Podcasts about Himalayas

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Mountain range in Asia

  • 1,599PODCASTS
  • 2,368EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 23, 2022LATEST
Himalayas

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Best podcasts about Himalayas

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Latest podcast episodes about Himalayas

Dark Histories
Tom Slick & The Search for the Yeti

Dark Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 73:24


High up in the peaks of the Himalayas, a footprint in the snow baffles a mountaineer as he attempts to climb Everest for the first time. Pulling out his camera, he prepares to snap a shot, eyeing the horizon nervously before placing his icepick down alongside the print for scale and bringing the viewfinder up to his eye. In India, a tea planter reads about the photograph in a local newspaper and turns over the idea of going to hunt the creature that made the tracks, completely unaware that he was about to start what would eventually become a lifelong mission. On the other side of the world, a Texas oil baron reads about tales of adventure high up in the mountains of Nepal, a mystical land of incense and meditation, and dreams of uncovering the mysteries of the wilds. The trio was, it's safe to say, a fairly unlikely crew, but their fates would become intimately linked by a search that would carry them halfway around the world, hole up in damp caves for days on end and pull off one of the most unusual heists in all of history. It was a search for a myth, a symbol and a monster. It was a search for the Yeti.   SOURCES   Coleman, Loren (2002) Tom Slick: True Life Encounters in Cryptozoology. Craven Street Books, Fresno, CA, USA.   Taylor, Daniel C. (2018) Yeti: The Ecology of a Mystery. Oxford University Press, UK.   Waddell, Laurance A. (1899) Among The Himalayas. Archibald Constable & Co. UK.   Liechty, Mark (2017) Far Out: Countercultural Seekers and the Tourist Encounter in Nepal. The University of Chicago Press, IL, USA.   McGarr, Paul M. (2013) The Cold War in South Asia: Britain, The United States & The Indian Subcontinent, 1945-1965. Cambridge University Press, UK.   Princep, James (1832) The Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, Volume 1. Baptist Mission Press, Calcutta, India.   Redfern, Nick (2016) The Bigfoot Book: The Encyclopaedia of Sasquatch, Yeti, and Cryptid Primates. Visible Ink Press, MI, USA.   Dundee Courier (1951) Everest Has A Monster: Britons Find Footprints. Dundee Courier, Tuesday 04 December 1951, Page 3. Dundee, UK.   Star Tribune (1921) Snowman! Star Tribune, Saturday 17 December 1921, p.20. Minneapolis, MN, USA.   The Sphere (1954) The Abominable Snowman. Saturday 02 January 1954, p14. London, UK.   The Press and Sun Bulletin (1961) Yeti Belongs in Legend Says Hillary, Disposing of Track, Scalp Evidence. The Press and Sun Bulletin, 10th January 1961, p.49. New York, USA   ---------- For extended show notes, including maps, links and scripts, head over to darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories The Dark Histories books are available to buy here: http://author.to/darkhistories Dark Histories merch is available here: https://bit.ly/3GChjk9 Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/cmGcBFf The Dark Histories Butterfly was drawn by Courtney, who you can find on Instagram @bewildereye Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.

Earth Rangers
S4 E12: Adelia Goodwin's Secret Journal - A Fireside Chat

Earth Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 11:57


Emma and Juliette need to spend the night in a cold cave, deep in the Himalayas. What better opportunity for the two research – biologists to have a nice chat around the camp fire and geek out about their favourite topic: wildlife conservation!———————————Take a look at exclusive pics of Adelia's secret journal on the shownotes page. https://earthrangers.com/podcast———————————Think you got what it takes to be a Junior Wildlife Reporter? enter the contest by submitting your report here: https://www.earthrangers.com/leave-us-a-message/Are you a card-carrying Earth Rangers member yet? Make sure to sign up for FREE App today to get your membership card in the mail!Get it here!Find all of our new podcast swag at the Earth Rangers Shop———————————Listen to more great kids and family shows at:http://www.gzmshows.com/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

No Blackout Dates
S2, Ep. 17: The Real Heroes of Machu Picchu

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:25


Marinel de Jesus is the type of outdoors-person the world needs more of. As the founder of The Porter Voice Collective, Marinel advocates for porters' rights in top international trekking destinations including Peru and the Himalayas. She rallies for better working conditions, pay, and even food for the hard-working porters lugging our gear up the world's highest peaks – and after hearing her speak about the cause you'd be hard-pressed to not want to sign on. An avid trekker herself, Marinel and the crew dive into packing for treks, including what isn't necessary to bring along (key takeaway – keep it simple, stupid). They also discuss Marinel's other project, Equity Global Treks, which highlights long-distance jaunts led by women, for women. The trio also hit on what travelers can do to ensure that porters on their trip are treated fairly, and how to vet a tour company for proper treatment of staff. In Hot Takes, Tim ponders a digital nomad he met briefly at the Denver airport and wonders aloud if he's a stalker for continuing to follow this guy on social. Eben makes his case for Dry January being bullsh*t, and the two discuss the pros of ordering two drinks at the same time when at a busy bar. Relevant Links: The Porter Voice Collective Equity Global Treks The Transformational Travel Council (how Tim and Marinel know each other) Tim's Instagram Eben's Instagram News of the Day: The strangest sex laws around the world Diplo took to TikTok to expose what Tulum is really like these days BONUS: What you need to know before visiting Machu Picchu

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation
134: Ginger Zee found the calm after a very personal storm

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 35:04


Ginger Zee is the chief meteorologist at ABC News, reporting on the nation's weather for “Good Morning America” and across ABC News broadcasts and digital platforms. Additionally, Zee is the managing editor of the climate unit at ABC News. Since joining ABC News, Zee has covered almost every major weather event and dozens of historic storms. She broadcasted from the devastated Jersey Shore during Hurricane Sandy, the Colorado floods and wildfires, and covered the aftermath from tornados in Moore and El Reno, Oklahoma. In 2018, she was in the eye wall of Category 5 Hurricane Michael live in the Florida Panhandle and in the 2020 hurricane season, Zee told the stories of devastation from the record number of named storms. From the epic bushfires in Australia to Boston blizzards and record-breaking heat in Death Valley, Zee is there to warn and show the impacts including the relationship to climate change. Zee's passion does not stop with storm chasing. Her love of adventure has taken her and ABC News viewers across the world. She has gone para-hawking in Nepal, flown a drone into the fissure of a volcano in Iceland, hiked the largest cave in the world in Vietnam, para-glided from the Himalayas to the Andes, dove with sharks in the Bahamas, rappelled 27 stories down the exterior façade of the Wit Hotel in Chicago, explored the 275 waterfalls of Iguazú Falls in Argentina and talked climate change on the edge of Victoria Falls in Africa. Plus, skydiving, ice boat racing and surfing live on “GMA.” Prior to joining ABC News, she was a meteorologist at NBC station WMAQ-Channel 5 in Chicago from 2006-2011, also filling in for several NBC and MSNBC News programs. Before that assignment, Zee worked at WOOD-TV in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she part of the Storm Team 8, also covering the environment, science and the impact of weather throughout West Michigan. From 2003-2005, Zee worked at WEYI NBC 25 in Flint, Michigan. She began her career at WLAV FM/ WXMI in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Zee, who has storm chased since college, has a genuine passion for the atmosphere and a dedication to getting young people interested in science. Zee is the author of a trilogy for 8-12 year olds called “Chasing Helicity.” Additionally, Zee and her husband, Ben Aaron, star in “Renovation Realities: Ben & Ginger” on DIY Network. Zee is the co-host of “Hearts of Heroes” on ABC Saturday's, highlighting the natural disasters she knows so well from the first responder and heroes point of view. The Emmy Award-winning meteorologist attended Valparaiso University and holds a Bachelor of Science in meteorology. She also served as an adjunct professor at the University from 2008-2011. Zee also holds the CBM Seal for Meteorology. JONES.SHOW is a weekly podcast featuring host Randall Kenneth Jones (author, speaker & creative communications consultant) and Susan C. Bennett (the original voice of Siri). JONES.SHOW is produced and edited by Kevin Randall Jones. Ginger Zee Online: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gingerzeetv Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ginger_zee Twitter: https://twitter.com/Ginger_Zee JONES.SHOW Online: Join us in the Jones.Show Lounge on Facebook. Twitter (Randy): https://twitter.com/randallkjones Instagram (Randy): https://www.instagram.com/randallkennethjones/ Facebook (Randy): https://www.facebook.com/mindzoo/ Web: RandallKennethJones.com Follow Randy on Clubhouse Twitter (Susan): https://twitter.com/SiriouslySusan Instagram (Susan): https://www.instagram.com/siriouslysusan/ Facebook (Susan): https://www.facebook.com/siriouslysusan/ Web: SusanCBennett.com Follow Susan on Clubhouse LinkedIn (Kevin): https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-randall-jones/ Web: KevinRandallJones.com www.Jones.Show

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
When God Picks You

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 13:36


What to Expect: The Enlightenment Edition "When the universe picks you, and you put on the magic glasses there's rules that go with them. You can never take them off... you never see things as they're supposed to be, you see things as they are."-Dick Gregory  "When I shut my eyes, I still see it (light) shimmering and shining, softer than soft, more tender than tender, finer than fine.  When the eyes are open, I see the blue rays all around.  Whenever I see anyone, I see first the blue light and then the person.  Whenever I see any thing, I see first the beautiful, subtle rays of Consciousness and then the thing itself.  Wherever my mind happens to turn, I see the world in the midst of this shining mass of Light. The way I see things, whether large or small, demonstrates the truth of the verses of Tukaram, which I have quoted before: "My eyes have been bathed with the lotion of the blue light, and I have been granted divine vision."-Muktananda, Play of Consciousness             When you continually meditate on Divine Mother, you start to see her in everything. You see her in everybody, and people – their faces, bodies, colors and features – simply disappear. The first thing that comes in front of you is the form of Devi.  The first layer is Devi, Goddess, Energy, Divinity, whatever name you want to give, and the second layer is light. I see everybody as a light. Then the light disappears, and the third layer that I see is the actual human body. It wasn't like this before; it's not that it has been like this since I was born. This experience came about after my intense sadhana in the Himalayas. And the presence of the divine energy of Mother Divine is so real in my life that I really hope by the time you finish this book, that you would walk away with enough inspiration, as well as learning, to manifest the same in your life."-Om Swami, from The Hidden Power of Gayatri Mantra: How to Realize Your Full Potential Through Daily PracticeRemember--WHEN God picks you, don't get so lost in your worldly work and success that you forget Him, your innermost Self.  Stay aware of this felt-Love (in and AS the background), while enjoying the world (appearing as the foreground)!  Be "in the world but not of it". Write to me and tell me of your enlightening experiences! I Love you and I'm with you, Niknikki@curlynikki.com

KiranPrabha  Telugu Talk Shows
The Saint and the Scientist | Swamy Jnanananda | సన్యాసి, సైంటిస్టు | స్వామి జ్ఞానానంద

KiranPrabha Telugu Talk Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 70:30


#KiranPrabha #SwamyJnanananda #AndhraUniversity Swami Jnanananda born as Bhupathiraju Lakshminarasimha Raju (5 December 1896 – 21 September 1969) was an Indian Yogi and Nuclear Physicist. Swami Jnanananda happens to be one of the first greats to have lived on this land. His life sketch is quite amazing. He left home at the age of 21 years. He toured many places near and around Himalayas doing meditation. He became a Sanyasi as a disciple of Swamy Purnananda. Changed his name to Swamy Jananananda. At the age of 31 years he left for Europe to get his philosophical book printed. His life took a new turn during that journey. He became interested in Nuclear Physics and did his courses in that subject. He did remarkable experiments in Nuclear Physics in Germany, Czechoslovakia, London, USA. After returning to India he worked as a assistant director of National Physical Laboratories and then as head of the department of Nuclear Physics Department, Andhra University. Through out his life he has been a Sanyasi and at the same time Scientist.. Don't miss this gripping narration of his life story by KiranPrabha.

Fantasy Football Delivery Men
Delivery Men Playoff Challenge Episode (Welcome to the Himalayas Episode)

Fantasy Football Delivery Men

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 118:46


Your Deliverymen take a deep dive into the mindset of putting together a team for our annual playoff challenge- story time- week 18 Review and much more! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Long Way Radio
#15 - Harley Rustad (new book: Lost in the Valley of Death: A Story of Obsession and Danger in the Himalayas)

Long Way Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:00


Harley Rustad is a journalist, author and a features editor at The Walrus. His newest book, Lost In the Valley of Death: A Story of Obsession and Danger in the Himalayas is out January 11th, 2022. This book is about American traveler Justin Alexander, who disappeared in 2016 while traveling in India's remote Parvati Valley. In this episode we talk about Justin, traveling in India, and Harley's book, Lost in the Valley of Death: A Story of Danger and Obsession in the Himalayas, which is available now. To learn more about Harley and to see more of his work, check out https://www.harleyrustad.com/ To see some of Justin's photos referenced in this episode, visit https://www.instagram.com/adventuresofjustin/?hl=en For more info about this podcast, visit https://www.longwayradio.com/

Healthy Human Revolution
Improving Your Health Through Your Conscience | Leonard Perlmutter

Healthy Human Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:28


I'm honored to have Leonard Perlmutter back on the podcast. Leonard Perlmutter is the founder and director of The American Meditation Institute in Averill Park, New York, and the originator and editor of "Transformation," the Journal of Meditation as Mind/Body Medicine. He has studied in India, and he is a direct disciple of Swami Rama of the Himalayas. During the interview, he discusses the four functions of the mind: ego, senses, unconscious, and conscience. Leonard states that only the conscience is the only function of the mind that can make a decision making it one of the most impactful on one's life and health. His new book 'Your Conscience' goes in-depth about this phenomenon and how it affects your everyday life. To connect with Leonard: Website: https://americanmeditation.org/product-tag/leonard-perlmutter/

Deviate with Rolf Potts
Lost in the Valley of Death: The life and disappearance of Justin Alexander

Deviate with Rolf Potts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 67:40


"I realized that Justin Alexander was the latest person to disappear in a long history of travelers disappearing in India's Parvati Valley. It's a dark aspect of this really beautiful place." – Harley Rustad In this episode of Deviate, Rolf and Harley discuss how Harley learned of Justin Alexander's story, why he chose to report it, and what makes travel to India unique (2:30); who Justin Alexander was, and what life events and desires led to him being a world traveler and social-media persona (8:00); what makes India's Parvati Valley unique as a mountainous place where backpackers sometimes disappear, and how "India Syndrome" affects travelers (30:00); Justin's decision to live in a cave in the Parvati Valley under the influence of a local sadhu (40:00); Justin's August 2016 Facebook message to Rolf, the timeline of his life before his disappearance (47:30); speculations on what became of Justin after he was seen for the last time, and what his legacy is (57:00). Harley Rustad (@hmrustad) is the author of Lost in the Valley of Death: A Story of Obsession and Danger in the Himalayas, and Big Lonely Doug: The Story of One of Canada's Last Great Trees. Notable Links: Adventures of Justin Alexander (Facebook page) Adventures of Justin (Instagram account) Adventures of Justin (YouTube channel) Chris McCandless (subject of Into the Wild) Timothy Treadwell (subject of Grizzly Man) Hippie Trail (1960s/1970s Asia travel subculture) Tom Brown Jr. (American survivalist) Royal Enfield (type of motorcycle) Mentawai Islands (archipelago near Sumatra) Hero's Journey (mythic narrative template) Joseph Campbell (comparative mythologist) Sterling Hayden (actor and adventurer) Parvati Valley (mountainous region in India) Hashish (drug common in the Parvati Valley) India Syndrome (delusional state) Sadhu (Hindu religious ascetic) "Lost in the Valley of Death" (2018 Outside article) The Deviate theme music comes from the title track of Cedar Van Tassel's 2017 album Lumber. Note: We don't host a “comments” section, but we're happy to hear your questions and insights via email, at deviate@rolfpotts.com.

The Jillian Michaels Show
The Ultimate Vision Quest, with Author Harley Rustad

The Jillian Michaels Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 40:39


Harley Rustad, journalist and author of the new book, LOST IN THE VALLEY OF DEATH: A Story of Obsession and Danger in the Himalayas, discusses the allure of vision quests, self-exploration, and what compels us to find a deeper connection in our lives.Guest Info:IG & Twitter: @hmrustadFor 25% off The Fitness App by Jillian Michaels, go to www.thefitnessapp.com/podcastdealFollow us on Instagram @JillianMichaels and @MartiniCindyJillian Michaels Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1880466198675549Email your questions to JillianPodcast@gmail.comYou can find new episodes of Keeping It Real: Conversations with Jillian Michaels, completely ad free, on Wondery+ https://wondery.app.link/jillianSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Through Inspired Eyes: Travel Can Heal
47: Long Term Covid Healing with Ananda in the Himalayas

Through Inspired Eyes: Travel Can Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 44:32


Have you or someone you know been impacted by COVID's long term effects? As we continue to learn and navigate this virus, the team of Ayurvedic doctors at Ananda in the Himalayas have been working diligently on finding ways to help us heal. Aniket Sarkar, general manager, and Dr. Mathew, Ayurvedic doctor at the founding member of Healing Hotels of the World, educate us on the Post Covid Rejuvenation program. As with all experiences at Ananda, this is customized based on the individual viewing health holistically.  Learn more about the Post Covid Rejuvenation program: https://www.anandaspa.com/en/programmes/post-covid-rejuvenation/112-16/  Visit Ananda in the Himalayas: https://www.anandaspa.com/  Work with IJC: https://inspiredjourneyconsulting.com/brand-ambassador/ 

Outside/In
It Was the Ladies Who Hugged the Trees

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:55


On May 21, 2021, an influential environmental activist died of Covid-19 and you probably didn't hear about it. Sunderlal Bahuguna's passing didn't make the major news outlets in the US, but it was a big deal in India, where he was the renowned leader of the Chipko movement against deforestation in the 1970s. Chipko is a Hindi word for “hugging”, but according to Bahuguna, he was just the messenger of the movement. “It was the ladies who hugged the trees,” he said.This story is about the life and legacy of Sunderlal Bahuguna, and the tree huggers that saved India's forests.Featuring: Haritima Bahuguna SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Subscribe to our newsletter.Follow Outside/In on Instagram or Twitter, or join our private discussion group on Facebook LINKSOn The Fence: Chipko Movement Re-visitedThe Axing of the HimalayasAppiko (To Embrace) CREDITSReported and produced by Felix PoonHost: Justine ParadisEdited by Taylor QuimbyAdditional editing by Justine Paradis, and Erika JanikExecutive producer: Rebecca LavoieMixed by Felix PoonTheme: Breakmaster CylinderAdditional music by Saumya Bahuguna, Samuel Corwin, and Blue Dot Sessions

Postcards From Nowhere
Shimla, Rare Books And The American Declaration Of Independence

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:37


In 1947, on the eve of Partition, a young man left Lahore and came to Shimla. What makes his journey unique, amongst the millions who must have undertaken this voyage is what he ended up doing in Shimla. What started out as a stationery shop went on to become a storied institution. This week, we travel to Shimla and learn about a rare bookshop which through a hand of chance, came in possession of a piece of history - A copy of the American Declaration of Independence. But that was not the only piece of history that the book store held - It also held a piece that went back to the very beginnings of an ancient religion. Tune in, and discover the magic of a rare book store, and what lessons in travel it holds for as we step into 2022. Till then Check out the other episodes of "India's Linguistic Heritage" The Hidden Story of Sanskrit, and the North-South Divide : https://ivm.today/3CpKQuO Reclaiming India's Linguistic Heritage: 300 Ramayanas?: https://ivm.today/3kgataz Partitions Unknown: Hindi, Urdu and the Umbilical Cord: https://ivm.today/3DhQCz2 The Hidden Injustice in India's Languages: https://ivm.today/3HA6YWo Breast Tax, Brahmins and the Bizzare origins of Modern Malayalam: https://ivm.today/3nQyuam The Improbable Impact Of Nature On 2000 Languages: https://ivm.today/3EvvmXz You can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts website https://ivm.today/3xuayw9 You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42 (https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42) You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Bebaak Batkahi
33: Banaras (बनारस)

Bebaak Batkahi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 14:37


This episode is dedicated to Lord Shiva and his Nagari Kashi. Why does this city look different to you as you become more mature and grow older? Why has it been an all time favourite of great saints and philosophers to live in, who could've chosen some serene place in the Himalayas instead?

Fighting Through WW2 WWII
77 The Able Queen, by Rainy Hovarth

Fighting Through WW2 WWII

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 136:04


The Able Queen, Tales of an Indiana Hump Pilot Lost in the Himalayas, China - by Rainy Hovarth - Extracts from the true story, told in his own words, of highly decorated CBI Hump Pilot, Robert Binzer, who flew combat transport missions with the 14th Air Force from China, 1943-1945. Plus: - V-discs - vintage wartime music - Major Mahony's VC story - How to pronounce Aluminium! Links: Link to Wikipedia on Vdiscs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-Disc Lakeview Hot Record Club: http://lakeviewhotrecordclub.org Lakeview Hot Record Club is based at the Spirit Room, 139 State Street, Rochester NY Spotify play lists (or go to Fighting Through Home page/Music) Bill Cheall's war: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5efF3wjTBs0oeXVpDjbdEo?si=494145735c10426a GI Joe Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0700vlwT6wh6WEQKNizPOV?si=5df8f16405c84f09 Rainy Horvath web sites: https://www.rainyhorvath.com/the-able-queen www.rainyhorvath.com Carl Weidenburner is a military historian who has made the CBI Theatre of War his specialty. Check out his extensive page, and amazing collection of information on his site: https://www.cbi-theater.com/menu/cbi_home.html   LINK TO BUY ME A COFFEE   Full show notes at: https://www.fightingthroughpodcast.co.uk/77-CBI-hump-pilot-lost-in-china-WW2 Reviews on main website https://www.fightingthroughpodcast.co.uk/reviews/new/ Apple reviews - https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/ww2-fighting-through-from-dunkirk-to-hamburg-war-diary/id624581457?mt=2 Follow me on Twitter  - https://twitter.com/PaulCheall Follow me on Facebook  - https://www.facebook.com/FightingThroughPodcast

VOMRadio
Moving Moments of 2021 – Part 2

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 26:52


Join us as we continue to look back on some of the most moving moments on VOM Radio in 2021: “Brother Aaron” says Christian persecution in Pakistan is “like the air”—all around, all the time. Aaron Miller says his personal experience of persecution was surprising—but sacred as well. Dan Baumann and Andrew Brunson said they don't miss being in prison, but sometimes they do miss that intimacy with God. (Register to view the Imprisoned for Christ Virtual Event.) Ellen Oblander shared how Richard Wurmbrand responded to suffering—even long after he was released from prison. Anita Smith remembered the death of her husband, Ronnie Smith, in Libya, and how she began to pray for the men who killed him. Tat Stewart tells about being in Tehran the day the US Embassy was taken over in 1979—and how God honored the spiritual seeds he planted in Iran. Andy Byrd told of a young lady who came to Christ in the Himalayas—and paid a very high price. “Brother Stephen” remembered telling the story of Jesus in a Bedouin camp to people who had never heard it before. Tom and JoAnn Doyle shared how God transformed a man from Syria named Mohammed—and through that transformation reached his wife, Dina, as well. John Weaver shared specific ways to pray for Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover of the country. After hearing these brief program excerpts, you'll want to go back and listen to the entire conversations. You can search for VOM Radio on your favorite podcast app, or listen online at the links below. Brother Aaron from Pakistan Aaron Miller Dan Baumann and Andrew Brunson panel discussion Ellen Oblander, editor for Richard Wurmbrand Anita Smith on forgiving her husband's murderers Tat Stewart on living in Tehran in 1979 Andy Byrd, leader of The Send Brother Stephen from Operation Mobilization Tom and JoAnn Doyle John Weaver on Afghanistan We praise God for allowing VOM Radio to share these amazing stories of His faithfulness in 2021. THANK YOU for listening. Please subscribe to the podcast and share VOM Radio with Christian friends you know would also be encouraged by these testimonies!

Whiskey and a Map: Stories of Adventure and Exploration as told by those who lived them.
Bruce Barron: Life as a professional explorer. Part 3 Conclusion

Whiskey and a Map: Stories of Adventure and Exploration as told by those who lived them.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 50:29


Part 3 and the concluding episode of Bruce Barron's expedition to find the source of the Heath River and other tales of adventure.Bruce Barron is a professional expedition guide, explorer and photographer.  Bruce began guiding backpacking and mountaineering trips at the age of 15, and has since led expeditions into remote areas in the Andes, Himalayas, Amazon rain forest and West Papua New Guinea. In this three-part series, Bruce recounts the experiences of a lifetime as a professional explorer.  Listen to his tales of hunting with native tribesmen, a close encounter with a jaguar, witnessing unique customs and rituals, starvation in the jungle, eating Sago grubs in Papua New Guinea, and drinking rancid yak tea in Tibet with the Ladakhi and Chicha with the Amazon's Waorani.Most notable of his adventures is the Heath River Expedition in 1996, which discovered the source of the Heath River in the Peru/Bolivia Amazon Basin. The Heath River delineates the border of Peru and Bolivia for 350 kilometers from the Amazon basin lowlands into the Amazon cloud forest. The expedition's objective was to follow South American explorer Colonel Percy Fawcett's 1910 Expedition route and then continue on to discover the still unknown source of the Heath River and make the first river descent. Learn more about Bruce's adventures at brucebarronexplorer.comSee Barron's photography at brucebarronphotography.comFollow Bruce on his Facebook page.Hosted by Michael J. ReinhartMichaelJReinhart.com

Construction Genius
Keep the Beat! How to Get Into the Rhythm of Successful Technology Adoption

Construction Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 27:22


Construction companies often struggle to adopt new technology. It takes work, time, costs money, and entails risk.  Our guest, Yaron Dycian — Chief Product and Strategy Officer at WINT-Water Intelligence brings an outsider's perspective to the table today on how construction companies can benefit from adopting new technology and using it effectively. We discuss the following essential highlights: • The importance of getting into a rhythm of technology adoption in your organization,   • The importance of consistent communication between the people on the ground and senior executives to ensure good technology adoption,   • How to be more effective at adopting technology in your construction company, and many more.   There's so much to learn today. So keep the beat and dance to the rhythm of adopting new technologies in your construction companies, starting with tuning in to this episode!   Discussion Points:   • 0:00 Introduction     • 3:03 The biggest challenge in terms of construction companies adopting new technologies and using them effectively   • 4:22 What does getting in the rhythm of adopting new technologies really mean?     • 6:19 Balancing the need for profitability and adopting new technologies     • 9:53 Two sets of people involved in the process of adopting new technologies and why it's crucial for them to stay aligned   • 11:42 Technology providers: Distinguishing good vendors from bad vendors     • 12:37 Characteristics of a good vendor      • 16:02 Bringing innovation experts/executives into the team and what their roles are   • 19:36 Examples of the benefits you get when you have innovation executives   • 21:00 What WINT does for construction companies     About Our Guest:   Yaron Dycian — Chief Product and Strategy Officer at WINT-Water Intelligence brings over 25 years' experience in driving strategy, building disruptive products and running market execution at innovative startups and Fortune 500 companies. Before WINT, he ran IBM's cybercrime protection portfolio following its acquisition of Trusteer, and held executive positions at Consumer Physics, RSA, the security division of EMC, Mercado Software, Cyota and others. Yaron holds an MBA summa cum laude from the Tel Aviv University, an MS in Engineering summa cum laude, and a B.Sc. in Math and Physics with the IDF's Talpiot excellence program. He is also an avid road and mountain cycler. He also loves skiing and hiking, especially in remote locations like the Himalayas.   Resources:   • WINT's Website: https://wint.ai/   • CNN Spot: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/03/15/tech/ai-water-meter-wint-spc-intl/index.html   • Restaurant recommendation: https://www.timnatlv.co.il/ or https://www.instagram.com/timna_tlv   • Yaron's LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yarondycian/#   • Company Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/wint-waterintelligence/   Do Your Project Executives Need to Become Better Leaders?   • Book a 10-minute call with Eric Anderton to see if/how he can help (https://10minutes.youcanbook.me/)   Connect with me on LinkedIn. For more podcast episodes, you may also visit my website. Tune in and subscribe to the Construction Genius: A Leadership Master-Class Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher.   Thank you for tuning in!

The NonProphet Podcast
# 182 — Stacy and RC

The NonProphet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 196:09


We recorded this conversation back in October before London got sick and we were overtaken by events.Stacy and RC Townsend join Blair and Mark to talk about art and photography and life. Stacy and RC Townsend join Blair and Mark to talk about art and photography and life. Stacy is a designer, photographer, and jewelry-maker while RC is currently (f)unemployed. We discuss the importance of mentors, people who believe in you, as well as the value of those who don't — because you need someone to tell you that you can't before saying, "I'll show you." Blair describes how heart is the source of art, and our human tendency to seek validation and then deal with criticism after putting art/heart out to the world.In a random rabbit hole, Mark talks about his first trip to the Himalayas (an experience founded in insecurity while his partner, Jeff Lowe, had a different experience, one founded in absolute confidence). Climbing may appear to be very different from art but at the source our motivations and drivers are human, and therefore similar. We talk about the craft of writing, how difficult it is, and also, on some days, how it flows. And to get over the hesitation about the words being good enough Blair advises, "Just vomit the words and press 'Share'". Shortly thereafter, she assures Mark that there is still time for him to become a romance novelist ... instead, he invents the Romance Zine ... aka the 11-page romance novel. Finally, the conversation turns to Stacy's unusual anti-marketing marketing; her website has been under construction for six years and she has made seven total social media posts yet she enjoys a full plate of work based solely on word of mouth and satisfied clients. This is pretty wild in an era where it seems like folks spend more time marketing than they spend making or creating."Full Send wherever you are." Links to chase in this convo:commonform.cotownsendcollective.comblairspeedcreative.com

Atmospheric Tales
Indigeneity and environmentalism in the Himalayas

Atmospheric Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 36:54


In this episode, we discuss the development of infrastructure and the Anthropocene in the Himalayas with a key focus on the impact on Indigenous peoples and their activism.

Armchair Explorer
Below Another Sky: A Himalayan Adventure in Search of a Lost Father with Mountaineer Rick Ridgeway

Armchair Explorer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 42:02


Follow legendary mountaineer Rick Ridgeway on the most profound adventure of his life, a journey through the Himalayas in search of a lost friend. In 1980, while climbing a remote peak in eastern Tibet, Rick and his three climbing partners were hit by a devastating avalanche. Rick survived but as he pulled himself out from under the snow, he saw his best friend Jonathan Wright lying on the ground not moving. He gave him mouth-to-mouth, he stroked his hair, he held him in his lap, but it wasn't enough. Jonathan died a few minutes later in his arms. As he died, Rick made a promise. Thousands of miles away Jonathan's baby daughter, Asia, was taking her first steps. He promised he would be there for her and watch over her as she grew. 18 years later, Asia turned up on his doorstep with a favor to ask. She wanted to go find her father's grave to pay her respects, and she wanted to Rick to take her. This is the story of the adventure. "A life worth living is lived at the edges where it is wild"                     - Rick RidgewayBut it is also the story of one of the greatest mountaineers of all time. Rick's latest book is called 'Life Lived Wild: Adventures at the Edge of the Map'.  It is a beautiful memoir of a life lived to the full, immersed in the beauty and adventure of the natural world. Through this episode we will also hear some of Rick's other favorite tales of adventure and learn the wisdom those wild places have given him. More info at www.patagonia.com Highlights includeGetting lost while sailing across the Pacific Ocean in search of TahitiTaking the famous newscaster Tom Brokaw to the summit of Mount Rainier with legendary climbers Yvonne Chouinard and Doug Tompkins.Nearly dying of hypothermia while kayaking across a frozen lake in Chilean Patagonia.Discovering what it feels like to be trapped in an avalanche facing certain deathFollowing the journey of Rick and Asia through one of the most spectacular landscapes in the worldLearning the wisdom of a life spent in the wild and how nature can be our greatest teacher Join the CommunityIf you're enjoying the show please consider showing your support by buying me a pint! The show is free but it takes many hours to produce and almost all of it is done singlehandedly by me. The sponsors cover costs, but not my time. If you like what you hear and think that two episodes a month is worth the price of a single frosty beverage then please go to www.patreon.com/armchairexplorerpodcast. From just $5 per month you will get you ad free episodes and access to our explorers community with exclusive travel discount vouchers delivered right to your inbox each month. Buy me a pint! ... the next round will be on me.Thank you Sponsors!Today's episode is sponsored by Wayfarer Vans - the backpacker's version of camper vans. Kick-ass van conversions at literally ¼ price of other people, that are designed to de-clutter your adventure so you can be in the moment, taking in the wild spaces your van has delivered you to.  www.wayfarervans.comLet's Hang outFollow @armchairexplorerpodcast on Instagram and Facebook or head over to www.armchair-explorer.com to find more background information on this episode  

Even the Podcast is Afraid
Himalaya's Mysterious Boner Lake

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 35:41


It's Christmas week in America & around the world, so we are taking a break this week to spend time with our families, spike the eggnog, and wait on the jolly fat man in a red suit. We will return with a new episode of Side Crime & Nick Porchetta on Monday 12/27/21.Instead of a new episode of 'Even the Podcast is Afraid', we are unlocking one of our many Patreon exclusive episodes of 'After the Podcast is Afraid' for everyone to enjoy for FREE!!'After the Podcast is Afraid' EP.73 - Himalaya's Mysterious Boner LakeIn this episode of the after show, we discuss the discovery in 1942, by H K Madhwal, an Indian forest official, who stumbled upon hundreds of human skeletons stockpiled in and around Roopkund lake. The find was announced to the public, raising great interest and triggering several investigations that continue to date.[FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA, WATCH OUR TV SHOW, & MORE]LINK to EVERYTHING: https://solo.to/etpia[PATREON]Join our 'Elbow Deep Club' on Patreon for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like the episode you just heard + ad-free & early access episodes & more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudios[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha Vazquez'After the Podcast is Afraid' is an Ordis Studios Original & Exclusive to Patreon MembersCopyright © 2021 by Ordis Studios

The Nishant Garg Show
#179(repost): Raj Sisodia on Wholeness and Healing, Spiritual Journey in the Himalayas, Mind Maps for Writing, Ayahuasca Experience, Feminine and Masculine Energy, Conscious Capitalism, and More

The Nishant Garg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 64:52


This episode was first aired in July 2021 and got massive traction. Therefore, I choose to repost for the new listeners or if any of the existing dear listeners missed. Here you go. Raj Sisodia was born in India and spent parts of his childhood in Barbados, California and Canada. He was educated as an electrical engineer. He pursued an MBA in Marketing and after which he earned a Ph.D. in Marketing and Business Policy from Columbia University. He's a Distinguished Professor of Global Business and Whole Foods Market Research Scholar in Conscious Capitalism at Babson College. He is also the Co-Founder and Co-Chairman of Conscious Capitalism Inc. Raj has published ten books and over 100 academic articles. His work has been featured in the Wall Street journal, The New York Times, Fortune, Financial Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, CNBC and many other media outlets. He co-authored the book Conscious capitalism with the CEO of whole foods John Mackey. In this episode, Raj details this healing journey, blending feminine and masculine energy, discovering and fulfilling one's unique purpose, his psychedelic Ayahuasca experience, and much more. Please enjoy this wide-ranging conversation with Raj. Please enjoy! Please visit https://nishantgarg.me/podcasts for more info. Follow Nishant: Friday Newsletter: https://garnishant-91f4a.gr8.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nishant-garg-b7a20339/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Nishant82638150 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NishantMindfulnessMatters/

Earth Rangers
S4 E10: Adelia Goodwin's Secret Journal - Polar Bears in the Himalayas

Earth Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 21:13


Emma's search for the missing conservationist Adelia Goodwin continues. Now with the help of Dr. Juliette Giri - Adelia's former research partner and a snow leopard expert. While hiking in the Himalayas, Emma finds out why there are no polar bears there, and discovers the next lead in her quest.———————————Take a look at exclusive pics of Adelia's secret journal on the shownotes page. https://earthrangers.com/podcast———————————Think you got what it takes to be a Junior Wildlife Reporter? enter the contest by submitting your report here: https://www.earthrangers.com/leave-us-a-message/Are you a card-carrying Earth Rangers member yet? Make sure to sign up for FREE App today to get your membership card in the mail!Get it here!Find all of our new podcast swag at the Earth Rangers Shop———————————Listen to more great kids and family shows at:http://www.gzmshows.com/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Intuitively Rich with Ani Rich
S2 E62 Empowering “Life Philosophy” We All Need In Life w/Keith Renninson

Intuitively Rich with Ani Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 58:06


In this episode of Intuitively Rich Ani talked to Keith about his life adventures and the wonderful inspirational lessons that he learned through those challenges. Keith is a Colorado native attending Douglas County High School, Arapahoe Community College, Metropolitan State University and the College for Financial Planning. His education was spread out over several decades with two years in the Army with a tour in the Vietnam War. Keith started with New York Life in 1975 when he was 27, acquired his Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation in 1989, and retired from planning in 2001. Keith was President of his local NAIFA chapter 1995-1999. Keith spent two years in the Army with a tour in the Vietnam War. That experience taught him to never waste time, it's too precious, and to that end, he has lived an interesting life racing cars and bicycles, skiing, foreign travel, and climbing many of Colorado's famous Fourteener's. It was that love of hiking and climbing that lead Keith to Nepal twice in the 1990's. His new award-winning book “Tenacity: You Don't Have to Get Lost in Nepal to Find Yourself, But it Helps!” is based on the second trip when he traveled alone and got lost for a few days in the Himalayas. It was from this experience that Keith developed his "TRIP Communication System". TRIP is an acronym for Tenacity, Resilience, Imagination, and Purpose. He started racing bicycles at 54 and became the President of the Colorado Bicycle Racing Association for Seniors (COBRAS) in 2011. Keith gained international acclaim with his 2004 article “Compassion at Death's Door” in The American Legion magazine. His other books include: “The Pain and Joy of Love, A Collection of Black & White Photography, Short Stories, and Poetry”, the illustrated children's book on grieving “Zooch the Pooch, My Best Friend” co-authored with friend Michael Kelley, and three Zooch audiobooks. He also wrote the column “Philosophy Speaking” for the Downtown Denver News for seven years. Ever the volunteer, Keith has sat on Boards and Committees for The American Diabetes Association, The American Cancer Society, and the Porsche Club of America Rocky Mountain Chapter. Looking to expand his horizons after retirement Keith joined a local Toastmasters club and learned public speaking. In 2016, Keith joined the National Speakers Association (NSA) Colorado Chapter and won the Member of the Year in 2017. He served on the Board of NSA-Colorado as the Secretary/VP of Operations from 2017-2021. FOLLOW Keith: Website: https://www.keithrenninson.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/flobito/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thetenacityexpert Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/keithrenninson/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOXGRfQVwDD8qUQ8uUwK9kA/videos Ani Rich is a Life Coach, Embodiment Yoga Teacher, Mother, a Podcast Host, and a Life Coach. FOLLOW Ani: Hear Ani's Story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yWsX... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ (personal) https://www.instagram.com/ani_rich_co... Website: https://anirich.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ani-rich-... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXAi... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/anirichcoaching Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VS7DG76 Much love Ani Rich --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ani-rich/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ani-rich/support

The Big Story
846: Why the SC Judgement on Char Dham Highway Project is Problematic

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 17:18


How does a tourism infrastructure project suddenly become a concern of the Ministry of Defence in India? This is the question which every environment activist in the country is asking about the controversial Char Dham Highway Development Project, which has been riddled with ecological violations ever since its construction began in 2016. The Rs 12,000 crore highway expansion project aims to widen nearly 900 kms of hills in Uttarakhand to provide all weather connectivity to the state's four major shrines—Badrinath, Kedarnath, Gangotri and Yamunotri—all in the upper Himalayas and all in very ecological sensitive zones. Now, the project from its start had a clear motive to provide easier access to the shrines. But over the years, with each ecological concern raised by activist in the Supremo Court, specifically targeting the petition to widen the roads beyond the Ministry of Roads and Transport 2018 mandate of 5.5 meters, the project has also moved into the ambit of national security. The Ministry of Defense in an affidavit in 2020 claimed that the roads need to be 7 meter wide to ferry essential arms and ammunition to sensitive border areas, given the rising China threat. And while the Supreme Court noted the environment concerns regarding the project, it agreed to the requirements of “national security,” and essentially, set aside its 2020 judgement where it denied the Ministry of Road and Transport the same thing. And activists and NGO's petitioning the widening of the highway project have been baffled by the Supreme Court judgement given that it does provide any credence to what they have been saying for the past few years or the hundreds of landslides which have occurred in the region due to the project. Guest: Mallika Bhanot, a member of Ganga Ahvaan, a citizen forum working towards conserving the Ganga and the Himalayas Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Editor: Shorbori Purkayastha Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

Cinemavino
We Don't Need Another Hero

Cinemavino

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 31:03


*This is a re-upload of our Venom podcast. On October 11, 2018, Cinemavino debuted on an unsuspecting world.  Much like WWE, it was beautiful, gripping...it was RAW. And it was just me and Trav.  Taylor was somewhere deep in the Himalayas.  Sean was touring with the Stones. We were pretty nervous for this first Todd-pod, and it does [...] The post Venom: We Don't Need Another Hero appeared first on Cinemavino.

Brilliant Gaze
Front Door Open

Brilliant Gaze

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 31:53


Our special guest, Keith, is a cross-cultural witness who lives with his large family in the Himalayas. Listen as we discuss changing perceptions of what it means to be a Christian in a non-Christian majority. Learn how to live with your front door open! Episode 2-19 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brilliant.gaze.5 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brilliantgazepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/brilliantgaze

New Books in Political Science
Amish Raj Mulmi, "All Roads Lead North: China, Nepal and the Contest for the Himalayas" (Context, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:04


On the sidelines of COP26, Nepali Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba met his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi as part of an effort to find a way to rebuild ties between Kathmandu and New Delhi--which had grown sour in the recent years, with a boundary dispute between the two as its low point. Around the same time, China trumpeted a donation of 1.6 million COVID vaccine doses to Nepal, as the country stays around a 30% vaccination rate. Discussions of Nepal often reduce it to a country sitting between two great powers—especially as relations between those two great powers worsen. Or, perhaps, as a strategically important country—but one whose history and people are rarely brought up. Amish Raj Mulmi's All Roads Lead North: Nepal's Turn to China (Context, 2021) published internationally by Hurst early next year, helps to fill in these critical details. Combining insights from centuries of history, to on-the-ground reporting along the China-Nepal border, Mulmi gives a full representation of Nepal's long relationship with its neighbors. Helen Li, freelance writer and journalist, joins Amish and me for this interview. Helen was stranded in Nepal during the COVID pandemic, and saw firsthand the interconnected between Nepal, India and China. In this interview, Amish, Helen and I talk about Nepal and China: what connects their countries, their economies, and their peoples. We talk about historical links, Tibetan exiles, investment, and what India thinks about all this. Amish Raj Mulmi's writings have been published in The Himalayan Arc: Journeys East of South- east and The Best Asian Speculative Fiction 2018; and Al Jazeera; Roads & Kingdoms; Himal Southasian; India Today; The Kathmandu Post and The Record. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of All Roads Lead North. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
Amish Raj Mulmi, "All Roads Lead North: China, Nepal and the Contest for the Himalayas" (Context, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:04


On the sidelines of COP26, Nepali Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba met his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi as part of an effort to find a way to rebuild ties between Kathmandu and New Delhi--which had grown sour in the recent years, with a boundary dispute between the two as its low point. Around the same time, China trumpeted a donation of 1.6 million COVID vaccine doses to Nepal, as the country stays around a 30% vaccination rate. Discussions of Nepal often reduce it to a country sitting between two great powers—especially as relations between those two great powers worsen. Or, perhaps, as a strategically important country—but one whose history and people are rarely brought up. Amish Raj Mulmi's All Roads Lead North: Nepal's Turn to China (Context, 2021) published internationally by Hurst early next year, helps to fill in these critical details. Combining insights from centuries of history, to on-the-ground reporting along the China-Nepal border, Mulmi gives a full representation of Nepal's long relationship with its neighbors. Helen Li, freelance writer and journalist, joins Amish and me for this interview. Helen was stranded in Nepal during the COVID pandemic, and saw firsthand the interconnected between Nepal, India and China. In this interview, Amish, Helen and I talk about Nepal and China: what connects their countries, their economies, and their peoples. We talk about historical links, Tibetan exiles, investment, and what India thinks about all this. Amish Raj Mulmi's writings have been published in The Himalayan Arc: Journeys East of South- east and The Best Asian Speculative Fiction 2018; and Al Jazeera; Roads & Kingdoms; Himal Southasian; India Today; The Kathmandu Post and The Record. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of All Roads Lead North. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Amish Raj Mulmi, "All Roads Lead North: China, Nepal and the Contest for the Himalayas" (Context, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:04


On the sidelines of COP26, Nepali Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba met his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi as part of an effort to find a way to rebuild ties between Kathmandu and New Delhi--which had grown sour in the recent years, with a boundary dispute between the two as its low point. Around the same time, China trumpeted a donation of 1.6 million COVID vaccine doses to Nepal, as the country stays around a 30% vaccination rate. Discussions of Nepal often reduce it to a country sitting between two great powers—especially as relations between those two great powers worsen. Or, perhaps, as a strategically important country—but one whose history and people are rarely brought up. Amish Raj Mulmi's All Roads Lead North: Nepal's Turn to China (Context, 2021) published internationally by Hurst early next year, helps to fill in these critical details. Combining insights from centuries of history, to on-the-ground reporting along the China-Nepal border, Mulmi gives a full representation of Nepal's long relationship with its neighbors. Helen Li, freelance writer and journalist, joins Amish and me for this interview. Helen was stranded in Nepal during the COVID pandemic, and saw firsthand the interconnected between Nepal, India and China. In this interview, Amish, Helen and I talk about Nepal and China: what connects their countries, their economies, and their peoples. We talk about historical links, Tibetan exiles, investment, and what India thinks about all this. Amish Raj Mulmi's writings have been published in The Himalayan Arc: Journeys East of South- east and The Best Asian Speculative Fiction 2018; and Al Jazeera; Roads & Kingdoms; Himal Southasian; India Today; The Kathmandu Post and The Record. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of All Roads Lead North. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
Amish Raj Mulmi, "All Roads Lead North: China, Nepal and the Contest for the Himalayas" (Context, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:04


On the sidelines of COP26, Nepali Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba met his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi as part of an effort to find a way to rebuild ties between Kathmandu and New Delhi--which had grown sour in the recent years, with a boundary dispute between the two as its low point. Around the same time, China trumpeted a donation of 1.6 million COVID vaccine doses to Nepal, as the country stays around a 30% vaccination rate. Discussions of Nepal often reduce it to a country sitting between two great powers—especially as relations between those two great powers worsen. Or, perhaps, as a strategically important country—but one whose history and people are rarely brought up. Amish Raj Mulmi's All Roads Lead North: Nepal's Turn to China (Context, 2021) published internationally by Hurst early next year, helps to fill in these critical details. Combining insights from centuries of history, to on-the-ground reporting along the China-Nepal border, Mulmi gives a full representation of Nepal's long relationship with its neighbors. Helen Li, freelance writer and journalist, joins Amish and me for this interview. Helen was stranded in Nepal during the COVID pandemic, and saw firsthand the interconnected between Nepal, India and China. In this interview, Amish, Helen and I talk about Nepal and China: what connects their countries, their economies, and their peoples. We talk about historical links, Tibetan exiles, investment, and what India thinks about all this. Amish Raj Mulmi's writings have been published in The Himalayan Arc: Journeys East of South- east and The Best Asian Speculative Fiction 2018; and Al Jazeera; Roads & Kingdoms; Himal Southasian; India Today; The Kathmandu Post and The Record. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of All Roads Lead North. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Tough Girl Podcast
Jill Wheatley - Visually impaired, traumatic brain injury survivor. Adventuring in the mountains around the world.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:51


“In the blink of an eye, I went from being an active, autonomous athlete to  suffering a traumatic brain injury (TBI) that took 70% of my vision and nearly my life. Now I aim to be mindful in every moment and strive to make every second count while adventuring in mountains around the world.”   Jill in her own words:   “On a day that began like any other in a high school Physical Education class, September 2014 began an expedition of survival. A line drive, a hardball to the head, began a climb testing personal strength and human potential. A medical team, hundreds of hands from 7 hospitals across 3 countries, guided me towards a peak that felt impossible to climb, traumatic brain injury (TBI). While I craved to climb alone, they got me to the summit but my work was just getting started. Now I am traversing an avalanche triggered by the TBI which left me days from death, with 70% vision loss and a life threatening eating disorder.   No mountain can challenge me the way traumatic brain injury has. I chose to adventure in massifs around the world with the intention to adapt to vision loss and acceptance of the trail my life had taken.   From surviving to thriving, I have run, climbed, and skied my way around the world embracing the 30% vision I am fortunate to have. My trails have connected with the Andorra Pyrenees, Italian Dolomites, French and Swiss Alps, Slovenia's Julian Alps, Iceland, India and Nepal Himalaya, New Zealand, Argentina, Peru, and the American Rockies.   As a traumatic brain injury survivor and visually impaired athlete adventuring in mountains around the world, I have a complex story of resilience to share. Speaking to resilience, head injuries, eating disorders, visual impairments, trauma, or mental health or simply sharing my story, I can make connections through authentic tales of my trails from depths of darkness to adventuring in the highest of the Himalayas.”   CONTENT WARNING - We discuss; Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), eating disorders, anxiety, PTSD and thoughts of suicide.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Speaking to us from Nepal Who is Jill in her own words Growing up in a sporty, adventurous family Becoming a teacher and following her passion for travel Teaching in Singapore, Russia, Switzerland and Germany  Taking advantage of the opportunity to travel September 2018 and how her life changed in an instant Being hit by a hard ball on the side of her head Going to hospital and being send home Ending up in intensive care with a bleeding and swelling brain Dealing with a Traumatic Brain Injury Finding out she would never see out of her right eye again Losing depth perception  The impact the TBI has had on her appetite and relationship with food Seeing multiple specialists and spending a lot of time in hospital Starting to get her independence back while in Colorado  Looking out to the mountains  Feeling very lost and grieving her past life Needing to go and heal in the mountains  Starting to travel again Creating a blueprint and plan for the future Being open to change…. Falling in love with Nepal and being inspired to get back into running Not wanting to share her story Being authentic with her feelings and being vulnerable Starting her website and starting to share her story Not wanting to do social media  Accepting that her life had changed Testing herself at altitude Getting connected with the running and climbing community in Nepal Dealing with pneumonia  Starting to climb higher in the Himalayas Planning to climb mountains over 6,000 metres Dealing with covid in Nepal and being in lockdown for 8 months Trying ice-climbing in early 2020 Escaping the lockdown and heading up into the mountains Not being able to run while in rundown and having to try different types of training while indoors Losing her father suddenly and supporting her family from afar  Spending time alone in the mountains Training to climb the 8th highest mountain in the worlds - Manasulu  Visa's for Nepal and being on a student visa Managing depth perception while climbing mountains  Spending time in the mountains as part of the healing process Acceptance of what's happened? Dealing with dark days and using different tools to help manage the feelings Why meditation is a significant part of her daily practice Hiding behind her sunglasses and not being comfortable with the way she looks Being a work in progress and being aware of her mindset and thoughts The good wolf and the bad wolf - choosing which one to feed Wanting to build on the good Connecting with Jill   Social Media   Website: mountainsofmymind.com    Instagram: @mtnsofmymind    Facebook: @mountainsofmymind    Twitter: @mtnsofmymind   

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
162: Jimmy Naraine on Being a Full-Time Nomad for 8 Years and Connecting With People Across Cultures Through Hip Hop

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 64:41


Jimmy Naraine takes us on his journey growing up in Poland to mixed parents, getting into graffiti and skateboarding as a form of rebellion, and eventually embracing hip hop and beatboxing.  Jimmy beatboxes live on The Maverick Show and then explains how he still uses it in his personal and professional life today, as well as in his travels—both to connect with people across cultures and to diffuse potentially dangerous situations. Jimmy then talks about how his interest in world travel developed, and how he was able to travel on a shoestring budget before he had much money—including a 3,000 kilometer trip across Europe on just 200 Euros. He then explains how he learns languages through intensive immersion and by leveraging the 80/20 rule.  Jimmy also reflects on his sustainability pillars for living a healthy, fulfilling, exciting life as a full time nomad for over 8 years.  He discusses his selection process for his travel destinations, and explains how he structures his lifestyle.  Finally, Jimmy shares his experience hiking the Annapurna Circuit in the Himalayas, and the profound life lessons that came out of it.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com

Whiskey and a Map: Stories of Adventure and Exploration as told by those who lived them.
Bruce Barron: Life as a professional explorer. Part Two

Whiskey and a Map: Stories of Adventure and Exploration as told by those who lived them.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:38


Bruce Barron is a professional expedition guide, explorer and photographer.  Bruce began guiding backpacking and mountaineering trips at the age of 15, and has since led expeditions into remote areas in the Andes, Himalayas, Amazon rain forest and West Papua New Guinea. In this three-part series, Bruce recounts the experiences of a lifetime as a professional explorer.  Listen to his tales of hunting with native tribesmen, a close encounter with a jaguar, witnessing unique customs and rituals, starvation in the jungle, eating Sago grubs in Papua New Guinea, and drinking rancid yak tea in Tibet with the Ladakhi and Chicha with the Amazon's Waorani.Most notable of his adventures is the Heath River Expedition in 1996, which discovered the source of the Heath River in the Peru/Bolivia Amazon Basin. The Heath River delineates the border of Peru and Bolivia for 350 kilometers from the Amazon basin lowlands into the Amazon cloud forest. The expedition's objective was to follow South American explorer Colonel Percy Fawcett's 1910 Expedition route and then continue on to discover the still unknown source of the Heath River and make the first river descent. Learn more about Bruce's adventures at brucebarronexplorer.comSee Barron's photography at brucebarronphotography.comFollow Bruce on his Facebook page.Hosted by Michael J. ReinhartMichaelJReinhart.com   

Locales Unknown
Exploring Nepal & The Himalayas with Suman Dhakal

Locales Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 63:09


In this episode we meet Suman. Chris starts off the episode by sharing his kindred experience of trekking to Everest base camp together. Suman tells us about his climbing and trekking experiences, his favorite stops in the Himalayas and some hidden gems for those who do not enjoy hiking. We finish up with his favorite place that is still a locale unknown even in Nepal, the Mustang District, and round out the episode with an overview of budgeting tips,  Nepali cuisine and proposed itineraries for all timelines.Whatsapp: +977 985-1011095InstagramEmail:  Sumandhakal1992@gmail.comMustang DistrictHimalayasFun fact: Nepal has the second deepest canyon in the world along with the world's highest mountain. 

Grand Tamasha
Tibet: India and China's 'Three-Body Problem' in the Himalayas

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 39:19


Ambassador Nirupama Rao has had the kind of career that every Indian Foreign Service aspirant dreams of. In 2011, she retired as foreign secretary to the Government of India, the most senior position in the foreign service. She has served as spokesperson for the Ministry of External Affairs, ambassador to Sri Lanka, ambassador to China, and ambassador to the United States of America. She is also the author of a new book, The Fractured Himalaya: India Tibet China, 1949-62. The book is a deep dive into one of the most consequential periods of India-China relations—a period whose repercussions are felt even today. Ambassador Rao joins Milan on the podcast this week to discuss Nehru's long fascination with China, his inability to settle India's border dispute with China, and his “flawed heroic” character. Plus, the two discuss the current state of border tensions and the deep roots of China's infrastructure advantage in the Himalayas.“Pallavi Raghavan on an Alternative History of India-Pakistan Relations,” Grand Tamasha, April 7, 2020.“Modi's Farm Law Reversal, India-China, and Trade Policy,” Grand Tamasha, November 23, 2021.“Kanti Bajpai on Why China and India Are Not Friends,” Grand Tamasha, July 6, 2021.C. Raja Mohan, “Nirupama Rao's latest book, The Fractured Himalaya, is a lucid account of Sino-Indian relations,” Indian Express, November 7, 2021. 

BFA Life Podcast
Alumni Influencing Their World - Katie in the Himalayas

BFA Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 37:21


We are connecting with BFA alumni who are influencing their world for Christ. Join us for a conversation with Katie who is working as a nurse in the Himalayas and hear how God is continuing to shape and equip her.

TRT Revolution Podcast
How to Cut Through The Noise of Your Ego Senses And Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide w/Leonard Perlmutter

TRT Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 58:06


We hold so much wisdom inside ourselves, but because we've been trained to prioritize our egoic senses, much of that wisdom never manages to come to the surface.    How can we push past the noise of what our ego is telling us, so we can put more emphasis on what our conscience has to say? Is it possible for our unconscious mind and our conscience to work together in tandem?   In this episode, Founder of The American Meditation Institute, Leonard Perlmutter shares how to tap into our conscience, so we can unlock a greater sense of health, happiness and fulfilment.    Three Curiosity-Driven Takeaways    The importance of striking a balance How can we achieve mental flexibility, so we know when to listen to our conscience, and when our egoic senses are working in our favor?    Why we need to create a ‘business plan' for our lives We pour so much of our time into planning our careers; why shouldn't we do the same for the other areas of our lives?     How to prioritize conscience in a culture personified by consumption It's impossible to live without some ‘stuff', but how much of that is really necessary, and how much of it is keeping us from tapping into our inner happiness?   Guest Bio-    Leonard Perlmutter is the Founder and Director of The American Meditation Institute. Author of The Heart and Science of Yoga®: AMI's Empowering Self-Care Program for a Happy, Healthy, Joyful Life, Leonard has an extensive background in meditation and is passionate about teaching others about the impact it makes on people's lives. A student of Yoga Science since 1975, Leonard is a direct disciple of mind/body medicine pioneer, Swami Rama of the Himalayas.    To find out more, go to:  https://americanmeditation.org/ Or email him directly at ami@americanmeditation.org

VOMRadio
NEPAL: Choose To Be Joyful

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 24:57


“Pastor Chitria” has been arrested multiple times for his ministry work in Nepal. He says such treatment is an honor and a privilege! Pastor Chitria talks about preparing believers to stand strong in the face of Christian persecution. He says new Christians preparing for baptism must answer seven questions, including whether they are willing to lose their family, friends and even their freedom to stand for Christ. Hindus believe there are more than 330 million gods—yet radical Hindus in Nepal see Jesus as a great threat to their life and culture. Pastor Chitria shares one unique challenge Nepali Christians face when one of their fellow believers dies, and how it is used to pressure new believers to renounce their faith in Christ. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast.

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
‘Torn': Balancing family at home and risky adventure far away

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:19


“Torn” is a new documentary about world-renowned mountain climber Alex Lowe and how his family coped following his 1999 death in the Himalayas. “When his body was discovered and our family made the decision to go back to Tibet together to recover his remains and put him to rest, it brought all that [trauma] back to the surface for me. … I think coming out of that trip was really the impetus for me in wanting to make ‘Torn,'” says filmmaker Max Lowe.  With the Omicron variant in the U.S., President Joe Biden announced new plans today to mitigate COVID spread, which includes ensuring insurers pay back members for costs of at-home COVID tests.  Around 150 million people around the world could be forced to move because of climate change within the next few decades, according to the World Bank. Climate migration is already happening in California and reshaping political environments. Finally, critics review the newest films: “Flee,” “Benedetta,” “The Hand of God,” “Drive My Car,” and “The Power of the Dog.”

SuperFeast Podcast
#144 Sexual Activation and Feminine Embodiment with Eva Williams

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 76:53


Eva Williams is the founder of Golden Lotus; A divine online portal of meditations, movement practices, and sexual/spiritual energy education designed to cultivate spiritual awakening, sexual activation, and embodied sovereignty. This episode explores rebirth and the unfolding of the sacred feminine through preparation and activation rituals, with a deep dive into birth and pregnancy. Tahnee and Eva journey into the numinous layers of Eva's healing work, her Golden Lotus portal, her focus on cultivating and purifying the body through ancient techniques, sexual embodiment, self-pleasure practices, and the many dimensions of birth work. A healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques, Eva carries a depth of knowledge that women need now more than ever. Currently, the way most women in society birth is within the structure of an over-medicalised patriarchal system. Sacred feminine lineages of natural birthing wisdom have been at large, replaced with time constraints, interventions, inductions, and regulations; The antithesis of a naturally unfolding feminine space. How did we end up here? With so much of her work focused on this space and where sexual embodiment falls into birth, Eva discusses the importance of birth preparation; From detoxing, orgasms, and opening the pelvis to the deep work of trusting the body and baby to do what they instinctively know how to do. This conversation is a deep weaving of energetic, sexual, and birth culture healing; For all women, past, present, and future.   "Many people come into tantra with a concept of a partner base in mind. But the way I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women; I never thought I would be working with birth. That was not my aim; My aim was to heal people. I worked on everyone. Ultimately, I wanted to find God. I wanted a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And over time, that guided me in that direction.  But there was a level of care and sobriety cultivated within me before I was put on that path. And this level of deep devotion and sobriety to my self-development was paramount".   - Eva Williams     Tahnee and Eva discuss: Doula work. Ultrasounds. Inducing labour. Foetal monitoring. Dolphin midwives. Birth preparation. Empowered birth. Tantric practices. Devine Female Orgasm. Self-pleasure practices. Feminine embodiment. Female sexuality and birth. The pelvis is a fluid body. Somatics and embodiment. Time constraints placed on pregnancy and birthing.   Who is Eva Louise Williams? Eva Louise Williams is a healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques. She began her journey at 18 learning reiki and pranic healing, before becoming initiated into Kriya yoga (the lineage of Babaji) at 20, then went on to study Shiatsu, Japanese Acupuncture, and Taoist sexual cultivation techniques. She began teaching others at 26 and received the transmission for Golden Lotus at the age of 29. She currently has over 10,000 hours of experience as a bodyworker and teacher. Eva is also a doula, a birth educator, and an RYT 500 in tantric Hatha and kundalini lineages. Golden Lotus was founded to both serve and lead female seekers towards awakening and remembering Self-love & trust. It is a series of teachings that cultivate spiritual and sovereign embodiment; the focus lies in stabilising, purifying, and awakening through ancient techniques and spiritual secrets taught through a state of ritual and Holy full-body Prayer.     CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: goldenlotus.com Golden Lotus Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody, and welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. Today, I'm joined by Eva Williams. I'm really excited to have her here. I've been following her work online and she's really aligned with what we do at SuperFeast. She's an explorer of this wide world of Daoist medicine through the Japanese lineage, but also, she waves in, from what I can tell, you seem to bring in all these beautiful, different traditions, Sufism, Kriya yoga, different types of feminine embodiment, Pranic healing, that kind of stuff. So I'm really excited to have you here today. I'm really excited to share with our community your work.   Tahnee: (00:37) And if you guys are interested, we'll talk about it through the podcast, but Eva has a whole lot of resources on her website, courses you can do related to different aspects of a lot of the stuff we teach at SuperFeast. So thank you for joining us here today, Eva, it's such a pleasure to have you here.   Eva Williams: (00:53) My pleasure. Thank you so much.   Tahnee: (00:57) Yeah, I'm so excited. I think I first came across you on Instagram and I've had a look through what you offer. I know you haven't studied with Mantak, but it really seems aligned with a lot of the work that I learned through studying with him, the feminine work around energy cultivation. Obviously, you've studied Shiatsu and Japanese acupuncture. So you speak to the meridians and all those kinds of things. Would you mind telling us a bit about your journey here? How did you get to be offering Golden Lotus to the world?   Eva Williams: (01:30) Yeah, sure. All right. My journey's been quite interesting in terms of length because my mom is really into alternative medicine. I remember when I was six years old and I just had this incredibly bad tonsillitis, it was to the point where I was being taken out of school for days and days every week. And my mom noticed that I responded really, really well to the osteopath that she would take us to because she used to take us all three to the osteopath regularly. And so the osteopath said, "Look, this kid is responsive as hell. You should just take her to a cranial osteopath because that will help."   Eva Williams: (02:12) So I started going to this professional cranial osteopath when I was six, and it was the only thing that assisted, it was the only thing my body would really respond to. So really, from an early age, my mom knew that, particularly me, I think my brother and sister definitely as well, but particularly me, if anything would happen, like when I was 13 and I had anxiety, my mom was like, "Oh, we could put her on anti-anxiety or we could do reflexology with Bach flower remedies." And also, I had psoriasis, I had developed psoriasis when I was 13. And psoriasis, for those of you who don't know, is a skin issue, and it's one of these just really stubborn, autoimmune things.   Eva Williams: (02:55) Anything that's autoimmune is basically, no offence to all of the fantastic doctors and the medical community, but anything that's autoimmune is basically in the realm of, "We don't really know what the fuck is happening, so here's some steroids. That's where we're at." And so I started trying out these different things and some of them are called like bowel neurotherapies, which are where you'd have a salt bath and then UV light therapy or something like that. And there's not a lot of sun in the Netherlands where I was living at the time. So I started getting into this world where every time I'd be going to this clinic, I'd be checking out the cards on the notice board.   Eva Williams: (03:34) And there'd always be like random things like Karma healing or like emotional Chakra clearing. And one day I found this card and I was like, "This is so good." I walked around with this card for like a week or two, and then I called the person. And I remember, as soon as I called her, she was like, "Yeah, how can I help you?" I'm like, "Look, I don't really know what you do. Do you speak English? I don't really know what you do, but I feel really like this is something that I need to try." And she was like, "Hmm, no, you need Dini." I was like, "I'm sorry, have we even met? I'm trying to book an appointment with you."   Eva Williams: (04:04) And she was like, "No, you need Dini." I was like, "Oh, okay. I need Dini." And then this woman was this like 75-year-old woman who looked so young. And she was like, "How old do you think I am?" I'm like, "We've been through this before." She was just amazing. And she barely spoke any English. And I remember I was 15 when I first went to see her, and she did Meridian massage. She did Meridian clearing and healing. She was just a healer, so she would tell me a bunch of different things, and then she would do this work on me. She would tell me things that I look back on now, I'm like, "Dude, she was so on point."   Eva Williams: (04:44) But at the time, I was like, "What the fuck is she talking about?" She's like, "You're taking on a lot from your father." I'm like, "Okay."   Tahnee: (04:51) What does that mean?   Eva Williams: (04:51) Exactly. And now, I'm like, "I'm that person." But it was quite a unique experience. And I remember when she first read my astrology chart, she just looked at me. And it was very Dutch. The Dutch are very dry, they don't beat around the bush, they're very pragmatic and straightforward. And she was like, "Wow, that's not good." I was like, "Why are you doing this to me?" So she started saying to me really early on when I was 15, 16, I didn't like high school, so I left high school when I was 15 to teach myself. She started saying to me really regularly, "You have to promise me that you will do this work." She's like, "Do you think what I do is amazing?" I'm like, "I think it's pretty out there."   Eva Williams: (05:36) And she's like, "Okay, but what you are going to do is this, but much, much more." And she's like, "You have to promise me." And my mom taught me from when I was really young that a promise is a really strong word and you don't use it if you can't keep it. So I was like, "Far out, man, this is my life ahead of me and you want me to..., " But she sent me to some other people, liquid crystal healers and all sorts of things, so I was getting into some really bizarro stuff. And I wasn't telling my parents that much about this because it no longer had this homoeopathic application anymore. Now, it was just like, "Fuck it, I'm going to go on a journey and meet the [inaudible 00:06:07]. See you later."   Eva Williams: (06:08) I was getting into some really out-there stuff at like 16, 17, but it was, it was really amazing. So I followed that thread and I taught myself, I homeschooled myself. And I got into a really great university. And so I went to university, everyone told me people are more free thinking in university, etc, etc. And I thought, "Okay, great." But actually I didn't find that, I actually found that the institutionalised information had just become denser. I didn't find that people were more free thinking, I found that there were more presumptions. And especially for someone who didn't go through the IB or the international baccalaureate programme, it was really difficult for me.   Eva Williams: (06:51) I had some really awakening moments, just some really jarring stuff happened where I was like, "I don't think I really belong here." And my dad moved to India that year, and so my brother and sister and I all went to see him in India. My dad's a geologist, so all around the house, ever since we were little, we'd had tumbled rocks, amethyst, turquoise, this or that. So he was always teaching us about all these crystals. So when my brother and I got to India, we saw the tumbled rocks, these beautiful amethyst, and we both took one. We were like, "Let's go to the Himalayas."   Eva Williams: (07:28) He's like, "Yeah, let's learn yoga from a really old yogi." I was like, "Yeah, let's go do that." So and I was like, "Dad, I'm taking this rock with me." He's like, "If you take that, you're bringing it back. That's my rock." So I took this amethyst in my pocket and I went into the Himalayas. And I met a woman and she... I wanted to study Reiki, that was my thing. She just looked at me and she was like, "Hey, look, I'm going to give you these codes for all the different levels of Reiki, and then I need you to come back and I want you to teach my level two students." I'm like, "Lady, I just walked in here. I don't know what Reiki is yet."   Tahnee: (08:01) I've got to learn.   Eva Williams: (08:06) "I've got a nab at this, I had a dream on the bus. There's a lot going on right now. I don't think I'm ready to teach people something I haven't learned." But what she was picking up on was that I could touch people and feel what they were experiencing. So I came back the next day, and I was just putting my hands on people and I just explained what I could see or feel. And she's like, "You need to promise me ... " I was like, "You know what, I've heard all of this before, my friend. I have heard all of this before." So I went back to the Netherlands to university, and I was doing my 30 days. You have to do this self Reiki thing after you do Reiki.   Eva Williams: (08:45) And during that period of time, I was like, "I'm not meant to be an architect, I'm not meant to be doing what I'm doing. And so I need to go." And so I gave away everything I owned and I said to my dad, "I'm free again." And he's like, "Yeah, great. You left high school twice and now you're leaving an international honours university. This is a great run you're having over here. I hope you put my amethyst back."   Tahnee: (09:07) Yeah. So proud.   Eva Williams: (09:10) He's like, "You'll face... " I'm joking. And he was like, "Okay, look, you've always been who you are, no one's stopping that. But what are you going to do? You should have a bit of a plan." And I was like, "Yeah, well, what do I have to my name?" He's laughing. He's like, "What do you have to your name? You're a broke student. You have nothing but a ticket home to New Zealand that I will give you until you're 22." So I was like, "All right, great. I'll take it." So I went to New Zealand for three weeks and I went for a Reiki session. And this woman, she did that same thing, she's like, "You don't need me, you need Barbara and you need Jan."   Eva Williams: (09:43) And I'm like, "Okay, send me the names." So I started exploring all these different modalities of incredible light work, just incredible, incredible things while I was there. I go down to the ocean and dolphins would come and visit me, and then I'd go see the healers, and they're like, "You called those dolphins." I'm like, "Okay. All right. Let's calm down." But now I'm like, "We all call the dolphins." Now, I'm like, "Of course, I called the dolphins."   Tahnee: (10:07) They're our people.   Eva Williams: (10:08) My allies. They came to me in my hour of need. It was just a beautiful time. And then one day, in my heart, I just heard... I was waiting for that moment where you hear it from within, because I have a very active mind, so I can make up whatever I want to hear. But I heard Melbourne from my heart. And I was like, "Okay, that's where it's going to be." So I called my parents, I'm like, "I'm going to Melbourne." They were like, "Oh, thank God, she's got a plan." And I went there and I thought I was going to stay doing something graphic design or something design oriented, because that's a big part of my passion in life.   Eva Williams: (10:42) And I found the Australian Shiatsu College, and I found my shakes. I found my Sufi shakes. And once I found these two things, everything else fell in line. Yes, I was initiated into Kriya yoga over when I was 21, which was amazing. When I was 20, still finding my feet, I hadn't found the college yet, I hadn't found my shakes yet. I used to lie in my bedroom listening to singing balls. And that was this one guy who I just loved, very camp, but amazing, but just incredible sound healer, just such an amazing heart and soul. And he would just put all this water in a bow and he'd be like, "These are the dolphin's ball, the dolphins are coming to sing us."   Eva Williams: (11:26) And he would hit it and he would play it. And it was like, oh my God, this man, I don't even know where he comes from, but he's amazing." So one day I fell asleep, listening to this and I woke up and how you know YouTube just plays. And I saw this image on my screen, and I looked at it and it was this blue light and this golden man. And it just said, "The golden body of the Yogi." And I knew in that moment this is why I'm on the planet. This is why I'm on the planet. And so then I found out who that was, and that was an image of Babaji. And so then I found out about Kriya yoga.   Eva Williams: (12:00) And it's interesting because when I had looked for yoga schools in India years before, the only ones that I had found that I wanted to go to were the Kriya yoga schools. And so I became initiated into the Kriya yoga lineage of the Babaji and then his disciple Lahiri Mahasaya, and then Sri Yukteswar, and Paramahamsa Yogananda. And that was the beginning of things unlocking for me. And then I found Shiatsu in oriental medicine, and I went on to study Japanese acupuncture. And then I also found a teacher, a female teacher, and she did a beautiful mixture of yoga and Daoist work with the Jade egg. And then through the studies that I was doing and her even teaching in the same building, I just made this place my home and we'd get all these amazing international practitioners.   Eva Williams: (12:50) I found myself picking up exactly what I needed from that, including doula training and all sorts of things like this that were going on in the space. And then I worked at a Japanese bath house after I graduated for five years or so, I think it was, or something around that. And I really was so lucky because even if you want to rack up hours as a practitioner, it's very hard to find a place to be doing flat out work as Shiatsu practitioner just right out of school. But I was able to rack up at 10,000 hours really quickly in my first, I would say, first six or seven years of work.   Eva Williams: (13:27) And then I went to Bali, I got married. I went to Bali for a honeymoon, and then I just decided I was going to move to Dubai because it was something I really wanted to do. And then about a year into being in Dubai, I was just lying in the bathtub and I just had this full download through my body. And these images came to me and all this stuff and I was just being told what to do like, "You need to write this down, you need to go and get these things." And I was told to build out a whole altar. So I had this massive altar. And I was just sitting in front of it like, "Okay, I now live in a church. What next?"   Eva Williams: (14:06) My husband, he was in Iraq at the time, so he wasn't home. So I was like, "Nobody's going to know about my weird little mat?" And then when he came home, he's like, "That's a lot of candles. Do you need to light all of them at once? Are we doing a séance? What's happening here?" But as I was doing this, the spirits of these different plants I've been told to buy exactly 13 were coming to me, people were sending me things. I was finding things that I'd had in my library for a long time, I'd just never seen them with that particular glow or from that angle, that a transmission was coming through.   Eva Williams: (14:41) And I basically just sat down and I wrote the 10 transmissions of level one of Golden Lotus, which is the eight extraordinary vessels and the 12 main meridians. Unless you do a practitioner training, I don't do Triple Warmer and Pericardium. So it's basically just the five elements. So water, wood, earth, metal as it were, and fire. And then the eight extraordinary. But we do the Chong Mai twice because it has the main vessel and then two other vessels. And for the purpose of female sexual cultivation, it's important actually to separate those two. And then from there, it just started unlocking, like level two became the three gates of orgasm and just the content was just pouring down.   Eva Williams: (15:28) And it was a mixture between a really pure transmission I was being guided to and led to, and then a really deep weaving of just years and years. I'm very, very autodidactic because I didn't go to high school even, so my ability to sit and research and work if I have the impetus is quite high. If not, guess what?   Tahnee: (15:54) Very low. I can relate to that.   Eva Williams: (16:00) I'm like, "Let's have a show of hands." I'm pretty sure everyone's like, "Yeah, that's a... '' So I was able to just channel this, and then it just was really natural that these two modalities, the way it's structured is that the level one is really about working with the Yoni egg, so the Jade egg. It's really about clearing your own body, detoxing and recentralizing through the pelvis. So clearing trauma in the pelvis, opening the sensitivity of the pelvis, and really weaving in the whole rest of the body to a pelvic alignment. So beginning to really understand all of these different reflex zones that we have in the body that all relate to the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (16:43) And I don't just mean the internal reflex zones of the different organ systems, I also mean really beginning to explore somatically the balance between the sacrum and the buttock and the stone and the breasts, or how there's different alignments of your pelvis and your jaw and your mouth. And there's multiple different ways that we can set up these reflexologies that allow us to have a sense that we're hinging from the pelvis. So it's very much about coming into that, and it's not supposed to be... It's supposed to basically teach you how to come into contact with your own energy, to disperse it through your whole body so that you can actually have proper tantra experiences and also to self-regulate.   Eva Williams: (17:23) Because the level two work, it's almost like we go from a pelvic central model out to the body. And then the next level is all more explicit. So it's like self-pleasure practises. Or if we do like a retreat, we'll do some touch exchange practises. If you come to my clinic, I will do internal work at times, things like this. And so that's very triggering work. And I've seen, because I have been in many of these schools with sexual energy, the lack of self-regulation that is taught before highly activating practises come into play. And I didn't like that.   Eva Williams: (18:02) And so while I didn't necessarily plan the way that Golden Lotus was channelled, it is a very deep reflection of the beliefs in the general that I've taken, which is that we need to prepare our body before we do all this highly sexual activating practise. Because otherwise, I think one of the big things in the tantra communities and things that's happened is, it's just become all about sex dressed up as something spiritual, you know?   Tahnee: (18:26) Oh, I know.   Eva Williams: (18:28) You're like, "Really? I've never come across this before."   Tahnee: (18:31) I'm just laughing because I spent some time at Agama Yoga in Thailand I have never laughed so hard. We did a 10 day silent meditation and we were asked to abstain from sex for 10 days. And every day, someone would ask, "I really feel like I need to have sex today. Could I possibly not have... " I was like, "So you guys can't go 10 days without touching yourself or someone else." I've never seen anything like it. So if you love Agama, I found it a really toxic culture. It was almost high school. I was really shocked.   Eva Williams: (19:10) It's infamous. It's infamous for this. My teacher went there, one of my teachers was there and she told me all about it. And then even recently, I was sitting with a friend and I was mentioning some of these things, and she was like, "Oh my gosh. One time, when I was at the very beginning of my path, I went to this place." And as soon as she said it, I knew. I was like, "I know where you were talking about. I've never been there myself, but it's infamous."   Tahnee: (19:37) It was an experience. Yes, I hear you.   Eva Williams: (19:37) I think that this thing is also, I think a lot of people come into tantra with a concept of partner base in mind, and the way that I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition and things like this, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women, I never thought I would be working with birth. This was not my aim. My aim was just to heal people. I worked on everyone. And ultimately, my aim was just to find God, I just wanted to have a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And so that over time guided into that direction, I just saw the level of care and sobriety that was cultivated within me before putting me onto that path.   Eva Williams: (20:30) The level of deep devotion and sobriety to my own self-development was paramount. And so there wasn't a sense of like there was a real sense that I wasn't allowed to just mess around, I wasn't allowed to just go to whatever workshop I wanted or something. I was really guided very strongly as to what is an integrity and what is not an integrity as far as transmissions go. And I'm very grateful for that. At least it worked for me within my system of integrity. So then basically it brought the birth of this beautiful work and I think that people love it when they do it, and I think people do feel that they can regulate themselves through it.   Eva Williams: (21:12) And that work for me, very, very naturally falls into birth work. If you are learning how to move and you're learning all these different ways of detoxing and opening your body and then you're learning these three gates of orgasm, which is very specifically sent into the pelvis, so then we are really going into the semantics of the pelvis alone. If you're doing all of that work, that is the birth prep is just extraordinary. And so I developed that into a birthing programme as well, because we need more of that. I think that you're not really taught how much prep goes into birth until you're pregnant.   Tahnee: (21:48) And it's really not a great time then to be exploring.   Eva Williams: (21:52) No. Not at all because it's traumatic.   Tahnee: (21:53) Because of your trauma.   Eva Williams: (21:53) You can definitely do some work on it then, but you need some guidance and holding through that because unwinding trauma can take a really long time, the somatic body's not quick   Tahnee: (22:10) Not fast, very slow.   Eva Williams: (22:17) It really likes to take its time.   Tahnee: (22:17) Oh man, it's so true. And I think what is so interesting about what you're speaking to though with coming into birth work, I know for me, I did muntuk's work and I was having internal work there and working with eggs and clearing those, that whole period of time was big for me. It was unpleasant in some ways and really beautiful and powerful in other ways. But I came to birth and I remember thinking like, "If I hadn't done that work, I wouldn't be able to hold myself through pregnancy and birth the way I've been able to, through pregnancy and birth."   Tahnee: (22:56) And you are speaking to this sense of sobriety and this sense of strength and just the ability to hold your own energy and read your own energy and tune into it, I think that's the piece for women going in and it's like, you're going to have people try and tell you things that you have to filter through, your truth filters. You have to make decisions around your sovereignty and around your care that you probably... These are big decisions and you don't have much context for them usually. I know for me even being fairly educated, there's just stuff I was like, "Do I have to do this? What are the rules?"   Tahnee: (23:32) And I think if you don't have that strong foundation, I think that's stuff golden lotus, it sounds like it just provides that container for women to start to build that trust in themselves so they can go and then really be open to what is honestly the most incredible experience you can have as a woman. I know woman choose not to birth, but for me, profound, but a lot of preparation too, I think in my experience.   Eva Williams: (23:58) I think it's really underestimated how much prep it takes. And I think it's also, to understand that you've got so much content that you want to read about the spiritual, about the physiological, but also how much you've got to inform yourself around just-   Tahnee: (24:13) Practical.   Eva Williams: (24:14) Yeah. Just random medical stuff, because we are taught to just, if someone's wearing a white coat, they know. They wouldn't suggest it if it wasn't for your best.   Tahnee: (24:23) Is that true?   Eva Williams: (24:23) That's not true. And it's sad. It's so sad to acknowledge that, but that's unfortunately the truth. And so I'm in the process of putting together a programme now which really takes people, basically it's like a month-by-month programme. So you can buy the modules as a month or you can buy them as a whole. And it's got workbooks and meditations. It addresses the emotional, the spiritual, how far along your baby is and where they're growing.   Eva Williams: (24:57) And it really also, for me, there's like this very strong concept of, you have the mother, you have the child, and then you have the mother-child unit, this third that's being generated and they call it mama toto in Swahili, this concept of the mother-child. And to build a bridge between these things because one of the things that I've noticed in for example, certain modalities like APA, like the pre and perinatal psychology, people who do fantastic work is that one of the main... how do I explain this for people who don't maybe come from this context? Someone asked me recently, how can you tell if your doula is a good doula? How can you choose a good doula?   Eva Williams: (25:44) How many stars are there in the sky, my friend? And then immediately it came to me, I know it really... And I realised that the doula that I really, we don't even call ourselves doula's anymore because we consider ourselves more birth keepers or birth workers because the work gets so close to midwifery at a certain stage that the idea that you are not advocating for a client or all these sorts of things, it doesn't have a place when you get to a certain level of birth work. And these women, all of them speak to the baby individually to the mother. And immediately I realise, "Oh, if your doula will have an individual relationship to the baby, as they do to you, but they are there for you, to me, that's a good doula."   Eva Williams: (26:38) And I know that sounds strange, but I come very much from this concept that the baby is always the most conscious being in the room, born or unborn. And so if we can begin to actually... What I would love for more women to know is that a lot of women really get bogged down with this idea like, "It's me, it's my body. Yes, my partner's helping me, but I have to carry this. I feel heavy, this baby's relying on me." And so there becomes almost a scarcity of this really deep sense of drudgery or something related, or just a deep sense of lack of support that becomes related to birth.   Eva Williams: (27:10) And one of the things that I think is really important for women to understand is neither on a physiological level, not spiritual level are you alone? This baby is the one that will release the hormone that will tell your body and your stomach when to dilate. This child will send stem cells to heal your body into your blood. This child is there for you, and this child is leading this labour actually. So this child is bringing you energy and bringing you protection, and bringing you gifts of healing. And this moment is actually for you, it's not happening to you, it's happening for you.   Eva Williams: (27:49) So the moment that that child is born is your rebirth as well, it is your moment to also let go and let something new come through. And I think that interconnection, that interplay is what allows women to not just trust their body, which is one of the thing that I wish more people could establish prior to falling pregnant, we should call it rising pregnant, "I rose pregnant."   Tahnee: (28:14) It's beautiful.   Eva Williams: (28:16) But also that they begin to trust not just their body, but the baby. So they're like, "Yeah, my body knows how to do this and this, baby's got this, I've got it. Our relationship got it and my body's got it. So this is what's going to happen." And just really leading from that place. And for many people, that might sound fantastical, but the more that we're going to understand birth, the more that we look at what's happening with the stem cells, the more that we look at the neurology and the physiology of labour itself and the more that if you have done that previously, you'll know that this is real, this is actually what's happening, that there is this very deep exchange of support.   Eva Williams: (28:56) And that's what I think is the most powerful thing is when a woman trusts so innately in her body and in the child that has chosen her to take this journey, that bond is what's leading the labour. I just think that that's very powerful. So the course that I've developed is to try to assist with that, and then obviously is also bringing different movements for different trimesters because different parts of the body obviously get affected at different times, and hypnobirthing scripts and of dolphin and whale stuff going on there, because you know, our allies.   Tahnee: (29:31) It's so funny all the stuff you're speaking about. With my daughter, she's five now, nearly five, but I had a dolphin come to me while I was pregnant with her in the water. And she had me through the whole pregnancy, guiding everything. I was doing body work at the time and I had this really strong download that I had to stop. And I remember contacting my teacher, who's the female teacher of Chi Nei Tsang from Mantak Chia. She was like, "If the baby's telling you to stop your stuff," and I had this golden thread with her and she was this little golden being, so probably about, I think around two dissolved completely. It got weaker and weaker over time. But just all of that stuff...   Tahnee: (30:17) And I had a lot of stuff going on in my life when I was pregnant with her and she just held me like I was... I remember thinking, "I should be really stressed out right now, but I feel really safe and really held through this." And it took me a little while to realise that that was her contributing that to my experience. And I think that trust is something she gave me, which I think is a really beautiful thing. I'm halfway through my pregnancy now, I'm four months, but this pregnancies been really different for me. So it's interesting. I'm interested to see how they play out, because I haven't had that same sense of baby protection or strong baby messages.   Tahnee: (31:03) But I'm interested in that space because I think it's hard to talk about that stuff as a woman, the midwives I had were very practical, wonderful women, but they were very grounded and of the earth. And you had a textbook pregnancy and a textbook birth, well done? And I was like, "Yeah, but what about all this cool stuff that's happening to me?" And they were like, "We don't want to talk about that stuff." I was like, "Okay."   Eva Williams: (31:33) It's a shame actually because it's weird thing-   Tahnee: (31:35) I'm glad you're here.   Eva Williams: (31:35) What did you say?   Tahnee: (31:38) That I'm glad you're here in the world.   Eva Williams: (31:41) Dolphins are so important in birth. That's so important. People who are not getting this message, I'm like, "You guys have to... " I always tell my clients, I'm like, "Just Google." I'll be like, "Yeah, the dolphin midwives." And then everyone at the table laughed. I'm like, "Huh." Wait until you see it.   Tahnee: (31:57) It's true, Hawaii.   Eva Williams: (31:57) I know. And then I'm like, "Google it. You Google dolphin midwife." And people come back, "Whoa." I'm like, "Yeah, that's actually a"-   Tahnee: (32:01) And wasn't they doing it in Russia, the Google something?   Eva Williams: (32:05) They did, yes. Birthing to being, Alana's work was incredible.   Tahnee: (32:08) Because Jeannine Parvati Baker talks about it a lot in her work, and some other people have talked about studying.   Eva Williams: (32:16) I think the woman who found a birth into being, she had a centre in the Caspian sea where the dolphins would come in and people would just be freebirthing in the water, which is wild. And so we have over here, birth it's a very obstetric-run American imported system. It's pretty brutal. So we are looking at different birth centres talk of shifting some things around birth here because Dubai is like a playground in terms of, they're so open to new ideas. And people may not think of them like that from the outside, but they really are.   Eva Williams: (32:56) They're so innovative and there's some very special, very, very, very special energy to the Emiratis to the Bedouin people, just something very special. So we were looking at working with a very beautiful woman whose work I incorporate a lot into mine, her name's Dr. Gallery. And she has some beautiful, gentle birth clinics in London and things like this. And she said, "Oh yes, I'd love to come out and do something with you guys in Dubai, but I only want to work with the dolphins." And she's a full OB/GYN. And I was like, "You and me, this is going to work so well." I was like, "Scrap all the land we've found, we're going to the ocean."   Eva Williams: (33:43) I was like, "This is the future of it. This is the future of birth." And I think that there's a lot of beautiful places in Cairo and around Egypt as well like in Sharm El Sheikh and in the Red Sea that we might begin to also see really beautiful work with the dolphins popping up. And I know that a couple of people that I know have wanted to do things like this in the North of Ibiza, and South, but the problem is the water's very cold over there, so it's not really something that can work as well. But in these waters, when the dolphin comes to the baby, it is telling you that you are going to give birth soon. Maybe in this instance, I don't know where you were in your pregnancy.   Tahnee: (34:18) No. I was heavily pregnant. My husband I got engaged there, and we got married there. It's this very special spot for us. And I was standing probably naval deep in water and it came, honestly, I was terrified. I was not like, "Oh my God." I was like, "Ah, I think a dolphin is coming at me." And it whooshed so close to me. My husband was out deep and he turned around and saw the dolphin and was like, "Whoa." And then there was a whole pod behind him. But it broke off and came and checked me out. And they can sonar heartbeats and stuff so I was thinking it must have been checking me out and being like, "What are you doing?"   Eva Williams: (35:00) So what they do is when you're very heavily pregnant, if they come towards you and if they put the nose toward the belly or come very close to you, usually you're always going to give birth.   Tahnee: (35:08) I thought it was going to scare me.   Eva Williams: (35:08) Oh, what a lovely experience.   Tahnee: (35:14) I was not like, "Oh my God." Seriously, I was like, "Holy crap, is this safe?"   Eva Williams: (35:18) I know. Every time I was in New Zealand and dolphins came as well, I was swimming in the water and I just shot bowl upright and I was standing and I was like, "There's something in the water." And I'd hear these voices like, "It's okay." I'm like, "It's definitely not fucking okay." My instinct body was like, "This is not okay." And my spiritual body was like, "It's going to be okay." And every part of me was like, "That's fine, but I'm still going to stand because I can run, and those, they can swim. This is not my territory."   Tahnee: (35:45) It's true.   Eva Williams: (35:49) It's so true. But they can activate the labour. They can do this really strongly by communicating with the child as well. It's something very, very powerful.   Tahnee: (35:58) Super cool. And the indigenous people here where we are, they believe that they are their people. Every time I've been in any ceremony or anything they will speak to the whales and the dolphins here as being ancestors.   Eva Williams: (36:10) Yeah. They bring children.   Tahnee: (36:14) Yeah. It makes a lot of sense.   Eva Williams: (36:18) I believe they bring the children because they don't just turn up when a woman's very pregnant to assist in the physiological activation of the hormonal aspects of labour, many, many women will see dolphins on the night they conceive or at the time or just before conception. And whenever a woman's like, "Yeah, we're trying to get pregnant. Oh, I saw dolphins." I'm like, "You go have baby." I had a friend and she saw porpoises. They're not even dolphins, I was like, "You go have a baby." And they did the ultrasound and they tuned it back to that time.   Tahnee: (36:49) Perhaps they're related to a dolphin somehow.   Eva Williams: (36:51) I'm like, "It could be a manatees, I don't care, you're having a baby." I'm joking.   Tahnee: (36:59) An orca. Let's not get too crazy. But it's okay. Tell me about this primary thing. That's interesting, because I know if you're not aware of this, I don't know if we've spoken about this on the podcast yet, so the hormonal cascade that the baby triggers in the mother, this is all these beautiful juicy hormones like oxytocin and things that, A, make birth less painful, which is a good thing. And B, obviously also the whole cascade of uterine contractions, breast milk coming in, all of these things. So the baby actually triggers that. And one of the things that happens a lot in our culture is we induce, or if there's an obstetrician that my midwife shared with me who wants to induce everyone at 38 weeks in a hospital near us.   Tahnee: (37:40) And this kind of thing just terrifies me, and I have friends who've waited 43 weeks plus for their babies to come.   Eva Williams: (37:48) Especially plus babies.   Tahnee: (37:51) My daughter was 42 weeks on the day. And I just think, can you speak a little bit to women who might have fear around, "I'm getting pressure from my OB/GYN or my midwife to induce." I know it's a real slippery topic, but at least speak to that.   Eva Williams: (38:06) No, no. It's not. I don't think it's slippery at all, I think it's underdressed. And it's interesting, I remember, so here they've got DHA, the Dubai Health Authority, has a policy around a certain time. Even if your OB/GYN is more liberal, there's a certain red tape that they can't really cross. And so I remember the first hospital birth I did in Dubai, home birth is illegal here by the way. It's actually not illegal to give birth at home, it's illegal for anyone to assist, anyone who has a licence issued by the government could get it taken away if they assist you.   Eva Williams: (38:44) So if you bring in a midwife from overseas or for me, I'm not an OB/GYN or a midwife, so I'm also not really assisting people with home births here because I don't think that's necessarily a great thing to do. But if someone were in labour and it was progressing really quickly, rather than stress them out and shove them into a car, I think I know what I'd probably end up doing. But it's an interesting thing because I remember the very first one I attended, the OB/GYN was just pressuring my clients so hard and she was outside and afterwards she was crying.   Eva Williams: (39:20) She's like, "I don't know what to do." And so obviously, as a birth worker, I've got 117 different things to pull out of the cupboard because I'm acupuncture, Im like okay acupuncture, we've been doing Homoeopathy week, 36 or 38 at that point, let's try some different homoeopathy, maybe something that's addressing more of the fears and emotions. Let's do massage, let's do the dirty three, hot food, a glass of wine and have some sex, all of that. And then also internal work, massage the cervix, check how it phased someone is, just at that stage of pregnancy. So we did a really beautiful ceremony of her husband and her on the bed, and I did the internal work. It was very dark. We put on music.   Eva Williams: (40:10) And we just really checked out what was happening, what the engagement was. So not a vaginal exam, but just to actually see, and definitely not a sweep or something, none of that stuff I'm trained in, but just really actually to feel how the effacement was going, how the pelvis was feeling, what was actually getting caught up in the pelvic. Was there something caught up there or was she just not ready? And for me, it was really clear that she's just not ready. It's her first baby, it's 39 weeks and the baby is just not ready. It's not coming yet.   Eva Williams: (40:38) I think that what's difficult about getting pressure... I remember after this situation, I gave them all these techniques. I said, "We're going to make a plan. Don't worry." And they felt better, and I went to my car and I just fucking sat in my car and cried for 20 minutes. The sense of stress and pressure, and it's not even my baby, that happens in that room when a doctor strong arms you and tells you that what they know is right, when it may not feel right for you, is so intense. And I know that doctors don't fully understand that. I know that OB/GYNs, not all of them fully understand that. I have the great privilege of working with many who do.   Eva Williams: (41:17) And I remember during this labour, I was sitting out in the hallway and I was just crying. And the doctor came to me and she's like, "Why are you crying?" I'm like, "Dude, you're pushing so hard. This is ridiculous. This is going to end really not well." And then she started tearing up and sat down next to me. And she's like, "It's just a lot of pressure." And we were just having this full heart to heart, just weeping in the hallway. Like, "What the fuck?" But it managed to buy me another 48 hours for my clients, which is amazing.   Tahnee: (41:46) Good work.   Eva Williams: (41:52) It's so much pressure. It's so much pressure. The thing is that there's very little that actually requires induction. Things that do not require induction, your baby is too big for your pelvis, it's a big baby, your baby has passed 40 weeks, meconium has passed, the cord is around the neck. These are not reasons for induction and they're not reasons for C-sections either. It's just very intense. I think some something that people don't understand is that an OB/GYN or a medical professional on your birth is someone that you want there in an emergency situation, they have no requirement to witness physiological birth. They have none. They do not have to witness a single, natural, physiological birth as part of their training, they have to do surgery.   Eva Williams: (42:48) So their whole frame of reference is coming that birth as an emergency. They have never had to sit. If you ask an OB/GYN what's a normal to long labour, I had an OB/GYN tell me that 10 hours was a long labour. I'm like, "Jesus Christ, what are you guys having? Have you got a slip slide set up out here." I was on a midwife tour recently in Aspen, someone's like, "How does labour take?" And the midwife's like, "It can take up to two hours." I was like, "What?" If it's your fourth baby and you're at nine centimetres. It's just ridiculous.   Tahnee: (43:19) Wow.   Eva Williams: (43:19) Yeah, I know. I know. And I always think to myself like, "Wow, I think that 40 hours of fairly active labour is long." I think that labour from early labour onward can go on for a week. That's the sort of time I'm willing to just give a woman and her body to just dilate at its pace and do its thing, and it's just unheard of. So if people are getting pressure to induce and it's funny, because we've made this thing over here and we're not doing it yet, but it's a couple of doulas and I have this, it's kind of our joke, but I also want to do it. And it's going to be for women who for partners, 36 and 37 weeks onward, and it's going to be the induction group.   Eva Williams: (44:01) Basically, you all come together and we watch a funny movie or a beautiful movie about birth, and you get a glass of red wine. We're not getting hammered over here, but you get a glass of red wine. We have some food, whether it's Indian or Thai, something with a little bit of spice, a little bit Mexican or something, and you just share. And you can share if it's stressful, you can share if it's funny, we share content and information. And then if you want to stay for the second part, we teach something like certain techniques, maybe not actually internal, but certain techniques like clitoral stroking or labial massage or hip massage or things like that that your partner can do that will assist in your hips getting ready and things like that.   Eva Williams: (44:42) And just from 37 weeks on, everyone is welcome to just join, come, have that glass of wine, just get a move on. Do a bit of dancing, have a bit of laughter. Because the group, you share more pheromonal energy. Because that's something that isn't readily shared, adrenaline and cortisol inhibit oxytocin. So if you're stressed, you cannot go into natural labour, they inhibit one another. So if women are feeling stressed about being induced, the thing that they really need is they need to disconnect from the timeline of intensity, they really need the opportunity to disconnect from that.   Eva Williams: (45:17) So if the doctor's pressuring you and says, "Okay, well take your time, but I need to see you again in two or three days." Don't go, don't go in two or three days. If they need to see you again, they can see you in a week. All they're going to do is an ultrasound and whatever, maybe a sweep. Give yourself the space that your body needs. And also, really, really, really take your homoeopathy from 36 weeks, from 36 weeks, be taking your homoeopathy and be taking just this very gentle way of beginning to release the stress on the system. Take the aconite, take the arnica.   Eva Williams: (46:00) Another thing that's really important, and again, this all goes back to prep, because if you're doing everything at the last moment, you're going to be dealing with a lot. In the programme that I run, around third 30 to 34 weeks, in between this time before your GBS test, we explore different internal works. And not necessarily me doing that, but maybe it's related to sex with the husband, maybe it's related to self-pleasure, maybe it's just internal gaze and interception kind of meditation, but we start unblocking and unlocking anything that might be held in the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (46:37) And then also, if you have a chiro, there's the Webster technique, or if you have a Bowen therapist who can do the sacral... There's a series of sacral releases that they can do. Anything you can do to prepare your body, to feel really good and open, speak to your cervix, ripen your cervix, yourself, speak to it, see beautiful pink light moving through it. All of these things work, they really, really work. And what doesn't work is being pressured into having a baby, it just doesn't fucking work. There's no evidence to support that it's ever worked.   Eva Williams: (47:11) It's insane, even with the foetal monitoring, even that, there's the only proof that it actually has any benefit is it there's no proof. The only thing that it's actually done is increased C-section rates. And so, these sorts of things, we have to just be really mindful of what the outcome is. Is the outcome an alive baby or is the outcome an empowered woman who knows herself and knows her body and can recover in the postpartum process because she's actually connected to the child, because oxytocin is also a huge part of recovery. It's what's bringing the colostrum and the breast milk, it's what's actually involuting the uterus.   Eva Williams: (47:52) So if we don't have this connection from the outside, if we're having those issues, then we also face a much longer recovery period. And that's when you really begin to see from an emotional perspective, from a body work perspective. If I see diastasis, like a herniated diastasis or something like this, for me, that's always that the woman has been opened in the birth process, but she hasn't had the closing afterwards, so she has no centre. Can you imagine what it would be doing to your back, to not have your rectus abdominis working? Basically, your back would be as stiff as a board, and that's a woman who feels that she's not supported. She hasn't been supported through that process.   Eva Williams: (48:37) I don't know, this stuff is so intuitive and natural, it feels so natural to say, but we aren't there as a culture of medicine and we're not there as a culture of birth yet either, and it's difficult. And there's a way I just want to say to people, just protect kept yourself. But I actually love working with OB/GYNs and I do love working with the medical system when they get it right, and they very often, if you find the right people and places, they do get it right. I had a doula complain to me the other day about how, at this one hospital that's really great here, the midwife didn't even turn up and the baby just came out.   Eva Williams: (49:17) And I was like, "Is this a complaint? This is a complaint that the baby just naturally came out and the mother caught her home own baby?" I'm sorry, I don't feel the same level of stress around this that you feel. It's so beautiful to hear about less managed births. And this is for those people who are being pushed toward induction, this is called active management, basically, of expectations in relationship to doctors. And another thing to understand is that 40 weeks doesn't really mean much.   Tahnee: (49:52) So arbitrary.   Eva Williams: (49:54) It's insane. I'm not standardised by that. Some hospitals do it from the first day of your last period, some do it from the last day of your last period? It's just ridiculous and there's no evidence that proves that. I think of 10% of children come on their due day.   Tahnee: (50:11) Not good odds-   Eva Williams: (50:12) I know, right. Yes. And everyone wants to be fucking Natalie Portman or Kate Moss or something. And guess what, 1%. You know what I mean? It's one of these expectations that we set up. We are lying to women when we tell them that they should be fitting that mould, and we are taking away from them the opportunity for them to make their own mould of what it looks like. So contentious. It doesn't actually feel that contentious, it feels really straightforward, but whatever.   Tahnee: (50:39) Well, it's interesting because I think one thing for me with birth too, it felt like... I don't want to be in the feminine/masculine, for me, time when I'm in a feminine space, linear time is not a thing. It's not real, it doesn't exist and there's this just natural unfolding of things as they are. My feeling around birth was very much like we're trying to apply this very linear masculine dimension to it and it doesn't exist like that. I think this idea of 10 moons or being able to see it in this sense of it's with them and it's a flow, but it's not something that's going to happen on a day. I'm struggling with it right now, people are like, "What's your due date?"   Tahnee: (51:33) And I'm, "Well, I don't know, sometime in April." And they want a due date. Well, I do know it's April 1st, but I don't believe my baby's going to come on April 1st.   Eva Williams: (51:44) I can tell you what I do always is I just take the full moon of that month. And I was like, "She's not due, then she's due in the beginning of the month." I'm like, "I don't care."   Tahnee: (51:56) That's when they come.   Eva Williams: (51:57) The baby is now officially due on the full moon. Baby's like a full moon, that's what's happening. It doesn't mean we won't prepare and I don't necessarily calculate my weeks from that, I'll do it from that ultrasound or whatever. And the programme that we are doing is a 10-moon programme, it's 10 modules and they're 10 moons. Yeah, it's just recognising that children have a rhythm, it's not something that we can set or determine. That rhythm is related to obviously the tides of our own life. Some babies like a new moon. There's no set rules, you can't apply them one way or another, like you said.   Eva Williams: (52:33) And I love this idea that, look, birth is very much about learning about abundance, about our own abundance, that we can actually create a whole other being. It's this radiant space that we enter into. Adding scarcity of time to that means that a woman feels a scarcity of space. And if she's feeling a scarcity of time and space, as these two things do manifest together within her own body, you're taking away the whole dimension and realm that she needs to live inside of during her birth, like you said. It's this feminine space. And that doesn't mean that we can't have a plan during pregnancy, it doesn't mean that certain practises won't be better at different times.   Eva Williams: (53:12) It doesn't mean any of that, but it's the invasiveness of how we treat birth needs to stop. I'm working on a new project right now, and I'm very excited about it and I can't say much about it, but what I can say is that one of the main focuses of it is the removal of incredibly invasive techniques. And some of them aren't even necessarily invasive, they're just fucking disgusting like the gestational diabetes test.   Tahnee: (53:40) Oh, that was the only fucking thing I did last time. And I was like, "This is the most sugar I've had in my entire adult life." Maybe as a kid, I gorged on Lollies, but other than that." That's the only time I was sick in my pregnancy was after that.   Eva Williams: (53:54) Yes, so many women have said to me like, "Oh yeah, definitely, the most traumatic thing of my pregnancy was that time."   Tahnee: (54:01) I was like, "Fucking hell, guys." It's like nine Coca-Colas or something. I'm like, "Great."   Eva Williams: (54:07) And it's not necessary. It's not necessary because there's so many other ways to remediate or even to tell. And what was so funny is, I was with a client recently and she had to shift OB/GYNs because on her due date, the original OB/GYN is not going to be there. And so we had just gone to that OB/GYN and said, "Look, we're opting out of this." And she was ready to fight. She's like, "I don't want this person." I was like, "Just chill. I'm sure they'll be fine with it." Don't go in for a battle, that's one thing. All birth workers, everyone, just don't go in for a battle. If you have to put your armour on, do it, but don't go in for a battle. And the doctor was like, "Huh. I've been in birth for a long time and I've seen a lot of incredible advancements and devices and ultrasound and all sorts of things really. And yet they still haven't managed to make something less disgusting than that drink. That's okay. Don't worry about it."   Eva Williams: (55:01) Even an OB/GYN was like, "Yeah, you'd think we'd gotten to this level, but really it's just Lucozade, sugar." And then we had to go to this other one and really communicate once again like, "Hey, the preference is for this off the table." And she just was like, "That's the most disgusting drink in the world, I wouldn't push that test on anyone." I was like, "Wow."   Tahnee: (55:19) Amazing. That's a good change in culture. [crosstalk 00:55:22]. What's your rate on ultrasounds in general? I haven't spoken about this much on the podcast either, but I do get asked about it a lot, and there's the one side of it where people are like, "It's good to know and it gives you that reassurance." And then there's the other side, which is probably more of the side I'm on where it's like, "What would it tell me that actually... What benefit would that information actually give me?" So I'm curious as to your take on that as a birth keeper.   Eva Williams: (55:53) Well, it's a great topic. One thing I can definitely say is, you know your body, you've done a lot of work with your body. I have also clients who are just super on it, and yet sometimes, and I'm thinking of one person specific, that if a woman, for example, has a miscarriage or something like this, even if she isn't someone who would naturally or usually lean toward wanting ultrasound or something like that in that early part of the next pregnancy, it brings an enormous amount of relief to know that everything's going healthy.   Tahnee: (56:38) Reinsurance.   Eva Williams: (56:38) Exactly. If you have chromosomal issues in your life, those 12 week tests, in your family, for example, or even the 20-week morphology exams, they can bring a lot of knowledge. So from my perspective, what I usually say to women when they say, "What do you think is necessary, blah, blah." I said, "The first thing that's necessary is anything that will bring you comfort. If your level of comfort and certainty and anxiety will drop with each or any of those visits, then those are the ones that are necessary, because your emotional and mental wellbeing is more important to the baby's health and growth than anything that an ultrasound is going to do to your body. That's my perspective.   Eva Williams: (57:25) And then usually, they just say that the main tests that are important are your morphology, your 20, 21-week scan, and that's really just to see if there's any... For those of you who don't know, that's not really an ultrasound, it's a full building out of, they check all of the different organs.   Tahnee: (57:44) It's pretty cool. I was like, "Whoa. There's a kidney and there's a... "   Eva Williams: (57:53) They go in, they check all the tissues, they check the formation of the organs. This is technology that I'm grateful that we have because it can put a lot of decision making power into people's hands. And simultaneously, I know a lot of people who aren't down for it, they're like, "No way, that's even worse than an ultrasound. That's super intense for the baby, blah, blah, blah." For me, it's all about comfort. And I have had a couple birth workers recently and clients saying, they're like, "Well, I know you're very pro natural birth and this is not."   Eva Williams: (58:26) I'm like, "Hang on a minute. I'm not really for or against anything, I just don't really have a role to play. If you're planning a C-section... " I know what the body is capable of, and those are personal experiences that I've had. You can't take that away from me or I cannot pretend that I don't know what the physical body can do and what we may need to train for, but can actually get what this experience can be. So I can't take that out of my being that if you know that that's available, that you gravitate toward it, but it doesn't necessarily mean that I am anti anything."   Eva Williams: (59:03) I've had my time being anti epidural, and then I saw a series of Pilates teachers and yoga teachers who had super tight pelvic floors get an epidural after like 36 hours of labour, and just one hour, boom, baby was out. Really incredible experiences. Legs were still working, everything. So I can't go through the level of experience that I've had, I can't afford to fight anyone. I hate it in the birth world, I hate this, the fight that happens when people are... I believe in advocating that there's a point where if you can change that inside of yourself, you stop attracting moments to have those conversations. That's what I have found in my personal experience.   Eva Williams: (59:45) And so I try to just be very, very open, and the reason is because I don't necessarily need to specify what I will and won't work with, because I really only attract people that I really will be the right person for. But I would say, if someone is just like, "I don't know what to get and when." I would just say, "Look, the most standard thing is that you have a 12-week ultrasound, you have your 21 week morphology. That puts a lot of power in your hands. Look it up, do a little bit of research." And then usually, there'll be something as a bare minimum right before your birth, like a 36-week thing, and then we'll do a GBS swab."   Eva Williams: (01:00:21) And you don't have to do your GBS swab, you don't have to get that scan. You can just wait and go into labour naturally as well. But those are some of the options. And I don't believe that you need anything more than that, but I've been with women who are going every third day in the end of their pregnancy just to sit in a room for 20 minutes just to hear if the baby's safe and good. If that's wh

The Big Travel Podcast
124. Firouz FarmanFarmaian; Escaping Tehran, Kashmiri Houseboats, Trekking Kyrgyzstan, Rock Bands and Contemporary Art

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:16


Born in Tehran, the descendent of a nomadic tribe traced back to the 1400s, Contemporary Artist Firouz FarmanFarmaian's family scattered after the Islamic Revolution, from Paris to Marrakesh and a houseboat on a lily-covered lake in Kashmir. He grew up trekking mountains and deserts, touring with his Indie rock band and now with his internationally acclaimed art. With a gallery in Tarifa, Spain, and a new base in Athens, he travels the globe sourcing ideas and materials with craftswomen in remote regions and will be representing Kyrgyzstan at the Venice Biennale with the exhibition Gates of Turan.   www.gatesofturan.com www.firouzfarmanfarmaian.com @werthenomads   On this episode we explore:   His recent 5 week trek through Kyrgystan  Landlocked country not unlike Switzerland in look Separated by mountains from China Krysgystan's pristine nomadic tradition 'Interweaving' metaphorically, material and cultural ideas His pluralesque approach to artist interaction Being important to connect to archaic cultures and what they have to teach us  Soviet brutalist architecture in the Bishkek capital, frozen in time How losing his own country to the Islamic revolution made him a citizen of the world The Russians industrialising in the 19th century Working towards the Venice Biennale for 2022  Going on sourcing/production trips to remote areas Mostly working with craftswomen  His job as an artist being to highlight the 'virtual circle' of craft history The beauty of the mountains and yurts around the Issyk-Kul lake   'The village of 100 yurt makers'   Local craftswomen developing felt for Muji  Felt becoming the centre of Firouz's artwork  How craftmaking empowers women  His We R The Nomad agency  Preparing another show for the Istanbul Biennale  The government completely changing cabinet in the middle of his government journey  Growing up in Iran just before the revolution  Taking one of the last flights out of Tehran before the Ayatollah took over  Being sent to boarding school in Paris  Growing up with his father in Marrakesh His father growing up a hunter before becoming a trekker The family houseboat in Kashmir  Trekking the Himalayas with mules, eating with their hands and travelling as a nomad Killing a live mutton to feast on around the fire  His work stemming from this sense of displacement  Getting lost in the middle of the Sahara overnight  His father reading the stars and finding their way out  The ancient family tribe of Turkish descent going back to the 1400s and Mongol invasions  His father's radical approach to travelling (as a hippy in the 60s and a nomadic background)  Contrast being a key part of his life - privilege, nomadism, radicality creating richness in his art  His grandfather, a well known architect in Iran, narrowly escaping execution Touring in an indie rock band for many years Shooting experimental black and white movies in art school  Opening for Interpol for New York and the Notting Hill Arts Club  Wanting to always better himself Working with his wife Camilla and Balenciaga  Facing his fear of solitude The pandemic making them spread their wings with both art and travels  How Athens currently feels like Berlin after the wall of the wall Street art and cultural events everywhere  The Bob Dylan song that takes him back to sunset on the lily-covered lake in Kashmir 

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
Cultivating Our Inner Awareness with Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo - 10 Minute Meditation

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 9:34


Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo is one of the world's most revered Buddhist teachers and one of the very first Westerners to become ordained into the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. She is best known for having lived in a remote cave in the Himalayas for 12 years. In this 10-minute  meditation, she offers us the invitation to cultivate moment-to-moment inner awareness - the essence of meditation practice.Episode 93: Instructions on the Essence of Meditation Practice with Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo - 10 Minute MeditationSupport the show (https://www.skepticspath.org/support/)

The HEAL Podcast
PGA Pro Golfer Morgan Hoffmann: His Holistic Healing Journey with Muscular Dystrophy

The HEAL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:50


Morgan Hoffmann is a professional golfer on the PGA Tour with a passion for wellness, sports, the outdoors, and aviation. Having recently been diagnosed with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSH-MD), Morgan decided to follow his intuition, tap into his competitive mindset, and go ALL IN on his healing journey to find a cure for the incurable.  From the peaks of the Himalayas to the jungles of Costa Rica, Morgan shares with us all the challenges he has faced, the modalities he has experimented with, and the “aha's" he has discovered along the way.  And while his healing takes 100% of his commitment and focus, he has still managed to find time to create the Morgan Hoffmann Foundation with the intention to use his platform as a pro athlete to help others. The Foundation's mission is to create a virtual and physical, naturalistic health and wellness space; dedicated to helping those suffering from debilitating diseases and other ailments. Today, I sit with Morgan in an emotional conversation that had us both in tears.  We discuss how a big part of healing is a reconnection to ourselves and nature, and that SO much more is possible when you believe it and you go all in to achieve it. It was an honor to sit with such a compassionate and courageous human and I hope you all walk away as inspired as I was.    To learn more about Morgan Hoffmann's Foundation visit: https://morganhoffmann.org Go to www.nativedeodorant.com and use code heal for 20% off   Go to www.flexfits.com/heal and use code heal for 20% off Flex Disc Starter kits or 10% off your first Flex Cup   Visit www.ritual.com/HEAL for 10% off   Go to www.organifi.com/healpodcast and use code healpodcast for 20% off your order. Produced by Dear Media 

Main Street Vegan
From Hollywood to the Himalayas

Main Street Vegan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:30


Vegan swami Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, Ph.D., started her life with Beverly Hills privilege. All that changed at the Ganges River 25 years ago.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1806: India pushes back in the high Himalayas. @CleoPaskal @F DD @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/china-biggest-security-threat-says-general-bipin-rawat/articleshow/87675595.cms

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 10:35


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow India pushes back in the high Himalayas. @CleoPaskal @F DD @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/china-biggest-security-threat-says-general-bipin-rawat/articleshow/87675595.cms

Align Podcast
Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati: Finding God Outside of Religion

Align Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 77:40


Are you in search of the Divine? Do you struggle to lead a spiritual life in our secular world? If yes, this episode is for you! "People who live without a deep connection to spirit, to soul, to consciousness, to love, to truth are not living happy lives," said this week's guest, Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati. Sadhvi is a world-renowned spiritual leader and best-selling author based in India. Twenty-five years ago, she left America carrying loads of childhood trauma and wounds to seek freedom. In a weird but magical way, she found it on the banks of Ganga River. Here, she shares how a leisure trip to India became a story of coming home not only to herself but to God. For her, spiritual awakening doesn't mean that we stop being fallible humans. It means experiencing the fullness of our humanity with freedom and power over things that enslave us: technology, hobbies, relationships, beliefs, and even our own thoughts. With that beautiful philosophy, she gives tips and practices to tap into our inner voice and regain trust in the perfect universe. Ultimately, she explains why finding God isn't an external quest but an inward journey we can choose to embark on right now. Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati is a multi-awarded changemaker with a Ph.D in Psychology. She teaches meditation, provides spiritual counseling, and leads humanitarian projects while also serving on United Nations Faith Advisory Council on Religion, among others. Her book, "Hollywood to the Himalayas," recounts her journey toward divine enlightenment and offers guidance to our own spiritual rebirth.    What we discuss: 2:20 - Dealing with childhood trauma and eating disorder 8:00 - The trip that changed her life forever 11:42 - How moments of enlightenment become a way of life 18:00 - If we are not our body, who and what are we? 23:00 - Why spirituality doesn't require transcendence from our human experience 34:00 - Are people born as empty slates? Do we have a set destiny? 39:08 - Why we CAN'T be anything we want to be 48:20 - Follow these practices and techniques to get through pain and anger 56:00 - Tips to breaking toxic attachment with technology 1:04:00 - What's the cost of living a happy life, and how do we prepare for it?   Learn more from Sadhvi: Website: https://www.sadhviji.org/ Instagram: @sadhviji

The Running for Real Podcast
Sonya Looney: You're Not Entitled to the Outcome - R4R 273

The Running for Real Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 57:09


Sonya Looney describes herself as a normal person who has been able to achieve extraordinary things through hard work, self-belief, determination, moxie, and grit. That includes being a World Champion mountain bike racer who has competed in over 25 countries, in places like the Sahara Desert, the Himalayas, and the Mongolian steppes. She's also a runner, a TEDx speaker, an entrepreneur, and host of her own podcast, The Sonya Looney Show. “I love the ultra endurance stuff just because I feel like you really get to know who you are as a person.” Sonya's mountain bike races are usually 50 - 100 miles or 24-hour races.  She loves the endurance aspect, and also that “you have a lot of time out there and it's so mental, and the range of emotions that you experience in the course of a day is so diverse, and you wouldn't necessarily feel those in your daily life.” “If I can safely push through this thing, then that builds my confidence and my self- belief for the next time.” The obstacles in endurance mountain bike racing require the rider to make a choice: do I go on, or do I quit?  Life, of course, is the same. As Sonya says, “you learn over time that giving up makes you give up more,” so she chooses to take on the challenges.  You can look back on the hard things that you did and got through, and then “you can remember that and then you just keep going and going.” “Optimism is accepting the difficult things as they come up, but knowing that with effort and maybe a little bit of grit that they can get even better.” Sonya believes that to do those hard things, you need to train optimism. That doesn't mean “just blindly thinking that everything is going to be fine and ignoring all the difficult things.”  You need to be aware of your negative thoughts, but instead of giving into them, you can work on confronting and overcoming them. “The outcome isn't the most important thing about what you're doing.”  One of the greatest fears that people have is failing to meet the expectations of others, or even harder, of ourselves.  Sonya emphasizes the importance of being focused on the process, because “you're not entitled to the outcome. Like you might think, “I deserve to win' or ‘I deserve this,' but so does everybody else out there that's working just as hard as you, or maybe even harder than you. So really it's about being proud of your effort at the end of the day.” “Our lives get over complicated, focusing on all these things that we think that we need to feel good.” One thing that Sonya has learned through her travels in other countries is that “you don't really need that much to be happy.”  There are places where people live very simply, but they've found a way to make it work for them.  Seeing that has made her ask herself what she really needs to feel fulfilled, and to appreciate all “the basic things we take for granted.” “Ask yourself, what are the consequences if I don't speak up and will I regret it if I don't speak up or do the thing?” Sonya has chosen to compete in some smaller races in other countries because it's important to her “to have a different lens on life,” even if that means passing up more prestigious races that could get her bigger sponsorships or more media coverage.  She's found that when you don't follow your heart, “a lot of times you do regret it if you don't do it, and that's because it's clashing with something that you fundamentally believe in.” “I think a lot of us do feel like people will love us more if you achieve more.” Following your own path can be difficult, especially if it means doing something that you're afraid you might not be good at, or that other people won't approve of or understand. But Sonya believes that “if you have the courage to explore that curiosity, to just open a door or to try an opportunity that comes your way that sounds interesting, you're going to learn so much.”  As she says, “it's not my quote, but  be brave enough to suck at something new.” “Just focus on the joy of getting better, because there is a lot of fun in getting better at something, but it requires getting started, even if you're bad at it.” Resources: Sonya's website The Sonya Looney Show Tina's interview on Sonya's podcast Sonya's TEDx Talk Sonya's Instagram Sonya's Facebook Running for Real NYC Marathon Watch-Along Thank you to Tracksmith and Generation UCAN for sponsoring this episode. Tracksmith is a Boston based company that truly cares about the quality of their running clothes. Running can be demanding on our clothes; they definitely go through wear and tear to where we may be purchasing new clothes constantly. Tracksmith designers work with the finest materials and keep you in mind as a runner, with spots for your keys, phone, and fuel. You can go here to check out my favorites! Go here and use the code TINA15, and Tracksmith will donate 5% of your purchase to Runners for Public Lands, and you'll get free shipping! Thank you, Generation UCAN. I have been talking about them for years and they are my ONLY source for fueling while I am training and racing. And without fail, I have a product of UCAN every day, whether it is a Peanut Butter Chocolate Bar or their delicious Cookies and Cream Protein Powder. I am also excited to share with you a NEW product, a gel! It's fueled with Superstarch and ready to go wherever you are headed. Go here and use the code TINAUCAN for 20% off your order!   Thanks for listening! We know there are so many podcasts you could listen to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real.  If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us: Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them.  Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone.  Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe?  You can find out here. "Thank you" to Sonya.  We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.