Podcasts about CVC

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Best podcasts about CVC

Latest podcast episodes about CVC

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Friday 26-Nov

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 4:59


US futures are indicating a lower open as of 05:00 ET. Asian markets traded significantly lower on Friday. European equity markets also trading sharply lower, though currently off the worst levels . Risk-off mode said to be driven by concerns over a new Covid variant first discovered in Southern Africa, said to be more transmissible, with questions over potential immunity to vaccines. Company's mentioned: Didi Global, KKR, CVC, Telecom Italia

Podcast de MERITOCRACIA BLANCA
Podcast 9x45 'Asamblea para la historia' |Actualidad Meritocrática

Podcast de MERITOCRACIA BLANCA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 95:47


Fantástica noche en la que nos hemos centrado prácticamente en exclusiva en el fantástico discurso de Florentino Pérez en la Asamblea anual de Socios COmpromisarios del Real Madrid. Un histórico discurso en el que, además de defender unas cuentas impecables y dignas de estudio en unos tiempos de crisis como los actuales, ha hecho una gran defensa de la Superliga y ha denunciado el acuerdo de la Liga con CVC. Para ello estamos reunido a un espectacular elencazo lleno de estrellas: @DiegoJMontero2 @goyix_salduero @LosSublimes @juanpfrutos @alpr97 *Meritocracia Blanca no se hace responsable de las opiniones de sus colaboradores Nos podéis seguir en: Web: https://meritocraciablanca.com/ Twitter/Facebook: @MeritoRMCF Twitch: www.twitch.tv/rmadridistareal

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Mike McFadgen, Partner and Co-Founder of Element Ventures - The Nuances of Investing Across Europe

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 33:21


Anirudh Singh sits down with Mike McFadgen, Partner and Co-Founder of Element Ventures. In this episode, they discuss: - Mike's early career at Barclays - Launching Element Ventures to focus on B2B fintech investing - Cultural differences that drive European fintech - Element's portfolio companies And much more! Mike McFadgen: Mike is a Partner and co-founder of London-based B2B fintech venture capital firm Element Ventures. Mike made his first fintech investment in 2009 and since has had 12 years investing experience working with Barclays and Euclid Opportunities (the CVC fund of NEX Group). He currently represents Element on the boards of Hepster, Billhop, Minna Technologies and Coincover. He holds a Masters in Finance from London Business School and lives in London with his wife and two small children. For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/wharton-fintech-club/ WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Anirudh's Twitter: twitter.com/avsingh_24

Primary Teacher Friends Podcast
Routine Their Way to Mastery

Primary Teacher Friends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 13:11


Teacher, how are your students doing with their foundational skills?In today's episode, I'm going to share a real teacher struggle moment I had recently. The short version is my students did NOT master CVC words after I taught them with our district's curriculum. So, it was time to go back to my tried and true method: routines. Routines are incredibly powerful. With a little time every day, we can practice the most important concepts, and our students can master them.Here's how I'm doing it!Links in today's epiosde:Today's blog postPhast Phonics routineDaily Write It sentence routine

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 85:09


How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You. And Why ExpressVPN Isn't Safe to Use. Ransomware, Trojanware Adware. What's the difference between these different types of malware.? And when it comes down to our computers, which should we worry about the most and which should we worry about the most? [Automated Transcript Follows] [00:00:17] There are a lot of different types of malware that are out there and they're circulating and scaring us. [00:00:23] And I think for good reason, in many cases, ransomware of course, is the big one and it is up, up, up. It has become just so common. Now that pretty much everybody is going to be facing a serious ransomware attack within the next 12 months. The numbers are staggering. And what are they doing while now they're getting you with the double whammy. [00:00:50] The first whammy is they encrypt your data. Your computers are encrypted, everything on them. So you can't use them anymore. Bottom line. Yeah, they'll boot they'll run enough in order to be able for you to pay that ransom. But any document that you might care about, any PDF, any word doc, and the spreadsheet is going to be encrypted. [00:01:14] And the idea behind that is. You have to pay in order to get that decryption key about 50% of the time. Yeah. About half of the time. Even if you pay the ransom, you'll get your data back the rest of the time. No, you you'll never see it again. So what do you do about that type of ransomware? Well, obviously most people just pay the rent. [00:01:39] But that's gone up as well. We've seen over a hundred percent increase in the amount of ransom people happy. So what's the best thing to do. What's the easiest thing to do in order to help you with this type of ransomware while it's obviously to have good backups. Now I'm going to be doing a bootcamp. [00:02:00] We're going to talk about this and a workshop. I really want to get going with these one week long workshops. So we'll do a, at least a couple of times a month in these boot camps that we'll do pretty much every week here, but they're coming up fairly soon. You'll only know about them. If you are on my email list, that is Craig peterson.com and the number one thing that you can do to. [00:02:27] You when you're hit with this type of rent somewhere, because if you're not taking all of the other precautions, you should be digging under really good that you're going to get hit the better than 50%. And once you do is have a good backup, and I want to warn everybody because I've seen this again and against people just keep making this mistake, probably because they don't get it. [00:02:51] They don't understand why and where and how, when it comes to ransom. The mistake is they do a backup to a local desk. Now, many times the backup is on a thumb drive or USB drive. So you just go to the big box store. You go to Amazon, you order an external drive. You're just amazed how cheap they are. [00:03:16] Nowadays. Once you've got that drive, you plug it in. You turn on some backup software. Maybe it's something you've used for some years, maybe. If you have a Mac, you're just using the built-in backup software. Even the windows operating system now comes with some built-in backup and you think you're off and running because every so often it back. [00:03:40] If we're using a Mac is smart enough to not only back up your whole machine, but as you're editing files, it's going to go ahead and make a backup of that file as you're editing it. So if there is a crash or something else, you're not going to lose much. I just love the way apple does that. Huge problem. [00:03:59] Because if the disc is attached to your machine, or let's say that disc is on a file server, cause you're smart, right? You set up some network attached storage of some sort and your machine has access to it. And so you're sending it off of your machine to a central. Well, you still got a problem because if your machine can read or more particularly right to a location on your network or locally, that ransomware is going to also encrypt everything, it can find there. [00:04:37] So, if you are sharing a network drive and you get ransomware, when you remember the odds are better than 50%, you're gonna get it. Then what happens? What would this type of ransomware it not only encrypts the files on your computer, but encrypts them on the backup as well. And it also encrypts them on any of the. [00:04:58] File servers or network attached storage the, to have on your network. So now everything's encrypted. You wonder why someone and people pay the ransom? Oh, that's a large part of the reason right there. And I keep saying this type of ransomware because there isn't another type of ransomware and they usually go hand in hand. [00:05:21] The bad guys were not making enough money off of holding your files. Rants. So the next thing the bad guys have done is they've gone to a different type of extortion. This one is, Hey, if you don't pay us, we are going to release your files to the world. Now they might do it on a dark website. They might do it on a publicly available site, which is what many of them are starting to do now. [00:05:51] And you're going to either be embarrassed or subject to a lot of fines or both, because now if your files have. Confidential information. Let's say it's your intellectual property. Now, anybody who bothers to search online can find your intellectual property out there. If you have anything that's personally identifiable information. [00:06:18] And it gets out. Now you are subject to major fines. In fact, in some states like California and Massachusetts, you are subject to fines. Even if the bad guys don't post it online. So that's the second type of ransomware and it's a bad type. And usually what'll happen is the bad guys, get their software on your machine and they can do it in a number of different ways. [00:06:45] One of the popular ways to do it now is to just break in because. Our businesses, we've, we've set up something called remote desktop, and we're using remote desktop for our users to get in. And maybe we're using some form of a VPN to do it with, or maybe we've made the mistake of using express VPN. And, uh, we have that now connected up to our homes and we think that that's keeping us safe. [00:07:13] And I got a few things to say about that as well. These VPN services. What happens now while Microsoft remote desktop has been under major attack and there are some major flaws. Some of these were patched more than a year ago now, but according to recent studies, 60%, almost two thirds of businesses have not applied the patches. [00:07:42] You know, th this is basic stuff. And I understand how hard it can be and it can be confusing and you can break your systems, but you have to weigh that against well, what's going to happen if our systems are broken into, because we didn't apply the patch. So that's the second type of ransomware and that's what most people are afraid of and for good reason. [00:08:07] And one of the things we do for businesses and we do ransomware audits, we have a look at your systems, your firewalls, et cetera, and make recommendations to. Man. I got to talk about this too, cause it really upset me this week. I signed up for a webinar just to see what was going on. There's a company out there that sells these marketing systems to managed services providers. [00:08:33] And I, I, I had to turn it off like instantly because it was just such. Garbage that they were telling managed services providers MSPs to do. I couldn't believe it. So this guy was talking about how, again, I turned it back on and I said, Hey, I've got to watch us anyways, because I need to know what's going on. [00:08:54] And this guy was telling these managed services providers, how they can double their clothes. I couldn't believe this guy. Cause he was saying that what they do is they offer to do a ransomware audit for businesses and they say, normally we charge $6,000 to do a ransomware audit, but I tell you what we'll do it for you for. [00:09:20] Now, this is a guy that he had an MSP managed services provider. Apparently he had started it and he was bringing in more than $1 million per month in revenue. Can you imagine that monthly recurring revenue over a million dollars? And so he's telling people businesses, Hey, I have a $6,000 audit that we'll do. [00:09:47] For free, Hey people, how long have we said, if you're not paying for something your, the product remember Facebook, right? Google, Instagram, all of those guys, Twitter, you don't pay for it, but your information is the product. So what's this guy doing well, guess what? His audit, it's going to show his audit. [00:10:10] It's going to show that you need him. And he's sucked in hundreds of businesses and he didn't even know what he was doing when it came to the audits or protecting them. It is insane. What's going on out there. I am ashamed of my industry, absolutely ashamed of it. You know, I've got my first attack, successful attack against my company back in 91 92. [00:10:42] And I learned this stuff because I had to, and I help you guys because I don't want you to get stuck. Like I was so important, important word of advice. If you want to nod it, go to someone that charges you for the audit. That's going to do a real one. It's going to give you real advice that you can really need and use rather than, Hey, you knew do use me. [00:11:11] Because my free audit tells you so, so many scams. [00:11:15] What is ad where in what is crypto, where these are two types of real, kind of bad things. Won't gray areas, things that are hurting us, our mobile devices, our businesses. And our homes. [00:11:32] Adware is also a type of malware that's been around a long time. But it does live in a gray area. [00:11:42] And that gray area is between basically marketing and, uh, well outright fraud. And I don't even want to call it just marketing because it's very aggressive market. What they will do with add where is they? They will have some JavaScript code or something else that's embedded on a webpage, and that's usually how you get it. [00:12:09] And then once it's in, in your browser, it sits there and it pops up things. So it'll pop up an ad for this, pop up an ad for that, even if it's. Uh, part of the site that you're on right now, and it can live for months or years on your computer. We've known for a long time about ad where on the windows environment and how it has just been just terribly annoying at the very least Microsoft and genetic Explorer. [00:12:40] One of the worst web browsers ever. Perpetrated on humankind was well-known for this. And of course, Microsoft got rid of internet Explorer, and then they came up with her own symposer browser, the edge browser that was also openly scorned. And so Microsoft got rid of their edge browser and switched over to basically Google Chrome chromium, and then changed his name to the edge browser. [00:13:11] And so you think you're running edge, but you're kind of not, you kind of are. So they did all of that in order to help with compatibility and also to help with some of these problems that people have had using that Microsoft browser online, very, very big problems. So what can you do about it and what does it do to you and where can be very. [00:13:37] You might've had it before words always popping up again and again and again on your browser, just so crazy knowing it it's insane, but it can also be used to spy on where you're going online and potentially to, to infect you with something even worse. Sometimes some of this ad where we'll purposely click on ads, that the people who gave you the ad were, are using as kind of like a clickbait type thing. [00:14:09] So you go to a website and it was. Automatically click certain ads and click on unbeknownst to you, right? It's as though you went there so that people have to pay for that ad. And sometimes aids are very, very complicated. Sometimes they'll use. In order to drive a competitor out of business or out of the market, because the ads are so expensive because so many people are supposedly clicking on the ads. [00:14:40] But in reality, you didn't click on the ad. You're not going to see that page that you supposedly clicked on, and it's going to cost that advertiser money, whole bunch of money. You might not care. Right. But it is. Ad ware over on the Mac, however, is the only real malware menace at all I had to where is something that choosed fairly frequently on the Mac? [00:15:09] It is pretty darn easy to get rid of. And as a general rule, it doesn't work very well on the Mac. Although I have seen some cases where it got very, very sticky. Where someone ended up installing it, it wasn't just running in the browser, but they installed it on their Mac, which is something you should never do. [00:15:29] But apple has some things in place to help stop any of this from happening. And it's gotten a lot better. I haven't seen this problem in a couple of years, but apple is using the signature based blocking technology called export. They also have at apple, this developer based notarization of apps. And so the run of the mill malware, which includes most of this Al where really can't find a foothold. [00:15:57] But I want to remind everybody that if they can get Al add where onto your computer, they might be able to get something worse. So you really got to keep an eye out for no two ways about it. There are some companies out there, for instance, there's this one. Parrot, which is a program linked to this Israeli marketing firm that gains persistence on your browser and potentially could gain root access to the Mac system. [00:16:30] So careful, careful on all fronts now. Anti-malware stuff that we use for our clients is called amp, which is an advanced malware protection system. That's been developed by our friends over at Cisco it's amp is very, very good. Unfortunately, you cannot get it unless you buy it from somebody like us and you have to buy so many seats for some of this stuff, it gets gets expensive quickly. [00:17:00] Um, if you can't do that much, a lot of people like Malwarebytes, there are some very good things about it, but be careful because in order for this to work, this is Railey parrot software to work. It has a fake install. So again, it's just be careful if you know how apple installed software, you know that unless you have instigated it, it's not going to be installed. [00:17:30] You're not just going to see an installer. And say, Hey, we're apple install us. Right? Apple just does it in the background when it comes to updates patches. But they're very sneaky here trying to install things like the Adobe floor. Player, which has been deprecated. Deprecated is completely now gone from Mac systems and from windows systems, you should not be using flash at all anymore. [00:18:02] It was very, very bad. So up becomes you, you go to wound stole the leaders flash player, or, and I'm sure they're going to change this or something else, right? It won't be flashed in a future. It'll be a Adobe. Would you also don't need on a Mac. So anyhow, that's what you got to be careful of ad were still a big problem in windows. [00:18:25] Not much as much as it used to be. Uh, thanks to the change to Google Chrome, which Microsoft has rebranded as of course its own edge browser. Much of a problem at all on Macs, but be very, very careful in either platform about installing software that you did not start installing. Now earlier this year, there's a security firm called red Canary that found something that's been named silver Sparrow. [00:18:58] That was on a. 30,000 Mac computers. And apparently the developers for this malware had already adapted it to apples and one chip architecture and have distributed this binary, this program as a universal binary. Now in the macro, the member doesn't just use Intel. It used to use power PCs and then it used Intel. [00:19:21] And now it's using its own architecture for the chips themselves. So a universal binary is something that will run on Mac Intel based and Mac architecture base. But, uh, the bottom line is that this proof of concept. Malware, if you will had no payload. So we know it's out there, we seen it now on almost 30,000 Mac computers, but at this point it's not really doing much, much at all. [00:19:53] So. These are malicious search engine results and they're directing victims to download these PKGs, which are Mac packaged format installers based on network connections from your browser shortly before download. So just be very careful about all of that. It can be something as annoying as malware or something as a malicious. [00:20:17] Well, potentially as ransomware. Particularly if you're running windows, Hey, if you want to find out more about this, if you want to get into some of my free courses here, we got free boot camps coming up. Make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. More than glad to send you my show notes, a little bit of training, and of course, let you attend these free bootcamps that are now to sell you stuff, but solve problems for you. [00:20:49] Hey, if you use VPNs to try and keep yourself safe, particularly if you use express VPN. Wow. What just came out is incredible. It is anything but safe and secure. [00:21:06] Express VPN was purchased by a company called Cape K A P E. Cape is a company that had changed its name because oh, things were bad. [00:21:19] Right. It was originally founded under the name of cross writer. And you might've seen notices from your anti-malware software over the years for everything from Malwarebytes on saying that, oh, it blew up. To this cross writer piece of malware, most of the time it's ad ware, but it is really interesting to see because this company was founded by a person who was part of the Israeli secret service. Right? So it wasn't of course not. It's not called the secret service over there in Israel. And it, frankly, it compares to our NSA, you know, no such agency. Yeah. It's part of unit 8,200 in the Israeli intelligence military. And it's been dubbed, of course, Israel's NSA. Teddy Saggy, which was one of these investors also was mentioned in the Panama papers. [00:22:24] Remember those? We talked about those back in 2016, those were leaked and that showed these law firm, this one particular law firm in panel. And that we're sheltering assets for people all over the world. And so now that express VPN is owned by this company that is, this company built entirely by intelligence agents for almost a billion. [00:22:55] Dollars in cash and stock purchases. That's a much, they sold express VPN for almost a billion dollars, which is kind of crazy when you think of it as a VPN service, but makes a lot of sense. If you're going to want to monitor what people are doing, where they're going, maybe even break into their systems or better choice than a VPN provider and the. [00:23:20] The company has been buying up VPN providers and is now the proud owner of express VPN. If you attended my VPN workshop that I had, oh, it's probably been a year and I'm going to start doing these again. I promise, I promise. I promise, but you know how much I just like VPNs. In fact, one of you guys, I'm sorry, I forgot your name. [00:23:46] Send me. A couple of weeks ago now about VPNs and saying, I know how much you disliked VPN look at this article. And it was talking about this whole thing with express VPN. So they just now all over the place, the discussions online about what. Been to hear who the founder was, the CEO, the CTO, this growing portfolio that they have in Sunbrella of ownerships, that now is centralized in a multiple VPNs. [00:24:15] Now, Cape technology only started acquiring VPN companies about four years ago. And they've been in business now for over a decade. And what were they doing before? They started buying VPN companies? While they own VPN companies. Oh, they were a major manufacturer and distributor of. Malware of varying types. [00:24:40] Now the first part of the show today, of course, I was explaining some of the differences, like ad words, et cetera, so that you could understand this story. Right? Ghulja that? So you can understand this. That's what these guys have been doing. It's absolutely crazy. So the F the co-founder of Cape technology and former CEO started his career in information technologies while serving in the Israeli defense forces. [00:25:08] As I mentioned, Israeli intelligence Corps under unit 8,200 it's that unit is responsible for. Dean what's called signal intelligence and data decryption. Now we have signal intelligence here as well, and that's basically intercepting signals, figuring out what's being said, what's going on? Where they are, the size of the forces, et cetera. [00:25:32] I have a friend of mine, a young lady who is in signal intelligence in, I think it's the Navy, but every part of our military has it is. However, our military doesn't directly control VPM services like express VPN that can be used in a very big spike capacity. That's what I'm really concerned about. Now. I also, I found an interesting article on zero hedge about this, uh, you know, this company express, VPN being acquired. [00:26:06] But they're also pointing out that companies that were founded by former operatives of unit 8,200. That again, the Israeli version of the NSA included. Ways Elbit systems, which is right in my hometown of Merrimack, New Hampshire and slews of other startups now ways. Right. I, I used ways I recommended people to use it and of course, Google bought it a few years back and that's when I stopped using it, but it was really nice. [00:26:39] It worked really well. And I had no idea the information was likely going to. The Israeli defense Corps. Oh my goodness. There's spy agencies, uh, and a bunch of other startups, by the way. It's estimated that there have been over 1000 stack tech startups that came out of the people working at unit 8,208. [00:27:07] Again, they're CIA NSA, uh, guys, their spine on everybody. You can, you believe that? And they've been bought by a mentioned Google, but other companies like Kodak, PayPal, Facebook, Microsoft have bought them. So in addition to the thousands of companies, according to zero. Uh, unit 8,200 has also fostered close working relationship with the U S government, which you would expect, right? [00:27:33] Edward Snowden. You remember him? He disclosed leaked documents. He obtained, which included an agreement between the NSA and the Israeli defense force. The agreement showed that the U S intelligence. Agency would share information. It collected under domestic surveillance operations with it. Israeli counterpart. [00:27:53] You remember we talked before about the five eyes, seven eyes searching eyes. It's up in the twenties. Now these countries that spy on each other citizens. For the other countries, right? Yeah. Your information might not be collected by the U S government, but the U S government gets it by buying it from private contractors, which it says it can do because we're only barred from collecting it ourselves. [00:28:17] We can use private contractors that collected on you. And also by going in partnership with foreign government. Because again, we can't collect that information, but we can certainly have the Israelis or, or the Brits or the Australians or Canada. They could collect it from. Can you believe this, how they're just stretching these rules to fit in what they want to fit. [00:28:39] Okay. Completely ignoring not only the constitution, but the laws of the United States. It's, it's just absolutely incredible. So critics of this unit, Eddy 200 attested that the Israeli intelligence outfit routinely uses the data received from the NSA by providing it to. Politicians Israeli politicians for the basics of blackmailing. [00:29:06] Yes. Blackmailing others. Yes. Indeed. Other whistle blowers have revealed any two hundreds operations have been able to disrupt Syrian air defense systems, hack Russia. Cap Kaspersky labs. You remember I told you guys don't use Kaspersky antivirus and has outfitted several Israeli embassies with Glendale, seen surveillance systems, cleanse Stein. [00:29:31] However you want to pronounce it. By the time Cape technologies acquired his first VPN company. Uh, the CE original CEO had left and he went on to found cup pie before leaving as it CEO in 2019, it goes on and on, uh, bottom line gas, SWAT express VPN, which is advertised by so many conservatives. Now looks like it is actually part of a spy operation. [00:30:01] So sign up now. Craig peterson.com. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You're going to want to attend my free VPN webinar. Hey, I don't have anything to sell you when it comes to VPNs. I just want you to know the truth. [00:30:17] Labor shortages are making businesses turn direction. And now that we're laying off people or firing them because they didn't take the jab, what are businesses going to do? Well, I have news for you that reduced workforce, well, guess what?. [00:30:34] U.S. Businesses are really seriously moving to automation. [00:30:39] Now they've been doing this since the start of this whole lockdown. They were doing it even before then. I tell the story of when I was in France, a boom went four or five years ago now, and I stayed off the beaten path. I was not in the touristy areas. I speak French. So I went just where the. I decided to go, my wife and I, so we rented a car and we spent a month just kind of driving around where do we want to go next to, or do we want to go next? [00:31:08] It was a whole lot of fun. And while we were there on a Sunday, I came to realize that these small French towns have no restaurants open on Sunday, nothing at all, talking about a bit of a culture shock. That's not true. There was one restaurant opened in the town and that restaurant was, and McDonald's. [00:31:30] So when I go to McDonald's here a few years ago in France, central France. And when I walk in, there's nobody at the counter, but they're all. Oh, half a dozen kiosks out front. So you go and you order your hamburger, whatever might be, or your drinks, et cetera, right there in the kiosk, you pay for them riding the kiosk. [00:31:53] And there's some people working out back that are then making the hamburgers or the milkshakes or coffee, whatever you ordered and bringing it up to the front. And then they just put her right there for you to grab that simple. And this was of course, pre. Down days, I assume that it has gone even more automated. [00:32:14] Uh, they're in France, but hard to say. And I've seen the same thing here in the us. I was out in Vermont just about a month ago and I was riding with a buddy of mine, motorcycle riding, couple of buddies, actually. And we stopped in this small. Town. And we went to this little breasts, breakfast restaurant and the breakfast restaurant had maybe four or five tables inside. [00:32:42] And you just sat at the table. No waitress came up, but there's little sign with the QR code. So it said a scan, the QR code to get started. So you scanned it, it knew based on the QR code, which table you were at, and it showed you the menu that was in effect right then and there. So the lunch menu or the breakfast or the all day, you got to pick it and then you selected what you wanted. [00:33:08] It used whatever payment you wanted. I used apple pay. And in order to pay for my breakfast and my buddy ordered what he wanted. And then out came a waitress who delivered the food. Once it was already in the drinks, it was very automated. It allowed them to cut back on some people and others, this small restaurant, they probably had one last waitress, but when you kind of had in the shifts. [00:33:33] Days and vacation days is probably two waitresses. So they're saving some serious money because a system like this that you just scan a QR code and do the order and it prints up in the kitchen is cheap compared to hiring. Well, of course, it's hard to hire people, especially in the restaurant industry nowadays heck and in my business where we go in and we do analysis of computer networks and systems, it's almost impossible to find people that are really well qualified that understand the regulations that apply to these different businesses. [00:34:10] So it's like, forget about it. There's more than a million of these jobs open right now. And just in this cybersecurity. Well, September mark, the end of the real lockdown induced unemployment benefits workers. Didn't just flood the labor market as we kind of expected. And we have now few, we have more people now. [00:34:38] Who are out of the workforce. Who've decided not to look for a job than we did in 2008. So that's telling you something 2008 during the great recession. Interesting things are about to happen, but there's a great little article that I found in. Times this week, and it's talking about this quality local products company out of Chicago, the prince logos on merchandise, like t-shirts water bottles, you know, the little stress balls, all of that sort of stuff. [00:35:10] And he said prior to the pandemic, we had over 120 employees. That's the co-founder talk in there. And he said, Primary focus was on growth. We simply plugged any holes or any efficiencies that we could along the way with human capital, bringing people in. But once the lockdown happened, of course, all of a sudden now you don't have the access to employees you had before. [00:35:36] So they had a huge decrease also in business. So those two went hand in hand. They let a lot of people go and they use the opportunity to program many of the previous manual and human controlled activities into computers. So now 18 months later, yeah, two weeks to flatten the curve. Right? 18 months later, the company employees, 83 workers. [00:36:03] And as managing a workload, that's pretty much the same as pre lockdown. So they went from over 120 employees down to 83. So basically they cut 40 employees from the workforce. That's a whole lot of quarter of the workforce gone. They don't need them anymore. So that's going to help produce more profits for them. [00:36:27] A lot more profits. Cause usually automating. Yeah, it can be painful, but it usually has major paybacks and that's exactly what it had for them. And they're saying that they anticipate that they can reduce employees even more by the end of this year and get their head count below. 50 now 50 is a magic number. [00:36:48] So it was a hundred when it comes to employees. Well, one is like the biggest magic number because when, once you have one employee, you all of a sudden have to comply with all kinds of rules, regulations, state, local, federal. But if you hit 50 employees, you have the next step of major new regulations that are gonna affect your business. [00:37:09] And then when you hit a hundred employees, Even more, so many people try and keep their businesses below 50 employees because it's just not worth it to have all of those regulations, additional regulation, taxes, and everything else. Another company, this is a California based property management. The managing more than 90,000 commercial and residential properties. [00:37:33] And what they've done is they added a chat feature to the website, the company's called sea breeze. And he says, even though we have the live chat, you can still reach us outside of business hours. Well, You are using the chat or you can call us either way, but they're saying people like the simple form and someone gets back to them as soon as they can. [00:37:57] So they're avoiding now having staff available 24 7 to respond to chat messages and to respond to the voicemails and phone calls that come in. So it's pretty good all the way around, frankly, new shopping models are in place. I'm looking at a picture of a business and it has. Of course, a window up front and in the window they have jewelry. [00:38:21] This is a jewelry store and they've got QR codes in front of each of these pieces of jewelry right on the inside of the window. So if you're interested in finding out more about that piece of jewelry, Just scan the QR code. It'll take you to the right page on their website and we'll even let you buy the jewelry and they will mail it to you again. [00:38:46] How's that for? Great. If you have a business in a tourist jury area and you don't want to be open until 11:00 PM at night, your story can keep selling for you. Even when you're close. This is window shopping, taken to an extreme, very simple. To do as well. This company is called full me waiter. Obviously they've got a bit of a sea theme here. [00:39:10] So once someone orders the jewelry and the other merchandise sent right to them, or they can have it set for pickup in the store, when they next open it's phenomenal. They're calling. Alfresco shopping space, right from the sidewalk. So businesses again are returning to pre pandemic levels and he, this guy is available in the store by appointment only he's loving it. [00:39:37] And he says that customers have been so satisfied with this QR code window shopping contract. That he wrote a guidebook. You can get it@scantshopsolution.com or excuse me, scan, just shop solution.com. I misread that. So any retailers who want to use this method, if you don't know what QR codes are, or you don't know how to code it into a website, et cetera, she's got webinars she's taught on it and she's got the guide book. [00:40:05] I think this is great. Right? So she's now making some money on. Explain to other people, how she did this. It's phenomenal across industries. Epic times is saying the staffing shortages could be temporary, but as firms are further embracing, embracing automation and all of its benefits, some of these jobs that people just don't want anymore may actually be going away. [00:40:33] And I think this is ultimately a problem. We had, uh, you know, again, I'm older generation, right? Us baby boomers. We had opportunities when we were younger. I had newspaper routes. I had the biggest drought in the area. I can't remember. It was like 120 homes. It was huge. It took me hours to do, but I made money. [00:40:56] I learned how to interact with people. I knew, I learned how to do bill collection, how important it was not to let customers get too far behind on their bills. Although I have been slack on that one, I'm afraid, but it helped me out a lot. So, what are kids going to do that need to learn a work ethic that need to be able to have a job, make the mistakes, maybe get fired a once or twice or, or three times maybe learn how to interact with customers. [00:41:27] Everyone, I think can benefit from some retail experience. Get that when you're young and if these jobs don't exist, then. Or the younger generations here, are they just going to be trying to find jobs they can do with Instagram? Right? They're all I know. A few kids who have said, well, I'm a social media influencer and you look them up and okay. [00:41:50] So they got a thousand people following them. I have far more than that, but you know, it, that's not a job. It's not going to last. Your looks are only going to last so long. Right now you start having a family and you start working hard outdoors, et cetera. There's a lot of things that make that all go away. [00:42:09] So I think many businesses now we're going to continue to accelerate our plans program out and. A lot of weld pain positions, as well as these entry-level positions in the next five or 10 years. Really? I don't even know if it's going to be 10 years retool retrain our workforce, or everyone's going to be in for a world of hurt. [00:42:33] Hey, make sure you subscribe. So you're not in a world of hurt. Get my latest in news, especially tech news and cybersecurity. Craig peterson.com. [00:42:46] In this day and age, if you don't have a burner identity, you are really risking things from having your identities stolen through these business, email compromises. It's really crazy. That's what we're going to talk about. [00:43:03] An important part of keeping ourselves safe in this day and age really is con to confuse the hackers. The hackers are out there. They're trying to do some things. For instance, like business, email compromise. It is one of the biggest crimes out there today. You know, you hear about ransomware and. It hits the news legitimately. [00:43:26] It's very scary. It can really destroy your business and it can hurt you badly. If you're an individual you don't want ransomware. Well, how about those emails that come in? I just got an email in fact, from a listener this week and they got a phone call. His wife answered and it was Amazon on the phone and Amazon said, Hey, listen, your account's been hacked. [00:43:54] We need to clear it up so that your identity doesn't get stolen. And there's a fee for this. It's a $500 fee. And what you have to do is just go to amazon.com. Buy a gift card and we'll then take that gift card number from you. And we'll use that as the fee to help recover your stolen information. So she went ahead and did it. [00:44:20] She went ahead and did all of the things that the hackers wanted and now they had a gift card. Thank you very much. We'll follow up on this and. Now she told her husband, and of course this isn't a sex specific thing, right. It could have happened to either one. My dad fell for one of these scams as well. [00:44:44] So she told her husband or her husband looked at what had happened and said, oh my gosh, I don't think this is right. Let me tell you, first of all, Amazon, your bank, various credit card companies are not going to call you on the phone. They'll send you a message right. From their app, which is usually how I get notified about something. [00:45:10] Or they will send an email to the registered to email that. Uh, that you set up on that account. So that email address then is used by them to contact you right. Pretty simple. Or they might send you a text message. If you've registered a phone for notifications, that's how they contact you. It's like the IRS. [00:45:35] I was at a trade show and I was on the floor. We were exhausted. And I got no less than six phone calls from a lady claiming to be from the IRS and I needed to pay right away. And if I didn't pay right away, they were going to seize everything. And so all I had to do. Buy a gift card, a visa gift card, give her the number and she would use that to pay the taxes it and this lady had a, an American accent to one that you would recognize. [00:46:10] I'm sure. And it's not something that they do now. They do send emails, as I said. So the part of the problem with sending emails is, is it really them? Are they sending a legitimate email to a legitimate email address? Always a good question. Well, here's the answer. Yeah, they'll do that. But how do you know that it isn't a hacker sending you the email? [00:46:42] It can get pretty complicated. Looking into the email headers, trying to track. Where did this come from? Which email servers did it go through? Was it authenticated? Did we accept? Did the, uh, the provider use proper records in their DNS, the SPIF, et cetera, to make sure that it's legitimate. Right? How do you follow up on that? [00:47:07] That's what we do for our clients. And it gets pretty complicated looking at DKMS and everything else to verify that it was legitimate, making sure that the email came from a registered MX server from the, the real center. There is a way around this. And this has to do with the identities, having these fake burner identities. [00:47:33] I've been doing this for decades myself, but now it's easy enough for anybody to be able to do. There are some services out there. And one of the more recommended ones. And this is even the New York times, they have an article about this. They prefer something called simple log-in. You can find them online. [00:47:57] You can go to simple login dot I O. To get started now it's pretty darn cool. Cause they're using, what's called open source software it's software. Anybody can examine to figure out is this legitimate or not? And of course it is legitimate, but, uh, they it's, it's all out there for the whole world to see. [00:48:17] And that means it's less likely in some ways to be hacked. There are people who argue that having open source software means even more. In some ways you are, but most ways you're not, anyways, it doesn't matter. Simple login.io. Now, why would you consider doing this? Uh, something like simple login? Well, simple login is nice because it allows you to create dozens and dozens of different email address. [00:48:51] And the idea is with simple log-in it will forward the email to you at your real email address. So let's say you're doing some online shopping. You can go ahead and set up an email address for, you know, whatever it is, shopping company.com, uh, that you're going to use a shopping company.com. So you'd go there. [00:49:13] You put in two simple log-in, uh, I want to create a new identity and you tag what it's for, and then you then go to some, um, you know, shopping company.com and use the email address that was generated for you by simple login. Now you're a simple login again. Is it going to be tied into your real email account, wherever that might be if using proton mail, which is a very secure email system, or if using outlook or heaven forbid Gmail or one of these others, the email will be forwarded to you. [00:49:52] You will be able to see that indeed that email was sent to your. Shopping company.com email address or your bank of America, email address, et cetera, et cetera, that makes it much easier for you to be able to tell, was this a legitimate email? In other words, if your bank's really trying to get ahold of you, and they're going to send you an email, they're going to send you an email to an address that you use exclusive. [00:50:22] For bank of America. In reality, you only have the one email box that is over there on wherever proton, mail, outlook, Gmail, your business. You only have that one box you have to look at, but the email is sent to simple login. Does that make sense? You guys, so you can create a, these alias email boxes. It will go ahead and forward. [00:50:49] Any emails sent to them, to you, and you'll be able to tell if this was indeed from the company, because that's the only place that you use that email address. That makes it simple, but you don't have to maintain dozens or hundreds of email accounts. You only have the one email account. And by the way, you can respond to the email using that special aliased email address that you created for the shopping company or bank of America or TD or whomever. [00:51:22] It might be, you can send from that address as well. So check it out online, simple log-in dot IO. I really liked this idea. It has been used by a lot of people over, out there. Now here's one other thing that it does for you, and this is important as well. Not using the same email address. Everywhere means that when the hackers get your email address from shopping company.com or wherever, right. [00:51:56] pets.com, you name it. They can not take that and put it together with other information and use that for business, email compromise. Does that make sense? It's it makes it pretty simple, pretty straightforward. Don't get caught in the whole business email compromise thing. It can really, really hurt you. [00:52:19] And it has, it's one of the worst things out there right now, dollar for dollar it's right up there. It, by the way is one of the ways they get ransomware into your systems. So be very careful about that. Always use a different email address for every. Website you sign up for. Oh, and they do have paid plans like a $30 a year plan over at simple IO will get you unlimited aliases, unlimited mailboxes, even your own domain name. [00:52:50] So it makes it pretty simple, pretty handy. There's other things you might want to do for instance, use virtual credit cards. And we'll talk about those a little bit. As well, because I, I think this is very important. Hey, I want to remind everybody that I have started putting together some trainings. [00:53:12] You're going to get a little training at least once a week, and we're going to put all of that into. We have been calling our newsletter. I think we might change the name of it a little bit, but you'll be getting those every week. And the only way to get those is to be on that email list. Go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:53:35] Please do that right. I am not going to harass you. I'm not going to be one of those. And I've never been one of those internet. Marketers is sending you multiple dozens of emails a day, but I do want to keep you up to date. So stick around, we will be back here in just a couple of minutes. And of course you're listening to Craig Peterson. [00:53:59] And again, the website, Craig peterson.com stick around because we'll be right back. [00:54:05] One of the best ways to preserve your security on line is by using what we're calling burner identities, something that I've been doing for more than 30 years. We're going to talk more about how to do that right. [00:54:20] We've talked about email and how important that is. I want to talk now about fake identities. Now, a lot of people get worried about it. It sounds like it's something that might be kind of sketchy, but it is not to use fake identities in order to confuse the hackers in order to make it. So they really can't do the things that they. [00:54:46] To do they can't send you fishing ear emails, particularly spear phishing emails. That'll catch you off guard because you're using a fake. How do you do that? Well, I mentioned to you before that I have a thousands of fake identities that I created using census data. And I'm going to tell you how you can do it as well. [00:55:13] Right? There's a website out there called fake name a generator. You'll find it online@fakenamegenerator.com. I'm on that page right now. And I'm looking at a randomly generated identity. It has the option right on this page to specify the sex. And it says random by default, the name set, I chose American the country United States. [00:55:44] So it is applying both American and Hispanic names to this creative. And now remember it's doing the creation based on census data and some other public data, but it is not giving you one identity of any real. I think that's important to remember, and you're not going to use these identities for illegal purposes. [00:56:11] And that includes, obviously when you set up a bank account, you have to use your real name. However, you don't have to use your. If you will real email address, you can use things like simple login that will forward the email to you, but we'll let you know who was sent to. And if you only use that one email address for the bank, then you know that it came from the bank or the email address was stolen from the bank. [00:56:40] Right. All of that stuff. We've talked about that already. So in this case, The name has come up with for me is Maurice D St. George in Jacksonville, Florida even gives an address, uh, in this case it's 36 54 Willis avenue in Jacksonville, Florida. So if I go right now, Uh, two, I'm going to do use Google maps and I am going to put in that address. [00:57:11] Here we go. Jacksonville willows avenue, all the guests. What there is a Willis avenue in Jacksonville, and it's showing hoes from Google street view. Let me pull that up even bigger. And there it is. So ta-da, it looks like it gave me. Fairly real address. Now the address it gave me was 36 54, which does not exist. [00:57:40] There is a 365, but anyways, so it is a fake street address. So that's good to know some, if I were to use this, then I'm going to get my. Uh, my mail saying why about I pass? So, uh, Maurissa tells you what Maurice means, which is kind of neat. It'll give you a mother's maiden name. Gremillion is what a gave me here, a social security number. [00:58:06] So it creates one that passes what's called a check sum test. So that if you put it into a computer system, it's going to do a real quick check and say, yeah, it looks. To me. So it's was not just the right number of digits. It also passes the check, some tasks. Well-known how to do a check sum on their social security numbers. [00:58:27] So again, it's no big deal. And remember, you're not going to use this to defraud anyone. You're going to use this for websites that don't really need to know, kind of give me a break. Why do you need all this information? It gives me a phone number with the right area code. Uh, and so I'm going to go ahead and look up this phone number right now. [00:58:50] Remember, use duck, duck go. Some people will use Google search and it says the phone number gave me is a robo call. As I slide down, there's some complaints on that. Uh, so there you go. So they giving us a phone number that is not a real person's phone number, country code, of course one, cause I said United state birth date. [00:59:13] Oh, I was born October 7th, year, 2000. I'm 20 years old. And that means I'm a Libra. Hey, look at all this stuff. So it's giving me an email address, which is a real email address that you can click to activate or right there. Again, I mentioned the simple login.io earlier, but you can do a right here and it's got a username and created for me a password, which is actually a pretty deep. [00:59:41] The password. It's a random one, a website for me, my browser user agent, a MasterCard, a fake MasterCard number with an expiration and a CVC to code all of this stuff. My height is five six on kind of short for. Uh, my weight is 186 pounds own negative blood type ups tracking number Western union number MoneyGram number. [01:00:11] My favorite color is blue and I drive a 2004 Kia Sorento and it also has a unique ID. And, uh, you can use that wherever you want. So the reason I brought this up again, it's called fake name generator.com is when you are going to a website where there is no legal responsibility for you to tell them the true. [01:00:39] You can use this. And so I've, I've used it all over the place. For instance, get hub where you have, uh, it's a site that allows you to have software projects as you're developing software. So you can put stuff in, get hub. Well, they don't know to know, need to know who I really am. Now they have a credit card number for me. [01:01:01] Because I'm on a paid plan. I pay every month, but guess what? It isn't my real credit card number. It isn't the number that I got from fake name generator. My credit card company allows me to generate either a single use credit card numbers, or in this case, a credit card. Number four, get hub doc. So just as an example, that's how I use it. [01:01:24] So if get hub gets hacked, the hackers have an email address and a name that tipped me off right away, where this is coming from. And if the email didn't come from GitHub by no, they either sold my information to a marketing company, or this is a hacker. Trying to manipulate me through some form of his fishing scheme. [01:01:47] So I know you guys are the breasts and best and brightest. A lot of you understand what I'm talking about and I'm talking about how you can create a burner identity. And let me tell you, it is more important today to create a burner identity. Then it has ever been at any point in the past because frankly burner identities are one of the ways that you can really mess up some of the marketing firms out there that are trying to put the information together, these data aggregator companies, and also the hackers. [01:02:24] And it's really the hackers that were off up against here. And we're trying to prevent them from. Getting all of this information. So when we come back, I want to talk about the next step, which is which credit cards can you get? These single use card numbers from? Should you consider using PayPal when my Google voice be a really good alternative for you? [01:02:52] So we're going to get into all of that stuff. Stick around in the meantime, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my newsletter. All of this. Is in there. It makes it simple. It's a simple thing to do. Craig peterson.com. And if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:03:20] Having your credit card stolen can be a real problem for any one of us. It gives the bad guys, a lot of options to spend a lot of money very quickly. We're going to talk right now about virtual credit cards. What are they, what does it mean? [01:03:37] Virtual credit cards come in two basic forms. [01:03:41] One is a single use credit card, which was quite popular back when these things first came out and another one is a virtual credit card that has either a specific life. In other words, it's only good for 30 days or that can be used until you cancel it. If you have a credit card, a visa, MasterCard, American express discover all of the major card issuers will give you the ability to reverse any charges that might come onto your cards. [01:04:19] If your card is stolen or missing. Now that makes it quite easy. Doesn't it? I want to point out that if you're using a debit card, as opposed to a credit card, there's not much challenging you can do with the credit card. You can say, I am not going to make my pain. And, uh, because of this, that, and the other thing, this was stolen, et cetera, they can file it as a disputed charge. [01:04:46] They can do an investigation find out. Yeah. I'm you probably were not at a bus terminal down in Mexico city, which happened to me. 'cause I was up here in New Hampshire, quite a ways down to Mexico city. And so they just reversed it out. That money never came out of my bank account because it was on a credit card. [01:05:08] If I were using a debit card. That money would have come right out of my account. Now, mind you, a bus ticket in Mexico city is not very expensive, but many people have had charges of many thousands of dollars. And if you need that money in your checking account, and you're using a debit card, you got a problem because your check for, well, if you ever have to pay rent again, red check is going. [01:05:38] Bound because they just empty it out to your bank account. So now you have to fight with the bank, get the money back. They will, they will eventually refund it, but it could make some of you. Transactions that you might've written a check or something, it'll make them bounce. And that could be a real problem. [01:05:57] These, it could make them bounce. So using a credit card is typically less of a hassle online. So why would you want to use a virtual card or also known as a master credit card? Masked and may S K E D? Well, the main reason behind this is to allow you. Control payment. I've used them. In fact, I use them exclusively on every website online. [01:06:29] And I'm going to tell you the names of some of them here in just a couple of minutes, but I use them all of the time. And part of the reason is let's say, I want to camp. Uh, service. Have you ever tried to cancel a service before and you have to call them many times, right. And so you're, you're arguing with somebody overseas somewhere who doesn't want you to close the account. [01:06:53] And of course the. Bump you up to the next level person who also doesn't want you to close the account. And so you have to fuss fuss, fuss, fuss. Have you ever had that experience and I'm sure you have. It just happens all the time. So with using the virtual credit card, Well, the advantage to me is, Hey, if you are going to try and fight with me, I don't care because I'm just going to cancel that credit card number. [01:07:24] So I don't have to cancel my credit card. I don't have to have the company reissue credit card for me. I don't have to do any of this sort of thing that makes my life pretty easy. Doesn't it? And so, because of that, I am now I think in a much better. Place, because it just, I don't have to fight with people anymore. [01:07:43] So that's one of the reasons I used it. The other big reason is if it gets stolen, they can cause less harm. Some of these credit card it's virtual credit cards are set up in such a way that you can limit the amount that's charged on them. Do you like that? So if you are using it on a site that maybe is charging you $50 a month, no problem. [01:08:09] $50 a month comes off of the credit card. And if someone tries to charge more bounces and then hopefully you find out, wait a minute, it just bounced on me right now. Then next step up is okay. It bounced and. Uh, I am just going to cancel the card and then you issue a new credit card number for that website. [01:08:32] So an example. In my case has get hub.com. We keep software up there and they charge me every month if get hub were to get hacked and that credit card number stolen I'm I really don't care because there's almost nothing that can happen. And if good hub doesn't properly cancel. My account, I can just cancel the credit card and, you know, let them come after me. [01:08:57] Right. This isn't going to happen. So then it's also called a master credit card number because it's a little safer than using your real credit card details. I also want to point out something about debit card. I went for years with no credit cards at all. Nowadays, many of my vendors will take a credit card for payment. [01:09:20] And in fact, give me a bit of a better deal. And then with the credit card, I can get 2% cash back, which I use to pay down the credit card. Right. It couldn't get any better than that, but when you're using a debit card, what I always. Is I had two accounts that I could transfer money between at the bank. [01:09:42] So I had one checking account. That was my main operating, if you will account. And then I had another checking account where I would be. Just moving money out of it. Or you could even do it with a savings account, but some banks, they only let you do so many transactions a month on a savings account. So the idea is I know that I have this much in credit card obligate while debit card obligations for this month, that money is going to be coming out. [01:10:11] So I make sure that. In the debit card account to cover the legitimate transactions I know are coming up and then I keep everything else in the other account. And then I manually transferred over every month. So that's how I dealt with the whole debit card thing. And it worked really well for me. Bottom line. [01:10:30] I think it's a really great. So there you go, who are the companies that you can use to do this? I've used some of these before all of them have worked really well. If you have a capital one credit card, they have something called Eno, E N O, and it's available to all capital one card. You know, even has an extension for your web browsers. [01:10:59] So if it notices you're on a webpage, it's asking for credit card number, it'll pop up and say, do you want me to create a credit card number or a virtual one for this websites you can make your payment. Does it get much easier than that? Citibank has something they call a virtual credit cards available to all Citibank card holders, master pass by MasterCard. [01:11:23] That's available to any MasterCard visa, American express discover Diner's club card holders, credit, debit, and prepaid cards by their way. So you might want to check that one out. Uh, yeah, so that's the only one I see on my list here. That will do it for debit cards, Masterpass by MasterCard American express checkouts, available to all American express card holders. [01:11:51] Chase pay available to all chase card holders, Wells Fargo, wallet, uh, visa checkouts, available to all visa, MasterCard, and American express and discover color card holders, credit and debit cards. Plus. Prepaid cards. Okay. So it does do the debit cards as well. Final that's all owned by Goldman Sachs and is not accepting any new applicants and entro pay. [01:12:19] Also not accepting new applicants. There's a couple online. You might also want to check out our Pyne. Premium Al buying. I'm buying a, B I N E blur premium. You might want to check that out as well. All right, everybody make sure you check me out. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [01:12:43] We're going to wrap up how you should be using these burner identities of few more tips and tricks that are going to help keep you safe from the hackers that are out there. So here we go. [01:12:58] There are a lot of hackers out there. [01:13:01] The numbers are just astounding. The cost of these hackers coming in and stealing our information is just unbelievable. And it goes all the way from big corporations, from things like the colonial pipeline, the U S government all the way on down through you and me. I want to tell you a little story about a friend of mine. [01:13:28] He is about 75 years old and he supplements his income by driving for Uber eats and one other company. And so what he'll do is someone puts in an order for food somewhere. He'll go pick it up and then he'll drive it to where whoever wanted wanted, whoever ordered it. Now, there are. Pricing number of scams with this. [01:13:55] So he's very careful about some of that orders, a cookie, for instance, because it's usually a bit of a scam anyways, we won't get into those, but I'll tell you what happened to him. His information was stolen online as it was probably yours. Mine I know was as well. So it's all stolen. What do you do? While in his case, what ended up happening is they managed to get into his email account. [01:14:27] Once they're in his email account, they now had access to the emails he was getting from one of these companies. Now it wasn't the Uber eats guy. He was, there was another company. So let's just explain this a little bit. Uber eats sends him a request for him to go ahead and do a double. So, you know, go to the restaurant, pick it up and take it to this client's house. [01:14:54] And in order for him to register, he had to register an email address. Now, of course, he uses the same email address for everything, all of the. Now, personally, that drives me a little bit insane, but that's what he does. And he has just a few passwords. Now. He writes them down a little book and heaven forbid he ever lose the book so that he can remember them. [01:15:24] He just wants to keep his life simple. Right. He's 75. He's not technophobic, but you know, he's not up on all of this stuff. What he found was a paycheck didn't show. And it was an $800 paycheck. We're talking about real money that he should have had in his. It didn't show up. So he calls up the company and says what happened to my paycheck and their record show? [01:15:53] Yes, indeed. It had been paid. We paid you, we deposited right into your account. Just like you asked. Yeah. You know, ACH into the account. Great. Wonderful. What had happened is bad guys had gone, gained control of his email address and use that now. Because they figured, well, I see some emails in his account from this food delivery service, so, well, let's try and see if this email address that we're looking at right now. [01:16:26] All of his emails let's look and see. Okay. Yeah. Same. Email address and same password as a used ad at this email address. Yeah, it worked. Okay. Great. So now we have access to this guys food delivery account. So they changed. The bank account number now, easy enough to confirm, right. They change it and send you an email. [01:16:54] Hey, I want to make sure that it was you until the bad guys, the hackers click out, yada yada. Yeah, it was me and then delete the email. So he doesn't see it. And now his $800 paycheck. In fact, I think there were a couple of different checks is deposited directly into the bad guy's bank account and. The money of course is transferred out pretty quickly. [01:17:18] Now the, that guys, these hackers are using what are called mules. You might be familiar with that in the drug trade. They'll have a third party deliver the drugs just to mule. They don't know what all is going on. They probably know the delivering drugs in this case, most of the meals are useful idiots of which there are many in this country. [01:17:43] Unfortunate. Uh, political and otherwise. And these people are convinced that all they need to do is transfer the money into this account so that the hackers can then pull it out. And you know, now they're going to take care of their grandmother who is stuck in the hospital and they have no way to pay for it. [01:18:07] And they can't transfer the money out of the country during. That's one of the stories they use for people. And in many cases, these meals know what they're doing. The FBI earlier this year arrested a whole group of mules out in California that were purposefully transferring the money. They knew what they were doing. [01:18:28] So his money was now out of the country. No way to get it. And this food delivery company was not about to pay him. So it, isn't just the big guys it's you and me as well. So what I want to talk about right now is multi-factor authentication. Now. You guys are the best and brightest. I hope you understand this. [01:18:54] If you have questions, please reach out to me. I am more than

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Callum Mallett: SkyCity COO on the decision to introduce vaccine mandates across nationwide sites

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 1:27


It's no vax, not play and no stay for SkyCity patrons going forward.To meet obligations under health and safety laws, SkyCity says it will introduce vaccine mandates for all visitors and workers across its sites around the country.SkyCity Chief Operating Officer Callum Mallett told Heather du Plessis-Allan the definition for mandates for both hotels and casinos captured under hospitality.“We looked through that framework and absolutely decided that bring in CVC for entry to our total properties, including casinos, Sky Tower, etc. was the right thing to do for the health and safety of our staff and customers.”LISTEN ABOVE

Venture
ACV Webinar 17. "Corporate Innovation: The CVC and other Tools"

Venture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 61:03


The purpose of this webinar is to share insights about what differentiates a CVC from a traditional fund, how does a company measure the impact of the CVC and about the cultural changes that occur internally in a company before considering having a CVC.

ResumoCast NEWS
NEWS Quarta 27.10, R$ 33 bilhões somente em 2021 – Venture Capital bate recordes

ResumoCast NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 21:49


R$ 33 bilhões somente em 2021 – Venture Capital bate recordes Na contramão do desemprego, startups e empresas de tecnologia têm vagas abertas em todo o país Estudo revela que quase metade das empresas brasileiras deseja investir em CVC nos próximos dois anos Essas são as manchetes de hoje, Quarta-feira dia 27 de Outubro de 2021 E você está no RC NEWS. Notícias para empreendedores. Se você tem um site e não teve resultados com ele, ou tem vontade de ter um, convido a conversar sem compromisso com meu amigo Eduardo da agência Kryzalis.  Apoiadores já há anos do ResumoCast, possuem 14 anos de experiência já com mkt digital e tem as soluções pra você Micro e Pequeno Empreendedor - ouvinte do RCNews. Bata um papo com o Eduardo ou Everton da Kryzalis pelo endereço: resumocast.com.br/resultadonainternet   Whatsapp (14) 99629-6537 Nosso programa é multiplataforma e estamos ao vivo no Youtube, Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter e Twitch do ResumoCast. As edições ficam gravadas nas plataformas podendo ser acessadas a qualquer hora do dia. E você pode enviar mensagens pelas redes sociais e quando acompanha ao vivo de Segunda à Sexta às 7h da manhã. Curadoria atualizada sobre Startups, negócios inovadores e tendências de mercado. Youtube do ResumoCast : https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2wFLSmdA7Zcbre3E2f9AA8KankrxceMu Youtube do Resumo Radio Cast : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvnH_YA25EKlEdfu8jVUpRA Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/resumocast/videos https://www.facebook.com/resumocastnews/videos https://www.facebook.com/groups/resumocast/ Linkedin : https://www.linkedin.com/company/resumocast/ Twitte : https://twitter.com/resumocast Twitch : https://www.twitch.tv/resumocast Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/show/3sEG6rOLvz6bLrMxEIcKRq Apple Podcasts : https://podcasts.apple.com/br/podcast/resumocast-news/id1505825539 Visite https://www.resumocast.com.br/news para ler as notícias e se inscrever na listra de transmissão do Telegram

Venture
Episode 48. Raghuram Madabushi. Director at National Grid Partners. "More than investments: The secrets of Corporate Venturing"

Venture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 42:21


Raghuram Madabushi is Director at National Grid Partners, the utility industry's first Silicon Valley-based VC & innovation firm. Raghuram knows that influencing entrepreneurs to succeed is not easy, even being a CVC. In this episode he tells us what it takes to set up a CVC, what it does and the challenges to be faced.

Mises Media
Samuele Murtinu: How Low Time Preference Elevates the Investment Returns of Family Corporate Venture Capital

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Family businesses play a major role in the US economy. According to the Conway Center, family businesses comprise 90% of the business ventures in the US, generate 62% of the employment in the nation, and deliver 64% of US GDP. And, they're good at venture capital. Samuele Murtinu, Professor of Law, Economics, and Governance at Utrecht University, visits the Economics For Business podcast to share the findings and insights (see Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF) from his very recent analysis of venture capital databases. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Corporate venture capital is a special animal. There are many types of venture capital. Professor Murtinu focused first on the distinction between traditional or independent venture capital (IVC) and corporate venture capital (CVC). Independent venture capital funds are structured with a general partner in the operational, decision-making role, and investors in the role of limited partner. Corporate venture capital funds are fully owned and managed by their parent corporation. The CEO or CFO of the corporation typically appoints a corporate venture capital manager, who selects targets, conducts due diligence and so on from a subordinate position in the corporate hierarchy. The important difference between IVC and CVC lies in objectives and goals. IVC goals are purely financial — the highest capital gain in the shortest possible time. CVC funds often have strategic goals in addition to, or substituting for, financial goals. These strategic goals might include augmenting internal R&D capabilities and performance, and accessing new technologies and new innovations, or entering new markets. Another form of CVC licenses patented technologies to startups in cases where the corporate firm does not have the capacity to exploit the IP, but can oversee the implementation at the startup with a view to further future investment or acquisition. This is the method of Microsoft's IP Ventures arm, for example. Typically, IVC investments are easy to measure against financial performance benchmarks or targets. CVC's strategic investments are harder to measure. Goals such as technology integration are too non-specific to measure, and normal VC guardrails like specified duration of investments are not typically in place and so can't be used as benchmarks. On the other hand, CVC investments often expand beyond the financial into strategic support via corporate assets such as brand, sales and distribution channels and systems. Corporate venture capital out-performs traditional venture capital in overall economic performance. Professor Murtinu's performance metric in his data analysis was total factor productivity — performance over and above what's attributable to the additions to capital and labor inputs. IVC's performance for its investments was measured in the +40% range, and CVC's was measured at roughly +50%. IVC performs better in the short term, while CVC performs better in the longer term. This difference reflects the lower time preference of CVC. It extends to IPO's: corporate venture capital funds stay longer in the equity capital of their portfolio companies in comparison to independent venture capital. Family CVC is another animal again — and even higher performing than non-family CVC. Professor Murtinu separated out family-owned firms (based on a percentage of equity held) with corporate venture capital funds for analysis. Some of his findings include: They prefer to maintain longer and more stable involvement in the companies in which they invest.They prefer to maintain control over time (as opposed to exiting for financial gain).They look to gains beyond purely financial returns, including technology acquisition / integration into the parent company and/or learning new processes.They are more likely to syndicate with other investors, for purposes of portfolio risk mitigation.They target venture investments that are “close to home” both in geographic terms and in terms of industries closely related to their core business. The resultant outcomes are superior: a higher likelihood of successful exits (IPO or sale to another entity), and a greater long term value effect on the sold company after the IPO or exit. Further, there is evidence from the data of a higher innovation effect for Family CVC holdings, as measured by the post-exit value of the patent portfolio held by the ventures. Family CVC is resilient in economic downturns. During the last economic downturn, family CVC invested at double the amount of corporate venture capital, reflecting family businesses' preference for long-term investing and for control. The lower time preference of family businesses and family CVC is crucial for the achievement of superior financial performance, especially in the longer term. Family CVC's lower time preference and longer investment time horizons result in beneficial effects. Ownership in the venture companies is more stable, and the value effect after IPO (when family CVC stability continues because these funds stay in the post-IPO company longer) is significant. Professor Murtinu relates this phenomenon to Austrian economics. The longer time horizon permits a closer relationship between investor and entrepreneur — it develops over time — and their subjective judgment about the future state become more aligned. Frictions and information asymmetries are reduced, and a shared view of the future emerges. This stability can scale up to the industry level and national level when there are more family CVC funds at work. Instead of pursuing unicorns and gazelles, an environment more conducive to duration and resilience is created. Additional Resources "Types of Venture Capital" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF "Families In Corporate Venture Capital" by Samuele Murtinu, Mario Daniele Amore, and Valerio Pelucco (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_Paper

Interviews
Samuele Murtinu: How Low Time Preference Elevates the Investment Returns of Family Corporate Venture Capital

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Family businesses play a major role in the US economy. According to the Conway Center, family businesses comprise 90% of the business ventures in the US, generate 62% of the employment in the nation, and deliver 64% of US GDP. And, they're good at venture capital. Samuele Murtinu, Professor of Law, Economics, and Governance at Utrecht University, visits the Economics For Business podcast to share the findings and insights (see Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF) from his very recent analysis of venture capital databases. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Corporate venture capital is a special animal. There are many types of venture capital. Professor Murtinu focused first on the distinction between traditional or independent venture capital (IVC) and corporate venture capital (CVC). Independent venture capital funds are structured with a general partner in the operational, decision-making role, and investors in the role of limited partner. Corporate venture capital funds are fully owned and managed by their parent corporation. The CEO or CFO of the corporation typically appoints a corporate venture capital manager, who selects targets, conducts due diligence and so on from a subordinate position in the corporate hierarchy. The important difference between IVC and CVC lies in objectives and goals. IVC goals are purely financial — the highest capital gain in the shortest possible time. CVC funds often have strategic goals in addition to, or substituting for, financial goals. These strategic goals might include augmenting internal R&D capabilities and performance, and accessing new technologies and new innovations, or entering new markets. Another form of CVC licenses patented technologies to startups in cases where the corporate firm does not have the capacity to exploit the IP, but can oversee the implementation at the startup with a view to further future investment or acquisition. This is the method of Microsoft's IP Ventures arm, for example. Typically, IVC investments are easy to measure against financial performance benchmarks or targets. CVC's strategic investments are harder to measure. Goals such as technology integration are too non-specific to measure, and normal VC guardrails like specified duration of investments are not typically in place and so can't be used as benchmarks. On the other hand, CVC investments often expand beyond the financial into strategic support via corporate assets such as brand, sales and distribution channels and systems. Corporate venture capital out-performs traditional venture capital in overall economic performance. Professor Murtinu's performance metric in his data analysis was total factor productivity — performance over and above what's attributable to the additions to capital and labor inputs. IVC's performance for its investments was measured in the +40% range, and CVC's was measured at roughly +50%. IVC performs better in the short term, while CVC performs better in the longer term. This difference reflects the lower time preference of CVC. It extends to IPO's: corporate venture capital funds stay longer in the equity capital of their portfolio companies in comparison to independent venture capital. Family CVC is another animal again — and even higher performing than non-family CVC. Professor Murtinu separated out family-owned firms (based on a percentage of equity held) with corporate venture capital funds for analysis. Some of his findings include: They prefer to maintain longer and more stable involvement in the companies in which they invest.They prefer to maintain control over time (as opposed to exiting for financial gain).They look to gains beyond purely financial returns, including technology acquisition / integration into the parent company and/or learning new processes.They are more likely to syndicate with other investors, for purposes of portfolio risk mitigation.They target venture investments that are “close to home” both in geographic terms and in terms of industries closely related to their core business. The resultant outcomes are superior: a higher likelihood of successful exits (IPO or sale to another entity), and a greater long term value effect on the sold company after the IPO or exit. Further, there is evidence from the data of a higher innovation effect for Family CVC holdings, as measured by the post-exit value of the patent portfolio held by the ventures. Family CVC is resilient in economic downturns. During the last economic downturn, family CVC invested at double the amount of corporate venture capital, reflecting family businesses' preference for long-term investing and for control. The lower time preference of family businesses and family CVC is crucial for the achievement of superior financial performance, especially in the longer term. Family CVC's lower time preference and longer investment time horizons result in beneficial effects. Ownership in the venture companies is more stable, and the value effect after IPO (when family CVC stability continues because these funds stay in the post-IPO company longer) is significant. Professor Murtinu relates this phenomenon to Austrian economics. The longer time horizon permits a closer relationship between investor and entrepreneur — it develops over time — and their subjective judgment about the future state become more aligned. Frictions and information asymmetries are reduced, and a shared view of the future emerges. This stability can scale up to the industry level and national level when there are more family CVC funds at work. Instead of pursuing unicorns and gazelles, an environment more conducive to duration and resilience is created. Additional Resources "Types of Venture Capital" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF "Families In Corporate Venture Capital" by Samuele Murtinu, Mario Daniele Amore, and Valerio Pelucco (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_Paper

The Pro Rugby Pod
Agents in Rugby - Tom Beattie

The Pro Rugby Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:14


Today I chat with rugby agent Tom Beattie, who is the founder of TDB Sports. We talk about;What he does to maximize players earnings.How agents get paid in rugby.How he got started as an agent.The British & Irish Lions coach that mentored him.How transfer dealings with club work, and the impact Covid had.The RFU requirements to being an agent, and representing players in England.What he does when a player doesn't settle in a club. CVC and his thoughts on outside investments into rugby.If you've any feedback for the podcast please leave a review on Apple Podcasts or send me a DM on instagram - The Off Field Rugby Coach @offfieldrugby.Thanks to all the people sharing the podcast on their instagram stories. If you enjoyed the chat, I would be grateful if you also shared the pod and sent it to some friends.Please subscribe/follow the podcast wherever you're listening.Really appreciate you clicking in, cheers! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Shadow Legends: Assemble
Shadow Legends: Assemble #74: CvC, SHARD EVENTS, AND MORE!

Shadow Legends: Assemble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 102:13


Shadow Legends: Assemble #74! TIMESTAMPS 0:00 - INTRODUCTION: Mr Tham, Mad Capper, JayrStar3 6:00 - TOPIC 1: x10 - 2 shards events a week 56:35 - TOPIC 2: CvC right now! 1:08:45 - Main Topic: New Fusion! September 30th 1:29:00 - Awards 2021: 1:38:30 - Outro 1:41:50 - End Check out our website! https://thesaffronman.com/ Social Links Twitter - https://twitter.com/The_Saffron_Man Twitch - https://www.twitch.tv/thesaffronman Discord - https://discord.gg/7BxAxhs Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/TheSaffronMan/ Merch - https://merch.streamelements.com/thesaffronman Join TheSaffronMan on YouTube and become a member for as little as 99p/99c and gain exclusive perks!: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3HCQY0F8hXSzQ9OqY_LmLQ/join Check out the awesome cast this week: Jaystar3: https://www.twitch.tv/jayrstar3 https://www.youtube.com/user/jayrstar3/featured mAdCapper: https://www.twitch.tv/madcapperyt https://www.youtube.com/madcapper Mr. Tham https://www.twitch.tv/mrtham https://www.youtube.com/c/MrTham/featured Also: TheSaffronMan THEME TUNE!!! https://open.spotify.com/album/3XVzYKIHdGNIndT14XpkTL https://youtu.be/56btXpf56w4 Artist: Sarah "GoodGame" Kuri https://www.twitch.tv/goodgamekuri https://www.youtube.com/user/sarahkuri https://open.spotify.com/artist/7Gm1FogzJNR1FruAemWjNp Want to help me further? https://streamlabs.com/thesaffronman/tip #RaidShadowLegends #ShadowLegendsAssemble #TheSaffronMan

InvestNews
BOLETIM IN$ #164: CIEL3 e CVCB3 têm semana intensa; e mais: Tesouro Direto com IPCA acima de 10%

InvestNews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 33:38


CIEL3 em alta, CVCB3 despenca. O que esperar dessas ações? E como fica o Tesouro Direto com a inflação disparando mais ainda? Esses são os temas do Boletim InvestNews desta sexta-feira (8). O programa analisa o desempenho das ações da Cielo e da CVC, que tiveram uma semana bastante intensa na bolsa de valores. Essas ações valem a pena? Outro assunto do dia é a renda fixa. Com a inflação medida pelo IPCA disparando mais de 10% em 12 meses, como ficam os investimentos no Tesouro Direto? Como escolher os melhores títulos? E de quais fugir? O BLTM também comenta os destaques do fechamento do mercado financeiro, como resultado do payroll, cotação do dólar e do Ibovespa hoje, além das ações que mais subiram e mais caíram neste pregão e na semana. Com apresentação da jornalista Karina Trevizan, o BLTM tem comentários de Eduardo Perez e Hugo Carone, analistas de investimentos do Nu invest.

Som das Torcidas
Na Bancada Live #23 YankeeBall

Som das Torcidas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 117:40


Investidores norte-americanos estão avançando sobre o futebol europeu (e global) de forma voraz nessa retomada econômica pandêmica. La Liga já bateu o martelo quanto a uma acordo bilionário com a CVC enquanto a Serie A italiana negocia com outro grupo. Diversos clubes são adquiridos por fundos estadunidenses a todo instante.O que está por trás desse movimento? Uma nova era de riquezas no futebol global?Conversamos com Felipe Lobo, João Ricardo Pisani e Luciano Motta a fim de perceber as movimentações dentro da indústria esportiva dos Estados Unidos para tentar entender essa investida.*Live realizada em 16/09

InvestNews
É HORA DA CVCB3 DECOLAR?

InvestNews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 14:12


Confira a análise completa da CVCB3. Será que vale a pena investir nas ações da CVC nesse momento da pandemia? Assista ao vídeo e descubra. Se tem um setor que foi duramente afetado pela pandemia de covid-19 este setor foi o de turismo. Com as restrições de mobilidade, cancelamento de viagens e fechamento de fronteiras, as empresas ligadas ao setor foram duramente castigadas. A questão é que o setor foi o primeiro a ser impactado e deve ser o último a ser totalmente retomado. Veja análise da CVC Brasil (CVCB3).

The Swyx Mixtape
[Weekend Drop] Developer Relations (with Sai Senthilkumar of Redpoint)

The Swyx Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 49:50


I was interviewed by Sai of Redpoint based on these blogposts: https://www.swyx.io/community-builder/ https://www.swyx.io/measuring-devrel/ The session was covered by Tom Tunguz, whose blog I love (https://tomtunguz.com/shawn-wang-offi...) and the feedback was wonderful!Full video on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guK1XiLQbH8Timestamps [00:01:42] What is DevRel?  [00:04:59] Where should DevRel report?  [00:06:57] Getting Started with Early Stage DevRel  [00:12:28] How to Structure DevRel Efforts  [00:16:02] When to Hire First DevRel  [00:18:23] Community and DevRel  [00:25:41] How to Start a Community  [00:29:47] Technical Community Builders  [00:31:04] Social Media Managers  [00:33:14] North Star Metric  [00:39:20] Product DevRel  [00:40:37] Finding Great DevRels  [00:43:47] DevRel for Dev Platforms of non-DevTools companies  [00:46:38] DevRel Tooling  Transcript [00:00:00] Sai Senthilkumar: My name is Sai and I'm at Redpoint investing primarily in B2B software with a focus on developer oriented business. I'm very excited to be chatting with Shawn Wang today about the importance of developer relations for any company selling to developers. You know, we find that several developer companies we work with today are hiring for diverse leaders and oftentimes it's function gets overlooked early. Or maybe not built out soon enough. So today we'll talk a little bit more about how to structure and measure our world-class Debra organization for any startup and why it's so important for a company's overall health. So I'm wanting you to be joined today by Shawn, who is the head of developer experience at Temporal. Shawn, do you want to briefly introduce yourself?  [00:00:39] swyx: Yeah. Hi everyone. I am Shawn Swyx online as well. I guess my dev role ex experience starts at Netlify where I was the second DevRel hire. And we grew from about 30 ish people when I joined to about 250. And. I think something like 300,000 developers to 1.5 million. And then we, and then I left in 2020 to go to Amazon where he spent a year working at amplify and thinking about AWS level or branded Daryl. And we can talk about what it's like to work at. You know, a series B to C stage company. The rail versus a big company devil. And then I joined Temporal this year in in February to head up developer experience. And we're a series, a company focused on microservice orchestration, which is a bundle of words, but basically we're reinventing asynchronous programming. And if that doesn't hook your interest, I don't know what will, so I'm happy to talk more about that. [00:01:42] What is DevRel?  [00:01:42] Sai Senthilkumar: Awesome. So is that Shawn is the, is the guy to speak with, in terms of structuring and starting out in Beverly also Shawn, I guess starting with the basics here, you know, many people wrote in asking for clarity around the devil row. So, so in your, in your mind, what is Deborah and the various roles and responsible. [00:02:04] swyx: In what is dev route and the various rules and responsibilities. Okay. There a very big question. So dev REL I think is essentially for a lot of people is essentially rebranded marketing. Developers. Don't like to be marketed to every time you hire a professional marketer and you get them to talk at developers, their eyes glaze over and they're turned off by your marketing buzzwords and your emphasis benefits over features because you refuse to talk about how things work because marketers don't know how things work. Cause they're not technical. You hire developer relations before. Developers want to be spoken to by other developers. And they want to be explained on how to use things, why, and not to be handheld too much to do some hand hand-holding, but not to do too much handholding that you restrict their creativity. Because I think some of the best DevRel programs have often just said, we can't wait to see what you build, which is a very cliched term in Debra. It's actually, it's pretty true. If you talk to the early Twilio, derails, they just held hackathons and they're like weird a communications layer. What can you come up with? And they are often impressed in a lot of their new products direction comes from the, the stuff that developers want to take their product in. And so Val is very much of a bottom line. Developer first marketing efforts. And I personally segments the growing sub specialties that devel into three set, three segments, which is community content and products. The reason I add products in there, which is not a very common thing to, to emphasize with Daryl is because developer relations has. Background or backstory as developer evangelism, which is kind of the old Microsoft slash Google name for it, which is essentially you hire professional influencers to travel the world and give talks. And it's very us to the rest of the world. Like I'm pre. The good word, which is very nice because a good talk and a good useful demo or a good you know, explanation is, is actually a very important, but there's not much of a two-way street. So, it's very, it's very like us coming out to them. And I think now people understand that they, once they're devils. Their PR company in front of developers. And they talked to them so much that we can actually use that product feedback to feedback into the development of the actual product itself. That's the vision. That's the, that's what a lot of people say that Debra is a two way street developer. Evangelism is a one-way street in practice. It's more like 99% outbound anyway. And 1% inbound. The reason being that no one has time for your product feedback. Everyone has their own product roadmap. You're not proud of the PM org. You're not part of the engineering org. Who are you that I have to listen to you. So people are still figuring this out, but I think the content and community pieces REL are a bit more developed. [00:04:59] Where should DevRel report?  [00:04:59] Sai Senthilkumar: Totally. 100% agree. And when you mentioned this in the beginning, but I think it's important to flush out the difference between. Developer advocacy and Deborah and for marketing, I think oftentimes those, those two those two topics get confused with each other. So, so yeah, I, yeah, I think that is that's important for any startup that starting out. And this is a separate organization,  [00:05:21] swyx: Hopefully, well, so there's there that kind of leads us into a natural segue of where does deferral report to, but you can have that conversation. I'm not sure that it's a solved question yet. I think a lot of people are converging on the consensus that dev roles should report into product. And I think that's fine, but I'm also, I don't judge people where dev REL reports into marketing. I don't judge people went there for all reports into engineering or, you know, at Netlify we were a separate org. We were separate from products, separate from engineering, separate from marketing. And we reported up to the CEO. Okay. It matters basically as a founder or, you know, or based on company direction, how important your dead relatives, your liver function is how senior you are a different leader is and also how you measure them because at the, at the end of the day, even if your dev REL team reports into product, but the way you measure. Is entirely marketing metrics. Like how many hits did you get to a front page? Then they are our marketing team. It walks like marketing talks about marketing, their marketing, even though they technically, you put them in your org chart under the product team. So be very careful about just play playing at like making your devil or you know, part of product, but not actually, because that leads to some interesting tensions between. What it means to be a representative for your company and how that actually leads to tangible impact for your business. So yeah, I'll leave it at that.  [00:06:57] Getting Started with Early Stage DevRel  [00:06:57] Sai Senthilkumar: And it, even before you get getting into building, you know, Deborah, I guess like what, what are some tips that, you know, any early stage startup or founder that's in that develop that is selling to develop. What are some tips that they should know when getting started? Yeah, I guess what are some lessons learned from, from your time of  [00:07:13] swyx: peripheral? How early stages are we talking? Let's say series  [00:07:18] Sai Senthilkumar: a, you know, you've just raised some capital, you know, you're scaling to the series B, you're selling to developers, developers, easy. These are core bread and butter, you know, I guess what are some.  [00:07:27] swyx: I think some amount of focus and regular cadence is important. So, so at, at a point of series, a like you have some form of products like your, you have been around enough that you, that you raise your seed and you, you convince people, okay. Invest in serious. Say. That's probably where you should start hiring you know, a different team like we hired to, to I, I came on in February and then we hired two DevRels this year and I think that's where you start trying to figure out what the public story is. You want to tell, because you have some core base of early adopters, but you need them to not just you know, not just grow into like, the early majority, which I love to use this model of crossing the chasm. And I like to say that my personal specialty is helping developer tools cross the chasm, which is a very. Profitable a specialty, if you can actually do that repeatedly. But yeah, so you need to start basically like kind of start building machine of like curious what here's a collateral that we here's the typical story, like our, our one sentence pitch, our five minute pitch, our 10 minute pitch. So 20 minutes a patient on a one hour pitch and you need to kind of market. Among different sets of audiences and figuring out what kinds of audiences like how to qualify these audiences immediately so that you can go down, you know, between two to three different talk tracks that are usually relevant. Because the reason I say two to three talk tracks is because I'm not a strong believer that there is one marketing message to rule them all. Because a lot of developers who was companies are horizontal companies and it can be used in multiple different ways. And the things, the words, the. Influencers, the concepts that appeal to different audiences vary based on their own background. So you need to figure out like what, what the, what that fit is. And then I think for me, like, the most important thing to establish at this early stage is the developer journey. Like what, yes, you probably have as CSA stage, you probably have a working products. You're probably building more features that are going to take you to the next level. And your products is pretty dense already. And probably a lot of people barely even scratched the surface. That's what everyone says, right? Like it's a little bit depressing as a deputy founder to build a bunch of features. And then like people just use you for like the bare minimum. That's, that's just how it is. A lot of people don't have time for anything more than the, the core. So first of all, your core value proposition needs to be really good, but second of all, you need to guide them through the rest of your product to see how awesome it is so that it can grow and usage. So that I termed the developer journey. What should people. Land on your landing page. And then they're like, okay, like my friend said, this is cool. I'm going to come check it out. But I only have five minutes. What are you going to give them in those five minutes? Are you going to dump your entire feature set? Are you going to give them a hello world that is trivial? That is that they could do in a weekend? Like what is the, what's the wow moment that you're really trying to deliver? And what's the open question that you're trying to leave in their minds. They're not happy with the five minutes and they want more. So I think that's something I think about a lot. And I, I draw a lot of inspiration from game design where it's a progressive review of features. And you don't give them that much apart from like, do this and then do that. And then, and then go here and then go there. And you have a very strong sense of like what level one level, two level three, it looks like. And so that's the journey throughout through to products for me, it's about what a core, what the core concept is. You know, doing a hello world or like, you know, deploying the, playing a basic app and then building, and then branching out into maybe like performance or security or deployments monitoring that kind of stuff. But that's for us, you know, and your, your message could be a bit different. Finally, I'll, I'll talk a little bit about specialties within the team. So , we are very focused on front end developers. So the way that. We'll thought our team was that we had different framework specialists. So I was the react specialist because I'm a well-known speaker in reacts. And we have view, we had angular, we had you know, sort of static site generators specialists for us at Temporal. We have SDKs in different languages. So we have a Java slash PHB guy, and then we have a gold person and I'm going to be the TypeScript person. And we'll, we'll have Python, ruby.net, whatever. You might want to split it up by, by that because there's a certain audience that each of these developer relations people speak to that maybe they're already known in the conference circuit. Like it's super easy for me to get into any JavaScript conference. And I think that's, that's a, that's a home ground or unfair advantage that you should play when building out a different team. It's a bit hard to hire like super well known people. So sometimes you need to have an eye for trajectory rather than. You know why rather than you know, where they are today because they Def Netlify definitely took a bet on me very early on when I was getting started my speaking career and it paid off for them. But sometimes it doesn't work out and sometimes you have developers where we kind of are not that productive, but I think that's where a really good dev manager can come in. And up-level your individual contributors. [00:12:28] How to Structure DevRel Efforts  [00:12:28] swyx: So. Yeah,  [00:12:30] Sai Senthilkumar: no, that's a great point. And I think you know, we'll get, we'll get into this later when we, when we discussed how to actually measure the ethicacy of if you done an organization, but you, you have a great way of thinking about it. You know, I think in the seminar we said something to the extent of there are four pillars of developer relations. And I think that is that's a company like Hashi Corp, where they have. You know, there, there are much later stage that they're not a series a or series B startup. And I think they bring it into education, community events and audience, but you know, that's just not realistic for a series a or series B startup. That's just starting out. And I think you just have a great framework for this by just asking what kind of Deborah are you? I think you get, as you mentioned, you have those three emerging subspecialties and Beverly the community focused upon think focusing product focus. Just asking that very basic question in the beginning. I think we'll go along with.  [00:13:18] swyx: I think so, too. So, I mean, since we're on zoom, can I screen share the visual? Just so we so that, so the audience members can actually see what we're talking about. So, what size talking about is this four pillars thing from the previous session with Adam Hashi Corp. And I mean, you know, there are a series what F or E company. And I w yeah, I would love to have an education team, you know, especially former teachers. A really good every time I see a former, you know, someone who actually has done teaching in like a public school setting or something crossover into developer education, they're amazing at it. A formal events team. Amazing, fantastic. You know, but I, you know, I think these require fairly large, large budgets and have a very long PR cycle. Whereas I think maybe a lot of earlier stage companies are more focused on community advocacy and audience, right. So my, the way I break it down is a little bit simpler. I and for the record, like I, I had seen this before, but like I just kinda made up, meet this up based on the people that I know. So like I have. Certain archetypes in my end, when I look at these things and that's kind of how I view it, right? Like at the end of the day, all everyone wants this monthly active developers. That's not screw around. Like that is the source of truth for where Deborah is going to feeds into the, the rest of the value equation for a startup. There are certain specialties for people. Like some people are not that great at content. You know, they, they, they don't produce like, especially inspiring blog posts or talks or anything, but look, they're charismatic as hell. You know, they, they, they just know everyone who's anyone. So their community devils, you know, whereas some people are just like thought leaders. They're just, you know, they just get chunk out like amazing and visually appealing and just like fantastic stuff. But then maybe, you know, and, and so maybe it should be applied. And then others, like they can, they're, they're sort of more quiet, but they are very inside. The understand the core user insight that like people, you know, when they aggregated a lot of feedback from people, they can really sort of channel that into a very strong sense of product feedback. So I liked this and I liked that for me, the most impactful time as a dev REL on. Was on product launches. So really focusing on making a launch successful by being the first beta user internally within the company RV products and just being brutally honest, like if you cannot pay someone to be brutally honest at you, then you don't have an intellectually honest culture. And then, but then also like making the demos and making the the collateral and the, the storytelling that will make your launch successful and a really good launch. You can't really emphasize it enough to, to really help you. So I'll, I'll leave it there. I don't want to like spam people with, with too much, but I can, I can talk a bit about intern about each of these specialties and we'll get  [00:16:02] Sai Senthilkumar: him.   [00:16:02] When to Hire First DevRel  [00:16:02] Sai Senthilkumar: We'll get more into that when we, when we get into measuring measuring the ethicacy. You know, you mentioned you know, after series a maybe even after your seed, but it seems that there isn't a black and white answer in terms of, at what stage in a company's growth earnings, should it consider building a debt relative? But it, it, it seems that you know, it may where it may be different from company to company, but generally it's when you, you're starting, you have a product out in market and you're starting to get developers to start paying for it. [00:16:30] swyx: Was there a question in there? I mean, I agree,  [00:16:33] Sai Senthilkumar: I guess for Temporal, when did, when did they hire you? And then when did you know, when did they start thinking about it? Was it after this year?  [00:16:42] swyx: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Right after series a, they they started reaching out to me and I, I said, no, at first. And then I said, yes. So that's the short history. Cause like I just joined Amazon and I was like, I was very, very ready to rest, invest for four years essentially. But like, you know, I think when you, when a rocket ship comes along and something that. Fundamentally feel at your core has been missing all this? Well, I think we should take the totally. [00:17:10] Sai Senthilkumar: And you were getting into this earlier before, but the question of who should that role report up there? It, I mean, ultimately it touches multiple facets of the business, product marketing, customer success. So I guess there isn't a black and white answer there as well.  [00:17:24] swyx: There's no black and white, but I think most people agree on products. They just don't. You know, it's one thing to like, all right, move some people around on your org chart and just say, okay, you're under products now. And then job done. Right. But then your metrics haven't changed. You. Okay. Ours are all marketing. So what does it mean to belong in products, but then you measure them like, That you just, you're just treating them like a marketing team. And they're a very expensive affiliate marketing team for a lot of people. That's how it is like at you know, at, you know, Phil in previous company, we counted our Google UTM tag attribution, right? Like, oh, I drove 10,000 visits to our blog this month. And you can pay for that way, cheaper, elsewhere. You can pay for inorganic surge. You can pay for like, you know, there has to be something else that your devils are giving you because otherwise they're just very, very expensive affiliations.  [00:18:23] Community and DevRel  [00:18:23] Sai Senthilkumar: Yeah, that's a great way of putting it. Awesome. You know, I, I want to make sure we hit on community, the importance of community here, a strong developer relations or John UI communities on the side. You also have a community at Temporal, I guess. Why, why invest in community, you know, in the first place you have a great post here, but I, you know, the audience would love  [00:18:41] swyx: to hear. So I guess someone will share it. The post. So I'll give, I'll give my community credentials for people who don't know. So I got started in the New York tech scene where I was very much, in-person just getting to know everybody at every single meetup. And then I moved online where I was the moderator for the R slash react to a subreddit. And we grew that subreddit from 20,000, 30,000 people to 220,000 people before I left. And then I started small society from scratch. And now that was about. A year and a half ago, and now we're at about 11,000 people. And then I wrote a book where I run a paid community for the book. That's about 2000 people. And then for Temporal, I run the community events, forums and stuff like that. And when I say I run, I mean, with a lot of help from actual other people who actually know way more than me. So, I've just like kind of the coordinator it's, it's pretty funny. Cause like at Temporal. One of the least technical people there. It's just very unusual position for me anyway. So that's my community backgrounds. And obviously I, I have a lot of friends in the community manager space Rosie, Sherry, or the orbit, love people comScore and yeah, Mac written from from, from all these, all these community funders. Like it's a very hot topic right now. Okay. Why community? Basically it's the. It's the, it's your users that are identifying with your company and a lot of community forums, a lot of company, community forums, like glorified support channels, right? Like, it's just, Hey you know, you don't like answering questions on stack overflow. All right. I'll come to your custom discourse deployments and ask questions to you, but it's basically stack overflow. And what you really want is your users talking to each other, what you really want is your users hiring each other where you really want is your users building on top of you because they believe that you're, you're here to stay and they expect that their association with you will outlast their current employment. The problem with this is good luck fitting any of this in an OKR that is measured quarterly because community is a relationship based. Long-term goal rather than a short term transaction. But I mean, I think people are understanding that at least for developer tools, that's the strength of the community is very important for crossing the chasm. And I think a lot of people realize that when they cross the castle. Early adopters don't need community. They just need the tool to work. They just need to, like, they don't even need like that great of a docs. They don't need like a functioning, a vibrant job market for that technology. They just need to understand that the tool works and they can use it to solve problems that they have. But once you get into the mass market, the majority, then people start deciding on like, Hey, I picked a. The TensorFlow community, because that community is really great at helping beginners. And it's got, it's got plugins and resources for everything that I could possibly want, that those are not core to the technology, but there are a lot of the reasons why people pick technologies, which is there, there's a strong community. And I think to invest in that is a very, very long-term game, but it's a moat as well because everything else about your technology can be cloned or out competed, but a community is very, very hard to.  Yeah,  [00:21:50] Sai Senthilkumar: and I think you, you have a great point there. That community is, is a feature that cannot be copied and it itself is a moat for you and helps you gain these network economies. I think you elegantly structure that in your, in your post.  [00:22:03] swyx: There is a, there's a VC out there. I'm, I'm really, I'm really sad that I'm blanking on her name because she wrote a really great book. I refer to her in my own blog posts on technical community builders. So, so please go check her out, but I'll give you the thesis of the blog post, which is previously. Traditionally community. It was like the community manager at now. The five was kind of like Lewis on the totem pole. You know what I mean? Like, they would be going through the forums and seeing like, okay, like this person asked the question three days ago, it hasn't been answered. Please can anyone in the company help answer this question? That is such a pathetic, like, I mean, you know, they were great, but like that, that just shows that the company. Value community, right? It went when, when that is, that kind of behavior is, is around. But then also the community experience or someone's interaction with a company is very fragmented. Like on the forums, I'll be interacting with the support team. In, in, in conferences, I'll be interacting with the dev team in webinars. I'd be interacting with the marketing team in sales conversations. I'll be interacting with. It's very disparate thing and there's no sort of central. I guess CRM to manage like the interactions, but also I think more, more, more, more to the point who in the C-suite or who in the VP suite is responsible for community and who's managing that journey through, you know, through your company. I think as I think. The community goes from periphery to core. Then a lot of things start deriving their insights from community. Like instead of having community be the afterthought of like, Hey, we launched this product from that's now go support it in the community forums, like actually go engage community users in the forums and help to drive product insights. Or, you know, or beta test with like a super user community where there's just some, which is a topic I really like as well. Like the, the idea that every, every company, like I'm, I'm a part of a few super-user programs like GitHub stars Stripe community experts. I am blanking on some of the others, but we're looking into establishing our own as well, because it was very, very helpful for basically not just like recognizing some experts within the community, but also giving them preferential access. As a ways to say thank you. And, and I think, I think it's just a very, it's a win-win proposition all around for your most engaged users. Yeah.  [00:24:26] Sai Senthilkumar: And Shawn, you're wearing multiple hats control your community, fellow Corps experience this, this community eventually become a separate role within, within Deborah. Let's say you get to that stage on that.  [00:24:38] swyx: I haven't seen it personally myself. But yeah, I've, I've seen some companies basically have a head of community or VP of community or chief chief community officer is also a title that I've seen thrown around. But it takes time, you know, it takes it takes the right person to lead that. And so I don't have a. Either way of like when the right time is, cause I haven't been through that myself. But I would love to see it. I would love someone at the highest level to say I represent the user and, and not, and this is very, by the way, this is very true for open source dev tools. I represent the. Who never pays us a single cent, but contributes so much in tangible value in terms of code in terms of content and sort of like just buzz around the tool. And sometimes that, that person is just not represented in meetings, you know, that, that free user. So, yeah. I love, I love for that to happen right now. A lot of that falls on their roles laps and that's a, that's a job that we need to just formally recognize that we do. And I think that's. Yeah. Awesome.  [00:25:41] How to Start a Community  [00:25:41] Sai Senthilkumar: So the, the $1 million question here, I guess, what are your recommendations for kick-starting a community, especially you guys have done a great job, you know, and you just pay in a year or so. Like what  [00:25:54] swyx: are some recommended. So, first of all, I don't think we've, I think we can do better. Let's just leave it at that. I, you know, I'm sorry that it's just never happy. And I want to acknowledge so many in the Q and a James light. Yes. I think that's Lisa. She I haven't personally connected with her, but I have, I think, I think her posts for like drawing, like sort of community led growth, I think is a, is a very core insight that I think a lot of founders should have a good think about if not actually implement. So. So recommendations, you said, right? Two things, like, I think obviously there's, there's this, there's this standard stuff, like have a slack, have a discord by the way, slack versus discord. If you're open source and maybe sort of more Indy go discord, if you're more enterprise Eagle slack, that's just how it is. I don't love slack either, but that's just how it is. And then So the two recommendations are this like one. Events are underrated for community. So you saw how into Hashi court, four pillar thing events where different team and community. But I think at a smaller stage, those are the same thing. People need gathering points, and this is about the temperature of. Your community as well. You need to manage your temperature. It's not always hot, but there's hot and cold and you need to make sure that the hot wet hot moments are really good. And when I'm not kidding around when I talk about temperature, so, for the sort of communication, immediate theorists in the room, you should refer to Marshall McLuhan who talks about hot media and cold media. And I think it's very, very true that there, there are a lot of community and. Forums which are cold. And then there is some community community engagement methods that are hot and you probably want a variation of these things. So slack, so slack is one of those interesting ways in which a cold can sort of upgrade to a warm, but a hot you know, event would be a, would be a meetup, right? Like a conference. And that's something that I think really helps. Netlify kicked it up, kick it off. Like we launched the conference where we weren't sure if we could sell up, sell up the seats. But we did. And then, you know, we went from one conference a year, it's a three conferences a year and that just really helps kick it off because once people have shown up and they start talking to each other and they have no choice, but they're kind of, they, they're kind of committed to like being in a room with you. One to two days and like sitting through a bunch of vendor presentations it's such a really powerful thing. And, and, oh, by the way, getting your users onstage to talk about how proud they are of using your product. Amazing. Right? So events are super under four, and you want to, if you want to get good at community and get good at events, because then people have a reason to, to come show up and join you. But also there there's a bunch of people who are just. Participate. So you need to be decent at a cold outreach as well. What is cold or what is you know, basically building an issue, distribution channel it's basically the stuff that you, you imagine like a mailing list like a Twitter presence, like a YouTube presence. I think those are the main channels that I focus on. And obviously blog posts that, that drive. The second part, which I really like to talk about community, which is underrated, I think is content content is the minimum viable community in the sense that all right, you know, you have your products and it's kind of like it exists and people can use it, but really good blog posts would drive people from hacker news straight onto your community. And they want to talk about your blog posts and give them a place to talk about it. Right. So, that's kind of how I drive my own. Writing community. That's how I think if you look at like basically the playbooks of the independent creators out there, they're writers for. Or there a YouTuber service, and then you have a community attached to them and the community aggregates around their writing or a content, but then they spread out from there. But at least it's a reason to show up that is not about asking for support. And once, once they see a place to promote themselves or actually, you know, get into related conversations that are about what you stand for, rather than just about using you then you have. Vibrant like a self-sustaining community where people just show up because they know that's where they're going to get good feedback or responses. [00:29:47] Technical Community Builders  [00:29:47] Sai Senthilkumar: Yeah, that's awesome. And I guess the point here, in terms of finding someone to drive your community, you have a great post you're on, on that technical community builder would love to just double click there and what you mean by that  [00:30:04] swyx: finding content, right. I mean, you know, at a bare minimum, just curation is really nice. So if you think about like the big newsletters in the tech industry, like software lead weekly you know, pointer there, there's a bunch of these like basically aggregation blog posts, but curated by someone fairly knowledgeable. And that can be enough. Like you don't have to write the content, you can just aggregate it and that's, that's still a form of content creation. So maybe someone to start there is, is good enough because writing original content that that's a hit after hit is, is a fairly tall ask. Like I write a blog post a week and I only get one hit a year. That's how bad it is. Right? Like that's how bad I am. But, but also like, that's just how brutal the content industry is. And at the end, at the end of the day, like what all you're trying to do is provide a space for people to come to, to connect with other professionals who are solving the same. That's right. Like, Yeah, we  [00:31:00] Sai Senthilkumar: had a question come in here. I'm going to weave it in because it's relevant to the community section. It goes. [00:31:04] Social Media Managers  [00:31:04] Sai Senthilkumar: What, what if you have a great team of devs and Deborah ELLs, but they don't necessarily want to run social for the company. So the company developer handle is run by an actual social team that doesn't necessarily have the developer chops. And so any, any tips for the not dev teams per se, the social teams running dev communities, or should you just, you know, maybe look otherwise elsewhere and get a technical community builder? [00:31:31] swyx: Oh, okay. Social. I think it's okay. So, by the way, for those who don't know, like the post for my, my block wasn't think community building was actually making a case for why your community managers should be technical rather than non-technical obviously that's a. More expensive, higher, but I think it does pay off because people, it really helps when developers understand that the person they're sitting across from actually gets what they're trying to do and can connect them with the resources or the people that they need to get stuff done, or, you know, just have mutual shared interest in. But social media, if you have a social professional, a professional social person I haven't worked with those. I'll be honest. So I don't know what it's like. I mean, I know I'm, I'm friends with Rob or gala boob as he, as he's known on Reddit and Twitter. And he's a professional social media guy, and he's funny as hell. And people follow him for that. If that's the brand that you're building more power to you, but sometimes that's not the brand of your building. And. And you need to make a conscious choice of like, is this, is this like, yeah, you're getting a lot of internet points for your social media person's output, but is there anything relevant to what you're trying to build as a business? And if it's not, you gotta cut it. If it is then great. So I, I don't want to say like, so, I'm, I'm an investor in a company called Swyx. And they're amazing at me marketing but that's just the founders who love developer memes. It's not a separate social team. So I, I, haven't worked with a separate social team to, to understand how to work best with them to, to really give you a good feedback there. [00:32:55] Sai Senthilkumar: Super base is great. I love that. I love it reads as well. I guess. Okay. So let's say you have a couple of folks in your Deborah or, you know, you're starting to build a community you're, you're driving that forward. The question that we, that that was most asked, you know, before the seminar is just measuring your devil efforts and then your, you already flopped that slide,  [00:33:14] North Star Metric  [00:33:14] Sai Senthilkumar: Shawn, and you, you shared your north star metric, but now people continue to talk about how hard it is to measure Deborah also, you know, would love to hammer. The point of just why, you know, monthly active developers is, should be your north star metric. We would love and will.  [00:33:28] swyx: It's it's, it's the one that keeps you honest, right? Because your usage at the end of the day, and there's, you know, you couldn't men measure monthly active deployments or monthly active cluster. And by the way, if you're hosting platforms this is a very relevant question. If someone deploys on you and just hosts on you and, but never touches, never logs in. But you know, they're, they're still getting value from your site. They're still paying you is that a monthly active developer? Right. But the definition of monthly active developer is up for grabs as well. What most people who I talk to who are in the hosting business agree on is that if they're not developing their sites then they're not active. So, so be more brutally honest with yourself. Like, are you delivering enough features or are you getting the kind of developers who are growing usage and if they are, they should be constantly in your dashboard kind of tweaking stuff. Like it's kind of like in how, in how consumer apps, like, you know, the people want. To build a recurring habit of coming back to you at least once a week, if not daily. And for developers that small, probably like at least monthly, if not weekly. So there should be some kind of recurring behavior, but monthly active developers, basically, you want to land within more and more different logos, and then you want to expand within those different logos and monthly active offers is like the one metric that kind of covers that, right? So you're not, you don't just want to do evangelism, but then you also want that. W make sure that people don't turn off and you also want to make sure that people are growing within within the, within the companies that they landed. So, I think that kind of covers all of it, you know? It's especially hard, especially for open source because developers are very touchy about telemetry. Yeah. As long as the contract is clear and you're, you were steadfastly just only measuring activity and not identity. I think people are fine with that. Okay. So, the one thing, one thing I will say as well, is that like, that, that is obviously the, the point where you know, sales can take over and, and start looking for leads and, and, and all that. So that most directly translates to money. The reason I do not. Stare at like, I don't know what my med is on a month to month or even a quarterly to quality basis. I just, I just need to know if it's like up. So it's just like up, it's fine. Like I will have good bites. I'll have bad months. Some of it will be driven by product launches. Just by the seasonality or whatever. It's very hard to control. It's a lagging indicator. And so you need to compliment it with a leading indicator. In fact, a bunch of leading indicators, and that's the way I set it up. Right. You have one lagging indicator, that's the source of truth. And then a bunch of leading indicators that should correlate in the long run with the lagging indicator. So the leading indicators depend on your. You're a devil efforts ranging from community activity to your contents, you know, views and your, your distribution channel growth, like emails, subscribers, subscriptions, and YouTube, and all that. So your product metrics on bunch days and and NPS scores. Well, and I, and I guess  [00:36:22] Sai Senthilkumar: the point of what are some metrics that you shouldn't necessarily care about as much the vanity metrics, the bad metrics per se.  [00:36:30] swyx: Yeah, I have a, I think I might get in trouble for saying some of this cause officially I'll get up. Stars is one of our cars for as many for Temporal, but I don't like it. It's it's so it looks so sad to beg for a star. Like people should want to start you anyway. And then when people start you, they don't, they're not using you at all. They're just starting you cause they're throwing you a bone. So it's just so meaningless that. Basically the only time get off stars convert into real value is when someone is just completely naive about how this works. And they're just like, wow, it's 20,000 stars. It looks amazing. And, and also there's also like the trending page, right? Like if you get on there, some people do discover projects through the trending page and get up. What else have I said, oh, I have. At conferences to scan badges we're going to cube con and like you have to pay for like the device thingy to like scan a badge for customers. I don't think those ever work. First of all, it's like cheapens the interaction between you and them. They're just like, okay, I'm just a business card or to you. And then second of all falling up is super hard and very leaky. And those aren't good leads, you know, maybe the leads a week, maybe I'm weak, you know, And if we can, we can do all Glinka Glengarry Glen Ross there, but. I, I don't, I don't think, I don't think the transactional interaction of like, let me scan into a database on my first interaction with you works very well. So I'll just, I'll just put it as my 2 cents. I, I did at one time and I have a permanently negative impression of it. What else did I say? Oh, GitHub Google analytics, UTM tag. Yeah. So that one, that one I have been measured by as well. And I mean, yeah, I, I, the, the problem with that one is that it, it biases you towards writing a superficial Papa fund, like super top of funnel that may not have content that may not actually have anything to do with the business itself. Like as long as it's funny, as long as it's controversial, as long as it's It buys you spices, you twist the wrong thing, like in the worst ways of like how it, how the Twitter algorithm or the Facebook algorithm biases you towards clickbait. And then finally NPS I don't love MPS, even though I did mention NPS just now. I know, I understand that it's an industry standard and understand that you know, everyone understands that it's a flood metric, but it's so flawed and particularly developers. Implement NPS. Like I've been on the side where I've been asked to implement an APSI. Everyone knows how this works, and everybody knows that you don't care. You throw out the seven, you count the eight nines and tens and you, you know, so like what are you really measuring? What insights are you really getting? Like, I much rather have narrative insight rather than an arm's length. Like, am I doing, you know, approval rating essentially, of, of my, of my job, because I don't think that actually gives me much actionable insight apart from things that trending up or down, which I already have with my reactive. [00:39:20] Product DevRel  [00:39:20] swyx: Yeah, did, this  is  [00:39:22] Sai Senthilkumar: a question that came in by the way, next it's relevant from an average conversation, but let's say you're never out several reports up to product. What are, what are some good metrics there that you should, that you should care about?  [00:39:33] swyx: Okay. Yeah. So this is this is the thing I haven't personally figured out that much. So what, what I wrote is. If I that makes sense for running devel, which is coming community content, and then product is like a third wheel. Product is one of the things that we're still figuring it out. How do you think products should be measured? [00:40:00] Sai Senthilkumar: I think.   [00:40:03] swyx: So there's a lot of philosophy of what product is, which varies from company to company. And that's an unsolved question. And then there's the philosophy of metrics, how you think you should measure the thing. And then we're, we're doing so many bad shots here then, then you're like, how should reporting into product should, should be measured, right? Like this is like three tiers down of unexamined core beliefs that you, that we haven't really figured out yet. So, that's why I keep it to tangible. Related to the activities that we're doing feeding into the, the one lagging metrics, which keeps us honest because we can monetize it.  [00:40:37] Sai Senthilkumar: Awesome.  [00:40:37] Finding Great DevRels  [00:40:37] Sai Senthilkumar: You know, I, and I know we only have 10 minutes left here. I do want to touch on the last point, which is just hiring you know, Temporal, they locked out on, on finding you what were some other folks like you, you know, if you were, you were just starting to hire folks for your devil organization, where would you say. [00:40:54] swyx: Yeah, this is a tough one. So yeah. By the way, I get maybe three calls a week from founders asking about how to hire differs DevRel which is like, it's so amazing to me cause I, I kind of lucked into the job and then, you know, I randomly now have a reputation for it, but it's so amazing to me that this is something that's in demand because like, it seems like a fun job that everyone should want. What I usually say is true. Think of the ideal user that you have, that you would most like to clone and hire that person? Because what a devil is essentially going to end up doing is cloning themselves by everything that they do in their community and the, every content that they write. They're essentially going to put out signals that, Hey, this is a place that I believe in. And if you're like me, you should join me. And that's obviously, you know, had its problems with diversity, but it was a little we'll, we'll sort of leave that as a separate topic. It's hard because when I say. Typically you're the users that you would most like to clone is also your most ideal customer. So you don't want to poach your Deno from your customer? Sometimes oftentimes that ends up happening anyway, because usually the customer, you know, the person is a champion at the customer they implemented successfully and they're off to the races and then customer. The person probably believes in your company more than they believe in the company that they work at. So they leave to join you. That's how this all happened for us. And for offers there for hire. So yeah, I mean, that's very natural and very organic and if it happens great for you if you have, if you're struggling to get that, and I completely understand, one thing I like to say actually is maybe you don't like, especially if you're like pre series a. So I talked to a lot of like seed stage founders, cause I'm an angel investor. If you're pre series a like. You may want to make sure that at least your founder you know, your CEO CTO can be effective. . If you can't do it, why you, what do you expect that? So you can hire someone else who, who, who can do as good a job or better like yesterday, because they could probably do a better job if they're like an experienced speaker, expensed their phone or whatever. But if you can not be a PR, if you personally, as the founder, as, as like someone in the C suite, Can I do a good job of evangelizing for your company, then you haven't figured it out. You'd, haven't figured out like the, the core message to pass on to your detriment, to, to execute on. So make sure that you you've, you've done the job first because you're also part of the default team as a founder, like it or not. Right. You're the most credible one too. And the one with the most power to fix anything that comes up. So, maybe don't like, if you're struggling to hire your first role, maybe don't hire like someone who's already an established level who comes from a different community, because if you try that and expect them to transfer their audience to you, like NPM installed. It may not work because they don't come from that same mindset. They don't have, they haven't experienced the same problems as you. I much rather take an existing engineer who you know, has some skill that at writing posts and stuff and, and train them up because I think that their roles are more made than bored. And that's, that's kind of, I.  [00:43:47] DevRel for Dev Platforms of non-DevTools companies  [00:43:47] Sai Senthilkumar: Awesome. Well, Shawn, I know we have like another five or six minutes. I want to hit on some questions that came in through the audience. There, there was a good one here about how deck row is different when the product is not specifically for developers like Salesforce, HubSpot, or where it's enterprise stats, but you still want a developer community using the APX. How, how is demo different there? How would you think.  [00:44:12] swyx: I haven't worked on that stuff. So please, please take this with a grain of salt. I've seen Spotify DevRels at work, which is fun. Did you know Spotify has their roads? And yeah, I, I understand that. Sometimes you just have a developer that notion has a devil. Yeah, there, there, sometimes it's not the core thrust, but you're still in developer community. I think that this one is more straightforward in the sense that like, Hey, come build a business on top of us, right? Like here are the existing users, here's the monetization. Hopefully there is monetization. Usually a lot of platforms develop a preference when they launched. They don't have any money to division figured out, which is super annoying. That's what happened to the Alexa by the way. A ton of crap because they never figured out monetization. And and yeah, I mean, basically sell it as a way to. An audience that a captive audience that is behind a walled garden that they could not reach otherwise. And here are all the APIs. Here's how seriously we support it. You know, you don't want to be Twitter where you deprecate APS every so often so that no one believes in you anymore. And you know, you want to host hackathons. You want to, you want to show examples of early success. You want to show, you want to give your developers. An idea of what is most demanded by your community of of your non-technical users. And then, you know, you want to show the re the revenue potential. Honestly, I think Shopify does an amazing job at this, right? You don't, you don't think of, I mean, I think more Shopify has like a dev focused company, but actually they're not like they're selling it. They're selling. It basically rails e-commerce rails to non-technical e-commerce users and the developers come along for the ride and build out the Shopify ecosystem. Right. That's a very successful dev ecosystem because Shopify has monetization figured out. So people gravitate to where the money is, which is why, you know, all right, let's apply this to the very app that we're sitting in right now. Zoom launched a dev community with no monetization, right? There's a whole, there's a bunch of plugins. Maybe you can use them. No one, no one has any idea. What they are you know, that's, that's not going to be that successful, even though zoom has a massive, like billions of users, audience it's hard to build a company on top of it, like slack launch the fund Companies when there are certain sizes, they launched like a creator fund or like a startup funds. So the cave come build on top of us, we'll fund you. And like, you know, we'll turn you into like a legit startup. I don't think there's, there's been like maybe one successful slack based startup, but that's it, you know? So yeah, you gotta really figure out monetization built into the. Yeah, totally.  [00:46:38] DevRel Tooling  [00:46:38] Sai Senthilkumar: Another good question that came through with some of the tool recommendations here technology that devil's stack, I we've actually been following a company called orbit.love that I believe you're familiar with as well. And you know, we're, we're calling it almost a deck as a Debra L CRM that effectively acts as the operating system that rolls in from agents and any other good ones or is orbit the one like, yeah. Well, what were your tool stack be if you were to recommend that.  [00:47:03] swyx: So it's funny. Cause basically I knew Josh before he started, orbit. And so I'm reasonably friendly with them and recently actually sat them down for like an hour and just. Just like unloaded on them on like, all the ways that I don't think their product is good enough. So it's, it's so fun because like, when you have to actually use the thing versus like show a pretty dashboard, like it's, it's a world of difference. So orbits orbits at the pretty dashboard stage right now they need to basically become the definitive source of how every Silicon valley company measures their developer community. They're not there yet because they present with too many numbers. Okay. So, common room is the other one. Have you seen it? Have you seen anybody?  [00:47:41] Sai Senthilkumar: That's   [00:47:41] swyx: a good one. They seem neck and neck. I think common room has has more focus on the integrations aspects. Whereas orbit is maybe more on just general open-source community. I'm not sure. I mean, in the common room seems to have very good enterprise sales for whatever reason. It's super weird. I don't, I don't understand it, but yeah, both of these things are okay or good. Like, I don't think they're amazing because they haven't changed my life as a dev community person. Yeah, that's kind of what it's kind of where I leave it, you know, and I don't, I don't have a formal system, I think for, for sure other people are going to have a formalized CRM. We run ours in notion. It's, it's manually attracts not automatically integrated. I would love for it to be automatically integrated, but also it's not going to materially change my life because I know who my most active users are. I know, you know, I know, I know who is like, you know, super active and I know who's falling off, like, I don't need a machine to tell me that yet. When I may be you know, a much bigger company, maybe like C stage S a CVC probably I'll want to have that so that I can at least have a shared understanding of reality with my team. But right now, you know, there's three of us. It's fine. You guys are doing  [00:48:49] Sai Senthilkumar: an awesome job and, and, you know, we're, we're big fans of what you're building over there and the community you're building over there. I think we're coming up on time, Sean. Unfortunately, I I'm gonna, I'm gonna kick it off. It's obvious.  [00:49:01] Travis Bryant: Shawn we've been running these COVID office hour sessions for since we all went into lockdown and I think this was the most engaged audience. We've had of any one of these. And it was the first time we had in the Q and a, a request for how to reach out to you directly. So what's the best way to to connect with.  [00:49:19] swyx: Oh, sure. You can find me on Twitter at Swyx. I'll drop it in the chat and you can find my sites where I have like a newsletter and more blog posts, all the blog posts you could possibly want. And Swyx.  [00:49:31] Travis Bryant: Yeah, great. And what we'll be doing in the recap of this, along with the recording, number of you asked for that, and we'll be publishing that in our recap blog post, as well as we'll just make it an index of all of Shawn's blog posts so that you have an easy way to pop to those are the ones that he referenced as well as the the graphic that he put up there.

Podcast de MERITOCRACIA BLANCA
Podcast 9x07 'Marsella, saudíes e intrahistorias de la Superliga' |Actualidad Meritocrática

Podcast de MERITOCRACIA BLANCA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 77:50


Nos volvemos a reunir para charlar entre nosotros y con vosotros sobre las últimas noticias del madridismo. El comunicado conjunto de Real Madrid, Athletic y Barcelona contra el trato con CVC y Tebas, el partido contra el Inter y las últimas noticias de la Superliga. Así mismo, conversamos con los espectadores del chat sobre jugadores y la próxima jornada de liga que empieza hoy. Todo esto y mucho más con este pedazo de elenco: @CraneoRojo4 @LosSublimes @jmburdalo @alpr97 *Meritocracia Blanca no se hace responsable de las opiniones de sus colaboradores Nos podéis seguir en: Web: https://meritocraciablanca.com/ Twitter/Facebook: @MeritoRMCF Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/meritocraciablanca

El Larguero
El Larguero completo | La guerra en el fútbol español es total

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 109:17


Tebas, Real Madrid y Barcelona vuelven aestar enfrentados por el acuerdo económico de los clubes con CVC promovido por LaLiga y que estos dos equipos con Athletic Club rechazan. Analizamos la previa del Atlético de Madrid y charlamos con un protagonista de Moto 2 y de fúbtol sala.

Hora 25 Deportes
Hora 25 Deportes | Alta tensión

Hora 25 Deportes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 26:05


El programs del viernes con Jesús Gallego y el deporte del día: empieza la quinta jornada de liga con la pelea activa entre Koeman y Laporta y las guerrillas de Madrid, Athletic y Barça con el resto de equipos y Javier Tebas por el fondo de CVC, resto de fútbol, El Sanedrón con Raúl Pérez, España se clasifica a octavos del Mundial de fútbol sala, empieza la Liga Endesa ACB y más deporte.

Hora 25
Hora 25 Deportes | Alta tensión

Hora 25

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 26:05


El programs del viernes con Jesús Gallego y el deporte del día: empieza la quinta jornada de liga con la pelea activa entre Koeman y Laporta y las guerrillas de Madrid, Athletic y Barça con el resto de equipos y Javier Tebas por el fondo de CVC, resto de fútbol, El Sanedrón con Raúl Pérez, España se clasifica a octavos del Mundial de fútbol sala, empieza la Liga Endesa ACB y más deporte.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
You Need to Start Using Burner Identities ASAP

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 83:25


You Need to Start Using Burner Identities ASAP! In this day and age, if you don't have a burner identity, you are really risking things from having your identities stolen through these business email compromises. It's really crazy. That's what we're going to talk about. [Automated transcript] An essential part of keeping ourselves safe in this day and age is to confuse the hackers. The hackers are out there. They're trying to do some things. Ransomware, for instance, like[00:00:30] business email compromise, is one of the most significant crimes times out there today. It hits the news legitimately. It's terrifying. It can really destroy your business, and it can hurt you badly. If you're an individual, you don't want ransomware. How about those emails that come in? In fact, I just got an email from a listener this week, and they got a phone. His wife answered, and it was [00:01:00] Amazon on the phone, and Amazon said, Hey, listen, your account's been hacked. We need to clear it up so that your identity doesn't get stolen. And there's a fee for this. It's a $500 fee. And what you have to do is just go to amazon.com. Buy a gift card, and we'll then take that gift card number from you. And we'll use that as the fee to help recover your stolen information. [00:01:30] So she went ahead and did it, and she went ahead and did all of the things that the hackers wanted. And now they had a gift card. Thank you very much. We'll follow up on this and. Now she told her husband, and of course, this isn't a sex-specific thing, right? It could have happened to either one. My dad fell for one of these scams as well. So she told her husband, or her husband looked at what had happened and [00:02:00] said, oh my gosh, Don't think this is right. Let me tell you, first of all, Amazon, your bank, various credit card companies are not going to call you on the phone. They'll send you a message right from their app, which is usually how I get notified about something. Or they will send an email to the registered email app. No, that you set up on that account. So that [00:02:30] email address then is used by them to contact you, pretty simple. Or they might send you a text message. If you've registered a phone for notifications, that's how they contact you. It's like the IRS. I was at a trade show, and I was on the floor. We were exempt. And I got no less than six phone calls from a lady claiming to be from the IRS, and I needed to [00:03:00] pay right away. And if I didn't pay right away, they were going to seize everything. And so all I had to do was. Buy a gift card, a visa gift card, give her the number and use that to pay the taxes. And this lady had an American accent to one that you would recognize. I'm sure. And it's not something that they do now. They do send emails, as I [00:03:30] said. So the part of the problem with sending emails is it really them? Are they sending a legitimate email to a legitimate email address? Always a good question. Yeah. Here's the answer. Yeah, they'll do that. But how do you know that it isn't a hacker sending you the email? It can get pretty complicated. Looking into the email headers, trying to track. Where did this come from? Which email servers did it go through? [00:04:00] Was it authenticated? Did we accept? Did the provider use proper records in their DNS, the SPIF, et cetera, to ensure that it's legitimate? How do you follow up on that? That's what we do for our clients. And it gets pretty complicated looking at DKMS and everything else to verify that it was legitimate, ensuring that the email came from a registered MX server from the actual [00:04:30] server. There is a way around this. And this has to do with the identities, having these fake burner identities. I've been doing this for decades myself, but now it's easy enough for anybody to be able to do it. There are some services out. And one of the more recommended ones. And this is even the New York times; they have an article about this. They [00:05:00] prefer something called simple login. You can find them online. You can go to simple login dot I O. To get started now, it's pretty darn cool. Cause they're using what's called open-source software, it's software. So can anybody examine to figure out this is legitimate or not? And of course, it is fair, but it's all out there for the whole world to see. And that means it's less likely in some ways to be hacked. There are people who [00:05:30] argue that having open-source software means even more. In some ways, you are, but in most ways, you're not; anyway, it doesn't matter. Simple login.io. Now, why would you consider doing this? Something like simple login? Simple login is friendly because it allows you to create dozens and dozens of different email addresses. And the idea is with a simple login, it will [00:06:00] forward the email to you at your actual email address. So let's say you're doing some online shopping. So you can go ahead and set up an email address for, whatever it is, shopping company.com that you're going to use a shopping company.com. So you'd go there. You put into simple login "I want to create a new identity," and you tag what it's for. You then go to some shopping company.com and [00:06:30] use the email address generated for you by simple login. Now you're a simple login account. Is it going to be tied into your real email account, wherever that might be if you're using proton mail, which is a very secure email system, or if using outlook or heaven forbid Gmail or one of these others, the email will be forwarded to you. You will be able to see that indeed, that [00:07:00] email was sent to you. So shopping company.com email address or your bank of America, email address, et cetera, et cetera, that makes it much easier for you to be able to tell, was this a legitimate email? So, in other words, if your bank's really trying to get ahold of you, and they're going to send you an email, they're going to send you an email to an address that you use exclusively. For bank of America. In reality, you only have the one email [00:07:30] box over there wherever proton, mail, outlook, Gmail, your business Excel. You only have that one box you have to look at, but the email is sent to simple login. Does that make sense? You guys, so you can create these alias email boxes. It will go ahead and forward. Any emails sent to them, to you, and you'll be able to tell if this was indeed from the company, because [00:08:00] that's the only place that you use that email address. That makes it simple, but you don't have to maintain dozens or hundreds of email accounts. You only have one email account. And by the way, you can respond to the email using that unique aliased email address you created for the shopping company or bank of America or TD or whomever. It might be, you can send from that address as well. [00:08:30] So check it out online, simple login dot IO. I really liked this idea. It has been used by a lot of people over, out there. Now here's one other thing that it does for you, and this is important as well. Not using the same email address. Everywhere means that when the hackers get your email address from shopping company.com or wherever, pets.com, you name it. [00:09:00] They can not take that and put it together with other information and use that for business, email compromise. Does that make sense? It's it makes it pretty simple, pretty straightforward. Don't get caught in the whole business email compromise thing. It can really hurt. And it has; it's one of the worst things out there right now, dollar for dollar, it's right up there. It, by the way, is one of the ways they get ransomware into your [00:09:30] systems. So be very careful about that. Always use a different email address for every Website you sign up for. Oh, and they do have paid plans like a $30 a year plan over at simple IO will get you unlimited aliases, unlimited mailboxes, even your own domain name. So it makes it pretty simple, pretty handy. There are other things you might want to do, for instance, use virtual credit cards. [00:10:00] And we'll talk about those a little bit. As well, because I think this is very important. But, hey, I want to remind everybody that I have started putting together some pieces of training. You're going to get a little training at least once a week, and we're going to put all of that into it. What we have been calling our newsletter. I think we might change the name of it a little bit, but you'll be getting those every week. And the only way to get those is to be on [00:10:30] that email list. Go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Please do that right now. I am not going to harass you. I'm not going to be one of those. And I've never been one of those internet marketers that sending you multiple dozens of emails a day. But I do want to keep you up to date. So stick around; we will be back here in just a couple of minutes. And, of course, you're listening to Craig Peter's son. [00:11:00] And again, the Website, Craig peterson.com. Stick around. Cause we'll be right back. One of the best ways to preserve your security online is by using what we're calling burner identities, something that I've been doing for more than 30 years. We're going to talk more about how to do that right now.  You can do some things [00:11:30] to help keep yourself and your identity safe online. We've talked about email and how important that is. I want to talk now about fake identities. Now, a lot of people get worried about it. It sounds like it might be sketchy, but it is not to use fake identities to confuse the hackers to make it. So they really can't do the [00:12:00] things that they. To do, they can't send you fishing ear emails, particularly spear-phishing emails. That'll catch you off guard because you're using a fake. How do you do that? I mentioned to you before that I have thousands of fake identities that I created using census data. And I'm going to tell you how you can do it as well. There's a website out there called fake [00:12:30] name a generator. You'll find it online@fakenamegenerator.com. I'm on that page right now. And I'm looking at a randomly generated identity. It has the option right on this page to specify the sex. And it says random by default, the name set, I chose American the country United States. So it is applying both American [00:13:00] and Hispanic names to this creation. And now remember it's creating based on census data and some other public data. But, still, it is not giving you one identity of any real people. So I think that's important to remember, and you're not going to use these identities for illegal purposes. And that includes, obviously, when you set up a bank account, you have to use your real [00:13:30] name. However, you don't have to use yours. If you have an actual email address, you can use things like simple login that will forward the email to you, but we'll let you know who was sent to. And if you only use that one email address for the bank, you know that it came from the bank or the email address was stolen from the bank. All of that stuff. We've talked about that already. So, in this case, The name that has come up with [00:14:00] for me is Maurice de St. George in Jacksonville, Florida even gives an address. In this case it's 36 54 Willis avenue in Jacksonville, Florida. So if I go right now two, I'm going to use Google maps, and I will put in that address. Here we go. Jacksonville willows avenue, all the guests. What? There is Willis avenue in Jacksonville [00:14:30], and it showing hoes oh, from Google street view. Let me pull that up even bigger. And there it is. So ta-da, it looks like it gave me. Fairly real address. Now the address it provided me was 36 54, which does not exist. There is a 365, but anyway, so it is a fake street address. So that's good to know some, if [00:15:00] I were to use this, I'm going to get mine. Am I male saying about I pass. Maurissa tells you what Maurice means, which is neat. It'll give you a mother's maiden name. Gremillion is what gave me here a social security number. So it creates one that passes what's called a checksum test so that if you put it into a computer system, it's going to do a real quick check and say, yeah, it looks good to me. So it was not just the right [00:15:30] number of digits. It also passes the check, some tasks. Well-known how to do a checksum on their social security numbers. So again, it's no big deal. And remember, you're not going to use this to defraud anyone. You're going to use this for websites that don't really need to know; give me a break. Why do you need all this information? It gives me a phone number with the right area code. And so I'm going to go ahead and look up this phone number right now. Remember, use duck go. Some [00:16:00] people will use Google search, and it says the phone number gave me is a robocall. As I slide down, there's some complaints on that. So there you go. So they giving us a phone number that is not a real person's phone number, country code, of course one, cause I said United state birth date. Oh, I was born October 7th, year, 2000. I'm 20 years old. And that means I'm a Libra. Hey, look at all this stuff. So it's giving me an [00:16:30] email address, which is a real email address that you can click to activate or right there. Again, I mentioned the simple login.io earlier, but you can do a right here, and it's got a username and created for me a password, which is actually a pretty deal. Password. It's a random one, a website for me, my browser user agent, a MasterCard, a fake MasterCard number with an expiration and a [00:17:00] CVC to code all of this stuff. My height is five-six on kind of short. My weight is 186 pounds own negative blood type ups tracking number Western union number MoneyGram number. My favorite color is blue, and I drive a 2004 Kia Sorento, and it also has a unique ID. And you can use that wherever you want. So the reason I brought this up again, it's called [00:17:30] fake name generator.com is when you are going to a website where there is no legal responsibility for you to tell them the truth. You can use this. And so I've used it all over the place. For instance, get hub where you have it's a site that allows you to have software projects as you're developing software. So you can put stuff in, get hub. They don't know to know, need to [00:18:00] know who I really am. Now they have a credit card number for me. Because I'm on a paid plan. I pay every month, but guess what? It isn't my real credit card number. It isn't the number that I got from fake name generator. My credit card company allows me to generate either a single use credit card numbers, or in this case, a credit card number for get hub dock. So just as an example, that's how I use it. So we've get hub gets hacked, the [00:18:30] hackers, have an email address and a name that tipped me off right away, where this is coming from. And if the email didn't come from GitHub by no, they either sold my information to a marketing company, or this is a hacker. Trying to manipulate me through some form of his fishing scheme. So I know you guys are the breasts and best and brightest. A lot of you understand what I'm talking about, and I'm talking about how you [00:19:00] can create a burner identity. And let me tell you, it is more important today to create a burner identity. Than it has ever been at any point in the past, because frankly, burner identities are one of the ways that you can really mess up some of the marketing firms out there that are trying to put the information together, these data aggregator companies, and also the hackers. And it's really the hackers that [00:19:30] were off up against here. And we're trying to prevent them from. Getting all of this information. So when we come back, I want to talk about the next step, which is which credit cards can you get? These single use card numbers from? Should you consider using PayPal when my Google voice be a really good alternative for you? So we're going to get into all that stuff. Stick around in the [00:20:00] meantime, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my newsletter. All of this. Is in there. It makes it simple. It's a simple thing to do. Craig Peterson.com. And if you have any questions, just email me, M e@craigpeterson.com. Having your credit card stolen can be a real problem for any one of us. It gives the bad [00:20:30] guys, a lot of options to spend a lot of money very quickly. We're going to talk right now about virtual credit cards. What are they, what does it mean?  Virtual credit cards come in two basic forms. One is a single use credit card, which was quite popular back when these things first came out, and another one is a virtual credit card that has either a specific life. In other words, it's only good for 30 days [00:21:00] or that can be used until you cancel it. If you have a credit card, a visa, MasterCard, American express, discover all of the major card issuers will give you the ability to reverse any charges that might come onto your cards. If your card is stolen or misused. Now that makes it quite easy. Doesn't it? I want to point out that if you're using [00:21:30] a debit card, as opposed to a credit card, there's not much challenging you can do with the credit card. You can say, I am not going to make my payment. And because of this, that, and the other thing, this was stolen, et cetera, they can file it as a disputed charge. They can do an investigation to find out. Yeah. I'm you probably were not at a bus terminal down in Mexico City, which happened to me. Because I was up [00:22:00] here in New Hampshire, quite a ways down to Mexico City. And so they just reversed it out. That money never came out of my bank account because it was on a credit card. If I were using a debit card. That money would have come right out of my account. Now, mind you, a bus ticket in Mexico city is not very expensive, but many people have had charges of many thousands of dollars. And if you need that money in your checking account, [00:22:30] and you're using a debit card, you got a problem because your check for if you ever have to pay rent again, red check is going to. Bound because they just empty it out to your bank account. So now you have to fight with the bank, get the money back. They will eventually refund it, but it could make some of you. Transactions that you might've written a check or something, it'll make them bounce. And that could be a real problem. These, it could make them [00:23:00] bounce. So using a credit card is typically less of a hassle online. So why would you want to use a virtual card or also known as is a master credit card masked and may S K E D? The main reason behind this is to allow you. Control payment. I've used them. In fact, I use them exclusively on every Website [00:23:30] online. And I'm going to tell you the names of some of them here in just a couple of minutes, but I use them all the time. And part of the reason is let's say, I want to cancel. A service. Have you ever tried to cancel a service before and you have to call them many times, and so you're arguing with somebody overseas somewhere who doesn't want you to close the account. And of course, Bump you up to the next level person who also doesn't want you to close the account. And [00:24:00] so you have to fuss. Have you ever had that experience and I'm sure you have. It just happens all the time. So with using the virtual credit card, the advantage to me is, Hey, if you are going to try and fight with me, I don't care because I'm just going to cancel that credit card number. So I don't have to cancel my credit card. I don't have to have the company reissue credit card for me. I don't have to do any of this sort of thing that [00:24:30] makes my life pretty easy. Doesn't it? And because of that, I am now I think in a much better. Place, because it just, I don't have to fight with people anymore. So that's one of the reasons I used it. The other big reason is if it gets stolen, they can cause less harm. Some of these credit card it's virtual credit cards are set up in such a way that you can limit the amount that's charged on them. Do you like that? [00:25:00] So if you are using it on a site that maybe is charging you $50 a month, no problem. $50 a month comes off of the credit card. And if someone tries to charge more bounces and then hopefully you find out, wait a minute, it just bounced on me. Then next step up is okay. It bounced and. I'm just going to cancel the card, and then you issue a new credit card number for that Website. So an example. In my case is [00:25:30] get hub.com. We keep software up there, and they charge me every month if get hub were to get hacked and that credit card number stolen I'm I really don't care because there's almost nothing that can happen. And if good hub doesn't properly cancel. My account, I can just cancel the credit card and let them come after me. This isn't going to happen. So then it's also called a master credit card number, cause it's a little safer than using your [00:26:00] real credit card details. I also want to point out something about debit card. I went for years with no credit cards at all. Nowadays, many of my vendors will take a credit card for payment. And in fact, give me a bit of a better deal. And then with the credit card, I can get 2% cashback, which I use to pay down the credit card. It couldn't get any better than that, but when you're using a debit card, what I always do. [00:26:30] Is I had two accounts that I could transfer money between at the bank. So I had one checking account. That was my main operating, if you will account. And then I had another checking account where I would be. Just moving money out of it. Or you could even do it with a savings account, but some banks, they only let you do so many transactions a month on a savings account. So the idea is I know that I have this much credit card [00:27:00] obligate while debit card obligations for this month, that money is going to be coming out. So I make sure that. In the debit card account to cover the legitimate transactions I know are coming up and then I keep everything else in the other account. And then I manually transferred over every month. So that's how I dealt with the whole debit card thing. And it worked really well for me. Bottom line. I think it's a really great idea. So there you go, who are the companies that [00:27:30] you can use to do this? I've used some of these before all of them have worked really well. If you have a capital one credit card, they have something called Eno, E N O, and it's available to all capital one cardholder. Eno even has an extension for your web browsers. So if it notices you're on a webpage, it's asking for credit card number, it'll pop up and say, do you want me to create a [00:28:00] credit card number or a virtual one for this Website you can make your payment. Does it get much easier than that? Citibank has something they call a virtual credit cards available to all Citibank cardholders, master pass by MasterCard. That's available to any MasterCard visa, American express discover diners club cardholders, credit, debit, and prepaid cards by their way. So you might want to check that one out. Yeah, [00:28:30] so that's the only one I see on my list here. That will do it for debit cards, master pass by MasterCard American express checkouts available to all American Express cardholders. Chase pay available to all chase cardholders, Wells Fargo, wallet visa checkouts, available to all visa, MasterCard, and American express and discover color cardholders, credit and debit cards. Plus. Prepaid cards. Okay. So it does [00:29:00] do the debit cards as well. Final that's all owned by Goldman Sachs and is not accepting any new applicants and entro pay. Also not accepting new applicants. There's a couple online. All right, everybody, make sure you check me out. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We're going to wrap up how you should be using these burner identities of [00:29:30] few more tips and tricks that are going to help keep you safe from the hackers that are out there. So here we go.  There are a lot of hackers out there. The numbers are just astounding. The cost of these hackers coming in and stealing our information is just unbelievable. And it goes all the way from big corporations, from things like the colonial [00:30:00] pipeline, the US government all the way on down through you and me. I want to tell you a little story about a friend of mine. He is about 75 years old, and he supplements his income by driving for Uber eats and one other company. And so what he'll do is someone puts in an order for food somewhere. He'll go pick it up and then he'll drive it to where whoever wanted, whoever ordered it. Now, [00:30:30] there are. Pricing number of scams with this. So he's very careful about some of that orders, a cookie, for instance, because it's usually a bit of a scam anyway, we won't get into those, but I'll tell you what happened to him. His information was stolen online as it was probably yours. Mine I know was as well. So it's all stolen. What do you do? In his case, what ended up [00:31:00] happening is they managed to get into his email account. Once they're in his email account, they now had access to the emails he was getting from one of these companies. Now it wasn't the Uber eats guy. He was, there was another company. So let's just explain this a little bit. Uber eats sends him a request for him to go ahead and do a deliver. Go to the restaurant, pick it up and take it to this client's house. [00:31:30] And in order for him to register, he had to register an email address. Now, of course, he uses the same email address for everything. All of it. Now, personally, that drives me a little bit insane, but that's what he does. And he has just a few passwords. Now. He writes them down a little book and heaven forbid he ever lose the book so that he can remember them. He [00:32:00] just wants to keep his life simple. He's 75. He's not technophobic, he's not up on all of this stuff. What he found was a paycheck didn't show. And it was an $800 paycheck. We're talking about real money that he should have had in his pocket. It didn't show up. So he calls up the company and says what happened to my paycheck and a record show? Yes, indeed. It had been paid. We [00:32:30] paid you, we deposited right into your account. Just like you asked. Yeah. ACH into the account. Great. Wonderful. What had happened is bad guys had gone, gained control of his email address and use that now. Because they figured I see some emails in his account from this food delivery service, let's try and see if this email address that we're looking at right now. All of his emails let's [00:33:00] look and see. Okay. Yeah. Same. Email address and same password as he used at this email address? Yeah, it worked. Okay. Great. So now we have access to this guy food delivery account. So they changed. The bank account number, no easy enough to confirm. They change it, Mel. Hey, I want to make sure that it was you until the bad guys, the hackers, click out, yada. Yeah, it was [00:33:30] me and then lead the email. So he doesn't see it. And now his $800 paycheck. In fact, I think there were a couple of different checks is deposited directly into the bad guy's bank account and. The money of course has transferred out pretty quickly. Now the, that guys, these hackers are using what are called mules. You might be familiar with that in the drug trade. They'll have a third [00:34:00] party deliver the drugs just to mule. They don't know what all is going on. They probably know the delivering drugs in this case. Most of the meals are useful idiots, of which there are many in this country, unfortunately. Political and otherwise. And these people are convinced that all they need to do is transfer the money into this account so that the hackers can then pull it out. And now [00:34:30] they're gonna take care of their grandmother who is stuck in the hospital and they have no way to pay for it. And they can't transfer the money out of the country directly. That's one of the stories they use for people. And in many cases, these mules know what they're doing. The FBI earlier this year arrested a whole group of mules out in California that were purposefully transferring the money. They knew what they were doing. So his money was now out [00:35:00] of the country. No way to get it. And this food delivery company was not about to pay him. So it isn't just the big guys it's you and me as well. So what I want to talk about right now is multi-factor authentication. Now. You guys are the best and brightest. I hope you understand this. If you have questions, please reach out to me. I am more than glad to send you some good material on this. Just [00:35:30] me. M E add Craig peterson.com. I am here to help. What multi-factor authentication does is allows you to not just log in by using an email address and a password, or maybe a username and a password. Which is much better, by the way. I don't like it. When sites require an email address to log in. Although as I use multiple email addresses, and I think you should as well, a different email address for every site [00:36:00] out there beyond question, you should be doing that. So anyway, this is. You should be doing with multi-factor authentication. They will have you put in your email address, have you put in your password, and then they'll do something that is supposedly something you have. So the best security is something, along with something you physically have. So in most cases, they'll use two factor [00:36:30] authentication by sending you a text message with a code. And then you type in that usually six digit code, and now you're in, and it only does that. If it doesn't recognize the browser, are you using, or in many cases of, it needs to be a little more secure than that it's only good for 24 hours or maybe a week. That is not good enough. You should be using a code generator. Google [00:37:00] has one for free, but I want you guys to use something called one password. That's the digit one password. You'll find it online. You'll find it in all the app stores. It is what we use for the most part. It's great for families. And it's great for businesses because you can have different vaults and you can share them and control access. Now there's a couple of reasons why that we're talking about multi-factor authentication right [00:37:30] now. So the first reason kind of the biggest reason is you can use it for generating passwords. Fairly random ones or fairly memorable ones. And then when you go to a site, one password can pop up and give you the password for the site. So you don't even have to look it up. You don't have to remember it. You don't have to look it up. Isn't that phenomenal. And then it also has built into it. Token this six digit [00:38:00] key generator. I'm trying to keep this simple. So you can then use that for the site. So it says, okay, what's the code go to your code generator. So you just go to one password. There it is. Copy it and paste it right in. And you're in that alone would have prevented my buddy's account from getting there. It's that simple, one more thing that you want to use one password. And that is those questions that you're [00:38:30] asked to verify. It's you many sites out there banks are really big into this and I don't get it cause it's not very good in most cases. So they'll ask you things like where were you born? What's your mother's maiden name? Where did you go on your first day to what was the car that you owned first? Or, your dog's name, et cetera. The reason, those things are so bad is because the hackers can go online, look at your [00:39:00] social media and figure out the answers to a lot of those questions. Bad. So what you should be doing is using one password, and it allows you to put notes pretty much anything you want to in the record for that Website. So you go to the Website and you log in, create your account right. To log in. So you're going to give it your, probably your email address, which is a bad idea, but [00:39:30] that's, what's required use one password. To generate a strong password for you that you'll put in. You'll use one password. Hopefully they have multi factor authentication that allows you to use one of these code generators. Google has theirs is called Google authenticator, and one password is compatible with that. Microsoft has done. Own thing. And it's not compatible with almost any Website online. So don't use the [00:40:00] Microsoft authenticator other than for Microsoft products, like using the, a windows 365 thing that they have does use Microsoft authenticator, but you can also use the Google one and the one password one, and then in the notes section, make up answers to the questions. So it asks you, what was your mother's maiden name? And say something different insecurity, where, what is your high school? It was named [00:40:30] movie elementary school, make something up a stream. Okay. Use random answers. Record them in one password. You're going to have to look them up. If you ever on the phone with the bank or whomever, because you're not going to remember them, but that's good because they don't appear in your. Social media anywhere and they don't appear anywhere else other than your secured encrypted one password fault. [00:41:00] Thanks for being with us. I appreciate you guys listening, and you can find all of this. I'm going to turn all of these and did a little mini-courses here over the next few weeks, and there's only one way you're going to get it. And that is by being on my email list. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Go there right now. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. As if this year and last year haven't been enough weirdness, [00:41:30] it looks like George Orwell is kind of lending some help here. You won't believe what the us department of Homeland security is planning on doing well, maybe it will. If you missed the last hour, it is absolutely must-listen radio. And so what I'm going to be doing is I will put it up online for you guys. You can get it by going to Craig [00:42:00] peterson.com/podcast. Hopefully, I'll get it up soon after the show today, but I went through and explained ways. That you can protect your privacy online. Absolutely protect it. So you don't get that kind of advice or most people, most people are trying to sell you a product that just doesn't really work that well. I I'm telling you what does work, what the experts do, what Edward Snowden would do. What I [00:42:30] have been doing for more than 30 years personally, in order to help keep my identity safe. So check it out again. Craig peterson.com/podcast. Now I want to point out too, that if it's not upon you, look, make sure you refresh your browser. So you're going to want to do what's called a cache clear refresh. So. And the browser by that URL bar, you'll see a little, it's usually a little circle [00:43:00] with an arrow on the end. That's your refresh, but you need to also reflect, refresh your cache. So you're going to hold down the shift. And hit that little circle with the arrow on the end, and then you'll be able to listen to all of that. And I'm thinking right now, I'm probably going to try and turn that into a series of emails so that you guys can just read. Through it over the course of a few weeks. Cause man, did I cover a [00:43:30] lot? And you can get that when those come out in. And even if I don't get around to this, I do do emails with training in them. And with of course the latest news. And you get that by subscribing again, Craig peterson.com. We've got to help you guys out. You need to know this. Okay. Absolutely. You, you personally need to know that. Well, this whole or wellbeing thing is scary, frankly. [00:44:00] I just finished going through reading George Orwell's 1984 again, and it was just so eyeopening. I read it many moons ago, and I learned a lot from it then, but now I see it out in the streets. I see it with what's been happening with government and even businesses. And we've complained about them many times here on the show. Haven't we, some of the deep [00:44:30] state, big tech ties that go between each other. It's no longer really the military-industrial complex. We're talking about the deep sea. High tech complex. It's a bad thing. It's a scary thing. Well, what they're doing right now, and this is a great article from news busters.org is they've got this Alliance between the department of Homeland security and private [00:45:00] companies that they're trying to put together. Now, news semesters, isn't saying. That it's already in place. They're saying this is what they're planning on, putting them place. However, I know what they have in place, and they're already doing a bunch of this. Again, it goes back to that app. Isn't really free that app that supposedly is free, is doing something it's gathering information, data on you, and then it's selling it. And the people that are buying it are data. Aggregators is what they're called. [00:45:30] 20 years ago, I had some of the top data aggregators on the show and I sat down with them and I said, well, let's look me up because they have information, public records, some private stuff, like obviously buying it from these app developers. And I said, let's look me up, find out what you have on me. So we looked me up, and I would say about three quarters of it was wrong. Which was really kind of interesting. And this is [00:46:00] data that was used back then, mainly for what's called skip tracing. So you have a bill to pay. You don't pay it. You move out of town. That's the process to find do is called skip tracing. And that's what they would do nowadays. It turns out that local. Federal police departments and other agencies are buying this data from the data brokers so that they can now track you. Now they're not allowed to, by [00:46:30] law track you, you know that, right. But the government is doing what one might call lawyering. That's what we called it in robotics. I was part of a us robotics team with kids, and they would always look at the rules, and they would get reprimanded. The teams would if they lawyered the rules. In other words, if they met the exact definition of what it was in the rules, but they didn't meet the spirit of the rule.[00:47:00] They would get reprimanded. They might even get kicked out. And that did happen a few times. However, if you're the government and you get to say which laws you want to follow, which court rulings you want to follow, think of what's been happening lately, right? We're not going to, yeah, I know. I know I can't do this. I can't do this. I can't do this. I can't do this. I have a pen and a phone. I'm going to do it anyway. Or just reverse all of the actions of the prior administration. [00:47:30] And even though the Supreme court says, Hey, you cannot do this, but we're not going to rule on it because the this policy is only in place for a couple more weeks. And then you do it again. Anyways, the government isn't, isn't even obeying the rules. Th the strict letter of the law. They're not even obeying, let alone the spirit of the law just drives me crazy. The wall street journal just reported, uh, about a week [00:48:00] ago here last Sunday that the department of Homeland security is considering hiring private companies to analyze public social media for warning signs of extremist violence, spurring debate within the agency over how to monitor for such threat while protecting American civil liberties. Now I'm glad they're at least giving you. Lip service to protecting our civil civil liberties, right. That I think is a very good [00:48:30] thing. They should be protecting them, but this just has the tendency to continue to inch forward again and again and again. So this effort has not received approval and has not been. But it's going to involve. According to the wall street journal is sifting through large flows of internet traffic to help identify online narratives that might provide leads on developing tax weather from home [00:49:00] or. Eh, this is, this is just amazing. Now I mentioned on the radio, uh, previously that I have personal experience with one of these large federal law enforcement agencies that has been doing what I considered to be completely unreasonable things with people's information and also completely unreasonable things [00:49:30] in defining. Where the thread is. You've probably heard it all over the news that, that it's all these conservative groups that are the real threat. Well, it's not the conservative groups that have been out there, burning down cities, demonstrating, beating people with clubs, pulling people out of cars, and BD. No, it's not. So where, where are these people coming from, and how do they define these [00:50:00] extremist actions? How do they define it? Right. Well, you can tell that there's obviously some extremism involved when there's a riot, but they will respond to a riot in Washington, DC after Trump rally, but they don't respond to riots all over the country and major cities. And in many cases they don't even do arrests. Oh, it's absolutely amazing what's going on. So I'm very, [00:50:30] very worried about this fusion of big tech and deep state government, because it's become really kind of a hallmark of the Biden administration. Senator Josh Holly's Republican from Missouri really went after the Biden administration for pressuring private companies to help spy on the techs of American citizens. This is back in July and he said that the big government, big corporation [00:51:00] Alliance is the real danger here. And. Absolutely have to agree. This is going to be a problem. And giving the government access to more personal data is going to be an even bigger problem in months and years to come. Particularly if we just let them do. Willy nilly and that's kinda what's happening. What kind of oversight is there really think about the Pfizer courts that are [00:51:30] supposed to be providing oversight for monitoring, uh, people who are not citizens. And yet it looks like. Our law enforcement agencies. We're targeting citizens specifically through the Pfizer courts who are playing games. So I absolutely don't want this to happen. I don't want any administration, Republican-Democrat, you name it. I don't want any of them to have access to [00:52:00] this type of deal. And I go right back on this and a, here's a great quote to explain why I'm going to use a quote from lever inti barrier. He was the most ruthless and longest-serving secret police chief in Joseph Stalin's reign of terror. He said, show me the man and I'll show you the crime. That should scare all of us, because even though the administration today, isn't doing that [00:52:30] types of things Stalin was doing, obviously we don't know what's going to happen in the future and we cannot let the hackers gain access to this information because believe me, they're going to be going after it as well. So don't collect it in the first place. Let's do think that surveillance on citizens, criminal and otherwise, is a rarity. We're going to talk about the New York police department [00:53:00] and their secret funds used for surveillance tools alone.  Here we go. This is from wired magazine, you know, definitely not a right wing entity. They have been reporting on a number of situations where the government has really overreached when it comes to our information and our privacy. And they have this report now that has been [00:53:30] released. And. Yeah, that and some other documents and Sydney fossil wrote this article, and he's saying that the documents are showing that police bot facial rec recognition, software vans, equipped with x-ray machines and stingers. Cell site simulators with no public oversight. And I'm going to explain what each one of these things is and what they are typically used [00:54:00] for. But this is amazing. No problem. Oversight now that's according to documents released last Tuesday. So when all these documents are showing that the New York police department spent at least $159 million over the last 15 or so years through this little known special expenses fund, the did not require [00:54:30] approval by the city council or any other municipal official. Frankly. I think one PP has something to answer for here. We'll have to ask Tom Selleck about it. Right? The documents are made public by two civil rights groups, the legal aid society and their surveillance technology oversight project would says that what the N Y P D was doing amounted to our surveillance slash fund. [00:55:00] It's just crazy, um, stops director, which is again, the, uh, surveillance technology oversight project stop. Their executive director said that the police are still blocking other records needed by the public to understand the way New York is being policed. This is just something out in 2018, the New York police department awarded almost $7 million to the [00:55:30] idea solutions company, which by the way, sells biometric tools, including facial recognition. So what they have done in essence now is set things up in New York. Kind of like they are over in China where they have cameras located all over the place. And those cameras are capturing pictures of pedestrians. How the only kind of saving grace nowadays is a lot of people are wearing [00:56:00] face mask, although, and because a lot of people were in face masks, there's new software that will recognize people, even if they're aware. A face mask obviously depends on the type of face mask, but you know, it's still doing that. So they have all of these cameras. They have this facial recognition software. And they can track you as you're walking around the city. In fact, they can do it in reverse, [00:56:30] which frankly is kind of cool that there are also these airplanes in the sky, over many of our big cities. Now, New York, they're concerned about it. Of course of what happened on nine 11. People get really nervous seeing airplanes over there. So they're using high flying drones that can't really be seen with the naked eye or heard, and they are taking continual video of the entire city [00:57:00] and of all of the streets. So let's say a bank gets robbed, they can try. Those robbers back in time using these drones or airplanes, along with the surveillance software in the cities, mash of cameras and find out where they came from. Okay. So it looks like this was the staging area for the bank robbers, and then they can go back further in time and see where the bank robbers came from. What were they [00:57:30] doing? Where did they go? That technology all exists. Now, it's not that good yet, but you know, it ended up, it will end up being that good. But this goes right back to what I was talking about a little earlier with, uh, show me the man, I'll show you the crime. What happens if those cameras pick you up on a street where a drug deal was going down? Now you've seen it on TV. You've seen it in the movies where they poem money back and forth a POM, [00:58:00] the drugs, you wouldn't even know that a drug deal was happening and now you get pulled into it. How about what happened on January six in Washington, DC? There was a riot. We all know that the Capitol building, but now the FBI and other law enforcement agencies are pulling people in who cell phones pinged in the general area. In Washington, DC. So if you were down there and you [00:58:30] were part of a school tour that day, and you went to maybe the Trump rally, maybe you didn't maybe just went to the reflection pond down there. They investigated you. If you were in our hotel, they investigated you. If you used a credit card in the area, they investigated. And that's being alleged right now by some of these people that were investigated and have had minor charges brought [00:59:00] against them that this was a total witch hunt. It was fabricating the crime. Again, show me the man. I'll show you the crime. I mean, under Stalin, the dictator over in the Soviet Union, you know, socialist government for those that aren't familiar with it. These contracts that were received through kind of a freedom of information request to buy these civil rights groups were heavily [00:59:30] redacted. And so I made it very difficult to understand how many single tool functions were purchased, how they could work together to create a surveillance Dragnet. Over people in New York City, this secrecy also blocks a more complete understanding of the relationship between the New York police department is vendors in the public. So again, it's a double-edged sword it's yet. You want to catch the bank robber. You [01:00:00] want to catch the murderer, but most of the time, those people know how to. Fool the system, don't they, uh, in 2014, the New York police department signed a five-year $800,000 contract with Elbit Systems, which is Israel's largest defense contractor. And by the way, they aren't just in Israel. They're also, they have a plant in New England. Uh, kind of all over [01:00:30] and Elbit provides a wide range of surveillance tools used by customs and border patrol on our borders, including cameras and sensors that make up this virtual border Raul wall that we have on our Southern border. It, this is not good. And I want to add one more thing. I said, I explained what these things are, you know what x-ray is. And some of these trucks are using millimeter-wave stuff and are our x-ray and people [01:01:00] walking down the street, supposedly to see if they have a weapon. Huh? Okay. So just walking past one of these vans expose you to health risks, no warning about that cancer risks from these mobile x-ray vans and these stingray devices are fake cell phone towers. So they capture your information. Who you're calling where you're calling and your text messages, whether you are a target [01:01:30] of an investigation under court order, or just someone walking around the streets in New York, check me out online. Craig peterson.com. Investment money is rolling into these high tech startups. That means if you're looking for a new job in high tech, it may be your lucky day, particularly if you want a job with a startup. So here we go. Jobs in tech have always been [01:02:00] pretty good. Generally speaking, technology is what drives the economy. It is what boosts productivity, and it is right now, a really hot job market there. More small businesses, startups are being funded by angels and venture capitalists than there have been for a few years. That means we've got money now pouring into [01:02:30] these little startups. There's a great little article in ARS Technica by Ariel pod dress. And she's talking about this company called revenue. This is a startup. They just closed their Series B, which means they had their second investment round. And this is a platform for managing in-app subscriptions. They just got $40 million in the idea behind this $40 million series [01:03:00] B series B is to grow the company and. To hire more people. And of course, it's hard to grow the company without hiring more people, even if you're in the software business. So we're talking about a 35 person. Startup that's getting $40 million. That's more than a million dollars per existing employee. They want to get another 50 employees by the end of the year and a hundred by the end of next year. [01:03:30] Now I've got to say, I, I had a startup, it was me and it was me and it was me. Right. I started it. I worked really hard, and I built it up to 50 employees. I didn't have a dime of investment money, but now this investment money is out there like crazy, but revenue, cat's having a hard time along with most of these other startups, hard time hiring people. So, what they've done now [01:04:00] is they've got a whole bunch of extra perks. Things like unlimited vacations. Yes, indeed. No more. Two weeks you earn an extra day for every year. You work there or a seven. These other rules that around for a very long time unlimited vacations. They'll give you a stipend. If you have an office at your home that you're working. Plus, they're also providing equity and salaries on par with some of [01:04:30] the big tech companies, regardless of where you live. Right now, Facebook is, and Google are both looking at saying, Hey, listen, you know, you live a hundred miles outside of Silicon Valley. You don't deserve to be paid as much as an employee that lives right here in San Jose. So now we're going to cut your pay by 10%, 15%, sometimes even more. So these little guys are saying, Hey, listen, you can [01:05:00] work for us. We don't care where you live. Timbuktu in Northern Africa just doesn't matter. As long as you can work from home, we'll pay you the same as if you're living right here in Silicon Valley in California. And we'll even give you extra money because we know it costs you money to be able to work from home because you're probably going to have to get a better internet line. You're going to have to have a phone that works so that we can call you. Maybe you have to call customers. [01:05:30] These types of offers really weren't around before the lock. But now we're seeing high-tech salaries, being driven, even higher benefits that are really being massively beached up, uh, beefed up, I should say. And companies that are offering incredible salaries and flexibility. So there you go. These companies are basically competing with Google, [01:06:00] Facebook, et cetera. So what does that mean? Well, these small startups like revenue cat are getting a lot of money, almost $300 billion invested in these startups worldwide. And it's really hurting the big guys because they're talking about cutting salaries, even though they don't need to. It's not as though they're suffering. They're these big companies, they're still sitting on [01:06:30] billions of dollars in cash. Isn't that something. And so they are starting to really hurt because the small guys are stealing employees, quote-unquote, from the dice, which is, has this industry career database is saying overall tech job postings are up 16% this year. We're seeing also, by the way, a whole [01:07:00] bunch cut backs because of the technology in how many people, these companies need to have a look at restaurants. Now they're doing QR codes for the menus QR codes to pay your bills. So there's even fewer people. That have to work in restaurants going forward. We've got meetings that are being held on WebEx or zoom. You don't go see the doctor anymore. You're using telehealth software programmers. [01:07:30] Engineers are being used more broadly between March and July. There are more than 300,000 openings for software and, uh, other types of computer high-tech engineers. It's 13% higher than even 2016. It is absolutely amazing. I had one person who responded. And when I offered, maybe it makes sense for me to do kind of a career [01:08:00] webinar on high-tech jobs. Right. What would it take to get into specifically the cyber security industry? Because it's something I know it's something I've been helping to drive the whole industry now for over 30 years. And I had only had one person respond. Uh, although I know of. I have a few listeners that have actually done that. They went and got themselves qualified in cyber security, but only one person makes me [01:08:30] think that, you know, what does one person represent maybe a hundred listeners. So there are some of you. I don't think I'm going to end up doing this little thing. Cause I was going to just do a free webinar and what it takes to become a cybersecurity analyst. Uh, but uh, we'll see what happens here kind of going forward, but there's a lot that can happen. There's tech co-workers out there who are leaving some of these high tech firms. There are also [01:09:00] lawsuits about the golden handcuffs, so that have been put on people, you know, that say, Hey, you can't compete with us or you can't even be in the same industry. Some of those. Contracts are being knocked down in some states. Uh, it's kind of interesting to see what happens. Um, there's a couple more things. Yeah. Here, different hedge funds, but it's a really great article. It's in ours. Double-check [01:09:30] your newsletter that I sent out or is going out this weekend. If you haven't received it yet, you should get it at some point this weekend. A very interesting one. If you're considering high tech jobs, ARS, Technica, Vicky. Now, if you want to track technology and cybersecurity, you know, already I go through thousands of articles every week. Now you can talk to my wife about it right in the evenings. And even sometimes you're in the day I'm [01:10:00] sitting there reviewing articles and all these sites, I put them together for you guys. So, you know, what's happened. And cyber security, what the latest breaches are, what you can do about it. I am going to continue with some of the trainings, pick them up again here within the next couple of weeks so that we can keep you guys up to date, but there's only one way you can find out about them. There's only one way that you can get involved, and that's, by making [01:10:30] sure you subscribe to my show notes newsletter, and you can get that by going to Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. You'll get all of these free trainings. You'll find out about what's going on, what you need to do in your. Small business door also in your home computers and environment, but everything from the CEO on down Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [01:11:00] I've been complaining about Facebook and what they have been doing to potential competitors for years, the same types of complaints I can make against Microsoft and Google to a lesser degree. While now the federal trade commission's coming out, agreeing with me. This is something that I think has been a long time coming. And this is the federal trade commission's lawsuit against Facebook. Now, lest you think that this is a Trump thing. [01:11:30] This is a Biden thing. Trump administration had filed suit, and then the suit was dropped, and now the federal trade commission has refiled the lawsuit against Facebook and has included some additional proof. That it hopes is going to Boyce bolster its case. The last one was rejected by the court. Great article by ARS Technica as Tim D chant. You'll find that in [01:12:00] my newsletters as well. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You can get my show notes for absolutely free. Well, this refiling is in response to the federal trade commission's initial case thrown out in June by us district, judge James Boasberg, who didn't think that the agency provided enough information or a real strong definition, what you might call a bright line in [01:12:30] legal terms of Facebook's market in its first five. This is really kind of an interesting problem here because basically, the federal trade commission is alleging that Facebook lacked the business and human and technical talent to survive the transition to mobile. That's according to Holly Vedova, she's the acting director of the federal trade commission's bureau of [01:13:00] competition. She also said after failing to compete with the new innovators, Facebook illegally bought or buried them when the popularity became any sense. Or existential, she said threat. Now, this is the same type of thing we've seen Microsoft do for decades and worse, frankly. It's similar things that Google has done to competition. Although I think Google hasn't been as bad at this as [01:13:30] Microsoft or Facebook have been, but the federal trade commission filed this original lawsuit in December. And that was under Joseph's Simmons, who was appointed by former president Trump, of course. And he cast the Simmons, the deciding vote in the initial filing with the two Republican commissioners voting against it. Now that to me is surprising because I'm all for free trade. In this [01:14:00] case of Facebook has been doing all kinds of anti competitive things. And it's interesting to see the statement here from the federal trade commission that FAPE spoke, lacked the business acumen and technical talent to survive. So that again tells you that Facebook might have a lot of really great political people in there working and censoring and deleting posts and some great marketing [01:14:30] people, but they sure don't have it. The technical talent. I love that. I would love to see the judge ultimately rule that way, but here's the problem. Facebook acquired Instagram and WhatsApp. And I've talked about this on the show before. And the other thing that they did and the way they acquired them was a problem. We'll talk about that in a second. The other thing they did that I haven't talked about before is. The way they blocked [01:15:00] competitors from accessing the API APIs now API APIs or application programming interfaces. It's what all of us programmers use nowadays. So rather than that, developing. For where that does, what Facebook does. I just go ahead and use Facebook's published interfaces. So the idea is I call an API using some methodology, and I say, I want this post to go. [01:15:30] In my Craig Peterson account or in my tech talk channel, right. Our group is actually what Facebook calls it. And then Facebook says, okay, great. And it publishes it for me. And that saves me from having to have to go to every Website out there that I post my radio show that I post my blog, Kat, my blogs on too. The podcast. It saves me from having to go to every one of those places online and repost, everything [01:16:00] manually. Those are API APIs. So I actually use a service that does that for me, using API APIs from Facebook and other places. I use it to publish onto YouTube. I use it to publish onto some of the instep platforms, et cetera, et cetera. But what happened here is Facebook invited developers to start using these APS, the eyes that they had put together, and then later trained the API [01:16:30] policies to actually be an antique competitive weapon. Developers could only access Facebook's platform and its user base. If they agreed to not compete with Facebook or the other thing that they could not do, if they wanted to use API APIs from Facebook is they could not help facilitate. The growth of rivals. That is absolutely amazing. So the FTC lawsuit [01:17:00] says Facebook recognize that the transition to mobile posed an existential challenge and that Facebook had a brief window of time to stymie emerging. Threats. This is right in the lawsuit. Failing to compete on business talent. Facebook developed a plan to maintain its dominant position by acquiring companies that could emerge as or aid competitive threat by buying up these companies, Facebook [01:17:30] eliminated the possibility that rivals might harness the power of the mobile internet to challenge Facebook's dominance. So when we look at things like WhatsApp, for instance, here's a small company that they acquired. Okay. So let me see. This is from Investopedia online and the title is WhatsApp. The best Facebook purchase ever. Question mark. Okay. [01:18:00] Facebook acquired WhatsApp in 2014. Now, how much did they acquire for how much was WhatsApp really worth at the time? It's hard to say, but you can compare it with other companies of similar size and it was probably worth 20 million, maybe 50 million at most. Right. Um, initial bid from Facebook for WhatsApp was $16 [01:18:30] billion for a company that was probably worth $50. Okay. Yeah. Uh, it brought in 10 million in revenue. WhatsApp did at the time, and it lost 150, $38 million in that same period. So let me see. The company loses $138 million on revenues of $10 million. And Facebook buys it for 16 billion in their initial offering. Well, [01:19:00] that was the, that was the initial purchase price. You can read up all you want on this. There's lots of information. So why did Facebook do it? Because they wanted to buy it potential competitor to Facebook messenger. And that's exactly what they did. And they've done that again and again, paint far more than what the market would really dictate so that they could get rid of a competitor. Another one is [01:19:30] an ANOVA, O N a V O. This was a VPN service that tracked users activities that they bought back in 2013 and Facebook called the Novo. Cool. This is a quote from the lawsuit. Again, according Facebook execs that the acquisition of the VPN service would be really cool for identifying acquisition targets. With our acquisition of a Nova. We now have insight into the most popular apps. We should [01:20:00] use that to help us make strategic acquisition. So in other words, by having a VPN server, so what have I said about VPN. Don't use these public VPN services because no matter what, they're promising you, it's not true. I did a whole webinar on this. In fact, I did it like two or three times last year. Um, but they buy the VPN service. They get people using the VPN service. They're tracking everything that's going on [01:20:30] on that VPN service. And now they know what's popular out there and anything that's popped. Facebook buys. Why are they buying it? Well,

Nossa Conversa com Wanderley Nogueira
Wanderley Nogueira conversa com Fernando Ferreira

Nossa Conversa com Wanderley Nogueira

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 15:25


"NOSSA CONVERSA" está no ar! La Liga e CVC (grupo investidor) fecharam o bilionário acordo com clubes espanhóis. Não concordaram - ainda - Real Madrid, Barcelona e Atlético de Madri. Pedi ao consultor Fernando Ferreira, um importante especialista no assunto, que explicasse como esse negócio vai funcionar e quanto receberá cada clube da 1ª e 2ª divisões do futebol espanhol. Ouça o podcast e saiba como esse tipo de comercialização — que pode chegar ao Brasil — será feita.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Barcelona Podcast
La Liga Begins! Race to register Memphis, CVC deal with La Liga, and Season Optimism

The Barcelona Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 59:33


On episode 278, Dan and Rafa Aldamuy of Més Que Un Podcast tackle your La Liga season preview! They discuss the ramifications of the CVC deal (and opt out), the race to register Memphis Depay, what to expect against Real Sociedad, and much more! Running Order: What does the CVC deal mean for Barcelona and La Liga? Does it matter that socios haven't bought tickets? Who should start against Real Sociedad? Which La Liga teams will be relegated this season? Listen on Apple Podcasts iOS App, Spotify and, if you want to support the show, head over to Patreon for more content! Become a Patreon to support the show and check out our Quick Take Match Reviews – Thank you! Access our exclusive, listeners-only Facebook Group here. Follow us on Instagram! Find us and watch exclusive content on YouTube! Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via Spotify We are excited to partner with Fanatiz! Use this link to sign up: https://bit.ly/2YAHuDd Submit your Blue Wire Hustle application here: http://bwhustle.com/join Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

FoodBev.com Podcast
FoodBev Weekly News Bulletin 13/08/21: Cargill and Continental Grain to buy Sanderson Farms for $4.53bn; Stock Spirits agrees to £767m takeover by CVC-affiliated funds; JBS to acquire Australian salmon farmer Huon for around $313m; and more.

FoodBev.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 3:57


FoodBev Media's Antonia Garrett Peel rounds up this week's food and beverage news, including Cargill and Continental Grain to buy Sanderson Farms for $4.53bn; Stock Spirits agrees to £767m takeover by CVC-affiliated funds; JBS to acquire Australian salmon farmer Huon for around $313m; and more.

El Larguero
El Larguero | El mejor análisis previo al arranque de LaLiga

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 79:55


Álvaro Benito analiza la situación del fútbol español tras la salida de Messi y al Real Madrid de Ancelotti. En el Sanedrín conocemos los detalles del acuerdo de LaLiga con CVC y terminamos con Alejandro Valverde

El Transistor
El Transistor 12/08/2021

El Transistor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 90:15


Programa completo de El Transistor con Ángel Rubiano. Hablamos con el director deportivo de UD Las Palmas tras la aprobación del acuerdo entre LaLiga y el fondo CVC. Saludamos al periodista Edu García se pasa por el programa antes de su debut al frente de Radioestadio. Y repasamos la última hora del Real Madrid, FC Barcelona y Atleti. 

El Transistor
Patricio Viñayo: "El Real Madrid y el Barcelona no deberían recelar de que el resto de los clubes crecieran de forma armónica"

El Transistor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 6:10


Hablamos con el director general de la UD Las Palmas sobre el proyecto de 'LaLiga Impulso', tras la aprobación este jueves en la Asamblea de LaLiga del acuerdo entre el organismo presidido por Javier Tebas y el fondo de inversión CVC.

Es así y punto con Hernán Pereyra
Cruz Azul sigue vivo pese a su derrota en la ConcaChampions

Es así y punto con Hernán Pereyra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 39:54


Dionisio Estrada analiza los partidos de ida de las semifinales de la Liga de Campeones de la Concacaf entre Monterrey y el Cruz Azul, y afirma que a pesar de haber caído, todavía tienen gran oportunidad de pasar a la final, y analiza la otra llave entre América y el Philadelphia Union. Además la aprobación del acuerdo de LaLiga con el CVC y la oposición del Real Madrid y Barcelona, la sorpresa de Pumas ante el NYC en la Leagues Cup y Gonzalo Pineda es el nuevo técnico del Atlanta United en la MLS.

Hora 25 Deportes
Hora 25 Deportes | Un impulso que no convence a todos

Hora 25 Deportes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 27:01


El programa del jueves con Sonia Lus y el deporte del día: LaLiga aprueba el crédito de CVC con el no de Real Madrid, Barça, Athletic y Oviedo, mañana empieza la temporada con el Valencia-Getafe, el Barça y otros clubes aún no han inscrito a sus fichajes y resto de fútbol, Anna Cruz se suma a las críticas a Lucas Mondelo, presentación de La Vuelta a España y más deporte.

Podcast RealMadryt.pl
#61: ElJarek, Leszczu - Wierzycie?

Podcast RealMadryt.pl

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 88:28


Sześćdziesiąty pierwszy odcinek podcastu portalu RealMadryt.pl. Jarek Chomczyk i Maciej Leszczyński na rozgrzewkę komentują plusy ze sparingu z Milanem (od 1:56) oraz jego minusy (13:19). Następnie wypowiadają się na temat odejścia Leo Messiego z Barcelony (31:47) oraz przyszłości Kyliana Mbappé (55:04). Na koniec spoglądają na umowę La Ligi z funduszem CVC (1:07:31), typują jedenastkę na pierwszy mecz ligowy (1:13:11) i oceniają wybór Vallejo na czwartego stopera (1:17:04). Na koniec odpowiadają na szybkie pytania w serii Café na ławę (1:23:12). Zapraszamy do wysłuchania naszych opinii!

Managing Madrid: for Real Madrid fans
Why the CVC deal is terrible for La Liga

Managing Madrid: for Real Madrid fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 44:07


This episode of the Managing Madrid Podcast is brought to you by Hotel Riu Plaza New York Times Square, where you should book your stay when you come see in New York in December for the live podcast. Book your tickets here. On this episode of the Managing Madrid Podcast, Kiyan Sobhani and Gabe Lezra discuss: Why the Lionel Messi situation is connected to the CVC deal Explaining La Liga's salary cap Barcelona's ridiculous mismanagement Why Real Madrid sold Sergio Ramos and Raphael Varane Will Memphis Depay and Sergio Aguero be registered? Will it get even worse for Barcelona? Why the CVC deal is problematic Is the CVC deal actually illegal? Why Real Madrid are filing a 'criminal' lawsuit against Javier Tebas Who owns audio and visual rights to La Liga What are the chances this still goes ahead? Preventing another Malaga situation And more. Did you enjoy this podcast? Please consider supporting us through Patreon for more bonus content: Patreon.com/ManagingMadrid. Book your tickets to these cities on the Managing Madrid Podcast world tour: Los Angeles, September Toronto, October Dallas, November New York, December Miami, January London, February Washington DC, March Chicago, April Mumbai, May Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

El Larguero
El Larguero | Fernando Roig, presidente del Villarreal: "Nosotros sí tenemos dinero, pero creo que es bueno participar en el fondo CVC"

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 16:14


El presidente del Villarreal explica en El Larguero cómo ven la participación del fondo de inversión CVC en la Liga tras la salida de Messi y la situación del Barça. 

El Transistor
Toni Roca: "El Real Madrid entiende que Tebas ha incurrido en un delito de administración desleal"

El Transistor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 2:48


Hablamos con Toni Roca, abogado experto en derecho deportivo y director de Sports Law Institute sobre la denuncia a Javier Tebas y al Fondo de inversión CVC. 

Churros y Tácticas
PSG's lineup, Barca's retracted offer, Odegaard's situation

Churros y Tácticas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 52:52


On this episode of the Churros y Tácticas Podcast, Kiyan Sobhani and Diego Lorijn discuss: - Diego's heartbreak - The Joan Gamper trophy - Answering questions about Lionel Messi's situation - What's going to happen to Sergio Aguero? - The idea of playing for free and taking paycuts - Martin Odegaard's situation - Florentino Perez's phone call to Joan Laporta about the CVC deal and Messi - Nas's new album - And more. Did you like these churros? Get a more raw version every Friday over on Patreon.com/ChurrosyTacticas

Talking Tactics
236 | Messi (Feat. Carl Anka)

Talking Tactics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 76:00


Talking Tactics are joined by Carl Anka (of The Athletic) to discuss the apparent departure of Lionel Messi from Barcleona. His press conference. The wage structure at Barca. The future of the club, looking at CVC, and the Super League. Is Paris Saint-Germain the right move? And you asked questions about Sergio Aguero, salary caps, Olympic medals, and why footballer's social media feels dull. Follow Carl on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/Ankaman616 - Think about becoming a patron... https://www.patreon.com/join/talkingtactics - Rate us five stars on Apple Podcasts! https://www.getpodcast.reviews/id/1127264410 - Follow Talking Tactics https://www.twitter.com/taIkingtactics https://www.instagram.com/talkingtactics https://www.facebook.com/talkingtactics352 - Talking Tactics Special Coup de tête: https://bit.ly/2DXSMVk - Have Hope's Website https://havehopefootballhut.com - Follow us https://www.twitter.com/HaveHopeHut https://www.twitter.com/DanielTiluk

Espalia | إسباليا

(00:05) جاهز سيدي! (00:57) خبر ميسي فجّر الدنيا (02:51) شو بعنيلنا ميسي (06:26) قرارات بارتيمو وصٌلتنا لهون (11:25) عقد الCVC وأثره على الدوري (16:17) شو مستقبل البرسا، على الملعب وخارجه؟ (24:02) نادي ميسي القادم - كل الطرق تؤدي إلى باريس (43:02) الدوري الإسباني بعد ميسي

The Barcelona Podcast
Final Goodbye? Barcelona and Messi unable to make it work under La Liga rules

The Barcelona Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 51:29


On episode 276, Dan is joined by Kevin Williams to discuss the bombshell announcement that Lionel Messi will no longer be a player for FC Barcelona. They try to hit every angle - La Liga, Messi's camp, Laporta, Bartomeu, CVC deal, broadcasting rights, Tebas, Super League, and many more! Running Order: WHAT IS GOING ON? Why did this announcement come out now? What will La Liga do without their most recognizable star? What will Barcelona look like without him? Listen on Apple Podcasts iOS App, Spotify and, if you want to support the show, head over to Patreon for more content! Become a Patreon to support the show and check out our Quick Take Match Reviews – Thank you! Access our exclusive, listeners-only Facebook Group here. Follow us on Instagram! Find us and watch exclusive content on YouTube! Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via Spotify We are excited to partner with Fanatiz! Use this link to sign up: https://bit.ly/2YAHuDd Submit your Blue Wire Hustle application here: http://bwhustle.com/join Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Partido Podcast
Ep 656: La Liga Impulsó, la negociación que cambia la Liga.

Partido Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 48:25


La bomba financiera de la Liga española se dio el día de ayer con la adquisición del 10% de la propiedad de la Liga a CVC en uno de los movimientos en el mundo deportivo financiero más importantes de la década, ¿cómo afectan estos $2700 millones de Euros a La Liga? Hoy te lo contamos todo con Daniel Souto Hoy nos sentamos en Manchester, para hablar del proyecto del Manchester City que tiene destinado $300 millones de euros para traer a dos jugadores elite de Premier League. Grealish y Harry Kane, como impactan estos fichajes al equipo azul de Manchester? 🗣️ Presenta | Ricardo Quintero (@RicardoPartido) twitter.com/RicardoPartido 🗣️ Dani Souto (@DaniiSouto) twitter.com/DaniiSouto 🗣️ Alfonso SanJuan(@Alfonso14) twitter.com/Alfonso14 📺 ÚNETE A NUESTRA COMUNIDAD DE YOUTUBE. SUSCRIBETE! - YouTube: El Partido Podcast https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMXCY1N_9aHi26iOybdmUzg? ⚽ SÍGUENOS EN REDES SOCIALES: Twitter - twitter.com/PartidoPodcast Instagram - instagram.com/partidopodcast/ Facebook - facebook.com/elpartidopodcast/ 📻 Escúchanos: - Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6a2qOO8I9YeUREU9AgEFov - iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/partido-podcast/id1330495051 🌐 Para más contenido: Sitio web: www.elpartidopodcast.com ✉️ Contacto: contacto@elpartidopodcast.com

Sporticast
Soccer's $3 Billion Private Equity Play / Tokyo Olympics Update

Sporticast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 27:34


This episode is presented by Marsh, a global leader in risk management. Click here to read Marsh's full report on safely re-opening stadiums. Scott and Eben discuss La Liga's pending deal to sell 10% of the Spanish soccer league's commercial rights to PE firm CVC. They also talk about the Tokyo Olympics, changes to the Olympics ticketing model, and a trademark fight over the Cleveland Indians' new name. 'Sporticast' is a new podcast hosted by business journalists Scott Soshnick and Eben Novy-Williams from Sportico that will deliver the inside scoop on the intersection of money and sports. From billion-dollar valuations to team sales, sponsorship contracts and media rights, go behind the scenes on the deals that power the global sports economy. For more coverage and information, be sure to check out sportico.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Es la Mañana de Federico
Prensa económica: Acuerdo multimillonario de la Liga para ingresar 2.700 millones de euros

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 8:08


La prensa salmón recoge el acuerdo de la Liga con CVC. LD publica cómo un software desvela cuánto tiempo dedican los diputados al móvil.

Jorge Ramos Y Su Banda
LaLiga recibirá multimillonaria inversión

Jorge Ramos Y Su Banda

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 164:32


LaLiga anunció un acuerdo con el fondo de inversión CVC donde se habrá una inyección de 3, 200 millones de dólares, que servirán para darle respiro a los clubes españoles. Varios de ellos, ahogados por los efectos de la pandemia del coronavirus, y permitirán tanto refinanciar su deuda como ampliar los límites salariales de las plantillas.

El Larguero
El Larguero | Messi ya prepara la firma

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 82:06


Conocemos todos los detalles del acuerdo entre LaLiga y CVC que acerca la renovación de Messi por el Barcelona. Además, analizamos la derrota de España en los Juegos en baloncesto femenino y el adiós de Laia Palau y hablamos con Jordi Xammar y Dani López Pinedo

El Larguero
El Larguero a las 23.30 | El acuerdo de LaLiga acerca la firma de Messi

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 30:40


Conocemos los detalles del acuerdo entre LaLiga y CVC y analizamos lo sucedido con Santi Giménez. Además, hablamos con Alberto Perea, goleador del Cádiz en el Trofeo Carranza ante el Atlético de Madrid

Podcast Eleven
Minuto Eleven 02/08 | Ibovespa inicia agosto em recuperação, com alta de 0,59%

Podcast Eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 2:11


No Minuto Eleven, nossa analista Jéssica Feitosa faz uma análise do pregão desta segunda-feira (02) e comenta as notícias que repercutiram nos mercados ao redor do mundo. O Ibovespa começou o mês em recuperação, encerrando em alta de 0,59% aos 122.515,74 pontos. Os principais destaques positivos foram Totvs (+4,55%) e Americanas S.A. (+4,42%). Na contramão do mercado, as maiores quedas foram CVC (-2,02%) e Petrobras (-1,86%). Os investidores locais seguem cautelosos com os riscos fiscais e políticos. A temporada de resultados também ganha um fôlego com novas divulgações. No cenário internacional, a temporada de resultados ficou no radar dos investidores junto com a preocupação da variante delta do coronavírus. O S&P500 encerrou em queda de 0,18%, aos 4.387,16 pontos, Dow Jones encerrou em queda de 0,28%, aos 34.838,16 pontos. Nasdaq encerrou em alta de 0,06%, aos 14.681,07 pontos. No mercado de câmbio, o dólar à vista terminou o dia em queda de 0,86% sobre o Real cotado a R$ 5,1653.

Growthaholics
Ep. 96 - Quanto vale a sua startup?

Growthaholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 52:28


Você sabe definir o preço da sua empresa? Conhece os métodos que você pode utilizar para chegar no valor ideal? E como avaliar um bom momento de venda? Neste episódio de Growthaholics, Pedro Waengertner conversa com o Luiz Fernando, Venture Capital Associate na ACE Startups, e o Luiz Fialho, Head de CVC na ACE Cortex, sobre valuation e precificação de startups. Vem comigo?LINKS CITADOS NO EPISÓDIOEp. 87: Desafios de estruturar uma área de inovação - https://open.spotify.com/episode/1xMqxvZu1BK2ruBAcH5PHr?si=w7dIr_d6RbKFdE867c9M7A&dl_branch=1 Guia do Exit para Startups - https://acestartups.com.br/exit-startups/Introdução - 00:15Apresentação dos convidados - 00:57O que está por trás do valor de um negócio? - 03:52Quais são os métodos para definir o valor de uma empresa? - 12:45Quais são os múltiplos não-financeiros? - 21:40Como trabalhar os meus drivers de valuation? - 28:48Como podemos enxergar a discussão de bolha de mercado? - 35:55Para ler esse conteúdo e muito mais, acesse nosso blog!Instagram: @acestartups e @ace_cortexLinkedIn: ACE Startups e ACE CortexE-mail: contato@goace.vc

Podcast Eleven
Minuto Eleven 27/07 | Mercados caem com medidas da China e de olho no Fomc amanhã

Podcast Eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 2:07


No Minuto Eleven, nossa analista Jéssica Feitosa faz uma análise do pregão desta terça-feira (27) e comenta as notícias que repercutiram nos mercados ao redor do mundo. Medidas regulatórias impostas pela China ainda repercutem, junto com as preocupações com a variante delta do coronavírus. O Ibovespa encerrou em queda de 1,10% aos 124.612,03 pontos. As maiores quedas foram CVC (-5,21%) e PetroRio (-4,27%). Na contramão do mercado, os principais destaques positivos foram CPFL (+1,89%) e Itaú Unibanco (+0,98%) e Bradesco (+0,79%). O S&P500 encerrou em queda de 0,47%, aos 4.401,46 pontos, Nasdaq encerrou em queda de 1,21%, aos 14.660,58 pontos e Dow Jones também encerrou em queda de 0,24%, aos 35.058,52 pontos. Os investidores também estão atentos à decisão de Política Monetária do Fomc amanhã. No mercado de câmbio, o dólar à vista terminou o dia em alta de 0,06% sobre o Real cotado a R$ 5,1775.

Podcast Eleven
Minuto Eleven 15/07 | Investidores mantém ritmo de cautela com inflação dos EUA no radar

Podcast Eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 1:43


No Minuto Eleven, nosso analista Raphael Figueredo faz uma análise do pregão desta quinta-feira (15) e comenta as notícias que repercutiram nos mercados ao redor do mundo. A preocupação do mercado global com a inflação dos Estados Unidos tomou conta dos investidores. O Ibovespa encerrou em queda de 0,73% aos 127.467,88 pontos, acompanhando o mercado internacional em ritmo de cautela. As ações que representaram as maiores quedas foram CVC (-3,54%) e Pão de Açúcar (-2,94%). O principal destaque positivo foi Magazine Luiza (+3,45%), após anúncio de Follow-On e aquisição da Kabum!, maior plataforma de e-commerce de tecnologia e games do país.. O S&P500 encerrou o pregão em queda de 0,33%, aos 4.360,03 pontos e Nasdaq encerrou em queda de 0,70%, aos 14.543,13 pontos. O índice Dow Jones encerrou em alta de 0,15%, aos 34.987,02 pontos No mercado de câmbio, o dólar à vista terminou o dia em alta de 0,60% sobre o Real cotado a R$ 5,1147.

What's Your Why?
Ashleigh Snoozy & Kristen Czaban: Furthering The Power Of Community

What's Your Why?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 23:17


Ashleigh and Kristen recently joined us to outline their stories and research with the Sheridan Press and their most recent project spotlighting humanity in our own communities. Their natural repartee is perfect for a podcast environment highlighting the Center for Vital Community (CVC), and its position as the "nonprofit for nonprofits." As we all know the pandemic is coming to an end, but political unrest is still at an all time high and Ashleigh and Kristen do an amazing job at creating a safe space for civil discussions around community, voting, and other subjects. Kristen is the publisher of Sheridan Press located in Sheridan, WY and Ashleigh is the managing editor of the same media source.  About the project: It is a three-part series about the Center for a Vital Community, a nonprofit for nonprofits of sorts that promotes civility, leadership and democracy in the Sheridan County community. The CVC is unique to Sheridan County, and the articles published dove into why it hasn’t been replicated elsewhere, things that have worked and haven’t over its more than 20-year life and its upcoming plans of hosting community conversations centered around mental health. Check out the articles below! • Civic engagement: CVC promotes leadership, cooperation in Sheridan • Finding what works: CVC success hinges on human potential • Buy-in: Community finds own solutions through study circles Thank you both so much for your time!

Geeks Of The Valley
#50: Starting a VC Fund, a Contrarian View, & Immigrant Founders with Leonis Capital's Jay Zhao

Geeks Of The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 44:42


Jay is a managing partner at Leonis Capital, an early stage venture capital fund that invests in AI-first companies and the automation economy. Previously, Jay is a Partner at T Fund (fka TCL Ventures), a global CVC arm by TCL Corp, one of the largest consumer electronics companies in the world. Jay is also responsible for helping define TCL’s strategic roadmap as well as corporate's M&A and partnerships. Prior to that, Jay was a Senior Director / Partner at Walden Venture Capital, one of the pioneer venture capital firms in Silicon Valley, with a global presence in Asia and Israel. Prior to Walden, Jay was a Principal at Granite Ventures (ex- H&Q venture group), a premier San Francisco based VC firm that manages over $1 billion AUM. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jayzhaolinkedin/ Newsletter: https://nexttrillion.substack.com/ Website: https://www.leoniscap.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/geeksofthevalley/support