/en/portfolio/sparks-in-time/Check out the Ljubljana Biennale of Graphic arts, with contributions by Other Internet, John Akomfrah, Simon Denny, Josh Citarella, us and more!: https://34.bienale.si/en/  

CityCast
CityCast Ep. 18: Cybersecurity

CityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:22


Vince Simonowicz, CIO of Information Technology joins the City of Rock Hill to discuss how to keep yourself safe online.

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist
Episode 292 - Critical Info Infrastructure Protection in Singapore with Cyber Security Agency of Singapore

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 36:58


Podcast: Cyber Security Weekly Podcast (LS 37 · TOP 2.5% what is this?)Episode: Episode 292 - Critical Info Infrastructure Protection in Singapore with Cyber Security Agency of SingaporePub date: 2021-10-24Interview by Jane Lo, Singapore Correspondent with Lim Thian Chin (Director, Critical Info Infrastructure Division, Cyber Security Agency of Singapore) Thian Chin is leading the Critical Information Infrastructure (CII) Division at the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA). The division is responsible for building the cyber resilience of the Nation's essential services across 11 CII sectors covering government, utilities, transport and services clusters. His team works with sectoral regulators to strengthen the cyber resilience of CII owners, to promote confidence-building measures and to deepen the public-private partnership between the government and CII stakeholders. Thian Chin also represents Singapore in International and regional cybersecurity forums where he shares his knowledge on cybersecurity resiliency and capability building. Thian Chin has over 19 years of experience in Information & Technology governance, risk management, resilience and compliance, and Operational Technology cybersecurity. Prior to joining CSA in August 2015, he was responsible for the regional Technology Governance function in United Overseas Bank. He also led the Technology Risk function in GIC from 2008 – 2013. In his earlier years, he was a Manager and had led a team of auditors in Information Technology in Ernst & Young. Thian Chin holds an Executive Masters (Cybersecurity) with Brown University, a bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from Nanyang Technological University and is an alumnus of the George C Marshall European Center for Security Studies. He is certified as a GICSP, CGEIT, CDPSE, CRISC, CISM, CISSP, CISA, and SABSA practitioner. In this podcast, Thian Chin shared some highlights* on cybersecurity and operational technology (OT) at the Singapore International Cyber Week (SICW 2021), and the OT Cybersecurity Expert Panel (OTCEP), organized by the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore. Touching on cybersecurity incidents highlighted in the “Singapore Cyber Landscape 2020” such as ransomware and supply chain, he noted the increasing complexity of the threat landscape. He discussed some common perceptions of the cybersecurity professionals and the engineers running the operating infrastructure, including infrastructure “air gap” and cultural differences such as skills and language, and security goals (“CIA” - versus “SRP”). Referring to one of Singapore's largest cyber incidents in the CII sector, and the recent threats, he shared perspectives on how government policies such as the OT-ISAC, the OT Cybersecurity Code of Practice (updated in 2019) and the Cybersecurity Competency Framework (2021) help to boost cyber defenses. With the recent release of the “Singapore Cyber Security Strategy 2021”, he also several areas of focus for the CII cybersecurity ecosystem, including structuring an approach to managing supply chain risks and building cyber resiliency profiles. *also included highlights from OT-ISAC (Operational Technology Information Sharing and Analysis Centre) and ISACA Singapore Chapter Recorded: 15th October 2021 (SGT 8.30am)The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from MySecurity Media, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Habits of Leadership
062: Have Conversations Worth Having - Using Appreciative Inquiry

Habits of Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:45


In today's episode Dan chats with Cheri Torres and Jackie Stavros. Cheri is CEO and lead catalyst of Collaborative by Design, a consulting firm that helps organizations improve performance, retain talent, and transform communication and culture, whilst Jackie is a professor at the College of Business and Information Technology, Lawrence Technological University, and an Appreciative Inquiry advisor at the David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry. This conversation explores how Appreciative Inquiry can be used to create much better conversations, both in groups and one-on-one. If you find the conversation useful, you should register for their free upcoming webinar here. You can also learn more about the book, and access some useful resources at: https://conversationsworthhaving.today/ If you're interested in checking out the Habits of Leadership Academy, or would like to get in touch with any questions, comments or suggestions for guests, then please head over to: https://habitsofleadership.com/  

Finance & Fury Podcast
Are we heading towards “Stagflation”?

Finance & Fury Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 21:50


Welcome to Finance and Fury. Currently, the prospect of stagflation is being seriously debated by economists and policy makers across most economies – the big question is – will we suffer stagflation – and if so, how do markets react? The first stages of an energy crisis are currently in the making - In Europe - natural gas prices have tripled in the last three months – with rising petrol prices across the globe – even in Aus, petrol prices are up – Why do energy prices matter and what does this have to do with stagflation? Energy is an input into everything – transportation, manufacturing, even keeping office lights on – all of this flows through into increasing prices over time Coupled with this – annual CPI currently is sitting at 5.3% in the US, 5.8% in Poland, 7.4% in Russia and 9.7% in Brazil – even Aus is at around 3.8% - so all countries are sitting above their target rates – the countries suffering the most severe inflation are those suffering from supply shortages The major concerns are that these energy spikes in conjunction with supply shortages will lead to lasting inflation – and due to the potential of slowdown in economic output (which is also related to the supply shortages, leading to less economic activities) – economies have the potential to enter a stagflation situation Stagflation was a phenomenon that plagued the economies of the world back in the 1970s – you had an energy crisis, with soaring prices, which had flow on effects to every sector – You also had slowing economic growth, where a few quarters in the mid-70s hit negative GDP growth rates - and there were accompanied with higher levels of unemployment – and due to energy prices, massive levels of inflation Defining stagflation – what does this actually mean? Relating the term stagflation simply to the economy of the 1970s is a little too simplistic – just saying that it is a time where there is inflation, lowering GDP, a wage-price spiral and high unemployment doesn't quite define the issue at hand This is because the issue is, there is no hard definition of stagflation when it comes to the metrics involved with the actual definition – i.e. how much inflation needs to be present, and what does the growth rate of the economy need to be to equate to stagflation – so here are three broad definitions for stagflation that can narrow this down Growth around zero or negative, and inflation well above target Growth below trend and inflation comfortably above target a strong slowdown in growth and strong pickup in inflation Out of these, instead, what if we say that ‘stagflation' is a period where inflation expectations are rising above the central bank target rate and growth is slowing and is below trend (i.e. expected to drop below growth forecasts)? This is a softer definition and much easier to apply – if inflation reaches a rate of above 3% and is expected to climb higher, and economic growth, as measured by GDP is forecasted to be 3% but turns out to be 2.5%, i.e. the forecasted nominal rate – then do we meet stagflation? I would say that this would be a situation where an economy would be in a stagflation environment There's just one problem: when compared to the economic environment of the 1970s - looking at the current state of the economy, things are a little different Where then do markets actually sit? Look deeper at inflation expectations and GDP growth To start with – looking at the US – inflation is high – at a 13 year high at around 5.4% - However – the US manufacturing Purchasing Managers' Index(PMI) has risen over the last two months whilst inflation rates have remained the same over this time period The PMI is an indexof the prevailing direction of economic trends in the manufacturing and service sectors – if this is on the rise, then it is expected that the costs for manufacturing and services is expected to increase – this leads to further inflation expectations down the road In Australia – The PMI has dropped heavily since July – so we seem to be doing better than the US – with lower potential inflation outbreaks Scenarios of slowing growth and rising inflation clash with most forecasts - recent moves in inflation expectations, especially in the US are a bad situation – but growth doesn't seem to be slowing at this stage – especially when compared to how the 1970s played out Over the past 18 months - GDP growth rates have gone through negative downturns – most western economies saw around three quarters of GDP growth rates – but will this continue? Well no – they rebounded rather quickly – US GDP dropped by around 9.1%, then sat at -2.9% and -2.5% over the next quarters respectively, but then rebounded to 12% growth – this 12% is a rebound from the bottom – so will calm down in terms of growth rates – but what is more important is the nominal level of GDP – this is sitting at about $20.9trn, from the peak in 2019 of around 21.4trn – or a $500bn loss Australia's GDP actually peaked back in 2012 at just shy of $1.6trn – crashed by 2016 – then recovered – but still lower at about $1.3trn But the question is, will growth rates revert back to negative – or below forecasted growth? It doesn't appear to be the case at this stage – not when growth forecasts have been slightly downgraded – to explain this further – if say you expect annual GDP to be 1.5% p.a. and it grows by 1.6% - this is a great result – because it is above forecasts – but is it really? Not if inflation is around 5% for the long term In Australia – Growth has rebounded after a negative growth period – dropped to negative 6.2%, then sat at -3.7% and -1% over the next quarters respectively rebounded to 9.6% in the second quarter of 2021 Where we are sitting – if growth can pick back up – and maintains a positive position – and the last quarter of rebounded growth wasn't just a once off that helped to mitigate the negative period of growth – then the only concern is inflation, not stagflation – but the risk to financial markets still remains – But many economists predict that growth with stagnate from here - stagflation is economists' base case expectation - even though many have cut their GDP forecast while hiking their inflation outlook – Because to add another element to this issue - Asset pricing also couldn't be more different between now and the last episode of stagflation in the 70s When looking over the 100 years – ever since the Fed was created - the 1970s represented the lead up to an all-time high for nominal interest rates that occurred in the 1980s - and an all-time low for equity valuations – had nominal rates in the US Comparing this to the markets today – we are at all-time lows when looking at both nominal and real interest rates – whilst witnessing all-time high valuations for almost every asset class – property, equities, fixed interest, even commodities – gold, copper, etc.    Historically - How do shares perform during stagflation – Spoiler alert: it isn't great in situation where stagflation does emerge – you seeweak historical performance of most equities – this is why even the term stagflation can freak out investors This being said - equity investors who are active today have likely had little experience with stagflation first hand – it would be rare to find an active investor who was participating in markets back in the 1970s - since 1960 – there have been 41 quarters (17% of this time period) that have met these criteria, but the vast majority of those occurred between the late 1960s and early 1980s – since the 2000s - stagflation has been virtually non-existent Over this time period - the S&P 500 has generated a median real total return of +2.5% per quarter – however in these stagflation quarters, the average return per quarter fell to -2.1% - This is actually worse than the returns when you had either weak economic growth or high inflation by themselves Most of this weakness during stagflationary environments has been attributable to pressure on corporate profit margins – due to inflation, declining profit margins and real earnings have been incurred, which indicates that companies struggled to raise prices quickly enough to offset rising input costs - P/E multiples have also declined modestly during stagflationary periods alongside rising interest rates. Another issue with the market compared to the 1970s and now is the amount of debt that corporations have – It was hard to try and find accurate data on this going back this long, best was the 90s – but the BIS did release a paper showing that as a % of GDP, corporate debt in the US has gone from about 40% to 80% from 1970 to 2020 – in addition, household debts are through the roof - Why does this matter? inflation is already showing up and impacting monetary policy.In just the last three weeks, many central bank rates have increased their interbank cash rates - 25bp in New Zealand, 25bp in Russia, 50bp in Peru, 50bp in Poland, 75bp in the Czech Republic and 100bp in Brazil – beyond NZ, each of these countries are already suffering high levels of inflation One final reason why markets can take a downturn during stagflation periods could be due to the wealth effect – i.e. not just economic growth declines but also the declining growth of household wealth – this can become its own self-fulfilling prophecy – if people are expecting tough times, or going to need additional cash/funds – they sell assets – which drops asset prices Household net worth has grown by a median real rate of 0.5% per quarter since 1960, but just a 0% rate during periods of stagflation.These periods have also been associated with declining household allocations to equities, helping explain the weakness in equity valuation multiples. Home prices have typically declined in real terms during stagflation while gold has appreciated.     Who are the winners and losers during stagflation? Nobody is really a winner in this environment – the population suffers due to monetary policy, the prices of goods increasing and growth slowing, leading to potentials of job losses When looking at shares – some perform better than others - Who are the winners in this scenario Looking at sectors - Energy and Health Care have typically generated the strongest returns during periods of stagflation. That may explain why during the past month, Energy has been the strongest sector in the market, rising by 14% alongside an equivalent surge in crude oil Healthcare may just be a coincidence – or simply be able to reprice better than other sectors – but energy makes a lot of sense – when energy prices go up in stagflation environments – energy companies can made additional revenues – therefore a good hedge has been energy providers in this environment Who are the losers - Industrials and Information Technology have generally lagged most during stagflationary environments - IT sector is less cyclical now than it was during the stagflationary years of the late 1960s to early 1980s due to the compositional shift toward software and services firms. Today, however, the sector's massive long long-term growth profile has given it a longer “duration” than most other equities, making it particularly sensitive to real interest rates It is estimated by investment banks like Goldman that a 0.3% increase in the cash rate would knock some 15% off tech stock prices For industrials - construction and engineering, infrastructure, transport and commercial services – many of these are sensitive to interest rate costs due to financing for capital expenditure Both of these sectors are sensitive to interest rate rises which would occur if central banks aim to combat inflation The biggest question when it comes to stagflation – will the high inflation be temporary? It is almost a given that growth will be low – low in the terms of nominal rates – but if inflation is too high, then real growth may be near zero or negative   In summary – The market is focused on stagflation; it just hasn't quite decided what that term really means Where we currently stand – many view the surge in energy prices as temporary, and that the most comparable period to the current stagflationary scare is more comparable to 2005 when CPI hit 3.5%, energy prices were booming and Stagflation was in the news a lot – it even graced the cover of The Economist - These fears eventually passed as growth rebounded and inflation moderated - so 2005 may provide a useful reference point for a scare that comes far short of the 1970s My "gut feel" is that while risks to financial markets are high, due to monetary policy responses, especially on the inflation side, the phrase “stagflation” is being used too aggressively at the moment – time will tell We don't appear to be in this sort of environment – the economy isn't looking great – many assets are overvalued – growth is lower than the average of a decade ago, and inflation expectations are rising – But the risk of stagflation don't appear to be present at this stage looking forward over the next 12 months If you are concerned about stagflation – the best play historically has been energy shares and precious metals, like gold – this isn't advice – but just general information based around historical occurrences But the trouble with energy is that it is cyclical – once the fears of stagflation blow over – or even if stagflation hits – once the decline to the market takes place, then energy shares tend to lag the next cycle of the market Thank you for listening to today's episode. If you want to get in contact you can do so here: http://financeandfury.com.au/contact/

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Matthew Runyan, Chief Information Officer & Vice President of Information Technology at Mount Sinai South Nassau

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 16:27


This episode features Matthew Runyan, Chief Information Officer & Vice President of Information Technology at Mount Sinai South Nassau. Here, he discusses responsibilities in his role, his current top priorities, and more.

DataCentric Podcast
Overcoming the Challenges of Multi-Cloud with HCI

DataCentric Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 26:14


Hybrid multi-cloud has become a standard part of nearly every enterprise's IT infrastructure, yet it often remains a disjointed element with complexities that are different from those faced in the traditional data center. In this episode of DataCentric, hosts Matt Kimball and Steve McDowell talk to Nutanix's Rakesh Sreekanth and Lenovo's Ritu Jain about how HCI can be a great way to address these challenges. Nutanix brings a unified range of solutions, spanning basic HCI all the way to full multi-cloud management solutions that tie together on-prem and cloud. Lenovo is one of fastest growing companies in enterprise infrastructure, and delivers Nutanix solutions as part of its Lenovo ThinkAgile HX series. Together, these companies deliver complete HCI solutions for the modern enterprise. Special Guests: Rakesh Sreekanth and Ritu Jain.

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast
Episode 292 - Critical Info Infrastructure Protection in Singapore with Cyber Security Agency of Singapore

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021


Interview by Jane Lo, Singapore Correspondent with Lim Thian Chin (Director, Critical Info Infrastructure Division, Cyber Security Agency of Singapore) Thian Chin is leading the Critical Information Infrastructure (CII) Division at the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA). The division is responsible for building the cyber resilience of the Nation's essential services across 11 CII sectors covering government, utilities, transport and services clusters. His team works with sectoral regulators to strengthen the cyber resilience of CII owners, to promote confidence-building measures and to deepen the public-private partnership between the government and CII stakeholders. Thian Chin also represents Singapore in International and regional cybersecurity forums where he shares his knowledge on cybersecurity resiliency and capability building. Thian Chin has over 19 years of experience in Information & Technology governance, risk management, resilience and compliance, and Operational Technology cybersecurity. Prior to joining CSA in August 2015, he was responsible for the regional Technology Governance function in United Overseas Bank. He also led the Technology Risk function in GIC from 2008 – 2013. In his earlier years, he was a Manager and had led a team of auditors in Information Technology in Ernst & Young. Thian Chin holds an Executive Masters (Cybersecurity) with Brown University, a bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from Nanyang Technological University and is an alumnus of the George C Marshall European Center for Security Studies. He is certified as a GICSP, CGEIT, CDPSE, CRISC, CISM, CISSP, CISA, and SABSA practitioner. In this podcast, Thian Chin shared some highlights* on cybersecurity and operational technology (OT) at the Singapore International Cyber Week (SICW 2021), and the OT Cybersecurity Expert Panel (OTCEP), organized by the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore. Touching on cybersecurity incidents highlighted in the “Singapore Cyber Landscape 2020” such as ransomware and supply chain, he noted the increasing complexity of the threat landscape. He discussed some common perceptions of the cybersecurity professionals and the engineers running the operating infrastructure, including infrastructure “air gap” and cultural differences such as skills and language, and security goals (“CIA” - versus “SRP”). Referring to one of Singapore's largest cyber incidents in the CII sector, and the recent threats, he shared perspectives on how government policies such as the OT-ISAC, the OT Cybersecurity Code of Practice (updated in 2019) and the Cybersecurity Competency Framework (2021) help to boost cyber defenses. With the recent release of the “Singapore Cyber Security Strategy 2021”, he also several areas of focus for the CII cybersecurity ecosystem, including structuring an approach to managing supply chain risks and building cyber resiliency profiles. *also included highlights from OT-ISAC (Operational Technology Information Sharing and Analysis Centre) and ISACA Singapore Chapter Recorded: 15th October 2021 (SGT 8.30am)

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
October 23, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 59:06


Non-fungible tokens revealed (similar to Certificate of Authentication), clipboard stealer malware (programmed to steal crypto), 5G cellular explained (deployment timing for key carriers), Bluetooth trackers (Tile Pro vs Galaxy SmartTag vs Apple AirTag), Profiles in IT (Jaron Lanier, father of virtural reality), and Jaron Lanier (humanist disguised as computer geek). This show originally aired on Saturday, October 23, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

DNUSD Coffee and Conversation
Episode #59 - Heroes in Education - Technical Services

DNUSD Coffee and Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 26:31


Coffee and Conversation Podcast Episode #59 - Heroes in Education - Technical Services Over the next few weeks, we're going to dedicate a podcast series to our classified and certificated staff. Each week, we'll focus on different job families within our district and the county office of education and hear from those staff members why and how they contribute their valuable skills to ensure the best education for our students. After we've hosted representatives from the different departments and certificated staff, we'll be able to celebrate them together by nominating Heroes in Education in November and recognizing them publicly in December. This week we were joined by our Technical Services classification group from Information Technology. Host: Jeff Harris - Superintendent of Schools Guest: Dan Gustafson - Network Systems Analyst Jeremy Safford - Computer Support Technician 1 Gavin Williams - Computer Support Technician 1

Mindful Multi Family Show
Mindful Multi Family Show #181 with Chris Salerno(Vinki Loomba, an IT professional/Professor turned into Full-time Real Estate Investor/Syndicator)

Mindful Multi Family Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 20:24


Vinki Loomba, an IT professional/Professor turned into Full-time Real Estate Investor/Syndicator. She is the founder and CEO of Loomba Investment Group. She is an entrepreneur and strategist with a background in commercial real estate, Information Technology, and academia. She is also a seasoned business leader with over 20+ years of experience in overseeing the effective execution of synchronized projects focusing on quality, timeliness, and functionality. She strongly believes that with 100% focus and concentration you can change any idea into reality. Vinki lives in SF/Bay Area with her family. She loves to travel and learn about other cultures around the world.

#coachbetter
#coachbetter Episode 134: Designing & Implementing Innovation Spaces in Your School

#coachbetter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:10


In this #coachbetter episode, Kim chats with two of our amazing The Coach graduates, Cary Hart and Andre De Koker. Cary and Andre are both graduates of the COETAIL* program, and for the last academic year have been working on building Innovation/Design/Maker programs in their individual schools, Cary at the elementary level and Andre in middle school. They talk about what's been successful, what's been challenging & the ways that these roles leverage instructional coaching skills to build relationships, community & connection around design/maker/ innovative learning. In schools where this role is brand new, like Cary and Andre's, there's a lot to unpack and uncover about the role of an Innovation/Design coach. It's fascinating to see the connections between Cary's experience in Moscow and Andre's experience in Shanghai at two different divisional levels. *Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Technology coachbetter.tv/episode-134/

You Own the Experience Podcast
The Great Resignation with Anastasia Valentine

You Own the Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:26


On this episode of the You Own The Experience podcast, Robert Mann and Lauren B. Jones rap about the Great Resignation and later are joined by Anastasia Valentine, President and Managing Partner of Resource 1, an Information Technology consulting firm that provides Staff Augmentation services to corporations across North America. While a tech stack expert, Valentine took this opportunity to continue the Great Resignation conversation which is a subject that has been on the minds of employers and recruiters in recent months. Mann, Jones and Valentine share the causes behind the Great Resignation, the role of COVID in some of these contributing factors, and the opportunity that the situation presents. This isn't actually the Great Resignation, they argue, but rather the Great Migration. People aren't leaving jobs, they're switching jobs, and if your company can position itself as a destination, you have the opportunity to capitalise on the now significant supply of available talent. The trio also chats about: How the Great Resignation has been caused by a generational change in the workforce. The role of technology in offering the flexibility that today's talent is searching for. How small and minority-owned businesses could be included in the technology-driven future. The dos and don'ts of Calendly links (in an at times spicy debate.) Check out the episode to learn more. This episode is brought to you by Able & Leap Consulting Solutions

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
October 16, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 59:06


Botnet used for crptomining, WhatApp connection issues (several fixs), Facebook face recogition (beware), Microsoft Defender (much better), Profiles in IT (Charles Hoskinson, Cardano founder), Macedonian fake news complex, Tip of the Week (free Office 365 for educators and students), and music of proteins (a fun mapping algorithm). This show originally aired on Saturday, October 16, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

This...I...Do...For...Me:  Over 50, Black and Fabulous!

Kwavi is 53 years old and BOLD! She is a certified Life Coach, Author, International Retreat Creator and an in-demand Speaker. Her niche is working with illustrious groups of women who are age 50+ to inspire them to live their best life! Kwavi received her B.Sc in Informational Technology from Thames Valley University in the United Kingdom. Additionally, she obtained her master's degree in Medical Informatics from Northwestern University in Chicago. Although she was very successful in her previous careers, Kwavi is equally proud of the excellent training that she received from the Life Coach School. Her emphasis is on the whole woman age 50 and beyond and her experience in Information Technology compliments her current career trek by providing women with tools and empowering knowledge. Kwavi also reaches women through her Master Classes like “3 Simple Steps to Live Your Best Life Over 50”. It is through Kwavi's commitment to motivating, encouraging and assisting women that accelerates her clients' ability to reach their maximum potential. This is a mission for her. In her exploratory work and conversations with women age 50+, Kwavi gleaned that the theme that kept permeating the dialogue was their feelings of invisibility. Kwavi in her mission to eradicate those internal feelings both within her clients and those external systems that contribute to this line of thinking became more determined to create solutions to this issue. “It is women who will make a difference in the world, says Kwavi. This is why she is adamant that it is not too late to walk into your authentic self and flourish in the way God has intended for you. “The world needs you”, says Kwavi. She has created the Flourish Online Community; in her words (as highlighted on her website) you will learn to reinforce self-care in the following ways: Get a whole new outlook on life in your 50s and beyond; Make your health a top priority inclusive of proper rest/sleep, increased energy and glow from the inside out; Identify habits that keep you stuck like people pleasing, perfectionism, shaky boundaries; Take steps to create the life you truly want Kwavi instructs her group members that there are six pillars to Flourish: It's all about you Relationships Health and Wellness Sleep and Sex Style To deepen her work with her women age 50 and beyond, Kwavi has written a book entitled “50 Questions to Answer When You Reach 50”. This is a guide that will help you shine and thrive! The book's aim is to get its reader to focus on answering questions that encourage you to really examine the things that are important to you. It is a non-judgmental and non-“preachy” approach to helping you pinpoint how you want to proceed on your life's journey without comparing yourself to others nor setting goals that don't serve you. You will walk away with a sense of renewal and a sense that all things important to you are conquerable. Kwavi has set a challenge to reach one million women, and she is determined to impact these women because it is them who are key to making our universe a healthier place for all. Kwavi has been featured on CBS, NBC, Best Self Magazine and the Atlanta Journal Constitution. Kwavi, who reside in Atlanta, is a prolific blogger, dedicated wife and mother of two teenage boys. You can connect with Kwavi on kwavi.com, Instagram – www.kwavi.tv/instagram1 Tik Tok -- @kwavi_tv

Coffee w/#The Freight Coach
#116 - Matt McLelland

Coffee w/#The Freight Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:06


Matt McLelland is the VP of Sustainability and Innovation at Covenant. After working exclusively in the world of Information Technology for 21 years, in June of 2015 Matt transitioned into a completely different space - sustainability and innovation. Matt is responsible for leading all sustainability, CSR, and ESG initiatives while also retaining all prior responsibilities as Innovation Strategist. Connect with Matt and follow Covenant on Social Media! 

RadioActive
This developers academy welcomes ‘non-tech bros' to the industry

RadioActive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:34


In 2020, only about a quarter of professional computing jobs in the United States were held by women, according to the National Center for Women and Information Technology. One Seattle group is trying to change that and ensure women, people of color, and gender-diverse people are able to show up as themselves in this industry.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 14, 2021: Boyles resigns as Charlottesville City Manager; Friendship Court agreement reauthorized by EDA

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:27


Today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!On today’s show:Charlottesville City Manager resigns, citing personal and professional attacks from Nikuyah WalkerThe Charlottesville Economic Development Authority reauthorizes a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for the redevelopment of Friendship CourtCharlottesville moving forward with planning for climate adaptation The Charlottesville Economic Development Authority has reauthorized a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for a loan for the redevelopment of Friendship Court. Piedmont Housing Alliance would pay the money back through the incremental tax revenue the city would get from a more intense residential development. Here’s Economic Development Director Chris Engel. (staff report)“Typically, our performance agreements are done to encourage business development, job creation, capital investment that creates office space or an industrial building,” Engel said. “In this case, the public good if you will is the rehabilitation and addition of not public housing, but affordable housing that would be owned and managed on a long term basis by the Piedmont Housing Alliance.” The city is currently considering using this tool to finance improvements to Stribling Avenue. This is also the same mechanism that was proposed by the owner of the skeleton Landmark hotel. In this case, the 11.75 acre property is assessed at $8.185 million this year, which yields $77,714 in property taxes for the city. When the first phase of redevelopment is completed, the value is projected to be over $20 million, which Engel said would bring in an additional $190,000. Piedmont Housing Alliance would get that increase through a transfer from the Economic Development authority. “This is a very complicated, complex deal to get this to all come together,” Engel said.This is separate from the nearly $16 million in capital funds city taxpayers will contribute to all four phases of redevelopment. Under this agreement, Piedmont Housing Alliance would collect the funding up to $6 million.“There’s not a profit making opportunity here for anybody but it’s an opportunity to see additional affordable housing added to the city again and an old site that needs rehabilitation,” Engel said. The EDA approved the reauthorization with little debate. The original agreement was written up by former city attorney John Blair before he became the acting city manager after former city manager Tarron Richardson resigned. Engel said the Piedmont Housing Alliance is ready to begin construction. Their website has not been updated with information about redevelopment since last October when a December start-date for construction was expected. More information as it comes in. Charlottesville’s efforts to create a Climate Adaptation Plan move forward this month with a community forum to get input on potential threats from more extreme weather patterns. The October 25 event will be the first steps for the city to complete a Climate Vulnerability Assessment. “As part of the city’s climate action effort, it has committed to developing a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare and respond to our changing climate,” said Susan Elliott, the city’s climate protection program manager..Participants are being asked to review a webinar recorded on October 7 where representatives from ICLEI described Charlottesville’s projected climate hazards and gave an overview of the process. Another pre-forum webinar will be held on October 15. (register) The Community Forum on October 25 will begin at 5:30 p.m. (register)Charlottesville City Council will have to appoint someone to serve as City Manager as of Monday, November 1. The five-member elected body held an emergency closed session Tuesday afternoon to discuss “Urgent Personnel Matters.” “I move that we accept the resignation of Chip Boyles, effective October 29, 2021 per the letter that he has sent to Council,” said City Councilor Heather Hill as she read a motion coming back from closed session. Council voted 5-0 to accept the resignation, but there was no sense of who would take over as city manager. There are two deputy city managers who were hired by Boyles, both of whom have a collective tenure of seven months. Ashley Marshall has been Deputy City Manager for Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion since May and Sam Sanders has been Deputy City Manager for Operations since August. Before we get back to Boyles, there was also news of another person leaving city government. In an earlier motion, Hill disclosed the departure of the city’s Information Technology department, Sunny Hwang. He’s served in that position since September 2018 according to his LinkedIn profile, which has not yet been updated. There are also vacancies at the tops of the parks department and the public works department. Back to Boyles. Boyles was hired in January to replace John Blair, who served as interim city manager after Dr. Tarron Richardson resigned in September. In his resignation letter, Boyles said he had been hired to help the organization get back on its feet after a “time of turbulence and organizational instability.” “This success was disrupted with my decision to to change the leadership of the City Police Department,” Boyles wrote. “I continue to support my decision taken on this matter, but the vitriol associated with this decision of a few vocal community members and the broken relationship with Mayor Walker have severely limited my ability to be productive towards the goals of City Council.”Boyles said personal and professional attacks from Walker and others were beginning to hurt his mental health. He resigned to protect himself and his family. To recap, Boyles terminated the contract of Chief RaShall Brackney on September 1, 2021, triggering a ferocious outcry from Walker. She spent much of the September 7 meeting using her privileges as Mayor to force a conversation about the topic. For context, go back and listen to the September 8 edition of this newsletter. The soundbites for the read of the newsletter today come from the October 4, 2021 meeting of Council, and the last hour or so of the meeting. The agenda listed a formal discussion of the matter at the conclusion of other business. Boyles defended his decision, which was his alone to make under the city’s charter. Boyles’ explanationBoyles said Brackney had moved the department toward being a more just and fair system, but said surveys conducted by the Police Benevolent Association indicated low morale.“It became to me evident that some type of change needed to be made that while we had been making strides in one area, the implementation into the department itself was in jeopardy,” Boyles said. That soundbite comes from about an 11 minute explanation that Boyles gave. For some more background, I refer you to the August 20 “response from the city” to those PBA surveys. The statement also describes the resignations of two members of the SWAT team and the termination of a third. (read the statement)What followed were questions from the rest of the Council. Councilor Michael Payne said he was concerned about the timing of the incident.“It has to be stated that, one, the PBA is an organization that is one that is not friendly to reform,” Payne said. “Those organizations across the country are not friendly to officers being disciplined and held accountable for mistreatment.” Vice Mayor Sena Magill said she wanted Boyles to write down his vision for the city.“I have seen the team that you are building in City Hall and I believe that you are focused on a team that wants to bring Charlottesville into 21st century practices on a lot of things including a teamwork environment,” Magill said.Councilor Heather Hill.“We’re not condoning any of the behaviors that were rightfully dealt with in the police department and that we are committed to a very way of policing in the city of Charlottesville,” Hill said. In his comments on October 4, Councilor Lloyd Snook referred to a closed session from mid August after the disciplinary actions described in the statement were made. “When Chief Brackney explained to use in closed session on August 16 I believe it was what the evidence was of the SWAT team officers conduct, showed us a few snippets of video,” Snook said. “Every Councilor in the room, every senior management person in the room was satisfied with the chief’s decision.”Snook said the City Manager has the right and power to fire the police chief.“The only issue for us quite frankly is whether we fire the city manager for firing the police chief,” Snook said. On October 4, Snook said the answer was no.But for Mayor Nikuyah Walker, the answer was not no. Walker’s cross-examinationWalker used her time to ask Boyles a series of pointed questions, including this one about internal surveys. “How did you arrive from looking at the survey that the Chief was the issue based on those surveys,” Walker asked.“Most of the survey was built around the command staff and answers were regarding the individual command staff but it was just an overall leadership from both the questions that were included in the survey and then the chance for the officers to comment,” Boyles said. Let’s skip ahead a little to another section.“So these issues arose and you didn’t afford her a conversation to talk with her about the issues that you had come to learn and create a plan with her to rectify those issues,” Walker said.“I did,” Boyles said. “And one of our meetings after a lot of this started becoming evident, I asked her about preparing a plan to try to address some of these items. The response was that a plan wasn’t needed and what did I have in mind to put into a plan.”Boyles said that was not his area of expertise. Let’s skip ahead. Walker quoted from the September 17 op-ed Boyles wrote for the Daily Progress.“So, in the immediacy of the decision in the op-ed piece that you wrote that the CPD was ‘gripped in chaos’,” Walker said.“Yes, it was my understanding that some of the leadership positions were not going to be staying if Chief Brackney were staying,” Boyles said. This line of questioning continued. Walker said her information said only two of six members of the command staff were set to leave. “So, you consider two of six people to be chaos?” Walker said. “No, I think it extends beyond,” Boyles said. “It’s the statements from the survey of people looking for other jobs, wanting to be out of the police department. There is no smoking gun in this.”Walker went through many of the comments and read through them out loud. She also wanted to pin down Boyles on what conversations he had with regional leaders about policing issues. Boyles said those were conversations were private and in confidence.“Okay, Chip, so since all of these people are secretive and you think that’s okay, because what you want us to do on whether or not you want to stay here or not based on some random conversations we had without talking to you about?” Walker asked.”That’s a decision you all will make,” Boyles said. “As I stated earlier, I’m here to fulfil the direction of Council. I took this job knowing. I think I’ve even stated for me there’s a job evaluation every other meeting. I accept that.”The questioning continued. At one point, there was to have been a press conference after the release of the August 20 statement.“And then, Chief Brackney arrived at a meeting, right, Chip? And you had changed course by that time that there’s no longer going to be a press conference,” Walker said.“Yes,” Boyles responded. “We had a disagreement over wanting to show the videos that you all saw in your closed session.” A little later on in the cross-examination, Councilor Hill brought a specific incident related to how former Police Chief Brackney responded to feedback. Go back to the tape to learn more about that but Walker asked Hill to read the email in question. “Okay, do you want to pull that email up?” Walker asked“I’m happy to find it, but I don’t think it’s necessary right now,” Hill said. “I’m just saying you are trying to pick specific examples. I don’t want to go down this path with you.”“I’m not,” Walker said, her voice rising. “I was open to whatever you all presented. I asked and allowed you all you to talk first because I’m just trying…”“We were trying to be respectful,” Hill said. “Excuse me?” Walker asked.“We were trying to be respectful of the process,” Hill said. “This is not the appropriate forum to get into all of this.”“You were not trying to be respectful of any process,” Walker said. “I have been on this Council and I know how you operate.”“I’d like for us to move on,” Hlll said. The conversation went back to that meeting after the August 20 press release. Boyles explained the dynamic that was leading him to make a decision. “That meeting was a good indication similar to what Councilor Hill was just talking about when we began to disagree over the videos and other issues, Chief Brackney just left the meeting which again gave me concern of being able to work with that type of interaction, with that type of relationship,” Boyles said. Boyles acknowledged that Brackney had told him that she had felt targeted by members of the community as well as internally. “My knowledge of that comes from what she’s told me and I certainly believe it to be true,” Boyles said. Walker was clear she was not going to let Boyles forget his decision to terminate Brackney. “I can go on about every city manager that has been here, and you are never going to, I told you this, Chip,” Walker said. “You’re never going to live past this decision.”Soon after, Walker quoted from the book White Rage to make part of her point and chastised her fellow Councilors for trying to control her.“Have I made 100 percent of the right decisions?” Walker asked. “No. Have you all made 100 percent of the right decisions? No. You haven’t. But again, your white gaze gets to determine who wins in a situation like this.”Earlier this year, Walker wrestled with whether to seek a second term before announcing in May she would be a candidate. She withdrew from the race on September 8, citing the racism of her fellow Councilors. Walker raised no campaign funds this year. The conversation on October 4 continued, and the rest of the discussion is available to watch.  Now it’s perhaps a better use of our time to think ahead to Council’s next meeting on October 18, as well as the four regular meetings of the year. Two new Councilors will join in January when Walker and Hill’s terms are up. Who will be the city manager? Who will be mayor? Who will be running the city This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Technically Speaking | A Keller Schroeder Podcast Series
FlexPod: Your Next-Generation Hybrid Cloud Infrastructure (Pt. 3)

Technically Speaking | A Keller Schroeder Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:06


Kris Linville, Senior Storage Engineer at Keller Schroeder, and Dan Barber, Data Center Solution Architect with NetApp return to conclude their three-part virtual conversation on FlexPod. Join Kris and Dan as they focus on data protection and how you can secure your storage with FlexPod and the hybrid cloud. Don't forget to check out episodes 24 and 25 to hear the first two segments of Kris and Dan's conversation.

RBC's Markets in Motion
The View From The Trenches Helps Put Current Worries Into Context

RBC's Markets in Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:06


This week in the podcast, we run through the results of our latest quarterly RBC analyst survey, in which we poll the firm's equity analysts on the outlooks for the industries they cover. The big things you need to know: First, outlooks for performance over the next 6-12 months remain optimistic, driven by constructive views on fundamentals, valuations, and cash deployment. Second, our analysts tilt most positive on Financials, Energy, Information Technology, Utilities, and Health Care, and least positive on REITs and Industrials. Third, policy outlooks generally remain cool, though it's worth noting most see higher corporate taxes as a moderate problem for earnings and performance as opposed to a major one. Fourth, while margin expectations have eased only a handful of our analysts consider supply chains to be a major problem for the industries they cover.

RM PODCAST FL
121 | Building an investment portfolio as a consultant with John Farhat

RM PODCAST FL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:23


John Farhat has run businesses for almost 25 years, and has an even longer track in Information Technology. Starting as a programmer, John moved to project manager, program designer, analytics and predictive work, large integrations, infrastructure, and security. His passion is the creation of something out of nothing. Whether a process, a business, a novel concept, a strategy.  Over the years, John has worked on strategic initiatives for large enterprises - like Marriott, Nationwide Insurance, Nestle, Borden Foods, Navistar International, Akzo-Nobel, and MAC Tools. Nowadays, he finds smaller and medium sized businesses much more interesting. Very few resources are properly sized for these types of companies. His efforts have helped the likes of Miles McClellan Construction Company, TownePark, Inc., and ALNI ltd. To learn more about John connect with him on LinkedIn by CLIKCING HERE or by phone at 614-582-1061.  GET YOUR ONLINE COURSE TODAY (Promo code ROMINA) VISIT WWW.CONNECTWITHROMINA.COM TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SHOW AND ROMINA

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
October 9, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 59:08


SMS email gateways (beware of malware), iPhone 11 locking up (possible fixes), driver update warnings (beware), laptop power adaptor options for UK, Windows 11 upgrade (requirements, delay recommended), Profiles in IT (Timothy Sweeney, founder and CEO Epic Games), Observations from the Faculty Lounge (Tim Sweeney success formula), a really bad week for Facebook (two outages, one whistle blower, a Congressional hearing) and Beethovens Tenth Symphony completed with AI software. This show originally aired on Saturday, October 9, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

Grateful Badass Podcast
GB149: Schools + On-Going Pandemic with Principal Jean D. Woods- Powell, Information Technology High School Queens, NY

Grateful Badass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:32


Delighted to begin our Schools + On-Going Pandemic Series with Principal Jean D. Woods- Powell of Information Technology High School of Long Island City Queens, New York. Listen in now as Principal Woods- Powell shares her insight, perspective allowing our listeners to check-in with what's going on in our schools. * Views presented are solely… Read More GB149: Schools + On-Going Pandemic with Principal Jean D. Woods- Powell, Information Technology High School Queens, NY

Chat with Leaders Podcast
Tim Huff: 3 Dimensions of Authentic Leadership

Chat with Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:57


Tim Huff is an Executive Coach and Leadership Advisor who has a passion for helping leaders and executives at all levels tap into the greatness that exists within themselves to lead their teams at their full potential and live their lives intentionally and unapologetically. With over 26 years of high-stakes leadership experience in the U.S. Army as well as multiple Fortune 500 companies, he has a unique background that allows him to empathize with his clients' leadership challenges as he helps them in their journey of transformational change. As a Certified Executive Coach, Tim enjoys coaching and advising individuals as well as teams in values-based leadership, effective behaviors, healthy relationships, executive presence, and high-performing team dynamics. With a strong business and Information Technology background, he understands the pressures placed on today's executives as well as the value of excellent leadership in an organization. Tim's mission is to help all leaders be at their best for their teams! What you'll learn When and why coaching authentic leadership became an important mission for Tim. Ways in which Tim has seen leaders struggle with the idea of being completely authentic while owning their responsibility for company performance. The 3 dimensions of authentic leadership and how Tim describes their importance. Purpose Passion Values How Tim would describe authentic leadership as “freedom”. The RAVE framework for authentic leadership: Respect, Appreciate, and Value Everyone How leaders can consciously create environments that are safe for all stakeholders to be comfortable as their authentic selves. Follow / Learn More Learn more about Tim's Executive Coaching Services at PlatinumLevelLeadership.com Email tim@plleader.com Learn more about the work Tim is doing with Turknett Leadership Group at https://www.turknett.com/team/tim-huff/  Email thuff@turknett.com  Follow Tim Huff on LinkedIn We Love Our Community Partners B Local G Georgia: a collection of for-profit companies each dedicated to creating a future where businesses operate as a positive influence on society Inspiredu: Nonprofit Leaders Bridging The Digital Divide AppBarry: Custom Web And Mobile Application Development Classic City Consulting: WordPress Website Development Stratfield Consulting: Consulting, Staffing, Recruiting See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

P3 - Project Privacy Podcast
The Human Element of Data Management

P3 - Project Privacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:02


EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1230: Norway's EVs Break Through The 90% Barrier | 02 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 24:29


Show #1231 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Saturday 2nd October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to EXECUTIVE PRODUCER ADAM BREWTON NORWAY'S EVS BREAK THROUGH THE 90% BARRIER "Norway's plugin electric vehicle market share in September broke new ground, hitting 91.5% with full electrics alone taking 77.5% share. Diesels lost more than half their share year-on-year, falling to just 2.3%, with petrol and plugless hybrids not faring much better. Overall auto market volume was 17992 units, slightly above seasonal norms. The Tesla Model Y and Tesla Model 3 took the top two spots." writes Dr Max Holland for CleanTechnica: "September's combined plugin result of 91.5% consisted mainly of full battery electrics (BEVs) at a new record share of 77.5%, with plugin hybrids taking a modest 13.9%. Last year, September saw 61.5% BEVs and 20.1% PHEVs." 13,946 BEVs for September. Read more: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/10/02/norways-evs-break-through-the-90-barrier-tesla-takes-top-two-trophies LORDSTOWN SELLING FACTORY TO FOXCONN "Electric truck startup Lordstown Motors was once viewed as a promising startup with its rugged electric pickup trucks targeting the commercial market. The company launched its U.S. IPO last October in a high profile merger with blank-check company Diamond Peak Holdings. Lordstown's shares trade on the Nasdaq." reports Futurecar: "Lordstown Motors claimed that it had more than 100,000 preorders for the Endurance pickup worth a total of $1.4 billion, which wasn't true. With a falling stock price, the fallout led to the sudden resignation of Burns along with Chief Financial Officer Julio Rodriguez in June, leaving the company's future uncertain.  Lordstown is reportedly in talks to sell its Ohio EV factory that it acquired from General Motors to Taiwan contract manufacturer Foxconn. Foxconn's Chairman, Young Liu, confirmed to news outlet Nikkei Asia in August that the company plans to build an EV factory in the U.S. and another in Thailand." Read more: https://www.futurecar.com/4898/Lordstown-Motors-in-Talks-to-Sell-its-Ohio-EV-Factory-to-Foxconn WHEN LAMBORGHINI'S ELECTRIC GRAND TOURER WILL ARRIVE "By the end of 2024, Lamborghini will electrify its entire lineup. Lamborghini's first-ever dedicated EV will then arrive in the second half of the decade. Lamborghini has previewed its first EV in a shadowy teaser image on a slide showing its future product roadmap, but details are being kept under wraps." according to CarBuzz: "a new report by Automotive News suggests Lamborghini's first EV will take the form of an electric grand tourer with a practical 2+2 seating layout so the whole family can come along for the ride. Details are still scarce, but the electric grand tourer is reportedly being developed in collaboration with Audi and Porsche and be underpinned by Volkswagen Group's new Scalable Systems Platform entering production in 2024. According to the report, Lamborghini's first fully electric car will launch between 2025 and 2027. Lamborghini could utilize Rimac's battery technology since Porsche owns a 45 percent stake in the recently formed Bugatti Rimac." Read more: https://carbuzz.com/news/this-is-when-lamborghinis-electric-grand-tourer-will-arrive TESLA-POWERED PORSCHE IS THE BEST ELECTRIC CAR JAY LENO HAS EVER DRIVEN " One company that specializes in converting European classic sports cars into modern EVs is called Zelectric. The California-based company has electrified everything from a Volkswagen Beetle to a Microbus, but is perhaps best known for its Tesla-powered Porsche 912. Jay Leno took one for a spin in the latest episode of Jay Leno's Garage, and to say he was impressed with the electric conversion is an understatement." say CarBuzz: "Fortunately, the electric motor and battery haven't ruined the original car's agile handling. Weighing just 2,505 pounds, the electric Porsche 912 is only 130 pounds heavier than the stock version. In fact, it's even more enjoyable to drive since it has better weight distribution and upgraded suspension. For the electric conversion, Zelectric has added a 32-kWh battery and an electric motor from a Tesla Model S rated at 536 hp. On a full charge, the Tesla-powered Porsche will last around 120-145 miles depending on how conservatively you drive." Read more: https://carbuzz.com/news/this-tesla-powered-porsche-is-the-best-electric-car-jay-leno-has-ever-driven TESLA DELAYING WIDER RELEASE OF FSD BETA Elon Musk tweeted: "Wow, lot of interest in FSD beta! Plan is to roll out version 10.2 midnight Friday, then on-ramp ~1000 owners/day, prioritized by safety rating. Apologies, 10.2 release will be a week from Friday" "Tesla will hold off on rolling out a beta version of its so-called “Full Self-Driving” system to more customers by a week to align with a delayed software update, Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk said. The carmaker will expand access to what it refers to as “FSD beta” when it releases version 10.2 of the software, Musk wrote Friday on Twitter. He announced earlier in the week that this will take place on October 8." writes driving.ca: "A week ago, Tesla released a button to customers allowing them to request to participate in the beta-testing program. They must agree to let the company assess their driving behavior for seven days and acknowledge they're responsible for remaining alert and keeping their hands on the wheel." https://driving.ca/auto-news/technology-news/tesla-delaying-wider-release-of-fsd-beta-by-one-week-musk-says NEW ENERGY DENSITY RECORD FOR A LFP BATTERY "According to the some recent MIIT (Ministry of Industry and Information Technology) documents, a pure electric dump truck from the XCMG Group now holds the record for having the most energy dense LFP (LiFePO4) battery." write PushEVs: "The XCMG Group is the leading Chinese construction machinery manufacturer and one of the world's largest. an energy density of 176,1 Wh/kg is impressive for a LFP battery pack. In the coming months we might see this kind of energy density also in LFP batteries for electric passenger cars." Read more: https://pushevs.com/2021/09/30/new-energy-density-record-for-a-lfp-battery/ EARTH RIDES IS A RIDE-HAILING APP DEDICATED TO EVS "The Nashville fleet is almost entirely comprised of Tesla vehicles, including several Model X SUVs and some Model S sedans that were purchased used (there's an early S that's accrued over 250,000 miles requiring little other than tires, and it's extra valuable because of the free supercharging). Most of the Model 3s and Ys in the Earth Rides fleet were purchased new. Ys are purchased with the optional third-row seat to accommodate larger ride parties." reports Motor Trend: "The fleet also includes Audi E-Tron, Ford Mustang Mach-E, and Polestar 2 models, and other higher-end models will join the fleet (but probably no Nissan Leafs or Chevy Bolts). The local charging infrastructure affects purchases—Nashville is well served by Tesla Superchargers; Austin is less so. Hence there are more non-Teslas in the Texas fleet. In addition to driver training, new employees are schooled to be conversant in the technology of the cars they're driving, so they can answer all the frequently asked questions riders might have. And Earth Rides has worked out some sweetheart lease deals with Polestar to both expose the public to the nascent brand and to accumulate mileage more quickly than retail customers would and thereby provide fast-tracked used-vehicle stocK" Read more: https://www.motortrend.com/news/earth-rideshare-app-evs/ AUSTIN TEXAS ORDERS 26 PROTERRA E-BUSES Proterra has announced that Capital Metro in Austin, Texas is purchasing 26 40-foot Proterra ZX5 Max electric transit buses, with an option for another 126 of these buses plus chargers over the next 5 years. The first 26 electric buses should be delivered in 2022." says electrive: "In the announcement about the new electric bus purchase, it is said that Capital Metro aims to transition its entire fleet of more than 400 transit vehicles with zero-emission vehicles. According to its website, the Austin public transport provider currently has a fleet of 368 MetroBuses, which are presumably fossil-fuelled, since they list their 12 electric buses separately. " Read more: https://www.electrive.com/2021/09/29/austin-texas-orders-26-proterra-e-buses/ CHARIN WELCOMES WiTRICITY "WiTricity announced today that it has joined the Charging Interface Initiative (CharIN) as a core member. WiTricity is the pioneer in wireless charging technologies for electric vehicles (EVs), and has long been committed to the development of common standards and interoperability of EV wireless charging and will continue those efforts as a CharIN member. CharIN is a leading global association with over 200 members dedicated to promoting e-mobility charging interoperability based on the Combined Charging System (CCS) as the global standard for charging vehicles of all kinds. Cross-industry stakeholders like automakers, charging station manufacturers, component suppliers, energy providers, grid operators and more are CharIN members whose goal, through making e-mobility charging solutions interoperable, is to make the EV user experience reliable, easy, and smooth to accelerate adoption. Read more: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210930005272/en/WiTricity-Joins-the-Charging-Interface-Initiative-CharIN-as-a-Core-Member EURO CAR MAKERS SEEK TO MITIGATE RELIANCE ON CHINA "European automakers are in discussions with Australian rare earths explorer Arafura Resources Ltd. about sourcing elements that help power electric cars from outside China, which dominates global supply." reports Autoblog: "The miner is developing the A$1 billion ($728 million) Nolans project in Australia's Northern Territory that will cover as much as 10% of global demand for the type of rare earths used in permanent magnets for electric motors. Crucially, Arafura plans to process ores close to its site, ensuring direct oversight of the treatment of toxic waste products at the project it bought in 2001. China, which controls two-thirds of mining and 85% of refining of rare earths, according to BloombergNEF, is expected to put much of its production to use domestically in future." https://www.autoblog.com/2021/09/26/rare-earth-metal-alternatives/ WORLD RX ANNOUNCES 14-CAR GRID FOR FIRST FULLY ELECTRIC SEASON https://www.motorsport.com/world-rx/news/world-rallycross-14-electric-cars-2022/6678742/ NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM If you have gone back to fossil cars, or play along, imagine you HAD decided to switch back from EV to combustion, what's the reason?  Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

YCSO: Behind the Badge
YCSO Behind the Badge - YCSO Information Technology

YCSO: Behind the Badge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 40:23


There are three IT gurus at the YCSO that specialize in maintaining all computers, software, in and out of patrol cars, and basically anything electronic at the YCSO. On this Behind the Badge we talk about the huge job is it to juggle it all.

The Mind Body Business Show
EP 164: La Tricia Grann Mingus - Promotions & Marketing Expert

The Mind Body Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 66:26


La Tricia Grann Mingus is the COO/Co-Founder of Grann Mingus Entertainment Group/Right On QUE Radio - a Promotions and Marketing company and Online Radio Station located in Las Vegas, Nevada. For 25 years, La Tricia developed significant experience in the areas of Business Administration, Program/Project Management, ILT/VILT (Instructor Lead Training/Virtual Instructor Lead Training), Business Analytics, Strategic Planning and Implementation, Information Technology, and Customer Service. La Tricia is a Wife, Mother to 4 AMAZING adult children, Persistent Entrepreneur, Life Coach (No Fear Coaching since 2010), and the Host of “Life Talks” a daily talk show currently broadcasting on Right On QUE Radio.