Podcasts about Asperger syndrome

Neurodevelopmental disorder affecting social interaction

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Best podcasts about Asperger syndrome

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Latest podcast episodes about Asperger syndrome

Luke Ford
What If Social Media & Universities Prohibited Christ Denial? (9-22-22)

Luke Ford

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 97:53


00:30 Can one claim Aspergers Syndrome for convenience? 02:00 Tucker Carlson on the Ukraine war 22:00 Who's got the strongest voice on the Alt Right? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vx7emH61F3o 31:00 Ron DeSantis's Martha's Vineyard yard: Heads, I Win; Tails, You Lose, https://radixjournal.substack.com/p/heads-i-win-tails-you-lose#details 49:50 Richard Spencer analyzes Tucker's monologues on Marth's Vineyard 56:30 Tucker says hospitals mutilate children for profit 59:50 Dooovid joins, https://twitter.com/RebDoooovid 1:15:00 Guardian: Who's correct about human nature, the left or the right?, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/nov/20/human-nature-politics-left-right 1:17:00 Claremont: Left, Right, and Human, https://claremontreviewofbooks.com/left-right-and-human/ 1:18:00 Is human nature basically good or evil? 1:21:00 The rise of Christian nationalism 1:22:00 The rise of Nick Fuentes 1:25:00 Inside the civil rights campaign to get Big Tech to fight the ‘big lie', https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/09/22/midterms-elections-social-media-civil-rights/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/09/22/midterms-elections-social-media-civil-rights/ https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/10/republican-party-extremist-history-hemmer-continetti-milbank-books/671248/ https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/21/opinion/republicans-democracy-elections-bannon.html https://www.newsweek.com/2022/09/30/antidepressants-work-better-sugar-pills-only-15-percent-time-1744656.html https://www.takimag.com/article/do-psyops-actually-work/ https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/antifa-on-trial-how-one-criminal-case-could-redefine-the-murky-left-wing-movement/ar-AA124TIb https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-gospel-of-wellness-review-the-quest-for-a-new-you-11663709519?mod=opinion_reviews_pos1 https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/09/16/5th-circuit-texas-social-media-law/ Why is identity based on race and sexual identity sacred but identity based on religion, owning guns, or beliefs not sacred? https://notthebee.com/article/san-francisco-bicycle-coalition-says-not-to-call-police-about-stolen-bikes-because-it-hurts-black-and-brown-people https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/interactive/2022/police-misconduct-insurance-settlements-reform/?itid=hp_national https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/08/opinion/environment/antarctica-ice-sheet-climate-change.html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/07/magazine/arizona-state-university-multicultural-center.html https://www.jta.org/2022/09/06/global/are-too-many-germans-converting-to-judaism-the-debate-is-roiling-germanys-jewish-community Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSFVD7Xfhn7sJY8LAIQmH8Q/join https://odysee.com/@LukeFordLive, https://lbry.tv/@LukeFord, https://rumble.com/lukeford https://dlive.tv/lukefordlivestreams Listener Call In #: 1-310-997-4596 Superchat: https://entropystream.live/app/lukefordlive Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/lukeford/ Soundcloud MP3s: https://soundcloud.com/luke-ford-666431593 Code of Conduct: https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=125692 https://www.patreon.com/lukeford http://lukeford.net Email me: lukeisback@gmail.com or DM me on Twitter.com/lukeford Support the show | https://www.streamlabs.com/lukeford, https://patreon.com/lukeford, https://PayPal.Me/lukeisback Facebook: http://facebook.com/lukecford Feel free to clip my videos. It's nice when you link back to the original.

Radio Fyris utvalda – Radio Fyris
Boss battles and more – World Of Warcraft – Game Play

Radio Fyris utvalda – Radio Fyris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022


Kolla in min Youtube-kanal där jag just lagt upp en ny video! 2 år gammal video som jag äntligen kommit över att redigera. Här kommer lite najs WOW material. Titta och njut! Inspelat under Corona. /Robban Inlägget Boss battles and more – World Of Warcraft – Game Play dök först upp på Radio Fyris.

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

On this episode, Reid Miles from Inside the Asperger's Studio, talks with Ben Sorensen, a comedian, and voice actor from Australia. They talk about his autism and how he deals with life on a regular basis. He fell into both comedy and voice acting and shares how he deals with disabilities down under.Quirky, eccentric, bearded, media personality, voiceover guy, writer, music lover, presenter of stuff & unable to leap tall buildings. Ben is also available as a keynote speaker and consultant in the areas of Autism/Asperger's, Conscious Kindness, Comedy, Advertising, Social media, Marketing. But most of all is a neurodiverse "Brain for hire."https://www.bensorensen1.com/

Sauna Talk
Sauna Talk #070: Lewis Jenkinson

Sauna Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 57:06


Today's Sauna Talk podcast episode is with Lewis Jenkinson, who shares with us his heart and soul of good sauna. Today on the bench we welcome Lewis Jenkinson from the absolute midpoint of England, just North of Manchester. With the rise in interest of sauna – real sauna – (not lightbulbs, toaster ovens, or other minimally ventilated fragmentations), it's interesting to learn how others have become impassioned with and driven towards advancing the authentic sauna experience in their lives. It's a simple formula, really. And In Lewis' case, his drive towards authentic sauna was propelled through his resonating positivity of contrast therapy. We'll hear his journey while marshal arts training, then cold immersion therapy, and onto the sauna bench. Lewis's unfulfilling sauna experience at the gym sauna, heated by a toaster oven with 9 rocks and terrible ventilation, has driven him deep into the depths of discovery into the authentic, quality sauna experience. Many of us curious enough can become knowledgeable about good sauna and are in clear understanding of the Holy Trinity of good sauna (heat, steam, ventilation). And Lewis is right there with us, a kindred spirit of good heat. Sauna Talk topics for discussion Trip to Germany – oh boy this way incredible. We get to hear about his Therma Erding, the World's largest spa, just outside Munich, Germany. History with Sauna, getting hooked and mental wellbeing – started martial arts, diet and exercise. Moved on to cold water and breathing, finally discovered sauna. All my adult life has unknowingly been searching for powerful ways to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety and Insomnia. I was later diagnosed with Aspergers and ADHD which made total sense. Cedar Sauna Company – Knew I needed my own sauna so started a mobile sauna company to share with the UK but then began to import and build barrels from Russia. Realized not to rely on imports and studied sauna construction. Company enquiries are flooding in and the company is going from strength to strength quite rapidly. Sauna in the UK – the scene is growing quickly. There is a huge rise in mobile sauna businesses and I manage a What's App group with my friend which was created to help mobile sauna entrepreneurs set up and run their own business through sharing information with other businesses owners. In true British fashion, the UK seems to be moulding it's own sauna culture taken from cultures all over the world including Russian, Finnish, Estonian, Lithuanian and German styles. What is good heat – manageable and breathable. A heat which initially seems mild but creeps up on you almost imperceptibly, sending your heart rate higher and higher until you have to leave. A cold plunge is essential and the thought of which helps me to keep with the heat a little longer. Recurring Sauna Talk questions Mobile sauna anywhere in the world – someone already said space which would be serene but I'm gonna go with a winter riverside landscape with lots of people. Everyone would be invited to strip off and enjoy the sweat. Sauna with anyone – my grandfather. He was a stoker for the navy so I recon he would have taken to sauna quite easily. Favourite sauna moment – cold plunge, before or after. This is where the world goes quiet for me. My normally racing thoughts go quiet and it feels like pure serenity. Sauna helps me to spend longer meditating in the cold. What is most misunderstood about sauna – that it is intense. It shouldn't be. It should feel as relaxing as a warm bath on a cold day.

NEO420's Podcast
NEO420 Talks - Lower Earth Orbit. NASA $53M per day. Con game of space. Buzz Aldrin we did not go. Elon scams again.

NEO420's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:21


There are scams and cons that have perpetuated for decades. And one is the con game of "space" and our planet. The criminal cabal is masters of deceit to control WE THE PEOPLE. The criminal cabal that is NASA has $53M per day to spend on whatever they want. And they spend a lot of money putting out computer generated images of space and outter space when we have never been beyond Lower Earth Orbit.  Even though that definition includes a lie about the moon missions, we provide it as evidence that no human has been beyond LEO. The rest is a lie. We included the audio from Buzz Aldrin answering a little school girl question about the moon and he could not lie to her like he has been paid to lie to WE THE PEOPLE for decades. The full video is on our video channel. So, if they are lying about space, why is Elon going along with it? I guess it is his greed and Asperger's (like psycho Gates). They pick these semi smart mental patients to go do their bidding while controlling them from within. It is the way of the criminal cabal pos.________________________NEO420 = Real News + Real Information for WE THE PEOPLEWE THE PEOPLE are at war with the deepstate criminal cabal!!!Turn off your tv, radio, and stop listening to paid professional liars spreading propaganda.***SUPPORT Independent Free Speech Reporting***- Here is our donate option belowhttps://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=URXRDL6AJ8H7GThank you for the SUPPORT & SHARING the TRUTH!!!Go to GOD for discernment and wisdom.Know the Truth as the Truth will make you free! (John 8:32)___________________________Listen and learn as we have an extensive coverage within our reporting and analysis.  The link is here http://neo420.com/talks-podcast/The link to our video channel is here. https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4The Viral Delusionhttp://www.theviraldelusion.com/IT IS TIME FOR WE THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD TAKE DOWN the criminal cabal. WE know who they are, and now it is time to bring them to JUSTICE!!!_______________________________NEVER FORGET!!!9/11 was a day that global*cabal*conspired to take our freedoms!!!Rumsfeld admitted $2.3 Trillion missing from Pentagon.  https://odysee.com/@NEO420TALKS:4/rumsfeld-2.1Trillionunaccountedforb-ccriminalsstoleit:7Planes did NOT bring down the two towers.AE911Truth.orgGeorge Bush Sr was CIA director before being Vice President then President. MANY are a part of this crime against US.Towers that fell:-Building 1-Building 2-Building 7 (seldom reported even though BBC reporter reported building down before it happened) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0VFMqinkcsSupport the show

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 58 – Unstoppable Communicator with Wayne Tuttle

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 61:23


Wayne Tuttle has been a self-described communicator his whole life. Even before he lost his eyesight, he wanted to go into broadcasting but could never get hired. However, ironically as he lost sight more jobs opened for him, not in radio but in areas such as the financial world and then later in the telecommunications industry.   Along the way, after losing his eyesight he first discovered the world of public speaking, and then later he found Toastmasters International where he learned to hone his talks. He now is a very successful speaker and communicator as you will hear.   I invite you to join me as we learn about Wayne's life and his adventures. His story is fun and inspirational and it contains life lessons for all of us. Listen along with me and see just how unstoppable your own world can be.   About the Guest: With over three decades as a Professional Speaker, a career in corporate communications, paired with multiple appearances on national radio and television as well as a full-length documentary featuring his life and dream of becoming a certified blind scuba diver, you will soon experience Wayne's infectious Can-Do attitude.    His powerful and inspiring message will shift attitudes, influence new ideas and share new ways of doing things that will inform, inspire and motivate audiences to lead happier, healthier and more productive lives.  With his self-deprecating humor and tales of personal triumph, Wayne has been entertaining, enlightening, and educating audiences around the globe in person and virtually.   Added to his many accomplishments, Wayne is a dedicated advocate for the disabled community and frequently facilitates Disability Awareness Workshops and Keynote presentations to organizations and corporate clients. For further information:  Email:  wjt.tuttle@gmail.com Phone: 705-578-2242       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi again. And thank you for being here, wherever you may be, if you're not sure you are listening to the unstoppable mindset podcast, where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet and we deliberately put inclusion before diversity. Because in my experience, diversity has not involved disabilities very much. Several of you have probably heard me say that on this podcast before. And you'll probably hear it some more. And you may even hear it from our guest today. who also happens to be a person who is blind. So Wayne Tuttle Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Wayne Tuttle  02:00 Well, thank you very much, Michael, for having me.   Michael Hingson  02:02 Glad you're here. And Wayne was introduced by someone who heard him speak at a Toastmasters group. Someone as I recall, you didn't even know but they liked what you had to say and introduced the two of us. And here we are, which is always a fun thing.   Wayne Tuttle  02:18 Yeah, brilliant. It's a small, small world.   Michael Hingson  02:21 It is and grows smaller daily. Will will tell me a little bit about you tell me about your your childhood and all that growing up and so on. And I gather from reading your bio, and so on that you were not initially blind.   Wayne Tuttle  02:35 No, actually, I didn't start losing my vision. On till the year after I graduated college, I was on track to be involved with radio and television broadcasting moreso in the radio part of it, I never really wanted to be in front of the microphone, I always wanted to do the production end of it. And unfortunately, back in the day, it was really difficult to break into that market, you always seem to have to have on air experience for at least a year before they would even think about putting you into production. And unfortunately, since my vision was starting to change considerably, it was very difficult at that time because everything was done manually. It's not like today everything is so technologically advanced. So how long ago was that? Wow. Well, that's that's gonna default by age shared was back and it is 75   Michael Hingson  03:41 There you go. I know the year well. No problem. Well, so you before then you went to school and high school and all that and got into college I gather before you started losing eyesight.   Wayne Tuttle  03:56 Yeah, like, I thought as a kid it I felt very different than everybody else. It seems like you know, the old saying your parents would always say, oh, make sure you're home before the streetlights come on. Well, for me it darkness started early. So I was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa. And for those of you that are not familiar with it, part of it has to do with night blindness. So I thought everybody had the same issue as I did, that I wasn't able to see as well as everybody else. But it was like playing hide and go seek or playing tag that became more and more difficult for me. But as time progressed, I started losing the peripheral part of it. And I was okay for a number of years. It just started progressing over the years or level off and then we go down a little bit more. And then finally guess it was around 2017 Or I lost the remainder A portion of my vision.   Michael Hingson  05:01 So did you ever get an opportunity to go into radio production or TV production?   Wayne Tuttle  05:08 Well, it was well, and funny that you asked that. On on the onslaught. As far as getting into the business. No, I was never really involved with it. But it wasn't until I lost my vision that a lot of doors opened up, I became very involved with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, of the RP Foundation, they were named that at the time, they've since changed the name, thump, Foundation Fighting Blindness. And I just started having more and more opportunities. So be invited on different radio shows, television shows, magazines, all kinds of different opportunities, I think because of it.   Michael Hingson  05:58 So you, you end up being in front of the microphone, after all,   Wayne Tuttle  06:04 unfortunately, but I was involved with that I've been in three different documentaries. So I was behind the camera, as well as in front of the camera, I did some producing and directing in that aspect. I have produced a number of podcasts over the years and that sort of thing. So I still like to keep my hands involved with it. Now, with the advent of so much different technologies out there, as you you know, Michael, would you use in Reaper, Reaper is a program that's fully accessible for people who are blind. And that's one of my next missions to really start to learn the editing portion of it without vision,   Michael Hingson  06:53 well, and you will find using Reaper that a lot of that is really very open and accessible. As you pointed out, I've been using Reaper now for who almost a year and have not done anything in terms of really editing music, or any of that. And Reaper certainly has the capabilities to do that. But as far as being a mechanism to do editing for podcasts, it is great.   Wayne Tuttle  07:21 Oh, absolutely. And there's so many different tutorials on YouTube and a lot of different people that you can network with, they have Facebook groups, that they share their different tips and tricks. So beyond really looking forward to   Michael Hingson  07:38 that. Yeah, there's a lot there. It's it's a lot of fun to do. And in fact, I just edited a podcast episode that we're going to put up next week. And was and I'm always learning new things, but I was very pleased with the results in just doing simple editing. But it's it's still a lot of fun. Yeah. So you were you out of college by the time you started losing eyesight or was that before you left college.   Wayne Tuttle  08:09 It started really taking effect around 1976. I knew there was some changes going on with my vision, especially with the peripheral part of it. And I searched out all kinds of different so called when I say so called specialists. I had everything from diagnosis of having cancer to I'm not sure what it is tumors, you've got this, you've got that. And finally, I was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa Crusher syndrome. Which when did that happen? I wasn't actually diagnosed with Asperger's till I was 30. Okay, so I guess I was around what 1920 1976?   Michael Hingson  08:57 Okay, so you definitely started to see changes in salon, but you went ahead and went through college. And then what did you do?   Wayne Tuttle  09:09 Well, from there, since I wasn't able to get a job in the business, I moved back to my hometown, which a very small community in northern Ontario and Canada, maybe a population at the time around 10,000 people. So there really wasn't a lot of opportunity available. They did have their own radio station at the time. And from time to time, I got to know some of the disc jockeys and I would go in and do my audition tapes and using their studio and that sort of thing. But I still had that dream that I always wanted to get into radio, but unfortunately I had to put it on the shelf for a while. I went back and worked in a factory. The same factory I did when I was a kid. So I thought after a year I said no. I don't want to do this the rest of my life. I want to do something there. For. So there was an ad and one of the major newspapers in Toronto, Ontario, one of the largest cities in Canada, they had an advertisement for someone in in communications for the Toronto Stock Exchange, right on the Toronto Stock Exchange trading floor. I applied for the job, and they hired me on the spot. So within three weeks, I was moving from a little tiny town to the big scary city.   Michael Hingson  10:34 What were you making the manufacturing plants? What were you doing?   Wayne Tuttle  10:38 Em? Funny, you should ask. There was bridal gowns and bridesmaids gowns. There you go. And it was formal, where I was involved in the cutting area where we would cut the pattern. So with all these electrical solid type things a little bit dangerous as you're starting to lose your vision, but I managed,   Michael Hingson  11:02 did they know that you were blind or losing eyesight?   Wayne Tuttle  11:06 Oh, no. No, you would have been knocking back in the day that that was taboo. You never ever told your employer that things were changing, because he always had that fear of losing your job because of it.   Michael Hingson  11:22 Sure. So you move to the stock exchange, did you mention anything about eyesight during that process at all?   Wayne Tuttle  11:31 For the first two years no. Okay, by did not let on at all. And the way that things worked on the Toronto Stock Exchange, you would be working for the Toronto Stock Exchange. But there was all kinds of brokerage firms that were always scouting for people up in the back office or to do different things on the trading floor, that sort of thing. So I was scouted out two years later. And I got hired on by Merrill Lynch, one of the largest in the United States and in Canada. Yes. And I eventually told them that the job was becoming more and more difficult. And you have to remember, this is going back late 70s, early 80s. So technology for people with vision loss was very archaic. I mean, the first technology that I worked with was a CCTV system, right, where I would put the piece of paper underneath the camera, and it would enlarge and up to whatever size that I needed, and continue on with that. So it was quite a challenge at the beginning.   Michael Hingson  12:46 So when you when you told them know what happened, they I   Wayne Tuttle  12:50 was very fortunate that I had a boss who was very receptive to it, she saw that the things were changing in and of course, you know, you try and cover things up and get around things, asking other people to do things for you and that sort of thing. But it got to the point where I think, deep down I knew she knew. So I eventually had to have that conversation and say, No, I really need to look at other adaptive technology. And I need to be, I guess more so accommodated, was, what   Michael Hingson  13:30 involvement did she do? Well,   Wayne Tuttle  13:33 she took me off, what I refer to the assembly line, or we had to do a lot of communication. But back in the day, it was teletype. There was no real thought of computers yet. So we were we were using a world war two technology with the teletype for that sort of thing. But I eventually started climbing up the ladder and became a manager of the department and I had 28 people under me. So I would spend my day half the day would be right on the trading floor of the Toronto Stock Exchange and the other half of the day. I wouldn't be up in the office.   Michael Hingson  14:16 Why do you suppose that she reacted in such a positive way. When you finally told her what you needed to tell her?   Wayne Tuttle  14:24 Well, I think we had a very good relationship. Inside work. She was a taskmaster. She was very, very strict. I'd like to use the word but it's not appropriate. But she   Michael Hingson  14:42 I Korea, she was tough. She was tiring.   Wayne Tuttle  14:45 Yes. Yes. Very, very tough. And I can remember all I was there 12 years, and I can remember probably around year 10 Year 11 I had just had a Enough of it. She was always on me, says, can I talk with you? We went into her office, close the door. And I said, What is going on? I'm just so tired of you always on me. And she said to me, you know something, because of your vision loss. If you ever leave this environment, it's going to be tough out there for you. So I'm just trying to toughen you up. And when you know, two years later, I left. Why did you leave? I needed to change. I think it was the stress level, because it wasn't a typical nine to five job. You were basically there until the job was done. Because you would have to send information to other departments and they couldn't start their job until your job was done. So I know there was many, many times 10 o'clock at night, you starting at eight o'clock in the morning. So when the stress level really started to wear me down. Of course, a lot of people in that environment   Michael Hingson  16:12 leave because of course, the reality is with the stock exchange, and I'm familiar with it from selling products to Wall Street and interacting with them a lot, it really is a 24 hour a day job for the company. Because stocks are being traded somewhere most all the time. And information is extremely important. I remember once being down in Florida, we were working with some folks from at that time, it was Salomon Brothers, and then became Salomon Smith, Barney. And now it's gone away. But we were down there, because we sold the products that people use to backup their data. And so we were talking with some of the people at the backup facility for the Wall Street trading floor. And they made it really clear that even if they were down for one minute, they would lose millions and millions of dollars in transactions, they could afford never to be down. And they actually and they actually had to backup facilities in Florida and had them somewhat underground and in places so that even if there was a hurricane, they would be able to continue to backup and operate and provide support.   Wayne Tuttle  17:33 Yeah, it was just unbelievable. You know, the old saying Time is money in the stock market industry. Basically seconds count   Michael Hingson  17:44 seconds. Absolutely count. I can't remember it was seems to me it was something like possibly up to $5 million a second, they would lose if they were ever down. There was something incredibly awesome in terms of the amount. So yeah, there's a lot of stress. So you left the stock exchange. So that must have been about what 2000 2001   Wayne Tuttle  18:09 Or no, that was 19 JD Oh, okay. 89. All right. And then what did you do? I was searching around, they thought I wanted to get into the personnel industry. I did a short stint at Children's Aid Society. Then I had an opportunity to get back into communications with Rogers Communications. I was there for another 10 years.   Michael Hingson  18:49 He didn't sell telephones. So that's how you   Wayne Tuttle  18:56 in job. What did you do? I was in the call center. Okay, so I was a manager in the call center. And occasionally I would have to deal with difficult customers and that sort of thing.   Michael Hingson  19:10 Oh, you couldn't have any difficult customers?   Wayne Tuttle  19:15 Well, if the weather network goes off yeah, the phone would light up. Yeah. My mike tyson fight only lasted   Michael Hingson  19:25 two minutes and six seconds. Yes.   Wayne Tuttle  19:28 I was I was there.   Michael Hingson  19:30 I remember that fight. We were watching it. I was with relatives or a friend I guess it was relatives. Anyway. We we watched it on TV. I never thought about the fact that people would be all ticked off that it didn't last very long. But hey, he was doing his   Wayne Tuttle  19:48 job. Well, especially if they're paying that kind of money. You   Michael Hingson  19:52 pays your money. You take your chances. Yeah, exactly. What did you do after being with Rajesh for a while so now you're good. be close to 2000, I assume?   Wayne Tuttle  20:02 Yeah, um, I think it was. His was three years before I left Rogers, I took a transfer to a smaller community, who was the head office was in Toronto, but they had satellite offices throughout southern Ontario. And I decided that, you know, it was time maybe my wife and I would think about starting a family and we wanted to get out of the city, the hustle and bustle type of thing. So it was still a city we were moving to. And I took a job and their call center was a little bit different than what was and the head office. But they decided after three years of being there, they pulled me in the day before my birthday and announced that though we no longer need you anymore. Oh, thank you. Yeah, well, at that time, I was still looking at starting my own business. I think that really gave me the drive to take my business to the next level.   Michael Hingson  21:09 So they invited you to no longer be connected with Rogers. And   Wayne Tuttle  21:14 then what? And then I started my own business, and   Michael Hingson  21:20 accents. And what were you doing? And what is your business,   Wayne Tuttle  21:24 doing motivational speaking, different types of workshops, everything from disability awareness, to breaking down barriers to employment for people with disabilities, doing different types of keynote addresses, high schools, doing workshops for local groups, here in Canada, they call it scouts, Canada as opposed to Boy Scouts in the United States. So I did a lot of work with them. A lot of nonprofit organizations and that sort of thing. So   Michael Hingson  22:03 why go into motivational speaking? Was your eyesight sufficiently changed by that time that it made good sense, or what caused you to do that?   Wayne Tuttle  22:11 I don't know. I really enjoyed speaking in front of people and sharing my story, I think so really sparked an interest with it   Michael Hingson  22:23 was your story. So a lot about the concept of eyesight and disabilities and so on at that point?   Wayne Tuttle  22:32 Well, I think my message was that, you know, the sky's the limit, follow your dreams, no matter what adversity that you face in your life. There's always a possibility. You have to want it bad enough to achieve it.   Michael Hingson  22:48 What's the favorite venue? Since you became a motivational speaker? What's your favorite place that you've been or a place that stands out in your mind?   Wayne Tuttle  23:00 Oh, there's so many of them. I think probably a weather I would say it's my favorite. But the most fun was the ride for sites. I would speak every year, the ride for site and we would have anywhere up to 9000 rowdy bikers,   Michael Hingson  23:23 and they listen to you.   Wayne Tuttle  23:26 Well, it's funny, you should ask Michael it, it was so strange, because of course, these guys are there to celebrate. They're there because they've raised literally hundreds of 1000s of dollars in a short period of time. And they really want to let their hair down. So but every time I got up on stage, it was almost like it was a pin drop. I would always make it a shorter dress because I know that they were there to party and carry on. And I always had an opportunity to play with the band that was there. an accomplished musician, I play bass as well as drums. And I've been doing that since I was 14 years old. So I had that opportunity. And I think that's where I have my most fun. Well,   Michael Hingson  24:20 it's interesting that you you came to speaking in the way you did, and you've certainly obviously had a lot of fun doing it. And along the way, I also know that you join Toastmasters and when did you do that?   Wayne Tuttle  24:37 2016 Okay,   Michael Hingson  24:39 so you've now been in Toastmasters about six years and is Toastmasters been an advantage and a help to your speaking career into your speaking style and so   Wayne Tuttle  24:50 on. I am a totally totally different speaker than I was years before. It got to the point where I was doing a lot of speaking engagements, and some of them were repetitious. I never had a mentor. So I learned this craft on my own, but I felt there was something missing. I needed to freshen it up. Well, I heard about Dale Carnegie, but I didn't think that was for me. And I just went on Google one day, and I don't even know what keywords I use. And all of a sudden, this thing came up Toastmasters. What the heck is a Toastmaster, a bunch of old guys sitting around the table haven't told staffed or toast or is it a gourmet toast making thing or something? Oh, no. So I started to investigate it more and ended up going to a few meetings and I said, Yep, this is what I want to do. So in 2021, I decided to take it to even the next level and joined an advanced Toastmaster club. That sounds like a lot of fun. Yeah, I write differently. My speeches are written differently. My workshops are different. My presentations are totally different than what I used to. And I'd like to say they're more effective,   Michael Hingson  26:18 one would think and I think appropriately so that being blind shouldn't really affect your ability to participate in Toastmasters much less being a public speaker. From my own experience, of course, I say that. But certainly finding a tool to help you with that, like Toastmasters makes a lot of sense to do. Oh, absolutely.   Wayne Tuttle  26:43 But I also find that one of the things that I've noticed is that there are literally 1000s, or even hundreds of 1000s of speakers out there. And to get into that type of market, you have to have some kind of fuck. To stand out, you have to be different than the rest of the crowd. And I find that because of my blindness, I seem to be getting more bookings. Now more so than I ever have.   Michael Hingson  27:17 Why is that? I don't know.   Wayne Tuttle  27:19 I wish I had that answer. I don't know if it's people are intrigued by that fact. They want to see something different.   Michael Hingson  27:29 Do you work with a speaker's bureau? Or how do you find speaking engagements,   Wayne Tuttle  27:33 I was with the speaker's bureau for a short period of time, but unfortunately, I probably joined the wrong one. But it's pretty much word of mouth. Someone sees me at an event and usually people in the crowd will come up and want to chat with me and do different things. I dabble into a lot of different things. One of the things that I'm involved with, but I've been a Titanic, Titanic historian, and artifact collector ever since I can remember probably early 70s And usually around the anniversary date usually have a few bookings to my displays. So my collection then they do a two hour presentation about the Titanic. You never show the movie will tell you. I've only seen it a few 1000   Michael Hingson  28:34 times. Yeah. Understand   Wayne Tuttle  28:37 what JJ ever did. He did do a good job of it. That was a good movie.   Michael Hingson  28:40 And I in fact, when it came out, it is long enough ago that we bought the VHS tape version of it, which was two cartridges. It wasn't one it was if I recall what three hours plus not four hours it was three hours. So the to be a nominated for an Academy Award, though. You could not have a movie that was that long. So they always portrayed it as being only two hours and 74 minutes long. Yeah. That's how they had it under three hours. It was kind of funny. But let's come back to blindness a little bit. Tell me some of the the strangest and most absurd questions you ever been given our experience. And we can sit here and talk about that all day, the two of us but we'll start with you.   Wayne Tuttle  29:35 Oh my Lord. It is hilarious. I think that the funniest ones are kids, especially the elementary kids. You know kids will say the darndest things they don't care at all. Like here's some of them. Is your wife blind to know she's a blonde she's got offline to Sublime. I remember this one presentation I did. This kid was so excited. He wanted to ask the question, you know, at a grade two grade three level, it's always that you're jumping up and down and okay, that and he was kinda a little shy, a little bashful and he pays but of course, he didn't take Toastmasters, you wouldn't send so many arms. But what you got, is it? Is it key because that's a key gisc Key is what does he mean? Oh, do you mean can you get it? continued? I see I can't do this, right. So I said, Well, why don't you come up here and shake my hand? No, no.   Michael Hingson  30:51 I think the funniest question I ever got was also from someone and I don't remember what grade they were in. It was a guy course it would be a guy, too. And his question was, how do blind people have sex? And he said it with an absolutely straight face. Oh, my word. And so the only way I could really respond to that was to say, the same way everyone else does. And if you want to know more about that, you really need to ask your parents.   Wayne Tuttle  31:31 Yeah. I've never had that question. But I've always had the question. How do you go pee all   Michael Hingson  31:38 the time? I haven't had that one.   Wayne Tuttle  31:40 Yeah. Same way as you do. No different. But I think you know, it's thought by consult just the questions. It's the comments. And one of the quieter comments that I get all the time, is, what do you do? What blind? Yeah, well, you don't look blind at all. You don't look stupid.   Michael Hingson  32:06 I had an insurance agent Call me once on the phone when I was in college. And he said that he wanted to come and sell me insurance. And I knew that insurance companies at that point would not sell life insurance to any person with a disability. But I figured, oh, what the heck. And I said, Sure, come on over. He arrived at three in the afternoon. And I went to the door and open the door. And I had my guide dog with me. I decided to do this upright, right. So I had the dog and harness. And he said, I'm looking for Michael Hickson. And I said, I'm Mike kingsun. And he said, You are my kingsun. And I said, Yeah, well, you didn't sound blind on the telephone. And it was so tempting to say and you didn't sound stupid on the telephone either. And of course, needless to say, he came in and hemmed and hawed and brownies, I have to call my boss. And I never heard from him again. Because, and, of course, as we know, the reason that insurance companies would not sell insurance, life insurance to blind or other persons with disabilities back in the 70s, was not due to actuarial statistics or any fact but rather simply to prejudice. Yes. And we were able to eventually fight that there's still a lot of it out there. But still, at the time, we couldn't buy any kind of insurance. My parents, when I when it was discovered, I was blind couldn't even buy $1,000 life insurance policy on me. They could not it would have cost so much, because of the fact that the insurance companies were steeped in this prejudice that blindness was going to create a situation where I would die off sooner than other people.   Wayne Tuttle  33:51 Yeah. Well, I had a situation not similar to life insurance, it was coverage with one of the companies that I worked with their insurance company paid for prescription glasses. While I didn't need prescription glasses. Back in the day, they were experimenting with what they called Corning lenses, right? Which they figured it would be a preventative measure. So I had to fight the insurance company because these Corning glasses were extremely expensive. And I actually won. They did pay for the preventative classes.   Michael Hingson  34:35 It's fascinating to really look at what people's attitudes are. And you mentioned that a lot of questions that you get from kids are funny and so on. But the neat thing about any question from a child is still, it really comes from curiosity. And mostly it doesn't come from fear. It really does come from curiosity. And if there's fear, it's because there's been fear instilled. And then by their parents who are afraid of blindness? Or why would want to catch that or ever have that ever happened to me, even though the reality is that in our world today, given all the things that are out there that can happen to one, blindness is clearly something that anyone might have the opportunity to experience. But kids always ask questions. And I think it really comes from Curiosity. So they're always worth answering. I have now in the lowly, I have one. Go ahead.   Wayne Tuttle  35:33 What I was just going to comment on with the mentality of some people in our public is that they have this understanding that it could be possible that you could catch blindness. Yeah, I noticed a huge difference when I was using a white cane. People would literally, if you're sitting on the bus, they would kind of shift over to the left, why don't want to touch that person. But when I'm out with my guide, dog, totally different story. People are swarming around you like flies to honey type of thing. It's   Michael Hingson  36:12 all about the dog? Well, you know, and that's, that's one of the things about the Foundation Fighting Blindness. And the reality is it doesn't fight blindness, it fights eye disease, and it shouldn't talk about fighting blindness, but it does. Back in 2016, they created this campaign called how I see and I was e y e, and they wanted people to blindfold themselves and then take videos of them trying to perform a lot of different kinds of actions around their home and so on. And, and of course, it was all giving an absolutely wrong and horrible depiction of blindness, because of course, none of these people were trained to do what, what they did. And finally, I was involved in a lot of ways with it. But finally, blind people, ourselves started sending in videos saying, No, this is the real picture, and overwhelmed the site. And eventually Foundation Fighting Blindness took the site down. And there were some discussions afterward. But the reality is, blindness isn't the problem. It is still the attitudes and misconceptions that people have. And unfortunately, at that time that the foundation promoted, that didn't help the situation at all, which is extremely unfortunate.   Wayne Tuttle  37:34 Absolutely. And you'll find that kids today are more understanding than adults are. When you have adults that are around our age, they're old school. So they may be have been brought up in a small community, or if they're in a very large city, they may or may not have had the experience to interact with someone who has churned whether whether they're blind or in a wheelchair, or what have you. And then all of a sudden, there's someone in their church group that's in a wheelchair or Toastmasters, it's blind. They just don't understand. And they're afraid. I don't want to offend them. Like, you know, I don't know what the right words are. How many times have you heard say, people say, oh, did you hear that movie last night? What do you hear that movie? No, I watched a movie last night. And I've seen it before. Yes, I don't take those words out of my vocabulary, because I have no vision. It's still just a part   Michael Hingson  38:44 of it. In fact, as I tell people, I think I have lots of vision. And I try to make light of it. I just don't see so good. But the reality is, and that's the problem with even using the word vision, but I'm not sure there's a better solution. But the reality is, we're that we're either blind or low vision. And I think it is something that we really should deal with the concept of visually impaired is ridiculous, because visually, is a completely different thing than eyesight altogether. It has to do with appearance and aesthetics and so on. And the fact is we're not visually impaired. It's better to say low vision. It's like with Deaf people who don't want to be called hearing impaired, they're deaf or hard of hearing. We are blind or low vision. And I think that's an appropriate way to put it. That is acceptable to everyone. But the fact is that blindness still isn't the problem. It is still all about attitudes. And we've got to change that and I would like to see organizations like the foundation. Enter that discussion in a positive way. There's nothing wrong with trying to cure eye disease, but don't do it at the expense of Providing misconceptions about what blindness is and what it isn't. And that's unfortunately, what happens all too often.   Wayne Tuttle  40:06 Absolutely. And I think it really comes down to where you're from as well. Because in some countries, they use different terminology. And it's always changing. Like the the newest trend that I've been hearing is differently abled, yes. What?   Michael Hingson  40:29 It's horrible. Because we're not differently abled, hey, I use Reaper like anyone else does. I use a keyboard, I don't use a mouse. But I use a keyboard and more people should use keyboards because sometimes they're faster than mice. But the concept of differently abled is horrible. It still depicts the fear. Yeah, and my wife is in a wheelchair, she has been in a chair her whole life differently abled, that's ridiculous. But it is oftentimes what we experience. And more and more of us who happen to be in the community of persons with disabilities are trying to get people to understand that words matter. It's no different than any other minority group who has been down this road. Except that, I think that there's a lot more fear associated with disabilities. And so as a result, it makes it tougher, because no one wants to be like them, that is still the thing that we face.   Wayne Tuttle  41:34 Exactly. And I coined a new new phrase that by I'm a sighted man living in a blind man's body,   Michael Hingson  41:44 I am light independent. It's as simple as that. And the reality is, most everyone in this world has the disability of being light dependent. And, you know, the reality is that we love you anyway. external light dependent. So you know, it is just kind of what we have to deal with. On the other hand, being blind, what kind of embarrassing things have happened to you. We all have had those kinds of things to where,   Wayne Tuttle  42:13 depending on how much time do we have, like, I'd like to share this story with the audience. And I'll try and give you the Reader's Digest version of it. But it has to be the absolute worst day of my life. And the funniest day of my life. It was my dad's scream 2010, I was to be giving the eulogy. And unfortunately, because I was so close to my dad, I wasn't able to deliver it. I wrote it and had the minister read it. But at that time, my sister in law's she was newly blind, and she had her first guide dog, and I was there with my guide dogs. And it was time for us to leave. And since we were the immediate family, we were to leave the child pool first and the rest of the parishioners would follow us out to the hearse. Well, her guide dog had this uncanny ability to lie on his back and snore. And do you think we could get him to get up, she just could not get him up. So my brother literally had to lift him up to get them going. Whereas my dog Cosmo, she decided that as she got up, she let a very aromatic odor go. That caused my great aunt to start choking, because it was so bad. Well, of course, I sort of broke the ice a bit. We got to the grave site. And there were chairs set up for the immediate family. So prior to the rest of the congregation showing up, like my father was very popular in the Tony as a volunteer firefighter. He was a model railroaders. So we belong to a few clubs and whatnot. So there had to be, oh, I would say 100 or so people there. And my wife and I would we rehearsed how many steps it was from the chairs up to the grave site. My father was cremated. So this was the very first time that I was involved with a cremation. All I knew was a tiny little coffin. And they told me go out to the hall and then just sort of drop it in. So I counted the steps up to how far away it was sat down, so it was time for me to do I got up there. And I went to reach down. And I felt the the actual hole with my arm. But I didn't have any clue of how deep this was, I was thinking in my head, well, maybe it's only like three foot deeper thing, and I didn't want to drop them. So I lean forward, and all of a sudden, I'm going in the hole. And my wife is trying to grab a hold of me, my brother jumps up out of his chair, grabs me by the back of the pants, and lift me out of the hole. And I couldn't think of anything else to say, but   Michael Hingson  45:43 there you go. You know? It is, we all have experiences, and it's okay. Blindness has nothing to do with that. I doubt that there is any person who hasn't had something in their lives that has happened that, that they haven't been embarrassed over or found to be funny. I know, I was with one of my guide dogs, we were wandering the halls of Congress, and, and we had a few of those aromatic kinds of things that happened with her. And, and the more I thought about the more I went, Well, who was in Congress, they deserve it anyway. So it's okay. But you know, you just got to go go to it. Well, so tell me, in your experience, we've we've been seeing more laws pass. And we've been seeing advances in technology and so on. Do you think that society's attitudes toward persons with disabilities is is changing significantly yet? What what do you think?   Wayne Tuttle  46:51 Yes or no? And the reason I say yes, is, I'm finding that younger kids today, they get it. They understand. I've been in situations where you'd be in a grocery store with my guide dog, and a mother would come over and automatically think it's okay to bend down and start paddling. And right away, the the young child would say, Oh, mommy, he's a working dog, you're not allowed to distract them or catch them or anything like that. So yes, I've seen some steps forward with getting kids at a younger age. And it takes people like yourself and myself to go around to schools and educate and really get the word out that there are people in our society today with disabilities. But on the other hand, I think governments really have to get more involved with people with disabilities, and the sense of having different type of programs available out there, there are still a lot of discrimination. When it comes to employment. If an individual with a disability wants to start their own business, they should have programs available out there to teach entrepreneurship. For people with disabilities. It's really no different than any other entrepreneur but they have to do things a little bit different. So they can be involved with it. But again, I think we have a long way to go. In in Canada here. We've we've got all kinds of different laws, but every province seems to be different and unsure. It's no different than in the United States. They are apart, trying to implement different laws to assist people with disabilities. But they still have a long, long way to go to they're chipping away at it. But a lot of these people are living with disabilities. Time's running out. Yeah. So what about the next generation that comes along after us? Like it's despicable. The amount of money that the government puts aside for people with disabilities, with the inflation especially in the last couple of years, it's on believable. So you have to make that choice, whether to pay your rent or whether you're going to eat today.   Michael Hingson  49:43 Do you think that there's any more awareness in the world because of the pandemic and the fact that we've had to do so many things online? Has that really made a big difference?   Wayne Tuttle  49:54 In some ways that has like every country is different especially when it comes to disabilities there, there are countries around our world that still want to hide people with disabilities. They're not allowed to be out in public good, thick. They've shamed the family because of the disability.   Michael Hingson  50:16 And what happens in civilized countries to Oh, yeah, yes, absolutely.   Michael Hingson  50:21 You know, last year, I began working with accessibe, which is a company that makes websites for the products to make websites more usable and accessible, and the company has grown a lot over the last year. But we find that even though it can be pretty inexpensive to start the process, the reality is that a lot of people are going well, yeah, maybe I need to do it. But I really can't do it right now, or I just don't have any money to, to put into this kind of a project, or it's just not something that I think we really need to worry about. And it's so unfortunate that, at the same time, those people provide electric lights for everyone in their offices, they provide coffee machines, they provide computers, and a lot of other amenities. But when it comes to dealing with disabilities, or making their websites more inclusive, so that more people might shop at their sites and so on, they won't do that.   Wayne Tuttle  51:30 And their mindset is that they have this assumption. Well, there's just not enough of them out there. So we don't have to do it. But guess what, if you do do it, that's going to increase your bottom line. Because those 10 people who are now shopping on your website are going to go and tell 10 of their friends. And it's just going to snowball even more, and then they'd be recognized that they are a fully accessible website,   Michael Hingson  52:06 one of the projects that accessibe is working on and it's still not live yet, but hopefully it will be sometime in the near future is called Access find. What access find will be is a database of accessible websites, any website that has made the effort to become inclusive, not only for people who happen to be blind, but who have other disabilities will be able to put their website into the access fine database. And so it will be a central location where people with disabilities can go to find local or whatever websites they truly can search and whether the site uses accessibility or some other mechanism or company to make their website accessible isn't the issue. The issue is that they've done it however they've done it and access fine. We'll allow that to happen. We're not there yet. It's coming, though. And it'll be very exciting. When that opens. It's a it's a great idea.   Wayne Tuttle  53:04 Yeah, it's it's something that is definitely needed. Because I think that that, again, our society lacks is is communication. There are all kinds of nonprofit organizations that are doing wonderful things. But the disabled community is not aware of it. So they need to spend more time and effort in shouting it out and say, Hey, everybody, this is new. This is what's happening right now. But they don't and   Michael Hingson  53:36 Neil's the Nielsen Company, the company that does ratings and so on, used to do index and still does all the ratings for TV shows and so on the Nielsen rating did a study in 2016. And categorically states, that websites that become more inclusive, we'll have brand loyalty that will very much carry over to persons with disabilities and people will shop those sites, rather than going through all the frustration of trying to find some other website that may or may not be inclusive for them. It's it is something that is absolutely substantial. It's something that can be verified. But we're still not yet seeing nearly enough of our world really deal with that. And it's all about still the same attitudes. That as you said, there aren't enough of them or we really just don't think that they can do it. Other people are going to do the shopping for them anyway. And it just isn't the way it works. Yeah, exactly. Well, so tell me as a person who happens to be blind, what would you give in the way of advice to someone who is coming to terms with losing their eyesight, you meet someone, either a family member or whatever of someone who of becoming blind or you meet a person who is losing their eyesight and becoming blind, what would you say to them?   Wayne Tuttle  55:06 It to me, it's a very personal aspect that they're going through. Some people are fully sighted today and totally blind tomorrow, some people gradually lose their vision over time. So it comes down to being a personal thing. And my advice would basically be that go through that grieving process, because there is grief involved with any loss, especially when you're losing your vision or your hearing or your mobility skills and the list goes on. But realize that your life has changed, you can still do pretty much the same things that you've always done. It's just that you have to find new ways of achieving your goals. And that's what it comes down to the sky's the limit,   Michael Hingson  56:04 it still comes down to is not blindness. It's our attitudes. And we need to be as forward looking in that as people who can see, because if our attitude is not a positive one about being blind, then we won't be   Wayne Tuttle  56:19 absolutely can, we   Michael Hingson  56:21 will have the challenges. Well, Wayne, this has been fun. I really have enjoyed having you on unstoppable mindset. I hope you've liked it as well. Oh, my pleasure. And we will have to get together and swap more stories   Wayne Tuttle  56:37 but have to come come down to California?   Michael Hingson  56:40 Well, it is it was 97 Fahrenheit today. And according to my lovely little trusty Amazon device, we're going to have an excessive heat warning on Thursday. So if 97 Isn't excessive, that means it's going to be over 100 Just what it really means. So I Interesting.   Wayne Tuttle  57:00 Well, where I come from, I'm very Northern Ontario. We are so far north, we literally wave to Santa Claus as we're coming to this area. So we have had a couple of frost alerts the last few days.   Michael Hingson  57:20 Well as the big guy waved back.   Wayne Tuttle  57:24 I have no idea.   Michael Hingson  57:26 Well, then, you know, you need to put your communication skills to use and come up with a way that you guys can communicate better. Absolutely. Well, thanks for being on unstoppable mindset. If people want to reach out to you learn more about you and chat with you. How can they do that if they want to learn about your speaking career and so on?   Wayne Tuttle  57:45 Well, if you'd like to reach out, my email address would be my initials. So it would be a W J T dot tuttle. And that's t u t t l e @gmail.com. Okay, I have a website that it's still under construction. So I'm not sure when that will be up and running. But I will definitely let you know.   Michael Hingson  58:13 Well, let's talk about accessibe going on the site to help you with access that makes it a lot easier for your website people to do. Absolutely. Well, meanwhile, everyone, thank you for joining us today. I'd love to hear what you think about this. As always, please reach out to me Michaelhi at  accessibe.com. That's M I  C H A E L H I  at A C C S S I B E.com. Or visit our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N WWW dot Michael hingson.com/podcasts. And of course, as I always ask, and I appreciate everyone who is doing it, please give us a five star rating. Wherever you're listening to the podcast and join us regularly you can subscribe to our podcast wherever you are finding us. And we hope that you will do that and join us for other adventures and other future podcasts. And again, Wayne, I really appreciate your time and you being here with us today.   Wayne Tuttle  59:20 Thanks for having me, Michael.   Michael Hingson  59:25 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

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The Experience of Transition to College for Students Diagnosed with Asperger's Disorder

Occupational Therapy Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


For the Church Podcast
Episode 177: Brant Hansen on The Men We Need

For the Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


On this episode of the FTC Podcast, Jared Wilson talks with radio host and author Brant Hansen about Christian manhood -- its problems and promise -- about godly ambition, toxic masculinity, and the like, as well as Asperger's, mission, and more.

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio
Neurodiversity in the Workplace, Part II

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 38:32


Join Dr. Holmes as she interviews Clay M. Westbrook about Neurodiversity in the workplace. Dr. Holmes wrote the forward for Clay's book, "Best Places To Work: An Autistic Adventure in Corporate America." Clay talks about his journey with autism and his experience in the corporate workplace.About Clay:Clay M. Westbrook is a lifelong resident of the state of Georgia. He was born in Athens and attended the University of Georgia, earning a bachelor's degree in History and a law degree, with honors, from the University of Georgia School of Law. After graduation, he moved to Atlanta with a carload of belongings, a Labrador Retriever, and dreams of wealth and success. After the real world swiftly crushed those dreams, he practiced law for many years, developing expertise in business law, corporate finance, and commercial real estate, while working with many of the most talented and/or insufferable attorneys this country has ever produced.Clay and the practice of law parted ways for good in 2009. The breakup was amicable, with both Clay and the legal profession drastically improved as a result. He then spent many years in consulting, developing expertise in corporate finance, financial restructuring, and litigation and bankruptcy strategy consulting. In 2016, he wrote his first book, "Debt & Circuses: Protecting Business Owners From Their Enemies, Their Allies, and Themselves," as both a memoir of his experiences as a consultant in the aftermath of the 2008 Financial Crisis, and a business-how-to guide for financially troubled businesses and their advisors.Later that same year, he self-diagnosed then was professionally diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Shortly thereafter, he transitioned into a research director role with a global commercial real estate services company. In 2020, he published "Best Places To Work: An Autistic Adventure in Corporate America," as a fictionalized memoir of his experience returning to the corporate world post-diagnosis.Clay most enjoys helping people in complicated situations that require original thought, and working with talented professionals who wish to better serve their clients, with a focus on research, marketing, and information technology. When not writing or working, He enjoys history, sports, reading, and the outdoors. Ideally, he would hike in the mountains all day, and then stay in a nice hotel. Clay resides in Atlanta with his wife and two sons.Clay recommends: Human: Finding myself in the Autism Spectrum, for those wanting to learn more about themselves or others on the spectrum.https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1783352251Books written by Clay:Best Places to Work: An Autistic's Adventure in Corporate Americaand Debt & Circuses: Protecting Business Owners From Their Enemies, Their Allies, and Themselveshttps://www.amazon.com/Clay-Westbrook/e/B01DZ0PYF2%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

Maximum Mom
Doing Your Best Work with Meg Garavaglia

Maximum Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 38:28


This week on Maximum Mom, your host Elise Buie joined Meg Garavaglia.Starting and growing Woven Legal has been both rewarding and challenging. Yet, it still pales compared to Meg's most important work helping her son, Matt, who is now 23, arrive at a life of independence, pride in his accomplishments, and a network of support from his close friends and trusted professionals. She recognized from Matt's extreme hyperactivity as a toddler that he was different. Still, she wasn't prepared for the difficulties which lay ahead when in 3rd grade, he was diagnosed with ADHD and a Non-Verbal Learning Disorder. Additionally, Meg was told that he was "on the Asperger's side of the spectrum." These differences would profoundly affect his academic and social success over the next nine years, not to mention his self-esteem. It, of course, also took a toll on her family, particularly her marriage - but she had amazing mentors who told her, "Don't quit before the miracle..." and she persevered. Looking back, Meg can clearly see the gifts she received from being Matt's mom. She is more patient (most moms are!), more FUN (not taking herself so seriously), and more accepting of others. And, perhaps most importantly, through serving as Matt's advocate, she was led to become absolutely unwilling to accept a FINAL answer as the FINAL answer when there's clearly a better way. Meg believes Woven Legal may be the byproduct of that lesson. The legal industry has been a pressure cooker for years. The broken families and mental health issues that lay in its wake are no secret. There is a better, more balanced way for attorneys to work with top talent, and that's what Woven Legal does. They place high-caliber virtual legal professionals to support busy attorneys so they can focus on growing and leading their firms.3:25 the science of making paper 7:27 no jerk policy12:29 practice area alignment 16:52 such rockstars 20:50 learning lunchbox24:38 all bets were off29:07 personality plus34:16 and everything in betweenWatch the interview here.Subscribe to Maximum Mom on your favorite podcast player, so you never miss an episode!Sign up for the Maximum Mom newsletter!

Late Night Playset
CHRISTIAN JAMES HAND: Updates on The Session LNP492

Late Night Playset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 103:16


Thursday, September 8, 2022 - Guest: CHRISTIAN JAMES HAND First, Happy 10th Anniversary to Sean Lee's Purist Group... Then... fresh off the Marconi show, this is our first episode back in Studio 11! Christian joins the show right away and we dive right in. He chose radio because you don't get famous. He didn't find music, Music found Him. And why SiriusXM is the Kaiser Permanent of Radio. "The Session" has run it's course... it's time to redirect those efforts. Christian goes deep into how the show changed him. Lots of discussion about Asperger‘s versus Autism and the nuances of autism spectrum disorder. He fills us in on Will Arnett and a future partnership with the "Smartless Podcast Network" - MAJOR CONGRATULATIONS are almost in order. Plus a birthday ECF and a recap of The Marconi Show. THANK YOU for watching!

Changing Lives Selling Knives
355: Jeff Teresi - Flashback Friday

Changing Lives Selling Knives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 16:22


Jeff Teresi is among the Top 25 sales reps in the history of the Cutco Cutlery /Vector Marketing sales organization, and is also a published author and aspiring public speaker. But there's a real twist to his story, in that Jeff battles with Asperger syndrome. Being on the Autism spectrum can be a monumental challenge for anyone in any role, and is magnified by Jeff's choice of sales and public speaking as his vocation in life. But Jeff looks at this difficulty differently, and that has made all the difference. As you'll hear in this conversation, Jeff communicates with well-chosen words that will speak to your heart. Get ready to be moved to see beyond your perceived weakness and instead be present to the beauty of your uniqueness. To get access to all episodes and free resources, visit ChangingLivesPodcast.com.

Retire As You Desire
How To Take A Month Worth Of Free Days With André Brisson

Retire As You Desire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 35:19


In this episode, Bill talks with his dear friend, Podcaster, Engineer, and Entrepreneur André Brisson, about how he will go on a month-long sabbatical and why it's important to do so. They also talk about André's hobbies and passion and how he takes care of himself by taking time to do them. André also encourages everyone to take that break from work to do the things they love.   André Brisson, P. Eng., is the host of The Impulsive Thinker Podcast, the podcast for the high-achieving ADHD entrepreneur. Andre owns an entrepreneurial consulting engineering company and recently started Tactical Breakthroughs, where he is developing the ADHD Transformation Journey program. Diagnosed late in life with severe ADHD and mild Asperger's (ASD), the mechanisms and systems he created to overcome his undiagnosed ADHD have helped him succeed. He credits his undiagnosed ADHD as the key to his success and a factor in restricting success. Since discovering how to turn his ADHD into a strength, people have sought him out for help with using their ADHD as a strength to drive success. André Brisson has a special ability in devouring and learning complex information and simplifying it for others to solve complex problems. Like most entrepreneurs, André has started multiple companies, two of which failed for various reasons. Learning from those failures, André now operates three very successful companies, including a self-managing entrepreneurial engineering firm specializing in niche markets that require unique training, experience, and impulsive instinct to try new things.   Connect with André: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrebrisson/   Listen to his podcast: https://theimpulsivethinker.com/ Show notes: [1:47] What does it feel like for André to record his 100th podcast episode? [3:26] What inspired him to take a one-month sabbatical? [8:36] His mindset and his transformation through the years [11:43] His favorite genre [13:17] How they set up his wife's business for success during the sabbatical [16:27] What's one thing he's looking forward to the most about being away for a month? [19:29] What was it like to see the finished product of his woodworking? [21:04] Creating new things, rewarding, and taking care of yourself [32:02] André's nugget of advice [33:26] The Impulsive Thinker [35:08] Outro   Connect with Bill Bloom  Web: https://www.bloomfinancialco.com/ https://bloomfinancialco.kartra.com/page/bNJ87 Email: bill@bloomfinancial.us  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bloomfinancial/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/retireasyoudesirepodcast     Securities and investment advisory services offered through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc. (WFS) member FINRA/SIPC. WFS. is separately owned and other entities and/or marketing names, products or services referenced here are independent of WFS.     Views expressed in this podcast are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to provide or be a substitute for specific professional financial, tax or legal advice or recommendations for any individuals. Information is based on sources believed to be reliable; however, their accuracy or completeness cannot be guaranteed.

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio
Neurodiversity in the Workplace, Part 1

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 29:32


Join Dr. Holmes as she interviews Clay M. Westbrook about Neurodiversity in the workplace. Dr. Holmes wrote the forward for Clay's book, "Best Places To Work: An Autistic Adventure in Corporate America." Clay talks about his journey with autism and his experience in the corporate workplace.About Clay:Clay M. Westbrook is a lifelong resident of the state of Georgia. He was born in Athens and attended the University of Georgia, earning a bachelor's degree in History and a law degree, with honors, from the University of Georgia School of Law. After graduation, he moved to Atlanta with a carload of belongings, a Labrador Retriever, and dreams of wealth and success. After the real world swiftly crushed those dreams, he practiced law for many years, developing expertise in business law, corporate finance, and commercial real estate, while working with many of the most talented and/or insufferable attorneys this country has ever produced.Clay and the practice of law parted ways for good in 2009. The breakup was amicable, with both Clay and the legal profession drastically improved as a result. He then spent many years in consulting, developing expertise in corporate finance, financial restructuring, and litigation and bankruptcy strategy consulting. In 2016, he wrote his first book, "Debt & Circuses: Protecting Business Owners From Their Enemies, Their Allies, and Themselves," as both a memoir of his experiences as a consultant in the aftermath of the 2008 Financial Crisis, and a business-how-to guide for financially troubled businesses and their advisors.Later that same year, he self-diagnosed then was professionally diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Shortly thereafter, he transitioned into a research director role with a global commercial real estate services company. In 2020, he published "Best Places To Work: An Autistic Adventure in Corporate America," as a fictionalized memoir of his experience returning to the corporate world post-diagnosis.Clay most enjoys helping people in complicated situations that require original thought, and working with talented professionals who wish to better serve their clients, with a focus on research, marketing, and information technology. When not writing or working, He enjoys history, sports, reading, and the outdoors. Ideally, he would hike in the mountains all day, and then stay in a nice hotel. Clay resides in Atlanta with his wife and two sons.Clay recommends: Human: Finding myself in the Autism Spectrum, for those wanting to learn more about themselves or others on the spectrum.https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1783352251Books written by Clay:Best Places to Work: An Autistic's Adventure in Corporate Americaand Debt & Circuses: Protecting Business Owners From Their Enemies, Their Allies, and Themselveshttps://www.amazon.com/Clay-Westbrook/e/B01DZ0PYF2%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

Business Meets Spirituality
From the Edge of Suicide to an Abundant Life with Dan Mangena

Business Meets Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 41:53


This week features special guest Dan Mangena, successful entrepreneur, best-selling author, host of the Do It With Dan Podcast, international public speaker, and life and business transformation coach. Dan talks about his mission to spearhead an evolutionary uplift in universal consciousness, what money and spirituality mean to him, how we can balance the inner and outer work on ourselves, and what it means to dream with your eyes open. Dan opens up about what being diagnosed with Asperger's as an adult did for his life, and how he overcame dark thoughts and created the life he's living now. We tie Dan's experiences and wisdom into what it really means to live a 200% life that is authentically yours.

FM Mundo
Café Fm Mundo - Dr. Francisco Espinel, Síndrome de Asperger

FM Mundo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 13:14


Café Fm Mundo - Dr. Francisco Espinel, Síndrome de Asperger by FM Mundo 98.1

Skeptic Generation
We're Off Our Meds! | Skeptic Generation | Episode 36 Season 2

Skeptic Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 90:36 Very Popular


This may be an interesting episode of Skeptic Generation. Due to the horrors of the US healthcare system, both Eric and Vi are off their meds and probably about to get a little spicy. Join for the fun, stay for the pandemonium. Call 585-526-8774 or tiny.cc/callSG to talk with us. ___________________TIME STAMPS & CALL NOTES 00:00 - Intro - New Camera, Can You Tell? 06:04 - Vi & Eric Fight - Javier (he/him) - PR 29:08 - Theist Contradicts Himself Over and Over - Connor (he/him) - TX1:09:44 - How To Accommodate Neurodivergence - Sal (she/they) - OH 06:04If all laws are based on our moral standards, why are we uniquely upset when Christians try to inflict their morality on our laws? This caller wants to highlight a double standard, but ends up inciting a claws-out debate between the hosts on whether laws are actually moral at all. Don't worry, your dads fight like this sometimes but they still love you very much. 29:08 Repeat theist caller Connor tries to explain why his faith does not grant full equality to women, and Vi is NOT having it. Buckle up, because this is a long call full of contradictions and checkmates that highlight just how duplicitous even a “progressive” religion can be. 1:09:44 This caller wants to talk about the line between explaining and accommodating differences in society, be they related to mental health or gender identity. The call got a little lost in the weeds, and we definitely want to highlight some terminology used during the conversation. Asperger's as a diagnosis is no longer in use, as we now understand it to be under the umbrella of ASD. Learn more about this diagnosis's history and use in Nazi Germany here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05112-1 Also, “high-functioning” and “low-functioning” are now understood to be inaccurate and even harmful terms when discussing autistic individuals. Check out more here: https://planningacrossthespectrum.com/blog/why-stop-using-functioning-labels/ Finally, in case you're interested, a non-cis gender identity is not a form of neurodivergence. Thank you and goodnight! ___________________Skeptic Generation is LIVE every Sunday at 11:30am-1:00pm CTCall on your phone: 585-LA-MURPH (585-526-8774) Call online: https://tiny.cc/callSG Love the show? Become a patron: https://tiny.cc/donatetoSG Buy our new Class of ‘22 merch: http://tiny.cc/SG22MerchHelp with our studio: https://tiny.cc/SGwishlist Join us after the show on Discord: https://tiny.cc/SGdiscord To find out more, visit https://www.skepticgeneration.com Copyright © 2022 Skeptic Generation. All rights reserved.

Butterfly Kisses
Joe Fletcher: Treating Mental Illness with Love

Butterfly Kisses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 43:27


A mind is a powerful tool, but it's not who you truly are. "We are so much more than our mental illness. We are so much more powerful."- Joe FletcherJoe Fletcher is the communications manager of Mental Health Transformations. Joe has been diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, OCD, and Aspergers Syndrome and was on antidepressants for 25 years. He recently realized that his thoughts created his reality and that he has the power to change his thoughts and, likewise, his reality. This realization led to a profound experience of love and connection, which changed Joe's life. Joe is now dedicated to helping others realize their inner power and potential. This is Joe Fletcher's story—Joe Fletcher became part of Mental Health Transformations after a long journey with mental illness. Joe was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome at age nine, which led to further mental health issues, including OCD and Aspergers. Doctors told Joe that he would never get better, but he found hope in a book called Anatomy of an Epidemic. This book made him realize that he could change his reality, and he began to see the world in a new way. He then found Sydney Banks and the Three Principles, which profoundly affected him. He started to see mental illness as a misunderstanding, realizing that he was not a slave to his thoughts and, more importantly, was not broken.  In this episode, you will learn the following:Joe's journey of self-discovery, including his experience of a sudden and profound shift in consciousness  The power of thought to create reality  The spiritual nature of humanity and the potential for everyone to connect with their true nature of unconditional love. Links for Joe:Website: https://heartfeltpresence.org/ (HeartFeltPresence.org) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joseph.fletcher.777 (Joseph.Fletcher.777) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxXkGuCaahZawIpOAA6Ng8g (Harold Or Harry Derbitsky of Act Training Inc.) Email for Joe: mentalhtjoe@gmail.com Suicide Hotline: https://988lifeline.org/ (988lifeline.org) or dial 988 to speak with someone in person! Other Butterfly Kisses Episodes you'll enjoy:Eps. 31. https://player.captivate.fm/episode/7bcaec76-19db-4541-8d54-9aa2dbd8730e (A Pathway to Insight with Ann Hince) Eps. 39. https://player.captivate.fm/episode/26d6cfb6-0059-4be9-a455-0fc98e8600da (The Secrets to the "Game of Life" Using Cardology! ) Eps. 47. https://player.captivate.fm/episode/be42510e-ae04-4e2b-87d8-563f3a200dfd (From An Addict's Wife to USOA Ms. Nevada 2021: The Debbie Freeman Story) Accessing Your D.I.G.S. WorkshopYou will learn how to access your Divine Inner Guidance System or D.I.G.S in the DIGS Workshop. The workshop consists of simple, fun instructions to access the Akashic Records (or your DIGS), the information you can receive from your Guides, and how to use it to manifest your desired life. Date: Sunday, September 18, 2022 Time: 2:30pm- 5:30pm Location: Sanctuary Imports, 822 Lamar Ave., Charlotte, 28205 Cost: $99 https://www.sanctuaryimportsclt.com/events/access-your-akashic-records-workshop (Reserve Your Seat Now!) Loved this episode? Leave us a review and rating here: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/butterfly-kisses/id1561256027 (Apple Podcast Reviews) and https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/butterfly-kisses-1841572 (PodChaser ) Connect with Amy:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amygraycunningham/ (AmyGrayCunningham) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amygraycunningham (AmyGrayCunningham) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnvTs4Vmm7FJFkbPmqG9Hzg (AmyGrayCunningham) Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmyCunnningham1 (AmyCunningham1) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amygraycunningham/ (AmyGrayCunningham) Website: https://butterflykissespodcast.com/ (ButterflyKissesPodcast)

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio
Music and Expression in Autism

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 33:58


Join Dr. Stephanie Holmes and Natalie as they discuss the impact of music when working with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Music is a powerful force in life that most of us are drawn to. Explore how to use music as a tool for at-home behavior management from a board-certified music therapist. You will learn easy to implement music experiences that will help both you and your loved one to navigate difficult behavioral situations, practice relaxation and coping skills, and facilitate appropriate expression of emotions.Natalie Fouty is a board-certified music therapist with over ten years of experience in the field. Currently serving as the Executive Director for Key Changes Therapy Services, Inc., her background includes working with children and adults with a wide array of medical and mental health diagnoses. Natalie's passion lies in making music an accessible medium of growth for all who may benefit.https://keychangesmusictherapy.com/

The Writer's Tribe Talk Show
Juggling the Issues with Matthew Kenslow

The Writer's Tribe Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 16:11


Buy Matthew's Book#ifounditonamazon TRY AUDIBLE PLUSElsa's BooksPath To Authorship CourseLiving beyond Asperger'sMatthew Kenslow was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, which is within the autistic spectrum, when he was six years old. He shares its common symptoms, such as lacking social and conversational skills, and having poor eye contact with others. In school he had difficulty with certain subjects, but others (like math and science) came easily to him. He has the ability to remember a myriad of facts and the events in his life-some he would rather forget!Juggling the Issues: Living With Asperger's Syndrome is a collection of short stories from his life. He describes many of the issues that those with autism and Asperger's face each day. He also talks about some of the positive aspects of having Asperger's as well. What is life like living with Asperger's? Matthew describes it as having "an enhancer" plugged into his brain, which accelerates his thoughts and even his emotions. "Asperger's will deepen everything's significance, causing us to take things to a more intense level," he confides.If you want to better understand those living with Asperger's, you need to read this book. The insights Kenslow shares come from his deep experience of living with it and making the most of life's opportunities.Support the show

Sintonizando con el Autismo - Asperger para Asperger
¿Como ver el panorama completo en el Asperger (TEA 1)?

Sintonizando con el Autismo - Asperger para Asperger

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 6:22


Para ver el panorama completo en el asperger he escrito el presente escrito que tiene como objetivo llevar a la reflexión a los profesionales, educadores y padres de personas con condición de Asperger o TEA 1. Más información sobre el Asperger en: www.aspergerparaasperger.org

RCN Digital
Rcn Digital - 30 de Agosto 2022

RCN Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 25:15


Hoy en RCN Digital hablamos de el anuncio de Elon Musk sobre los modelos Tesla autónomos que estarían disponibles a final de año, nace en Colombia un videojuego para niños y niñas con síndrome de asperger, además Huawei nova Y90 llega a Colombia, les contamos todas las características, buena música y mucho más!!

A Nefarious Nightmare
S3 E5 - Lured Away - the kidnapping of Haley Burns

A Nefarious Nightmare

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 90:14


Content/Trigger warning: domestic abuse, self harm, mental illness, disordered eating, sexual assault of a minor Haley Burns, now known as Alaska, went missing in May of 2016 (she was 16 at the time) and was held captive for 399 days where she was abused and forced to lose weight. The man, Michael Wysolovski (31 at the time) who did this to her walks free today. Listen as her mom, Shaunna Burns, tells us everything.  Sources -  Shaunna Burns tiktok - @shaunnaburns3 https://www.fbi.gov/news/press-releases/press-releases/fbi-releases-2021-and-first-quarter-2022-statistics-from-the-national-use-of-force-data-collection https://www.missingkids.org/content/dam/missingkids/pdfs/2021%20Family%20Abductions%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf  https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/global-report-on-trafficking-in-persons.html  https://www.unicefusa.org/child-trafficking-us#:~:text=National%20Human%20Trafficking%20Hotline%20statistics,victims%20of%20child%20sex%20trafficking.  https://www.thorn.org/child-trafficking-statistics/  https://childsafety.losangelescriminallawyer.pro/missing-and-abducted-children.html#:~:text=Every%2040%20seconds%2C%20a%20child,percent%20of%20these%20are%20children.  https://unbate.ngontinh24.com/article/the-truth-about-child-abduction-statistics-in-2022  https://people.com/crime/hailey-burns-inside-dramatic-escape-predator-held-captive-13-months/ https://www.wsoctv.com/news/local/man-accused-of-holding-ballantyne-teen-captive-to-face-judge/943410586/ https://youtu.be/VuGUBdJGF3M Dr. Phil episode - https://youtu.be/Uq3sPv78vfA Combined tiktok story times of the situation - https://youtu.be/qQRX4Vlbkw8 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6998719/Pervert-accused-keeping-17-year-old-girl-Aspergers-sex-slave-spotted-roaming-free.html Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Buddhist Voices
44: Aryadhi - The Missing Piece of The Puzzle

Buddhist Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 27:24


When Aryadhi encountered meditation for the first time, she wholly embraced it amid the very positive atmosphere of the London Buddhist Centre. She recalls the memory of waking up on her first retreat after a powerful new year's eve puja just knowing that she was a Buddhist, and that her life would never be the same again. A series of important self discoveries would begin to unfold during her ordination training. And in September 2013 she was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, a neurological condition on the autistic spectrum. Aryadhi describes this discovery as being like finding ‘the missing piece of the puzzle', and her moving account is a testament to the importance of receiving the help she needed on her journey. Listen to a deeply inspiring story of self-aware Buddhist practice, and of coming into your own as a human being with vital gifts to share... Extracts from this talk were used for the Fifty Years, Fifty Voices project: Visit the Fifty Years, Fifty Voices on The Buddhist Centre Online

Celebrating the Spectrum
An Island in Alaska

Celebrating the Spectrum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:56


Jared Stewart describes himself as an “ambassador for autism”. After college, he started a job at an adult autism treatment center and quickly realized he was on the spectrum. Jared was officially diagnosed with Asperger's a short time later. In this engaging conversation, Jared talks about the two cliffs parents of children with autism face; when their child enters adulthood and no longer gets government-mandated services and the second, scarier cliff, when the parent can no longer care for the child. Jared is advocating for a world that celebrates the uniqueness and strengths of those with autism.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Parenting Autism
E89: Our Visit with Bryce's New Autism / MAPS / DAN / Functional Medicine Doctor

Parenting Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 48:01


This episode is a conversation about our visit to Bryce's new autism doctor. This type of doctor is also referred to as a MAPS doctor (Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs), a DAN doctor (Defeat Autism Now), or a Functional Medicine doctor. Our first autism doctor experience helped us achieve our goals for Bryce. After a difference of opinion for the next steps and a bit of a plateua/regression, we felt led to make a change with a fresh perspective as we move into the future. It was a great decision! We are thrilled to see Bryce progressing again with some changes that we were advised to make with his supplements. Bryce had his first experience with a hyperbaric chamber. The autism doctor visits have definitely been "information overload" but each of them have been  well worth the investment due to the positive results we have seen with Bryce. Bryce is a funny, mechanical, HAPPY little guy who was diagnosed with autism at age two and is now eight years old. His pure joy makes this world a much better place!If you are enjoying the show, please take a quick moment to give us a rating and review to help other families find our podcast, too. We are humbled and honored to follow our calling and be Autism Ambassadors while helping others understand our world a little more than they did before listening to the podcast. We also feel called to bring light to a community that has experienced dark days after the "diagnosis". (Luke 1:79) You can follow us on our Parenting Autism Youtube Channel (Parenting Autism Show) and our Facebook & Instagram pages to see stories, pictures, and videos of our autism journey. You can also contact us through Facebook, Instagram, or by email: parentingautism@att.net.Our website is: www.ParentingAutismShow.comMolly Whiskers and the Blue TentacleA hilarious, big-hearted comedy caper for kids of all ages.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Awaken Your Inner Awesomeness with Melissa Oatman-A daily dose of spirituality and self improvement

Dan Mangena is a podcast host, a best-selling author, international speaker, and a successful entrepreneur. He has been featured in Forbes and Entrepreneur magazines, and appeared on FOX, CNN, and CBS. A life-shattering trauma at the age of 20, a late diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome, and amassing a great deal of wealth and then losing it all took its toll. Dan didn't give up The tools Dan discovered and implemented long ago to help himself later became his book "Stepping Beyond Intention." Dan talks to us today about facing our financial fears so that we can open ourselves up to all of the abundance that we so richly deserve. Even Though Podcast https://app.audry.io/publisher/discover/1564797189?_ga=2.229043925.838247130.1661291515-2088451308.1641140614 Contact Dan https://dreamwithdan.com/ Contact me: Purchase show merchandise https://awaken-your-inner-awesomeness.creator-spring.com/ Join my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/moatman?fan_landing=true https://melissaoatman.com melissaoatman77@gmail 636-748-4943   Download my free eBook on Manifesting  https://mailchi.mp/240e02dfadcf/ebook Download my free checklist Habits of Highly Successful People https://mailchi.mp/b8078533248a/habits-of-highly-successful-people    Join my monthly membership:  https://www.melissaoatman.com/magical-mo   Free Heart Chakra Healing Guided Meditation https://www.melissaoatman.com/landing-page   Purchase my book Beautifully Broken: https://www.audiobooks.com/audiobook/beautifully-broken-the-spiritual-womans-guide-to-thriving-not-simply-surviving-after-a-breakup-or-divorce/459896   https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/beautifully-broken-melissa-oatman/1136174371?ean=9781989579060 https://www.amazon.com/Beautifully-Broken-Spiritual-Thriving-Surviving/dp/198957906X https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50977070-beautifully-broken   Purchase my book Mindfulness Matters   https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08HDSKGGH/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=melissa+oatman&qid=1599159677&sr=8-2   Follow me on social media:   https://www.facebook.com/groups/awakenyourhearttopurpose/ https://www.facebook.com/reikiwithlissa/  http://www.instagram.com/melissaoatman222 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQPtU9hPeEWjbHr62LxuEXA  https://www.twitter.com/MelissaOatman   Donations are not necessary, however, if you feel inclined to donate to my channel through Venmo or PayPal, your energetic gifts are very much appreciated! Venmo @Melissa-Ann-161 PayPal: melissaoatman77@gmail.com

Practical Access Podcast
S8 E5: Autism on the Seas with Dr. Janet Bertoni

Practical Access Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 16:23 Transcription Available


Today we have a special treat for you! Our hosts Drs. Dieker and Hines get to sit down with Dr. Janet Bertoni, a part of Autism on the Seas. Autism on the Seas is an international organization that develops cruise vacation services to accommodate adults and families living with children with Special Needs. This includes but is not limited to, Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Down Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, and all Cognitive, Intellectual, and Developmental Disabilities. Tune in as they discuss what it's like sailing for the families and the individuals they serve using their services. For more information about Autism on the Seas, visit their website: https://autismontheseas.com or (800) 516-5247 or (203) 604-0278. Don't forget we love to hear from our listeners! If you have any questions, feel free to reach out. We look forward to receiving your questions on our Google Phone (407) 900- 9305, Facebook (Practical Access), Twitter (@AccessPractical), or Instagram (@Practical_Access).

Your Parenting Mojo - Respectful, research-based parenting ideas to help kids thrive
164: Supporting Neurodivergent Children with Dr. Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist

Your Parenting Mojo - Respectful, research-based parenting ideas to help kids thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 47:47


Parents have been asking me for episodes on neurodivergence for a while now so I'm hoping this episode will become the start of a mini-series. In this first conversation I talk with Dr. Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, co-author of the new book Neurodiveristy Studies: A New Critical Paradigm. We look at this topic through the lens of autism, and I share some information I found to be pretty surprising when, out of curiosity, I took the Autism Spectrum Quotient screening online.   We discuss ways that schools, workplaces, and the wider world could better accommodate neurodivergent people, both so neurodivergent people can live the fullest expression of themselves, and also so everyone can benefit from their ideas, experience, and expertise.   While this episode uses autism as a lens through which to discuss neurodiversity, the ideas in it can be applied to other types of neurodiversity including Asperger's syndrome, dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD, synesthesia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome.   I also see neurodiversity as much more broad than the typical way this term is used, which tends to be used to mean “a person with a disorder that makes them not as good as a normal person.” I see us all as neurodiverse, each with our own unique combination of talents and struggles, so we should support children in learning in the way that's uniquely suited to them.   If you'd like to learn how to do this, come and join my FREE You Are Your Child's Best Teacher workshop, which is coming up between August 29 and September 9. Enrollment is open right now - just click the banner below!   https://yourparentingmojo.com/bestteacher/ ()

Martha Debayle en W
Asperger, mitos y realidades

Martha Debayle en W

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 43:32


Antonio Rizzoli, especialista en Neurología

Theatrephonic
Chameleon

Theatrephonic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 9:23


Theatrephonic presents 'Chameleon'"People have an idea of what it looks like... and I'm not that"Joint winner of the HearSay International Audio Rising Award 2021 Created and produced by Lydia KennyMusic:Drum Kid. (2018) 9 Lives, Drum KidAvailable at: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Drum_Kid/Drum_Kid [Accessed 17/12/2020]Monotonix. (2008) Live at WFMU on Liz Berg's Show, Drum SoloAvailable at: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Monotonix/Live_at_WFMU_on_Liz_Bergs_Show_7142008/drum_solo_1588 [Accessed 10/12/2020]The Theatrephonic Theme Tune was composed by Jackson PentlandPerformed by:Jackson PentlandMollie Fyfe-TaylorandEmmeline BraefieldFor more information about the Theatrephonic Podcast, go to catonapiano.uk/theatrephonic, Tweet or Instagram us @theatrephonic, or visit our Facebook page.If you enjoy Theatrephonic and would like to get more content please consider becoming a patron by going to www.patreon.com/theatrephonicPlease don't forget to rate and review.Thank you for listening

Boyce of Reason
s04e87 | Surviving Awkward: from Aspergers to Anime to Transition | a Detrans Story, with Emmie

Boyce of Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 81:33


Emmie is a Texan lady who grew up with Aspergers. She recounts her obsession with self-harm and anime and internet and teenage transition, then her turn toward accepting her self and developing something other than her identity. Follow Emmie on twitter @EmmieS3311 Support this channel: https://www.paypal.me/benjaminboyce --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/calmversations/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/calmversations/support

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3662: Hacker Public Radio 2021 - 2022 New Years Show Part 1

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022


Hacker Public Radio New Years Eve Show 2021 - 2022 Part 1 2021-12-31T10:00:00Z Welcome to the 9th Annual Hacker Public Radio show. It is December the 31st 2021 and the time is 10 hundred hours UTC. We start the show by sending Greetings to Christmas Island/Kiribati and Samoa Kiritimati, Apia. LINT Christmas Island/Kiribati Kiritimati Ken and Honkey talk about setting up streaming Mumble → Client (Butt) → Ice Cast https://www.mumble.info/downloads/ https://danielnoethen.de/butt/ https://icecast.org/ http://www.darkice.org/ Ken and Honkey talk about COVID-19 Omicron Variant https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/variants/omicron-variant.html https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/coronavirus/about-coronavirus Ken, Honkey, and Netminer talk about mental health, Asperger's Syndrome, Eli The Computer Guy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome https://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/mental-health-aspergers-syndrome https://aspergersfromtheinside.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-FpBZR7DbpvNj5UrFN8qUA https://www.youtube.com/c/Elithecomputerguypage Ken gets his HAM radio license http://www.arrl.org/getting-licensed Ken talks about rebuilding the house Growing up in the 60's https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Greeley https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1197497.The_High_Tech_Knight https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Frankowski What is a Dunny? https://www.warrenfahey.com.au/the-dunny-a-history/ https://www.pinterest.com.au/rosepat52/old-aussie-dunnies/ Farming Talk Isaac & James https://www.facebook.com/IsaacenJames/?fref=mentions&__tn__=K-R More Amateur Radio Harmonised Amateur Radio Examination Certificate (HAREC) http://www.zs6mrk.org/RAE%20Handleiding/The-HAREC-syllabus---CEPT-T_R-61-02-Annex-6---Class-A-only.PDF Raspberry Pi 400 Chat & Makulu Linux (installs Android APKs) https://www.raspberrypi.com/products/raspberry-pi-400/ http://www.makululinux.com/wp/ https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=makulu Honkey Talks about his Pi4 and Steamlink, Diet Pi , Etcher + more https://store.steampowered.com/app/353380/Steam_Link/ https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.valvesoftware.steamlink&hl=en_US&gl=US https://apps.apple.com/us/app/steam-link/id1246969117 https://dietpi.com/ https://etcher.download/ https://github.com/raspberrypi/rpi-imager Archiving Old Vinyl https://www.raspberrypi.com/news/hi-fi-raspberry-pi/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWGU0lk_fr4 Tony H. Netminer & Dave Chat https://distrohoppersdigest.blogspot.com/ https://mintcast.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackpool https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nantasket_Beach Buying PCs/laptops with Linux pre-installed. https://www.entroware.com/store/ https://junocomputers.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asus_Eee_PC UK Fiber Optic ISP https://cityfibre.com/ Group Chat about various tech topics BSD flavors https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Software_Distribution https://www.openbsd.org/ https://www.freebsd.org/ https://nomadbsd.org/ Boxes VM Manager https://help.gnome.org/users/gnome-boxes/stable/ ARPANET https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARPANET Leena / Lena Lenna or Lena is a standard test image widely used in the field of image processing since 1973. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenna https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Equipment_Corporation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenVMS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DEC_Alpha https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tru64_UNIX Knight TV /Tom Knight (Knight TV) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Knight_(scientist) http://pdp-6.net/knight-tv/knight-tv.html PDP 11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDP-11 Haiku OS https://www.haiku-os.org/ Motorola StarMax Mac Clones https://everymac.com/systems/motorola/index-motorola-starmax-mac-clones.html DECstation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DECstation VMS / OpenVMS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenVMS DEC Alpha https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DEC_Alpha https://www.techopedia.com/definition/18752/dec-alpha Ultrix https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultrix PowerMac G5 https://everymac.com/systems/apple/powermac_g5/index-powermac-g5.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_Mac_G5 Tru64 Unix https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tru64_UNIX https://winworldpc.com/product/tru64/50 TU58 http://gunkies.org/wiki/TU58_DECtape_II http://web.frainresearch.org:8080/projects/mypdp/tu58.php http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/dec/dectape/tu58/EK-0TU58-UG-001_TU58_DECtape_II_Users_Guide_Oct78.pdf ICL 1900 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Computers_Limited http://www.ict1900.com/ DECwriter http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/la36.html https://vt100.net/docs/tp83/chapter14.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DECwriter ISDN Phone Lines https://uh.edu/~wrice/phone.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Services_Digital_Network X.25 https://www.lifewire.com/x-25-816286 https://networkencyclopedia.com/x-25/ IMP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interface_Message_Processor https://www.techopedia.com/definition/7692/interface-message-processor-imp UK Academic Network. JANET (Joint Academic Network) https://www.jisc.ac.uk/janet/history UK Academic Coloured Book Protocols https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coloured_Book_protocols Anne & Lynn Wheeler https://garlic.com/# https://www.garlic.com/~lynn/ George 3 Operating System http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/acl/pdfs/icl1900_intro_george3.pdf Hercules MVS Emulator https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hercules_(emulator) http://www.hercules-390.org/ Doctor Who, K9, Ultraman, and Thunderbirds+ more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Who%3A_The_Curse_of_Fatal_Death https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006q2x0 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Who https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1102732/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraman_(1966_TV_series) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbirds_(TV_series) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermarionation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Who:_The_Curse_of_Fatal_Death https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Doctor_Who_Night_(1999) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfQFmZCbOfM Log4J Vulnerability https://www.cisa.gov/uscert/apache-log4j-vulnerability-guidance Hacker Public Radio show mention -- Fixing a Noisy Blower Motor http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps.php?id=3499 Netminer suggests a newsgroup alt.sysadmin.recovery Sysadmin humor Better than a 45 to that damn server. . Nike Missile Site mention http://ed-thelen.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nike_missile_sites "Bubba shot the Jukebox" song reference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbQW7rDOPxI ClaudioM's Blog - Hello from the End of 2021!: https://claudiomiranda.wordpress.com/2021/12/31/hello-from-the-end-of-2021/

Parenting Autism
E88: Our Amazing "Deliver the Dream" Autism Family Retreat

Parenting Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 75:19


This episode is a conversation about our recent weekend retreat with the Deliver the Dream and other autism families. We are humbled and honored that we were selected to be the guests of this incredibly kind and loving organization. It was such a beautiful  opportunity to meet other autism families and share laughter, tears, our stories, and suggestions. It was a judgment-free zone that our families were able to enjoy without inquisitive questions, stares from strangers, or a need to apologize. The Colter Family will be forever grateful for the kindness and love that was poured upon us for three days. We hope that our listeners will learn from this episode that these organizations and opportunities exist. The autism journey can feel isolated and lonely at times. Please remember that you are not alone! Bryce is a funny, mechanical, HAPPY little guy who was diagnosed with autism at age two and is now eight years old. His pure joy makes this world a much better place!If you are enjoying the show, please take a quick moment to give us a rating and review to help other families find our podcast, too. We are humbled and honored to follow our calling and be Autism Ambassadors while helping others understand our world a little more than they did before listening to the podcast. We also feel called to bring light to a community that has experienced dark days after the "diagnosis". (Luke 1:79) You can follow us on our Parenting Autism Youtube Channel (Parenting Autism Show) and our Facebook & Instagram pages to see stories, pictures, and videos of our autism journey. You can also contact us through Facebook, Instagram, or by email: parentingautism@att.net.Our website is: www.ParentingAutismShow.com    Support the show

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast
82 - ASD & Gender: Who am I? with Dr. Tony Attwood

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 64:53 Very Popular


Professor Tony Attwood has specialized in Autism Spectrum Disorders since he qualified as a clinical psychologist in England in 1975. He has written two books: Asperger's Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals and The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome. Between the two, they've sold over 800,000 copies and have been translated into dozens of languages. He has been a keynote speaker at many Australian and International Conferences and he presents workshops and runs training courses for parents, professionals, and individuals with Asperger's syndrome all over the world. Today, Dr. Attwood helps us to better understand autistic traits in the gender-questioning teens we see today. We covered this topic in Episode 17 but felt there were things we missed and wanted to clarify. As Dr. Atwood informed us before we hit record, his expertise is in Autism, and he may not be as well versed in the intricacies of contemporary gender identity activism or the studies around gender dysphoria, transition, and desistance. But his knowledge of autism in children and teens is vast and he was engaging and lovely to speak to! We asked Dr. Attwood about special interests, or the fixations and narrow obsessions that are common in autism, we asked him about the difficulty with socializing and how immediate affirmation in an LGBT peer group might be experienced. We also delve into the vulnerabilities and strengths of autistic adolescents and how parents can best support their children when they make rigid or urgent demands. Dr. Attwood highlights the difficult position parents may be in when their child is highly distressed but rushing into a process he/she may not fully understand. We also explored the new world that has opened up to teens via computers and social media and the tricky landscape that complicates a normal adolescent search for identity. Links: Website:  https://tonyattwood.com.au/ (https://tonyattwood.com.au/)   Dr. Attwood's Books on Amazon:  https://amzn.to/3PKm1AN (https://amzn.to/3PKm1AN)   Events:  https://www.attwoodandgarnettevents.com/ (https://www.attwoodandgarnettevents.com) Extended Notes Sasha explains to Professor Attwood the slower, psychological approach to gender facilitated on this podcast. Often, in those with autism, the age of emotional maturity does not match the chronological age. Professor Attwood describes what he believes to be the similarities between autism and gender. Autistic individuals seek affirmation and the transgender community offers affirmation but not at the level the autistic individual is seeking. Discovering a self-identity, regardless of gender, is a mechanism of realization utilized by Professor Attwood. Parents are expected to accept a child's different concept of self in autism and gender. From a psychological perspective, it seems that social transition creates a sort of pathway toward medical transition. With autism subtlety is rare. Professor Attwood shares the positive and negative physical and psychological advantages for teens who find acceptance online. In his group, Professor Attwood explores how the world is perceived by autistic individuals. The ratio of autistic boys to girls is two to one. One in three of those in eating disorder clinics have autism, gender-dysphoria, etc. What it means when diagnoses are changed from autism to ADHD+. Professor Attwood describes an example of when children have characteristics of autism but not the disability. Gender exploration can lead to a change of course and into a new persona. Professor Attwood doesn't see autism as a psychiatric condition. Psychiatrists may see autism as a treatable condition. People who are bad at emotional regulation become controlling over others. Professor Attwood is bilingual. He speaks neuro-typical speak to neurotypical people and autism-speak to the autistic parent. Wider Lens Renewal Retreat – Arizona 2022:...

Martha Debayle
Martha Debayle en W. Miércoles 10 de agosto de 2022.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 91:16


Happy To Help: mexicanos apoyando sueños aeroespaciales, Asperger, mitos y realidades y llevo años trabajando y no sé cómo atraer riqueza.

Martha Debayle
Martha Debayle en W. Miércoles 10 de agosto de 2022.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 91:45


Happy To Help: mexicanos apoyando sueños aeroespaciales, Asperger, mitos y realidades, llevo años trabajando y no sé cómo atraer riqueza.

Martha Debayle
Asperger, mitos y realidades. Miércoles 10 de agosto de 2022.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 36:21


Antonio Rizzoli, Especialista en neurología pediátrica, fundador de la especialidad de pediatría del desarrollo nos habla sobre el Asperger, mitos y realidades.

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio
Autism in Relationships

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 59:22


Join Dr. Stephanie  Holmes and her husband Dan Holmes, hosts of the Neurodiverse Christian Couple podcast, to talk about their own neurodiverse relationship and interview world-renowned autism expert, Dr. Tony Attwood. Dr. Attwood will discuss autism in relationships and give some practical advice and tips from decades of working with individuals on the autism spectrum.Professor Tony Attwood BioTony is a clinical psychologist who has specialized in Autism Spectrum Disorders since he qualified as a clinical psychologist in England in 1975. He currently works in his own private practice and is also an adjunct professor at Griffith University, Queensland. His book Asperger's Syndrome – A Guide for Parents and Professionals has sold over 500,000 copies and has been translated into 27 languages. His subsequent book, The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome, published in October 2006 has sold over 300,000 copies and has been translated into 18 languages, and is one of the primary textbooks on Asperger's syndrome, otherwise known as Autism Spectrum Disorder – Level 1. He has several subsequent books published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Future Horizons Inc., and Guilford Press on emotion management, relationships and sexuality, and general advice for autistic children and adults. Tony has been invited to be a keynote speaker at many Australasian and International Conferences. He presents workshops and runs training courses for parents, professionals, and individuals with Asperger's syndrome worldwide and is a prolific author of scientific papers and books on the subject. He has presented several live webinars with his colleague, Dr. Michelle Garnett, which have been recorded and can be accessed via their website at www.attwoodandgarnettevents.com. He has worked with many thousands of individuals of all ages with many expressions ofautism.https://tonyattwood.com.au/

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast
Investing in Guidance with Daniel Mangena

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 33:35


How much do you invest in your personal development in a year? It is saddening that some of us feel like it is a waste of money, and they cannot pay anyone for that. In this episode, I have Daniel Mangena joining me on the show. He will be sharing his entrepreneurship journey with us and why he thinks investing in guidance is essential. Also, he will share incredible networking opportunities with some high-quality mentors. Listen in and learn. Who is Daniel Mangena? Dan Mangena is a best-selling author, radio host, international speaker, master money manifestor, and the creator of the Beyond Intention Paradigm. He is entirely self-made and has spent decades perfecting his world-class coaching to help others live an abundant, joyful, purpose-driven life. The essence of investing in guidance According to Daniel, investing is guidance helps avoid wasting so much time in the trenches. If you get a mentor who has been in the trenches before, they will guide you not to make the mistakes they made. They'll make your path shorter. Daniel's inner superpower Daniel believes his inner superpower is his ability to solve problems. He was diagnosed with Asperger's when he was 27 years old. The way that his brain works has saved him. Timestamps [00:36] Getting to know Daniel [01:46] Daniel's transition into abundance [05:42] The essence of investing in guidance [12:49] Daniel's upcoming film [14:56] How Daniel got into entrepreneurs.com magazine as a contributor [22:29] Daniel's experience working with clients [22:50] Money DNA [25:09] Daniel's best tip for making the world a better place [30:03] Daniel's inner superpower Quotes: “I haven't spent money on personal development that hasn't been back in spades.” “If you want to leave a legacy, you have to be playing on the same level as legacy leaving players.” “I don't charge more than I'm prepared to pay myself for being on this.” “Information without direction, I find it takes much longer, and mistakes come about. So, you take the wrong direction, and you drift.” Connect with Daniel Mangena: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/626830771085464 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dreamerceo/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dreamerceo/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/dreamerCEO

Grey Mirror: MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative on Technology, Society, and Ethics
Fossils, Mothers & Babies Revealing the Way Human Brains Have Evolved With Dean Falk

Grey Mirror: MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative on Technology, Society, and Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 57:46


In this episode, renowned paleo-anthropologist Dean Falk joins us to talk about how the evolution of our brains led to the emergence of language and how we differ from apes in terms of language and tools. Dean Falk shares her interesting perspective on how language began and the biases we have trying to understand our past from a male and female perspective which helps us acknowledge how humans evolved. A lot was going on 7MM years ago all the way to and through 200/300K years ago. We dive deep into the importance of fossils and what they have revealed, human and chimpanzee common ancestors and the split between the 'human' family tree from the chimpanzees. Additionally we talk about what happened after the split, the Botanic Age and the key role of mothers and babies in the origins of language. Stay tuned! SUPPORT US ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/rhyslindmark JOIN OUR DISCORD: https://discord.gg/PDAPkhNxrC Who is Dean Falk? Dean Falk is an American evolutionary anthropologist specialized in paleo-anthropology, academic, research professor and author who is currently writing a book about the emergence and evolution of the earliest human predecessors who lived long before the appearance of the oldest known stone tools (tentatively titled Basket Weaving 101: Hominin Evolution during the Botanic Age). She is the Hale G. Smith Professor of Anthropology and a Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University. Much of her work focuses on the evolution of the human brain (paleoneurology) and the associated emergence of language, music, art, and science. Topics: Welcome Dean Falk to The Rhys Show!: (00:00:00) Goal for listeners: (00:02:16) What part of early sapiens Dean focuses on: (00:02:50) Answering questions by studying skulls: (00:04:37) 4 decade discussion focusing on lunate sulcus: (00:08:51) About Bipedalism & the split between humans and chimpanzees: (00:10:06) About tools and mothers & babies: two cognitive biases: (00:14:33) The role of women as opposed to stone tools & the Botanic Age: (00:18:21) How does Dean know whether her perspective is true or not: (00:27:11) How did language start & how was it connected to imitation: (00:32:43) What about imitation, spindle neurons or mirror neurons?: (00:39:18) About the evolution of brain size: (00:45:16) How evolution as from early primates applies to the future: (00:49:21) Overrated or underrated questions about fire and the importance of being in groups in human evolution: (00:53:34) Get in touch with Dean: (00:55:35) Dean Falk's books: “Geeks, Genes, and the Evolution of Asperger Syndrome”: https://www.amzn.com/0826356923 “Finding Our Tongues: Mothers, Infants, and the Origins of Language”: https://www.amzn.com/0465002196 Connect with Dean Falk: FSU Department of Anthropology: https://anthro.fsu.edu/faculty-staff/department-faculty/dr-dean-falk Web: https://deanfalk.com/

NeuroDiverse Christian Couples
Tips for Executive Functioning

NeuroDiverse Christian Couples

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:37


Join Dr. Holmes as she interviews Robin Tate, a life coach, and NeuroDiverse Couples' coach. Today we discuss Neurodiversity and strategies for executive functioning. Robin describes a little about herself:I am a professionally trained Teacher and Coach who is passionate about providing the best experience to my clients. As well as training, I have an in-depth understanding of the impacts of living with an Asperger's Profile and/or ADHD in a world that is neurotypical. My approach to coaching is client-centered and strength-based. I join with clients to work through obstacles and meet self-determined goals. For Neurodivergent adults, challenges are often rooted in neurological differences which impact communication, executive function, and/or sensory regulation. As an experienced educator, I also have an understanding of learning disabilities, learning styles, accommodations, and a toolbox of strategies. Coaching and education services are complementary to a variety of other professional services. When needed, I easily collaborate with other professionals and family members.  I meet with clients via online video calls (worldwide). I also meet with clients in person, as agreed to be necessary and safe on a case-by-case basis.Find her at: https://robintatellc.com/

Women Living Well After 50 Podcast
The 10 Principles of Wellness, the keys to ageing well & looking younger – Part 2

Women Living Well After 50 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 33:15


In Episode 1 of Season 4, of the Women Living Well After 50 podcast, my guest was Sally Thibault, the Founder and Creator of the Stronger Leaner Lighter online membership program designed to help women in their 50's and 60's to transform their lives, to feel stronger, leaner and lighter in the journey to ageing well.During our conversation we discussed the first 5 principles of Sally's 10 Principles of Wellness which are the keys to ageing well and looking younger. Sally has a wealth of experience and information to share and I was reluctant to end the interview. I decided to make this episode into two so we could discuss each point in more detail.In this second episode we will cover principles 6 -10.Link to Sally's Top 10 Secrets to Staying Younger Series10 Things You Need To Know About Staying YoungSally Thibault - Stronger, Leaner, LighterWith a successful four-decade career in fitness, wellness, business, marketing and media, Sally Thibault is an experienced Keynote speaker, Wellness & Accountability Coach, Professional Counsellor, Author, EFT Specialist and media commentator. She is the author of three books: The Amazon best-selling - David's Gift, the story of her family's journey following her son's diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome. Tapping to Reclaim You – How to Reignite your Passion, Power and Purpose in 30 days Stronger, Leaner & Lighter - The Intuitive Anti-Aging Wellness Guide for Women to be released in early 2023Sally has been featured extensively in International and Australian mediaShe has been married to husband Gerry for over 40 years and together they have raised three children, David now 36, Alissa 34 and Caitlin 28. While Sally and Gerry live on the Gold Coast in Australia, their three children, who all have dual Canadian/Australian Citizenship, all currently live and work in Canada.Connect with Sallywww.strongerleanerlighter.comwww.facebook.com/sallythibaultwww.instagram.com/sallythibault sally@sallythibault.com.au  

Poplitically Incorrect
The Dodd Pod with Kelly Leventhal

Poplitically Incorrect

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 83:44 Very Popular


RHOC legend Kelly Dodd finally joins Unpopular for an unfiltered interview about her former castmates, battling backlash from Bravo fans, where she currently stands with Andy Cohen, her true political opinions, masks and government overreach, being more hated than literal criminal Housewives and more.  Before that, Jacques gets into Demi Lovato's pronouns and why non binary isn't real, more on the fake ADHD craze, Netflix's Virgin River, RHOA's forced drama and figuring out if RHOBH's Sutton has Asperger's or not. TIMESTAMPS00:50 Demi Lovato08:45 Aussie ADHD craze12:30 Virgin River19:00 RHOA22:50 Sutton's an aspie?32:30 Kelly Dodd interview For more content, subscribe to Unpopular on Patreon! You get access to bonus episodes and get to help keep Unpopular's lights on. https://www.patreon.com/unpopularjp Please support the show by leaving a five star review on Apple, Spotify or Podchaser, or by joining Patreon or donating to Buy Me a Coffee. FOLLOW UNPOPULAR:https://www.instagram.com/unpopularjp/https://twitter.com/unpopularjpSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dad to Dad  Podcast
Dad to Dad 213 - Dr. Eric Endlich of Sonoma, CA Father of Two, Including a Son Who Is Autistic, Discovered Late In Life, He Is Also Autistic

Dad to Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 46:49


Our guest this week is Dr. Eric Endlich, of Sonoma, CA who is an Autistic man, the father of two, a Psychologist, author and founder of Top College Consultants, an organization that serves students with Autism, ADHD and other learning differences, navigate the college admissions process. Eric and his wife, Kristina, have been married for 35 years and are the proud parents of two children; Elyse (21) and Alex (24) who is Autistic. Eric discovered late in life he is Autistic, which has helped him relate to his son and has shaped his career. His book, “Older Autistic Adults In Their Words, The Lost Generation”, is available on Amazon. We'll hear Eric's fascinating story on this Special Fathers Network Dad to Dad podcast.Top College Consultants - https://www.topcollegeconsultants.com Asperger Autism Network (AANE) - https://www.aane.org Email - eendlich1@gmail.com Book: Older Autistic Adults: In Their Own Words - https://tinyurl.com/5czzzyhfPhone – (617) 515-3568LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/topcollegeconsultants/ Special Fathers Network - SFN is a dad to dad mentoring program for fathers raising children with special needs. Many of the 500+ SFN Mentor Fathers, who are raising kids with special needs, have said: "I wish there was something like this when we first received our child's diagnosis. I felt so isolated. There was no one within my family, at work, at church or within my friend group who understood or could relate to what I was going through."SFN Mentor Fathers share their experiences with younger dads closer to the beginning of their journey raising a child with the same or similar special needs. The SFN Mentor Fathers do NOT offer legal or medical advice, that is what lawyers and doctors do. They simply share their experiences and how they have made the most of challenging situations. Special Fathers Network: https://21stcenturydads.org/about-the-special-fathers-network/Check out the 21CD YouTube Channel with dozens of videos on topics relevant to dads raising children with special needs - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzDFCvQimWNEb158ll6Q4cA Please support the SFN. Click here to donate: https://21stcenturydads.org/donate/

The Good Complex
Ep 017 | Creating Possibilities

The Good Complex

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:00


Today we are joined by Charmaine Solomon, the Founder of My Possibilities ,which serves adults with disabilities such as Down Syndrome, Autism, Asperger's, Prader-Willi, head injuries and more. My Possibilities is the first full-day, full-year educational program of its kind in Collin County, TX.

The KrakCast
KrakCast Interview – Living with Asperger's Syndrome

The KrakCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 43:21


Kuba Widlarz was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome as a teenager. He joined us to talk about what it means to have Asperger's and gave us some insights into many aspects of the disorder that you might not be familiar with. Join us and listen to Kuba's story and learn more about this increasingly common diagnosis on the Autism spectrum. 

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Simplifying Your Complexities w/ Impulsive Thinker Andre Brisson

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 18:51


André Brisson, P. Eng., is the host of The Impulsive Thinker Podcast, the podcast for the high-achieving ADHD entrepreneur. Andre owns an entrepreneurial consulting engineering company and recently started Tactical Breakthroughs where he is developing the ADHDTransformation Journey program. Diagnosed late in life with severe ADHD and mild Asperger's(ASD), the mechanisms and systems he created to overcome his undiagnosed ADHD havehelped him succeed. He credits his undiagnosed ADHD as key to his success and a factor in restricting success. Since discovering how to turn his ADHD into a strength, people havesought him out for help with using their ADHD as a strength to drive success. André Brisson has a special ability is devouring and learning complex information and simplifying for others to solve complex problems. Like most entrepreneurs, André has started multiple companies, the two of which failed for various reasons. Learning from those failures, André now operates three very successful companies, including a self-managing entrepreneurial engineering firm specializing in niche markets that require unique training, experience, and impulsive instinct to try new things. Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Andre discuss:   00:45 - Thank you so much for listening and for subscribing! 00:48 - Welcome Andre Brisson! 02:40 - What is your success key for imparting complex information to the neurotypical? Ref: Ringette 04:15 - Simplifying the complex 05:06 - On the differences between informing and teaching 05:30 - When did you get diagnosed and what brought all that about? 06:02 - On inventing a “character” for yourself to be perceived as “not abnormal”. 07:00 - On then importance of being unique  07:45 - You said you were beginning to scare your kids- can you go into details on that? Ref: emotional dysregulation 09:55 - Have you ever bought anything strictly on impulse? Tell us in the comments! ;-) 11:00 - Parenting with ADHD/mild Asperger's prior to a diagnosis 12:20 - So when you got diagnosed, what was the treatment plan? Ref: DBT, CBT Executive Function What is Time Blindness? 13:36 - On learning your strengths and maintaining, managing and delegating what's not best for you. Aka Peter's “life rules” 15:15 - A bit more on delegating and staying in the lane, on the road. 16:38 - How can people find more about you? Email:  andre@andreb.ca André Brisson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andre.brisson.1447/ LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrebrisson/ Twitter: @fatrol Website: www.andreb.ca Objective Engineering Inc. Website: www.objectiveeng.ca Tactical Breakthroughs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TacticalBTs LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tactical-breakthroughs/ Twitter: @tacticalbts Website: www.tacticalbts.com The Impulsive Thinker Podcast Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/impulsivethinkerpodcast LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/impulsive-thinker-podcast/ Twitter: @impulsivthinker Website: www.theimpulsivethinker.com 16:51 - Andre, thank you so much!  Ref: Faster Than Normal the book! 17:75 - Thank you. Guys, as always thanks so much for subscribing! Do you have a cool friend with a great story? We'd love to hear. I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via email at peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  19:08 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits  — TRANSCRIPT via Descript and then corrected.. somewhat: [00:00:38] Hey everyone, Peter. Shankman welcome to the episode of Faster Than Normal. I'm thrilled that you're here. It is great to have you again, we have a fun guest today. I'm gonna start with his tagline because his tagline pretty much says everything ;it's simplifying your complexities, which I think is just the best description I've ever heard of someone who works with people with A D D ADHD, people who are. ADHD. I love that. It's just so clear. Andre, Brisson and I, I screwed it up. I tried my was really hard to get. That was good. Was good's the host of the Impulsive Thinker podcast, very similar to FTN. Podcast for high achieving ADHD entrepreneurs. He owns an entrepreneur consulting engineering company, and recently started another company called Tactical Breakthroughs where he's developing an ADHD transformation journey program. He was diagnosed later in life with severe ADHD and mild Asperger's and the mechanisms and systems he created much like the stuff I did to overcome his undiagnosed ADHD have helped him succeed and he credits his undiagnosed as a key to his success and a factor in restricting success as well. So that's ING to discover, um, Since discovering how to turn his ADHD into a strength people have out for help using their ADHD as well. You talk in your bio about how you have special ability for taking complex information and simplifying for others and first thought, when I heard that was something that happened with me. And I think my mom, like five years ago when she got a new iPhone and she was having a problem doing like four things. And so I just went over there. The their, my parents' apartment. And I'm like, here, gimme the phone done. Dun dun dun. She's like, great, but I didn't learn how to do it. Right. Right. And I realized I'm terrible at taking complex information that I understand and teaching people how to understand it. I just want to do it and get it done. That's an ADHD thing. So let's, let's start there. What is, what is your sort of success key there where you actually have the ability and the, the patience or whatever it is to take that information and simplify it down so other people can learn it as opposed to just doing it for them.  [00:02:55] Andre: Well, the, to me, that's the key difference is I don't do it for them. I've always helped people understand, break down something complex into simple steps or layman terms so that they can act on it. And then they can think about it differently to act on it at a future time. Um, like for example, and on in Canada here, we have Ringette. It's a, it's a, it's a sport on ice for women. So basically they got a rubber ring with a spear, their stick. And I, I referee then I was in an evaluator and, uh, an officially evaluator. So what I actually did was I always asked them what's. The rule, like usually you guys say this occurred, this occurred that I call it right or not. So I go by and says, what's the rule. The rule says this. And then we break down the steps of what occurred and apply the actual rule to those steps. So I step it out for people so that they can understand it. And if you don't understand the first way, I tackle it at a different angle until they get it. And what I'm trying to teach them is stepping out the thought process to come with their own conclusions, with the facts that they know they already had. And didn't realize it. Okay.  [00:04:04] Peter: That makes sense. Yeah, it does. It does. It's interesting. Cause that, that takes patience and, and that's one of the few things that most people with ADHD simply don't have anywhere near half of. [00:04:15] Andre: Mm-hmm yeah. The thing is a lot of times I can simplify that complex information. So someone understands it and so that they can act on it and I can make it real. So usually I, I I'm able to connect something that's in their life or someone else's life or mine. And that's what I do a lot on the podcast is this is a snare that happened. It kind of happened to me. And then people, once you make it real people seem to click with it better.  [00:04:39] Peter: Yeah. Makes sense. And, and yeah, I mean, that's, that's a, a, you know, my keynote speaking trait, you tell stories that people have people who relate to and all of a sudden, it's not some guy on stage talking about something foreign, it's something. Oh yeah. I get that.  [00:04:51] Andre: Yeah. I. I had a chat today with two different people. We, I kind of, I blurted this out and I thought it was pretty smart now to think about it now, but I think there's a difference between informing to understand versus educating, to teach. So if, and for me, I was talking about advocacy as you know, I, I stopped educating people. I just tried to inform people so they can understand adult ADHD and the differences.  [00:05:17] Peter: That makes a lot of sense. I think that also the more informed they are, the more they feel like they can have a handle on it, as opposed to. I guess educating. Yeah. Yeah. They might not necessarily get, no. That makes sense. Tell us about, um, your background. You said you were late, you were late, uh, diagnosed how late?  [00:05:36] Andre: Uh, about four years ago when I was 44. Oh, wow. Um, and then that was a, that was all because of a life Tempest. As I've been calling had three perfect storms collide at once. Um, got into a bad business partnership. I got bored with my first company once it got successful. So I S sabatoged that. Things weren't going well at home. And my Sy symptoms overtook me and controlled me for a couple of years to the point where my kids are just looking at me scared. And I said, I gotta get help. Huh. And got the diagnosis. I went actually to get the diagnosis to prove it wasn't ADHD. Cause I thought there was something worse, wrong with me. Because that diagnosis, like it was too simple of a solution to explain my last 44 years and develop a character that I became so I can fit in and not be looked as abnormal. And then, so I got really good at playing this character. Now I'm learning how to be me and to differentiate the two, because it almost became, you know, I almost, I brainwashed myself to believe that that was the person I was or shouldn't be. [00:06:38] Peter: No, I get that. I mean, it's, it's, you know, fitting in and not being, uh, you know, and not sort of ever really fitting in with the crowd or with, with, uh, any group in, in school, you know, and that takes a toll. I don't think, I think we're just starting to realize what kind of toll that takes on people, um, and how much, uh, that that's re you know, those early forming, forming years are really responsible for sort of right. The kinda stuff you deal with.  [00:07:03] Andre: And then I was overlooked because I was doing well in school. Like I'm also gifted. Um, and so since you're successful and you're doing well in school, you can't have it. You're just not doing what you're supposed to. You're not trying to hard enough for, you know, stop being unique. That was my favorite word. You're too unique to be part of this and I've always fought the right to be unique. And I always thought we should all, we're all different. I understood why we were always trained to say we're everyone's alike, but we're not. We're all unique. [00:07:35] Peter: So what, when you get, I'm curious, you mentioned something, you said, um, you said you had symptoms that were starting to, uh, that were starting to scare your kids. Ex can you go into detail on that?  [00:07:47] Andre: Oh, emotional dysregulation times 2 million. Um, it didn't take much to spark me off. And then all I would do was I'd just be screaming at them for something silly. And when I started being cognizant of a screaming at them, for being silly, my brain was actually saying, Hey buddy, you're overreacting here. You should stop. And then I got the other part of my brain going, eh, forget it. Let's keep going. I'm already into it. Um, so when I saw those look in their eyes, it gave me a. It scared me cuz I saw myself. Um, there when I was a child and that's when I said no, no more, no more. So I went and got help. So the emotional dysregulation definitely took over, um, and enforced, uh, and then my impulsivity and the no filter uh, aspect of my brain having no filter, just my impulsivity, my ver my words would just come out and I just started not caring anymore. And that's when I said that, that, that the symptoms took over, um, impulsive bias, impulsive business partnerships, knowing that it was not going to be good. Um, and for me, I realized with time, since my diagnosis, I have a fear of being idle and when I get bored, that's when I could become dangerous. And that's when, so my physical hyperactivity, even at, as an adult kicks in, if I'm bored and then what happened was with my other company, once the startup phase was done and we're successful in maintaining success and having good gradual growth, I was bored. The, the entertainment, the interest was gone. So I created chaos. Impulsively trying this, trying that in muscle dysregulation, continuing. Um, and, and then just going on with the inattention, not caring, I had a really great point and it just escaped me. It'll come back to that's yeah. [00:09:46] Peter: I mean, that's that happens all the time. You, you go down the route, press rabbit, home, like, wait, my original point was like five feet away from that. Yeah. Um, I think that probably, I think every episode [00:09:55] Andre: and the impulsivity of buying stuff. You know, spending sling money, losing cash flow, all that type of stuff. That was it.  [00:10:03] Peter: It's interesting. I've never, I, I, I, I understand that. And I get that. I I'm fortunate. I don't think it ever, I never went down that rabbit hole too much, but I've certainly made impulse. I mean, you know, mm-hmm, virtually everything I've ever bought in my life has been impulse by, I, I do you wind up doing research on the product you bought after you bought it? [00:10:22] Andre: um, No. I usually do all the research ahead of time. So I know what I'm buying is good is just deciding to do it. Like the one was, Hey, we got a bunch of cash in the bank account. Um, I've been looking at building a server. This is quite a few years ago getting a server for the office. We got a big team, so I'm just gonna blow 40 grand right now, rather on a finance plan. Um, cuz at the same time I didn't care. Um, which was part of it, which was the interest part. Um, but the other thing too Peter. I think that I think a lot of people are getting diagnosed later in life. And for me, I never realized this about two years ago was. It really started to take control. My symptoms. When I had kids, when they disrupted my, my rhythm at home, my routine at home, that was my calm down time. When I got home, I could rejuvenate and now having being stuck, cuz you're scheduled being disrupted all the time. Cuz kids just want to be with you. They just wanna last minute try different things and no, no, I like, I just sat down, I'm ready to do a bunch of stuff and now you're disrupting me. So that's when I think it started to steamroll the effects of these symptoms.  [00:11:35] Peter: I totally totally get that. It's it's a, having a kid. I got diagnosed before I had my daughter, but it was Def it's definitely a, um, you know, you sort of, you get this vibe where it's like, okay, uh, dinner's over, you know, I have an hour till I have to put her to bed, I'm gonna, you know, I'm gonna sit down and breathe and just whatever. And then it's like, dad play with me. And of course I, I will, but it took a while to sort of, uh, be able to focus entirely. Right, right. And  [00:12:01] Andre: not oh, huge. You know? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then you feel shitty as a, as a parent, cuz you can't give your full attention or you're always thinking, how can I get outta this? I , how can go back to what I was doing exactly. Cause I need to get that done. I gotta get it done. What's going on? Right?  [00:12:14] Peter: No question about it. So when, so when you got diagnosed, what, what was the, uh, what was the treatment plan? Was it medication? Was it, . [00:12:22] Andre: We, uh, tried medication, uh, I think I'm part of that 20% that doesn't work well. Um, but I think the, some of the medication I was on at that time, I needed it just to settle and almost had stopped my brain for a while so I can just catch my breath and take everything in. And then, um, Slowly got off of it. Um, but for me, the big thing is I just hyper-focused for a good year and a half on learning everything I could about ADHD interesting and simplifying it. And that's why I tell people like educating yourself the effects and then is huge. And then I was part of therapy group therapy. Now I'm just finishing up my dialectal behavioral therapy. I've done cognitive behavioral therapy, ah, even the group therapy on how to have fun. But it was a neurotypical direction, but anyways, um, a lot of talking with similar people helped. And then for me to simplify ADHD down to, I think it's its core, it's an executive functioning dysfunction and time blindness. Those two affects the, the, the, the DSM symptoms of inattention hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention. Um, that made a lot of sense to me. And then at the same time, shortly before my ADHD diagnosis, I got diagnosed with type two diabetes. And that's when I realized I can't get rid of it. Like I diabetes, I can't get rid of it. Nothing I can do can cure it, but I can manage it and extend my life. And that's what I saw with ADHD. .Manage the symptoms so I can work well. And I had a mantra my whole time for a long time saying your strengths can become your weaknesses. And when I put that together with my ADHD symptoms, as long as I can manage my symptoms, That's how, why I succeed as an entrepreneur and those are my strengths, but if I let them go be overutilized or underutilized and then become my strengths. And that's when I say ADHD can become a disorder, is when they're impeding your day to day. [00:14:23] Peter: I agree. I, I think it's another way of saying, you're saying the same thing that I say a different way, which is, you know, you have to have. These life rules that you can't deviate from because you know, you, your brain works a certain way. And so you put these right pro processes into place that allow you to utilize it to your best ability. Mm-hmm . And if you, if you deviate from that, you're gonna go off the road.  [00:14:42] Andre: Right. And, and then the other thing I discovered too, so for, I don't know, I can't do math. I'm an engineer. I need a calculator here. Um, so about a good 20 years, all I did was read all the self-help books. I've taken almost every assessment out there to identify strengths, but my therapist actually said you were doing all that to find out what was wrong with you to concentrate on what's not good enough to build on. So with my diagnosis, I took there's three good tools that I use that really identifies my talents and strengths. And. Take those. And I help people with these assessments too, to understand what's your unique strength and talent. So if we could just stay in those abilities, Then it's easy to hyperfocus and you're having a lot of fun and you're not, and don't waste your time on things you're not good at and you don't like doing that. So as an entrepreneur, it's handy, you, you got staff, you can have people, you delegate a lot of those, but I help people understand what their unique talents and strengths are, where they should be spending their time, where they can get a lot of energy and enjoyment every day, be creative and then have a team around you that just take care of the stuff you don't like. [00:15:50] Peter: That's a hundred percent given you, have you have someone or people to do the stuff that you're terrible at? I mean, that's, you know, for 14 years now, I've had, I've had my assistant, it's a game changer.  [00:16:00] Andre: Yep. Like we got a minimal limited brain mental brain, uh, energy, right. Every day. And I think ADHD, we just have a really good ability to effectively use it to run all day, or we have a really great efficient way to inefficiently use our mental energy and at the end of the day, it, so if we're starting to do things we don't like to do all day, then we're really, really burnt out at the end of the day. But if we can stay in that lane, man, you can do that seven days straight and not get, get tired. [00:16:29] Peter: It's a great way to put it. It's a great way to close too. I wanna keep us to our 20 minute mark. Uh, tell us how people could find you?  [00:16:36] Andre: Uh, you can find me at, uh, Andre, Andre, b.ca I'll take anyone's email. Um, but you can find me on LinkedIn. Our tactical bts.com is another source.  [00:16:47] Peter: We'll put all the, all the, all your links that you gave us. We'll put 'em in the, uh, in the podcast notes. Andre, thank you so much for taking the time. This was really, really informative. We're definitely gonna have you back, uh, at some point in the near future.  [00:16:57] Andre: Well, I appreciate you having me, Peter. And, um, like I said, like, I don't think I said this, but, uh, yet till now, um, you're Faster Than Normal book. I actually bought it five years ago, thinking it was one how I can work faster. then I bought it again, uh, and read it. And then I found the other book, but I think I really liked your aspect too, that, you know, it's not a disorder. It's our, it's a, it's a very unique ability of doing things and to not thinking as a negative. And, and make it work. And I really, a lot of stuff in there I re not reflected it hit me. I can, I understand exactly what was in there. And it was also comforting to know what I created in the past. Unknowingly. I was on the right track. So I thought it was a really good book and I do recommend it to a lot of people. [00:17:45] Peter: Thank you, man. That's a really, really kind of you. Guys as always, Faster Than Normal, We wanna hear what you're thinking. We wanna hear of any guests you might wanna hear from,  shoot us a, a email Peter@shankman.com. We're on all the socials. You know, our, our handles by now. Thank you for listening. We will see again next week with another guest, we appreciate you and know that ADHD and all forms of neurodiversity are gifts, not curses! We'll see you next week! [00:19:08]Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at shankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!