Podcasts about Asana

Postures in hatha yoga and modern yoga practice

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Latest podcast episodes about Asana

Free Time with Jenny Blake
129: The $10K Work Framework with Khe Hy

Free Time with Jenny Blake

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:52


Think of your day-to-day work as fitting into one of four quadrants, as defined by today's guest Khe Hy in a recent issue of his fantastic RadReads newsletter:  $10 Work is low-leverage, low-skilled work that you can do when you're hungover. $100 Work is when you leverage the wrong thing – and get overwhelmed by meta-work. $10K Work consists of high-leverage skills that exponentially grow your business and bring you closer to your dream life. As Khe writes, “The quadrant people high-performers really get stuck in is the $1,000/hour quadrant . . . the domain of unique skills that have no leverage.” That's what we're discussing in today's episode so you can learn strategies to stop struggling and do more of your best work. More About Khe: Khe Hy is the founder and CEO of RadReads, an online education company that helps over 36,000 professionals lead productive, examined, and joyful lives. He has been called Oprah for Millennials by CNN, is the creator of the $10K Work productivity method, and teaches the popular cohort-based course Supercharge Your Productivity. Before founding RadReads, Khe spent 15 years working on Wall Street and was one of the youngest Managing Directors at BlackRock. 

That Desi Spark (formerly The Woke Desi)
Heart of the Matter | A Conversation with Director of the Center for Medicare Dr. Meena Seshamani and ASANA Voices CEO Prince Bhojwani

That Desi Spark (formerly The Woke Desi)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 40:26


South Asians make up 25% of the world's population and 50% of the world's cardiac health burden. That statistic alone is staggering, and on this week's episode, we explore initiatives aimed at including more South Asians in healthcare research, the help of Medicare in reaching our parents' generation, cardiac health risk, and more, alongside Dr. Meena Seshamani (Director of the Center for Medicare) and Prince Bhojwani (CEO and Co-Founder of ASANA Voices).

Wandaful.Living Yoga off the Mat
Crew love is true Love - Gespräch mit dem Rose of Fire - Yoga Lehrerinnen-Team

Wandaful.Living Yoga off the Mat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 77:17


130: In dieser Folge lassen wir euch einen Blick hinter die Kulissen unseres Online-Yoga Studios: ‚Rose of Fire - Yoga by Wanda Badwal‘, werfen.  Lerne die inspirierenden Powerfrauen und Yogalehrerinnen von ‚Rose of Fire‘: Julia, Florentien, Andrea, Britta, Karin & Svenja näher kennen und erfahre, wie sie die yogischen Praktiken und Prinzipien auch jenseits der Matte ‚Beyond the Asana‘ im Job und im Alltag integrieren. **In dieser Folge sprechen wir außerdem über spannende Themen wie:** - Wie kam es zur Gründung vom Online-Yoga Studio von Rose of Fire? Und was steht hinter dem Namen? - Wie ist das eigentlich Online zu unterrichten? Was gibt es für Herausforderungen? - Was ist der besondere Ansatz von ‚Rose of Fire‘? - Welche Traditionslinien stehen hinter dem Konzept von Moon, Sun, Fire?  - Wann ist Moon, Sun oder Fire passend für mich zu praktizieren?  - Warum ergibt es so viel Sinn, Yoga im Einklang mit den Ayurvedischen Prinzipien und Gesetzen zu praktizieren? - Was sind Wanda's Aufgaben hinter den Kulissen? - Warum ist es so wichtig für unser Nervensystem beruhigende Praktiken wie Yin Yoga, Moon Hatha, oder Yoga Nidra zu praktizieren - Wie kann Yoga heilen? Und was bedeutet Trauma sensibles Yoga? - Wie können wir selbstwirksamer durch Yoga werden? - Wie kann uns die Praxis des Yoga langfristig unser Leben zum Positiven verändern? **Links:** **Kostenlose Yoga Klasse:** Du kennst uns noch nicht? Dann wird es jetzt Zeit! Hol dir jetzt deine 1. Probestunde, diese ist bei uns immer kostenlos. Hier gehts zum aktuellen Stundenplan: https://www.wandabadwal.com/stundenplan/ **Infos zum Studio:** Willst du noch mehr über das Studio erfahren? Hier findest du weitere Infos über unser Studio: https://www.wandabadwal.com/ueber-unser-yoga-online-studio/ **Die Bedeutung des Namens:** Was bedeutet ‚Rose of Fire‘ - hier kannst du über die Hintergründe zum Namen lesen: https://www.wandabadwal.com/rose-of-fire/ Ganz viel Freude und Inspiration mit dieser Folge. Wanda & Team ROF Sharing is caring - alle Informationen in diesem Podcast sind komplett kostenlos, die Empfehlungen enthalten keine Affiliate-Links. Wenn du meine Arbeit supporten möchtest, freue ich mich über eine gute iTunes Bewertung und natürlich, wenn du deine Lieblingsepisoden mit deinen Herzensmenschen und auf Social Media teilst. Mehr zu meiner Arbeit und mir erfährst du auf meiner Website und Instagram:  https://www.wandabadwal.com/ https://www.instagram.com/wandabadwal/ Werde jetzt Teil meiner Community und erhalte regelmäßige Impulse von mir: https://www.wandabadwal.com/newsletter/

She Believed She Could Podcast
Simplify Your Launch with Melody DiCroce

She Believed She Could Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 19:16


Melody DiCroce is a launch strategist and founder of The Launch Library, where she helps ambitious females simplify their launches while getting more sales and better results for their students and clients. She's worked with entrepreneurs like Selena Soo and Ramit Sethi on dozens of launches and loves introducing strategies from those multi-million dollar launches to course creators, coaches, and service providers so they can have wildly successful launches while having the space and capacity to create and live the life of their dreams.  In 2012, Melody sold her Nashville home and all her belongings and ditched her traditional 9-5 to travel on a sailboat for 10 years. She now lives with her husband in Loreto, Mexico, a small coastal town on the Sea of Cortez. MEMORABLE MOMENTS:“I don't claim to know it all. It's an ever evolving thing. But the fear is real…there's so many points of failure in a launch, that people get stuck, and they end up not launching, or they delay their launches. And so that's what I'm trying to help people overcome that fear, because the only way you're going to learn is by doing it.”“I tell people to follow affiliate launches, because you'll learn so many lessons…if you're afraid to launch yourself, do an affiliate, watch or follow someone else's launch” “Where most people get stuck when it really boils down to it is the mindset behind it all. We're afraid to look unprofessional, or we're afraid to make a mistake….so I try to be a cheerleader for people and help them know it's okay to make a mistake.”“it's a really big mindset shift, to put yourself out there and put a product out there.”“…And sometimes that's all it takes, is just to say ‘Okay, now we have a starting point. Let's go from there.'” “Your life is an experiment. Business is an experiment. So don't be afraid to make mistakes.. That's the only way we learn.” Connect with Melody:⭐ Connect on Instagram @thelaunchlibrary⭐ https://thelaunchlibrary.com/ Connect with Allison:⭐ Connect on Instagram @allisonwalsh⭐ JOIN THE SOCIETY: www.shebelievedsociety.com (use code 2022 to access the Society for $22/month)⭐ JOIN OUR FREE COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/shebelievedshecouldcommunity⭐ Check out book recommendations from the show here⭐ LEARN MORE about THINKIFIC COMMUNITIES here

Just Great Yoga
#192 Unassailable Tranquility

Just Great Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 70:32


A really great class with an experienced group of students. Strong flow, light energy.

Meditationen für die Schwangerschaft und Geburt - mama.namaste
#104 - Mini Herz Meditation für dein Baby + Yoga Übung [Schwangerschaft]

Meditationen für die Schwangerschaft und Geburt - mama.namaste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 13:22


Hallo du Liebe! Heute erwartet dich eine Mini Meditation, die ich vor Kurzem schon einmal auf Instagram geteilt habe. Hier jetzt noch einmal mit Live Mitmach Anleitung zum Meditieren für dich. In dieser Meditation kombinieren wir eine Yoga Übung, nämlich den Fisch, mit der Meditation. Ich leite dich in eine abgewandelte Version des Fisches, für die Schwangerschaft geeignet, ganz entspannt zum passiv liegen und genießen. Der Fisch wird im Yoga als herzöffnende Asana bezeichnet. Er unterstützt deine Energie im Herzen zu aktivieren, dich für Liebe und Freude zu öffnen. Deswegen finde ich ihn wunderschön in der Schwangerschaft mit einer kleinen Herzmeditation für dein Baby zu kombinieren. Du gehst also sozusagen mit doppelter Kraft in die Wirkung dieser Meditation. Ich wünsche dir einen wunderschönen Moment dich mit deinem Baby zu verbinden und zu genießen. Alles Liebe, Deine Sabrina Übung auf Instagram anschauen Online Schwangerschaftsyoga: https://mamanamaste.de/yoga/ Nächster Start: 27.09.2022

Defend & Publish
D&P Podcast Episode 89: How I Got Back into Writing after a Month Off

Defend & Publish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 15:34


In this episode, President and executive writing coach Christine Tulley describes the specific steps she used to get started writing after taking off a month due to various family obligations, school starting up, and other interruptions. Download the slides in this episode Episodes referenced: EP 75: I Tried Penzu for Logging Writing EP 46: Using Asana to Manage a Big Revision ADDITIONAL WAYS TO CONNECT WITH DEFEND AND PUBLISH: Follow us on Eventbrite to stay up-to-date on all upcoming workshops  Email christine@defendandpublish.com for additional details or click links for registration information.

Yoga Hero: Teachers
29. How to layer your asana classes with yoga philosophy

Yoga Hero: Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 8:26


You're a yoga teacher because yoga has improved your life - possibly immeasurably - and you have a desire, a need, to share that with others.Whilst asana is a hugely important part of yoga, it's not the full story, and as such, as yoga teachers, sharing the full story; the roots and the history of yoga, is probably part of the job. But it's not necessarily a part of the job that comes easily, that's covered in yoga teacher trainings, that's even accessible...Well, this podcast episode aims to change that. It's full of practical tips to layer your asana classes with yoga philosophy, to weave in themes and wisdom without having to be fluent in Sanskrit, without having to be completely knowledgable about the entire history of yoga. Basically, we're aiming to take the reservations and fears out of sharing the fullness of what yoga is, whilst also deeply respecting yoga and all its roots.See the shownotes-- Training for yoga teachers: Trauma Informed Yoga: September 2022Traditional Hatha Yoga, Prānāyām and Meditation: October 2022Philosophy, Sanskrit and Chanting: October 2022Yin Yoga Training: November 2022As always, we would love to know what you think of the Yoga Hero: Teachers Podcast, do leave an honest review if you can, or drop us a message @yogahero_teachers Join our our Shatter Imposter Syndrome challenge, perfect for yoga teachers who are struggling with confidence, or self belief! -- Say hi on Instagram: @yogahero_teachersSee what trainings are coming up, at Yoga Hero and online: yogahero.co.uk/training

The Concussion Community
49. How do I manage to work? Planning& Tools - How I built this community with my concussion symptoms

The Concussion Community

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 10:09


2021 was the year that I started with this community. It's a big change for me because I couldn't do any work for almost 3 years due to my concussion symptoms. Starting this community was overwhelming, helpful, fun, stressful and fulfilling. All at the same time. It sounded so easy in my head to create a community for people with concussion symptoms and I just started without even thinking that it could be too much to handle. Listen for more! Take a look at how Asana look and my Google Calendar look like: Click here. Download my Free eBook: "7 things that helped me the most" Follow me on Instagram (14K+ followers): @theconcussioncommunity What is The Concussion Community? We help people with a concussion to reduce their symptoms, not feel alone and enjoy life again. A community platform providing all knowledge from concussion experts combined with a strong community to lean on and learn from. My Courses: My 2 game-changers translated into a course. Is this podcast helpful for you? You would really help me by leaving a review. The more reviews this podcast will get, the easier it is for other people to find it and to feel less alone and lost in their journey.

Unf*ck Your Biz With Braden
246 - What Contractors Want You to Know About the Hiring Process - An Interview with My Team

Unf*ck Your Biz With Braden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 55:32


On today's episode of the podcast I chat with five members of my team about what my team looks like and tips for successfully onboarding contractors. Lili Enriquez - Lili is a general virtual assistant whose role has varied while working for me. During her time with me she has completed a variety of tasks including managing my Pinterest, uploading my podcasts to YouTube and still continues to edit and upload my podcast to its players. Shandra Cornelia - A wedding planner and virtual assistant, Shandra joined the team as Customer Support Manager after being a former student in Branden's course. She works with Braden on student calls and answers customer emails. Emily Rochotte - A social media manager and content writer for creative small business owners, Emily manages Braden's social media, pitches him for guest spots on podcasts, and oversees calendar integration for Braden's involvement in summits, bundles and other speaking events. Juliet Peay - Juliet is a copywriter writing emails, sales pages, and websites for people with strong personal brands. For Braden, Juliet writes Braden's weekly emails and launch emails throughout the year. When Braden was hiring a copywriter he asked select candidates to write test emails that they were compensated for at their hourly rate. If you're going to offer a test and will possibly use their work, you need to have them sign a work for hire contract and pay them for their work as you may use it in the future. Connie Hurlburt – Connie is a virtual assistant and she welcomes members into Braden's Besties Facebook group , answers their questions and directs them to resources. The team shares with Braden what helps them feel organized in the business, especially as part of a multi-person team. SOPs – Having standard operating procedures in place help team members to know that if they are taking time off and someone needs to step in to complete a project, Project Management System – email can be tempting, but keeping all info in a place that is accessible to everyone will be increasingly helpful as your team grows and other members need to reference information or see what stage in the process other members are on for projects multiple members are working on. Voxxer – Have a communication tool in place so you know the best way to reach your client/contractor(s) In Profit Rx we talk about micro and macro organizers when it comes to creating systems for your business. Braden is a macro organizer – he has a few project boards on Asana with details under it versus micro organizing Asana into a ton of projects. Shared calendars – Organize your launches and content in a calendar that your team can see The team shares their tips for business owners when hiring a contractor: Know if you need a contractor or a part-time employee As a contractor, make sure to update your contract as scope of work changes. As a client, know that your contractor will update their contract from time to time If you are outsourcing from another country or time zone it's important to understand turn around times and how time differences impact that and to give significant advance notice if you need the contractor to be available at a specific time Have a good onboarding process Equip your team with the information they need to easily access during their work time when you as the client may not be available to provide it to them such as passwords that allows your contractor to feel empowered to do the work they need on their own Keep communication streamlined in one place as opposed to spread out across multiple apps if possible. Don't be afraid to start small – hiring for a 5 hour a month project is okay and you want to hire someone you know can give you the most quality work in that time Know what the contractor specializes in. For example, just because someone is a copywriter does not mean they write sales pages, blogs and social captions. Know what their strengths are and hire based on that. Have a very clear idea of what you want to hire someone for so they know your expectations Hire carefully – know that the person aligns with your values and what you stand for Respect your contractor's boundaries. Follow the contract, especially any time element laid out there, and deliver what they need to do their job on time or they will not be able to deliver it back to you on time. If you are someone who frequently changes their mind, make it clear to your contractor when you are ready to move forward with a set idea Set an agenda for your team meetings so contractors know what to expect To learn more about systems and how Braden runs his business, check out Module 9 in Profit Rx Get in Touch with our Guests Juliet Peay: Connect with Juliet on LinkedIn Emily Rochotte: Follow Emily on Instagram or Connect with her on LinkedIn Lili Enriquez: Check out Lili's Upwork profile or Send her an email Shandra Cornelia: Send Shandra an emailConnie Hurlburt: Follow Connie on Instagram

The Build Good Fundraising Podcast
#64: The operating system you need to structure your fundraising shop

The Build Good Fundraising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 47:34 Very Popular


Here's a common pain point for many nonprofit CEOs and fundraising leaders: we're spending too much time on the operations of the shop, and not enough time connecting with donors. There is a way to reclaim some of that time. But it's not sexy.It's not glamorous. It's kind of a pain to implement at first. It's for sure never a priority.But it will—in the long term—make your life and your work so much more effective. And that's standardizing our operations with a series of SOPs, trainings, FAQs, templates and systems. Think of it as building an operating system for your fundraising operations.In today's episode, we are running a chat Louis Diez and myself had on the Donor Growth podcast. Here's what each element of the operating system looks like:1) SOPs are standardized operating procedures. They show you what to do. Usually a step by step instruction, or a checklist. Most nonprofits probably have a basic 30-50 SOPs they could create today that are the core of their revenue ops.2)  Trainings show you how to think. They are usually a slide decks, videos, PDFs, courses or even books. 3) An FAQ knowledge base helps you avoid wasting time and answering the same questions over and over. A good FAQ base empowers your team to find answers quickly without getting bottle-necked by the leader.4) Templates show you how to work. A good template library is a giant shortcut so you don't start from scratch every time.5) A project management system houses everything in one spot. Usually some sort of took like Airtable, Asana, ClickUp, Monday or even Google Sheets.Combined, this operating system will become the brain of your operations.

The Game On Girlfriend Podcast
141. 6 Tools I'd Use If I Started My Business Today

The Game On Girlfriend Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 21:08


One of the most popular questions I receive is: “Sarah, What do I need to actually launch a business, and how do I do that without slapping a bazillion dollars on my credit card?” I love that question. You really want to take tangible steps, and I'm going to give those to you today. Before I get into the tools I use, let's be honest about one thing: A business is simply an exchange of value for money. That's it. You need to understand the finances and make sure you're making a profit.  If you're just starting out and you've got your business idea but you're scared to get it off the ground, please hear this: Add value and learn how to explain your value. Now, let's get into some tools that are efficient without breaking the bank. 1. ConvertKit (https://convertkit.com/email-marketing-fresh-start): I am an affiliate of ConvertKit, that's how much I love them! They give you powerful tools for online marketing. You can tag each customer based on their behavior. Here is an example: Let's say you're just starting out and you were a guest on someone's podcast. You share that podcast episode with everyone on your newsletter list. ConvertKit will let you tag the people who listened to the episode, so the next time you're on a podcast you think those folks will enjoy, you can send them a special message. It's such a great way to take care of  your people and show you understand them and what they are interested in. The other reason I really love ConvertKit is they give you the tools you need to build landing pages and form with freebies and lead magnets. You don't even need a website. They will track the data for you and tell you whether or not the pages are successful so you can grow  your newsletter list. Cost: Free up to 300 subscribers | $9/month for growing creators 2. Stripe (https://stripe.com/): Next up, you need to be able to accept money. And Stripe is a great company that happens to integrate with ConvertKit. You can log into Stripe to create products and services that you can link to directly in your emails. People can make purchases right from their phone, and your business will look professional.  Cost: 2.9% off the purchase price (at the time of this recording). 3. LegalZoom (https://www.legalzoom.com/): Now that you're accepting payments into your bank account, I'm going to assume you're incorporated. Getting incorporated might not be necessary yet, but my recommendation is to check out LegalZoom.com. Depending on the state you live in, it will cost about $400 to get your incorporation papers. You'll take those papers to the bank to set up your business banking account, which you'll also set up in Stripe. Easy, right? Cost: About $400 4. Basecamp (https://basecamp.com/ ): Now that you're set up with your newsletter and payment system, you're going to want a project management system. Why? You want to be able to go back and understand how you've created things and where they are living. I love Basecamp. You can assign deadlines and tasks to people. There are a lot of alternatives too, like Asana and even Google Sheets. If you'd rather have a customer tracking system, I recommend HubSpot (https://www.hubspot.com/products/marketing/free). I use this to keep track of all our members, their birthdays, gifts we've sent, cancellations, etc. I want customer service to be number one — and I'm sure you do too. HubSpot is free up to a certain amount of people and lets you track how you've worked with them. Cost: Basecamp free up to 3 projects | $99/month unlimited features 5. Canva (https://www.canva.com/) and Hautestock (https://hautestock.co/): Beautiful graphics are key if you're going to sell online. Canva is something we use in our business all the time. You can put in your brand colors, and the free version gives you access to templates. If you find you need stock photos, I recommend Hautestock — I have an annual membership — for their photos and videos, which you can then import into Canva to create beautiful graphics. It's so classy, and it's important in this online world that your content looks fantastic on social media. Cost: Canva free | Pro and Teams plans for additional features. Hautestock: $399 a year 6. Websavers (https://clients.websavers.ca/whmcs/aff.php?aff=282): Once you're ready for your website, I'm going to recommend Websavers — I'm an affiliate by the way. And yes, they are a Canadian company. First of all, their customer service is fantastic, and their pricing is competitive. Use Websavers for your hosting, and then find a designer. One of my favorite things to do is to go online and find fantastic Facebook groups that support moms and women and ask anyone in the group if they have a web designer they'd recommend. And what I love about doing that is you might get someone who's new, so the price will be a lot less. But you're also helping someone else start their business. I love doing that. Cost: Plans are low as $3/month So as you can see, you don't have to break the bank to get started.  I think anytime you're adding value, you can usually do that by communicating well online. Once you start making money, once your business is actually profitable, I would highly recommend two things: Learn how to write. Learning how to communicate your value well online is critical. There is so much nonsense out there. (I know this is self-serving, but I absolutely mean it with all my heart) Invest in a coach because success is 80% mindset and 20% strategy. You can get all these incredible tools and have them at your disposal, but if you start thinking negative thoughts, you're already out of the game! I can give you every strategy in the whole world, and it's not going to work because your head's not straight. So, the second you are able to get yourself in a course with a coach or to hire a coach, please do that for YOU. More resources to help launch your business: Legal support: https://www.laynelyons.com/   Coaching support: https://sarahwalton.com/programs/  Other Game On Girlfriend podcast episodes you might want to check out:  Best ways to THINK About Your Small Business: https://youtu.be/XHetnBTyw1U  How I'm Investing During Our Biggest Year Yet: https://sarahwalton.com/investing/  How to Manage Emotions When You See Your Balance Sheet: https://sarahwalton.com/manage-emotions/  You can check out our podcast interviews on YouTube, too! http://bit.ly/YouTubeSWalton   Learn more about your host by visiting www.sarahwalton.com 

Reyna's Podcast
Ep. 103 - 3 Ways to Improve Your Goal Setting and Organizing Process

Reyna's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:03


In my new podcast episode, I go over the 3 ways to improve your goal setting and organizing process. Stop trying to do everything all yourself- Trust me, I have been there. It will burn you out and you will feel extremely overwhelmed. I do believe you can do it all, but not by yourself. You will need a team/assistant and learn how to successfully delegate. Have the right community/accountability partners in your life - The people you surround yourself with will either influence you in a positive way or in a negative way. Attend meetups, attend networking events, read books, listen to podcasts, and start reaching out to people you admire and respect and ask to connect.

Just Great Yoga
#191 Magic Everywhere

Just Great Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 70:23


The great every once in a while kind of class where everyone is on the same page being on their own page.

Women in Product Marketing
Asana's Head of Product Marketing, Growth and Scale, Victoria Chin on Product Launches

Women in Product Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 31:12


“Cultivating strong relationships and not being afraid to ask for help has been important in terms of growing my career.” - Victoria ChinIn this week's episode Mary sits down with Victoria Chin, who leads Product Marketing at Asana, to discuss product launches. They discuss common mistakes to avoid, making decisions around channels and metrics, and how product strategy paves the way for great launches.Check out Victoria's AMAs on Sharebird.Connect with Victoria on LinkedIn.Questions covered in this interview: What is the common mistake you see companies make with product launches? How do you make decisions around channels to use for new product launches? What product launch metrics should B2B SaaS product marketers be accountable for? I know another area you're passionate about is product strategy and customer focus. Can you talk about how that's done at Asana, and how it feeds into the launches?

In Systems We Trust
49: Mastering productivity tools with Paul Minors of Minor Workshop

In Systems We Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 24:52


In this episode, we're having a swap! Marquis will be interviewed by Paul Minors a productivity expert, consultant, and another fan of Asana. Tune in as Marquis discusses his journey, tips and advice for entrepreneurs on how to find the right tools and free up more time in their life. This podcast is sponsored by Ditto: www.thinkditto.com Ditto's vision is to put an end to team burnout. They are Asana Solutions partners and help businesses optimize business workflows.

Nice Podcast with Dave Delaney
#41 Fully remote teams, firing yourself, and retention with Brian Roland.

Nice Podcast with Dave Delaney

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 53:54


The Nice Podcast is brought to you by Futureforth.com. We help fast-growing tech companies onboard, create, and keep happier, more connected employees. Brian Roland is a Social Entrepreneur and Founder of Abenity, the 6x Inc. 5000 Company that's powering corporate perks for top brands, including U.S. Bank and MasterCard. What we talked about... Coffee snobbery and a herniated disc. Starting Abenity as a fully remote team in 2006 led to his obsession with coffee. On founding the company with his brother and bootstrapping to millions of members and nearly $10M in annual revenue. Brian fired himself after thirteen years. He hired a CEO and President to run the business. Improving performance reviews and providing feedback. Focus on building momentum and scaling your business. Thirty team members across ten states - fully remote. Covid redirected their focus. Social mission sponsoring children with each client via WorldVision. “Just show up. You're looking for the people who are looking for you.” Adding a task management platform like Asana to help communication. Hiring team members who already have relationships with staff is important. Open jobs are not advertised. They only tap their existing team for recommendations. Trust, respect, and accountability are already there as they onboard new people. The dangers of hybrid work and loneliness. Using DiSC personality assessments to determine how they will work remotely. Manage output over activity. Read Faith Driven Entrepreneur: What It Takes to Step Into Your Purpose and Pursue Your God-Given Call to Create by Henry Kaestner. Contact Brian at BrianRoland.com. Check out Rules of Engagement for Fully Remote Teams. We ❤️ Our Listeners. Please follow the show and leave a review wherever you subscribe to podcasts. Reviews and sharing the show are the nicest ways to support the podcast and are deeply appreciated. Thank you.

Awake: The Life of Yogananda Minute By Minute
Minute 67: Pranam Sri Mrinalini Mata

Awake: The Life of Yogananda Minute By Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 49:28


We discuss the benefits of experiencing your body as stone, consciousness and light, as expounded by Paramahansa Yogananda in this minute. We also reflect on what Asana/posture would be most conducive for this experience. Brother Chidananda talks about the importance of Yogananda's writings during this time (after returning from India in 1936) and how Sri Mrinalini Mata was crucial in this respect, we recollect some the most moving moments from her memorial service. Guruji's writings in English are just as powerful as ancient Sanskrit mantras to devotees around the world, encapsulating the famous quote: “When I am gone, the teachings will be the Guru”. 0:00 Hopes and dreams; 3:31 Summary of Minute; 5:06 The "New" Lessons; 9:54 Guruji and meditating with body "as if like stone"; 22:42 Master's Great Samadhi; 28:18 Mrinalini Mata. NB: the recording at the end of this episode is not by Daya Mata, but Mrinalini Mata. Mrinalini Mata - In His Presence: https://yssofindia.org/about/mrinalini-mata-in-his-presence Sri Mrinalini Mata Memorial Service: https://youtu.be/A-Ut2SB-dU8

Focus on This
#157: Your Planner and Your Project Management System

Focus on This

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 26:09


One of the most common questions we hear is: "How do I integrate the planner with my project management system?". We all know the value of using the Full Focus Planner to not just stay organized, but to help us conceive and achieve our goals. What happens when you want to take the insights from the planner and use it with Asana, Trello, ClickUp, or whatever project management system you use?Well, you're in luck because today Courtney is joined by the Corporate Project Manager at Full Focus, Annie Mayberry. She'll talk you through three specific bridges that you can use to connect your planner to your project management system.Later in the episode, we're joined by Andrea Liebross. She's a Full Focus Certified Pro who stops by to share how her coaching career and life have been impacted by the Full Focus Planner. She also shares some of her favorite planner tips! If you want to know more about working with Andrea, you can visit her website: https://andrealiebross.com/work-with-me/.In this episode, you will learn:Which areas in the planner lend themselves to direct integration with a project management systemHow to integrate your Big 3 into a project management systemHow the daily pages are like a containerTo watch this episode on YouTube, visit https://youtu.be/VpskpE5g9Nc.To see Annie's Asana/Daily Big 3 integration, make sure to visit the Full Focus Planner community at https://www.facebook.com/groups/ffpthinktank/.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career
How to build a powerful marketing machine | Emily Kramer (Asana, Carta, MKT1)

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 70:54 Very Popular


Emily Kramer led and built the marketing teams at Asana, Carta, Ticketfly, and Astro (acquired by Slack). These days, she's the co-founder of MKT1, where she helps founders and marketers build and scale their marketing functions. Emily is also a well-respected angel investor and writes my favorite marketing newsletter (MKT1). In today's episode, she shares her insights on when to hire marketers, how to determine which type of marketing hire is best for your team, how to best work with marketing, and what red flags to look for. Emily shares actionable templates and some incredible frameworks that are sure to expand your marketing knowledge.—Where to find Emily Kramer:• Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilykramer• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilykramer/• MKT1 Newsletter: https://mkt1.substack.com/—Where to find Lenny:• Newsletter: https://www.lennysnewsletter.com• Twitter: https://twitter.com/lennysan• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lennyrachitsky/—Thank you to our wonderful sponsors for making this episode possible:• Amplitude: https://amplitude.com/• Lenny's Job Board: https://www.lennysjobs.com/talent• Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/lenny—Referenced:• Building an efficient marketing machine: the fuel & the engine: https://mkt1.substack.com/p/fuel-engine• The GACC Marketing Brief: https://mkt1.substack.com/p/the-gacc-marketing-brief-the-best• The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference: https://www.amazon.com/Tipping-Point-Little-Things-Difference/dp/0316346624• Crossing the Chasm: https://www.amazon.com/Crossing-Chasm-3rd-Disruptive-Mainstream/dp/0062292986/• Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable: https://www.amazon.com/Purple-Cow-Transform-Business-Remarkable/dp/014101640X• All the Light We Cannot See: https://www.amazon.com/All-Light-We-Cannot-See/dp/1501173219/• The Daily podcast: https://www.nytimes.com/column/the-daily• Stream Yellowjackets on Showtime: https://www.sho.com/yellowjackets• CODA on Apple TV+: https://tv.apple.com/us/movie/coda/umc.cmc.3eh9r5iz32ggdm4ccvw5igiir• Ashley Mayer's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashleymayer/• Kevan Lee's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevanlee/—In this episode, we cover:(03:44) Emily's background(06:08) Hiring a marketing team(11:26) Examples of fuel and engine in marketing(16:00) What is a product marketer?(18:20) Why you should start with a marketing generalist (20:30) The difference between a growth person and a product person (23:57) What to look for in a product marketer(26:58) When to hire a marketing person(30:45) The role of a brand marketer(33:24) Marketing for PLG startups(36:22) What is product-led growth?(39:23) How to get product and marketing to collaborate (43:38) What is the GACC framework?(47:58 ) How to know if your marketing team is effective(54:33) Why founders need angel investors with functional expertise(1:00:23) Lightning round—Production and marketing by https://penname.co/. For inquires about sponsoring the podcast, email podcast@lennyrachitsky.com. Get full access to Lenny's Newsletter at www.lennysnewsletter.com/subscribe

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Hat Philipp schon ein neues iPhone bestellt? Super Gäste und schlechte User Experience bei der Code Conference von Kara Swisher. Kim Kardashian gründet eine Private Equity Firma. Macht es Sinn, für einen Master einen Kredit aufzunehmen? Wie steht Pip zum Thema Shareholder- vs. Stakeholder-Capitalism? Was werdet ihr machen, wenn jetzt doch noch ein größerer Crash kommen sollte? Earnings: UiPath, GitLab, Asana, DocuSign und Zscaler. Philipp Glöckler (https://twitter.com/gloeckler) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: 00:00:00 Small talk 00:14:00 Apple Keynote 00:16:45 Code Conference 00:23:45 Kim Kardashian goes PE 00:27:45 Kredit für Master 00:32:45 Shareholder- vs. Stakeholder-Capitalism 00:40:30 was tun wenn weiterer Crash 00:46:00 UiPath Earnings 00:53:00 GitLab Earnings Asana Earnings 00:58:30 DocuSign Earnings 01:01:30 Zscaler Earnings Shownotes: **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Doppelgänger & Friends auf Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/doppelgaengerio Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet/ Earnings & Event Kalender https://www.doppelgaenger.io/kalender/ Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Passionfroot Storefront https://www.passionfroot.xyz/storefront/doppelgaenger Post Production by Jan Wagener https://twitter.com/JanAusDemOff

Emprendeduros
EP. #140 | Kim Kardashian abre un Fondo de Inversión

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:29 Very Popular


MANDANOS TU PROYECTO fondo@emprendeduros.com DESCUENTOS PARA LAS FIESTAS PATRIAS EN MEZCAL ALERÓN www.mezcalaleron.com 20% de descuento Amazon, Mercado Libre y Walmart - 15% de descuento ¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro nos da una actualización de mercado donde discuten los múltiples cambios en el Reino Unido, la crisis de Energia, las diferencias de los bancos centrales Europeos y Americanos y los Cierres de China. Después hablan de los reportes de ingresos de Tio, Asana y GameStop. También hablan del suicidio del Director Financiero de Fed Bath And Beyond. Después hablan del evento de Apple y del fondo de Kim Kardashian.  Finalmente nos dan la actualización de Cryptos donde hablan de las movidas de Binance con su Stablecoins y de la ley unificada de Crypto.

Motley Fool Money
1 Question For Your Stocks

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 38:58 Very Popular


As profitable companies like Alphabet talk about steeling themselves for the immediate future, investors may want to ask: "How prepared are the companies in my portfolio are for the next 12-15 months?" (0:30) Jason Moser and Emily Flippen discuss: - DocuSign's latest results, and using the company as a lens for looking at other businesses - Good news (finally!) for Asana shareholders - Rough weeks for UiPath and Bilibili - RH taking a "Tiffany-like" approach to their business (19:45) Emily and Jason dip into the Fool Mailbag to talk about blue chip stocks, as well as: - Stocks they've been buying over the past year - Acquisitions they'd like to see - Uber's upcoming robot delivery tests in Texas and California - 2 stocks on their radar: Casey's General Stores and McCormick Stocks discussed on the show: DOCU, GOOG, GOOGL, PYPL, ASAN, PATH, BILI, RH, MMM, SBUX, HD, TWLO, NET, OM, FTNT, CRWD, UA, UAA, LULU, NKE, ZM, UBER, CASY, MKC Host: Chris Hill Guests: Jason Moser, Emily Flippen Engineer: Dan Boyd

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM
Cómo es trabajar en Twitter y Dibujo Libre feat. Jose Peña

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 49:00 Transcription Available


Si prefieres verlo en video, puedes seguir este link a mi canal de YouTube (y aprovecha y suscribete): https://youtu.be/Lz-JX1SfiNM

OV | BUILD
Krista Anderson-Copperman (Asana): What is a Chief Customer Officer?

OV | BUILD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 3:37


Krista was CCO at Okta for 6 years, and held a similar role at Salesforce before that. But this is a relatively new role at large software companies. What does it mean exactly? And what makes for a good CCO? Conversation highlights: [01:20] What is the Chief Customer Officer[02:22] The glue between an organization and its customers

Alles auf Aktien
Jumbo-Zinsschritt und neue Hoffnung für Rivian

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 16:50


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Philipp Vetter über Übernahmegerüchte bei Lyft und Wachstumsfantasien bei Snap. Außerdem geht es um GM, Uber, Deutsche Bank, Commerzbank, Munich Re, Hannover Rück, BMW, Mercedes, Rivian, Tesla, Volkswagen, Ford, Porsche SE, Beiersdorf, Plug Power, Lhyfe, Ginkgo Bioworks, Asana und Amazon. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM
¿Cómo es trabajar en Twitter? feat. Jose Peña

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 49:00


Cuentame que te parecio el episodio mandandonos un email a hugo@conexiones.io o a mis DMs en Twitter (https://twitter.com/HugoCast_) Este episodio es posible gracias a Asana. La mejor solución para manejar proyectos y tareas de equipos remotos. Prueba Asana gratis por 30 días yendo a conexiones.io/ASANA ¿Alguna vez pensaste como es cambiarse de una compañia a otra? Jose Peña nos compartio su experiencia yendo de Microsoft a Twitter. Tambien hablamos sobre estrategias para mantener tu salario de Silicon Valley si piensas mudarte a Florida (o a cualquier lugar del mundo) Este episodio quedo bastante dibujo libre :) tambien conversamos sobre: - Crypto si, crypto no - Layoffs en Tech - Twitter Spaces y productos que nos gustan (y no tanto) - La mecanica detras de cambiarse a un rol remoto - Como mantener tu salario de Silicon Valley (aunque te mudes a Miami) - [What Color is Your Parachute: Un libro y curso para darle forma a tu carrera profesional ](https://www.udemy.com/share/101yo43@aHXhjR9fF1Q7hJ6b1ZReziLReWYVrnuH0g6Q8CuUrMBZwMKN0lauoeQPoNuVoX6-hw==/) Este episodio es posible gracias a Asana. La mejor solución para manejar proyectos y tareas de equipos remotos. Prueba Asana gratis por 30 días yendo a conexiones.io/ASANA Conecta con Jose (y aprovecha y pidele un referral para Twitter ) https://www.linkedin.com/in/jouvash/ #ConexionesPodcast #twitter

21st Century Work Life and leading remote teams
WLP310 Adopting New Collaboration Habits through Asana

21st Century Work Life and leading remote teams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 48:14


In this episode we go into the detail of how to best use a collaboration tool like Asana - even though we concentrate on this particular tool, much of what we talk about is applicable to many other platforms that allow us to visualise our workflow. To connect with Bastien, you can find him on LinkedIn, and you can check out his website: ido-clarity.com/ For the full show notes, check out https://www.virtualnotdistant.com/podcasts/using-asana  

Earnings Season
Asana, Inc., Q2 2023 Earnings Call, Sep 07, 2022

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 59:14


Asana, Inc., Q2 2023 Earnings Call, Sep 07, 2022

OV | BUILD
Krista Anderson-Copperman (Asana): Today's Team vs. Tomorrow's Team

OV | BUILD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 31:19


Let's face it. Statistically, your current team is not likely to be your future team. It's incredibly rare for any single leader to stay with a company through multiple phases of growth. As a board member and advisor to companies like Asana, Krista's job is to assess teams and help CEOs determine who's gonna make it and who isn't. What she looks for to determine this may surprise you. Conversation highlights:[00:09] Intro — Meet Krista[02:11] Having a team for the future[05:09] Common traps people fall into when building their teams[10:15] Addressing and assessing whether or not you have a team for the future[12:37] Lean on others, and learning what your business should be solving for[15:03] Characteristics to look for in future-proofing your team: passion and curiosity[19:24] Embracing and loving change[22:31] Finding the truth and not just hearing the right answer[25:29] The challenge of scale and growing teams with the business[27:33] A good starting point for looking at teams and defining if they're tomorrow's team

CIO Classified
Powerful Partnerships That Push CIOs to the Next Level

CIO Classified

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 28:33


Just like the role of the CIO has transitioned from a back-office data manager to a business enabler, how CIOs build and maintain internal and external partnerships has also greatly evolved. In this episode, Madlin Sadler, COO of the International Rescue Committee, and Colleen Berube, CIO and SVP of Operations at Zendesk, draw insights from their own collaboration to talk about the many ways partnerships can be powerful—from bringing in new perspectives to providing resources and solutions—as well as share their advice on building strategic partnerships for today's CIO.---------Quotes“The need to have great partnerships with people who are helping us push our thinking has been more critical than ever… particularly for us, meaning that we transform and innovate in a way that I don't think we could if we didn't know what was out there and what the world was capable of achieving with us. Partnerships for us are really pushing us to the next level.” - Madlin Sadler, COO of the International Rescue Committee“Part of the value that you can bring as a technology leader is really not about the technology at all—it's about having the visibility to see what's happening in different parts of the business, and you can bring those things together and influence different thinking by looking more holistically at what could be happening in the company.” - Colleen Berube, CIO and SVP of Operations, Zendesk---------Time Stamps:* (1:46) Meet Madlin and Colleen, and learn about their roles* (6:38) How the role of CIO has evolved to include operations* (11:21) Emphasizing productivity in the hybrid workplace* (16:46) Why internal and external partnerships are important for success * (23:27) Secrets every CIO and exec should know* (24:53) Madlin and Colleen ask each other questions--------SponsorThis podcast is brought to you by Asana. Asana is a leading work management platform that empowers teams to orchestrate their work — from daily tasks to big strategic initiatives — all in one place. By enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly, Asana helps organizations of all sizes and industries achieve their goals, faster. Learn more at Asana.com.--------LinksConnect with Ian on LinkedInConnect with Madlin on LinkedInConnect with Colleen on LinkedInLearn more about the International Rescue CommitteeLearn more about ZendeskLearn more about Caspian Studios

Secrets To Scaling Online
Ep 369: Effectively Communicating With Consumers With Melodie Reynolds, Elate Beauty

Secrets To Scaling Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 25:49


Your consumers do not know the ins and outs of how things work in your business. By taking them on this journey with you, you can build dedicated and loyal customers.In this episode, Melodie Reynolds of Elate Beauty talks about her brand and how it grew from 2014 to now.  She also discusses her sales team, the balance between direct-to-consumer and wholesale, and about the importance of transparency.Listen and learn in this episode!KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODEPeople like it when you take them on a journey and it is important to recognize that we are all consumers.Too much transparency is not a bad thing as long as there is context. People that you are speaking to are not in your industry, they don't know who you are, and they don't know the ins and outs of how things work.When you try to show people who you are, you can't just open up your coat, you have to educate them on why you are telling them.It is important to understand what transparency means and how we take responsibility within that transparency.The key thing for Elate Beauty to continue growing is support.The secret to scaling any business is investing in your people.Recommended Tool:  Asanahttps://www.Asana.com Recommended Podcast: The Prof G Podcasthttps://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/the-prof-g-pod-with-scott-galloway/id1498802610 Today's Guest:Melodie Reynolds is the founder and CEO of Elate Beauty.Elate Beauty is a brand of ethically-made and sustainable cosmetics.Connect and learn more about Melodie and Elate Beauty here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/melodieelatedhttps://www.instagram.com/elatecosmetics Website:https://www.elatebeauty.com This month's sponsor is Triple Whale.  Triple Whale's powerful analytics platform clarifies your ad performance across channels, keeping you instantly in the know. Hit https://www.triplewhale.com/upgrowth and use promo code Upgrowth for 15% off today.***PROMO CODEUpgrowthWe love our podcast community and listeners so much that we have decided to offer a free eCommerce Growth Plan for your brand! To learn more and how we can help, click here:upgrowthcommerce.com/growJoin our community and connect with other ecommerce brand owners and marketers!https://www.facebook.com/groups/secretstoscalingpodcast 

Free Time with Jenny Blake
125: How to Create Your Own CRM with Alex Sherwood

Free Time with Jenny Blake

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 45:08


If there's one software question that invokes a near-universal groan among small business owners, it's “What do you use for a CRM?” Much of the existing software is clunky, expensive, or at worst—both. Today I'm chatting with Notion pro Alex Sherwood, a former Salesforce CRM manager, on how he built his own Customer Relationship Manager tool in Notion, and inspired me to do the same. Because even the acronym CRM gives me shudders, I renamed mine “K.I.T.”, Keep In Touch, in a nod to high school yearbook sign-offs. More About Alex: Alex Sherwood, also known as A Notioneer, is a full-time Notion Certified Consultant, ambassador, and creator, who helps Notion users structure their system with his 50+ templates, guides, and consulting. Previously, he managed a Salesforce CRM for more than 3 years that started with 9 users and scaled to more than 75.  He is the resident expert for our Free Time Operations Dashboard, a done-for-you guide to your entire business, helping all of our new Dashboarders get up-to-speed.  You can use the code PODCAST for a special deal on the Free Time Operations Dashboard (which includes two 1:1 sessions with Alex!)

Student Counselor
Ep 28 - Conversation with Brooke Leith, a current Clinical Mental Health Counselor graduate student.

Student Counselor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 59:41


In this episode, I speak with Brooke Leith, a current Clinical Mental Health Counselor graduate student. We talked about the most important things to consider when choosing a program, effective ways to stay organized in Grad School, our favorite classes, and more! Link to her Stay on Track in Grad School with Asana course on Udemy: https://bit.ly/3ADCrEJ - Use Coupon Code: SPC-20 for 20% off (expires 10/06/22) Did you like this episode? If so, please rate it and subscribe to the show on Spotify and Apple Podcast. Thank you! Connect with me on Instagram - @student.counselor.podcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vitorcsouza14/support

The Smart Influencer Podcast Corinne & Christina

In this episode we're talking with Allea Grummert of Duett about how she uses Asana to streamline her two main client services. If you're trying to improve your email marketing, using Asana will help you do so.LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:Asana AirtableConvertKitFULL SHOW NOTES: https://thesmartinfluencer.com/an-insiders-guide-to-asana/TSI Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/214681812013517TSI Instagram Community: https://www.instagram.com/thesmartinfluencer/

Just Great Yoga
#190 Keeping the Peace

Just Great Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 78:01


A mellow stretchy one to carry out your long weekend. Lots of hips and folds with some moderate strength challenges along the way. Happy Labor Day! Get some rest.

GameMakers
How to Argue Constructively (Philosophy Friday #20)

GameMakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 66:26


Drew Levin is currently Director of Product at Riot Games and before that a Director of Product Management at Zynga. Zynga vs. Riot: two companies with wildly different approaches to game development, decision-making, and a culture of debate and discussion. Even more, Drew worked as a political campaign manager before game development. I believe Drew is uniquely experienced in speaking very deeply about different cultures and approaches to having constructive debates within a corporate context. However, more broadly, in our talk today, we discuss the following: - #1. The problem at many companies focused on winning vs. discussion and seeking truth - #2. Impact of company culture - #3. Specific techniques to facilitate more constructive discussions - #4. Ideas and ways in which we can improve discussions

Spiritual Dope
Spirituality with Breathwork Ryan McElvenny

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 56:59


Learn more about Ryan here: https://ryanmcelvenny.com/about   Want to know more about today's podcast promo? Check here: The Skeptic Metaphysician Intro Guy 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general, you're so limited thought process Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the question you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you this world the people in it? Most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't even have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another hit of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:42 Their spiritual dope I'm on with a special guest today it is Ryan McAvennie. Right I get that right? That's correct. Yeah, so listen, for the for the people that have been on this podcast for a while and hang hung out for a while. Sometimes I really jack up like the the last name or any part of the name, right. And I think one of the things that we we learn here is pay attention to your intuition. I was getting ready to start off and I was like, You know what? Let me ask real quick, right. Let me just make sure. And, you know, Ryan Ryan helped me make sure that I said his name correctly. Right. He's got a lot going on guys. He's got a background in medicine. He's been in a Buddhist, you know, you are in a monastery for like four years, you've traveled around the world. And you're deep into this breathwork you're still pretty young, I would say right now at this point in time, I wish I'd found it kind of at your age and had the journey that you did. But once you explain to everybody why you're on and kind of where you're at. Ryan M 1:45 Sure. So for me, just to clarify, it was a tantric ashrams. So we, we were following more Yogic and Tantric principles and studying these and other than Buddha, I spent a little bit of time with Buddhism in Thailand. And then I was in a process of, you know, I was in a process of exploring a lot of different things. And I was also in a process of really exploring my own darkness and the depths of my darkness and going into quite a dark period of my life. And that, that essentially brought me to where I am now, because it kind of broke me down. And I ended up in India, and I met this tantric school, I ended up going deep into that and moving to Denmark, where they had their second biggest ashram, and then living there working for that school, studying and practicing very, very intensely periods where it was seven hours a day for seven months while working more than full time hours. So it's quite quite an intense life. Not necessarily what when I first mentioned that I was in an ashram, a lot of people imagine this very, very relaxing kind of lifestyle, but because we were Tantrics and karma Yogi's, we loved the intensity. And that's what we were cultivating this capacity to stay centered in intensity. And this is still very much the, in a way, the core of my entire, the way that I live my life and the way that I share these techniques and teachings that I share now. So since leaving that ashram, I came to a point where I felt that what we were being taught in the ashram made more sense to practice in the world than in the ashram. So Tantra is a is a philosophy that's very much something to be practiced in the world rather than in isolation. And so I left and I started teaching the techniques that I'm still practicing that I, I learned the foundations of there, and they've continued to develop. And I was teaching one on one for about a year. And about six months ago, I started to teach groups, these techniques. And in around when this should be airing, or maybe a couple of weeks out, I'll be launching a new platform, which will go even deeper into some of the techniques that I learned there. And a lot of that is about working with the breath and working with different ancient techniques from the hatha yoga tradition, but bringing them kind of up to a more modern standard. So understanding what's actually going on when we're using these techniques, and understanding the mechanics behind them both on a physical and we could say an energetic or spiritual level. So that's kind of what what I'm up To these days, Well, right now, honestly, I'm settling into my new home in Mexico. And that's been more of a process than I expected it to be. But once I'm settled, then it's straight back to developing this platform and teaching, teaching these techniques, including meditation and breath techniques. Brandon Handley 5:25 Now fantastic. So look, before we dive into all of it, right, and that's awesome. You've been so deep into this, and again, to the people that are tuning in, and listen today, if you haven't checked out, you know, make sure you go check out his Instagram, because he doesn't, you know, really amazing postures and, you know, exercises that really kind of blow my mind, right. I'm like, I'm at the beginning of the beginning of the beginning. And Ryan's, you know, definitely further along than I am, he talks about doing seven hours of meditation a day, for seven months straight, I might do seven hours and seven months, if we're just calling it, calling it out. But that doesn't mean that I won't do it and use it. So I mean, that's pretty intense and awesome. So we're gonna dive into all of it. So Ryan, I just like to start these off with the whole idea, right? That you and I are basically conduits for universal energy, right? You and I are here for really everybody else's highest and best good, right? We're here for service. And somebody listening to this podcast today. They're gonna, they're not gonna hear that you and I talking? They're, they're gonna hear a message that's specifically for them. Right? And it's can only be delivered through you to them on this platform in this moment. What is that message today? Ryan M 6:48 Well, I feel that different people will be in different places and take different things from but for me, what, what is one of the core messages that I really try to get across to people is the importance of cultivating a dedicated daily practice, whether that be five minutes, or 10 minutes, or, as it was my case, it's sometimes seven hours. And whether it's five minutes or seven hours, it doesn't really matter. It depends on what we want to offer to the practice and what we are kind of aiming for the practice to help us to achieve. But especially for, I would say, especially for men, this daily aspect to it is very important, this this dedication, this this fire. And this is one of the things that I always try to encourage people to embrace. Because, I mean, you kind of mentioned that a little bit before we started recording. But there is so much what I would call the plague of vagueness in modern spirituality. And actually, when we when we look at yoga, traditional yoga, so yoga, now, it comes to mean just postures, but yoga. Asana is one part of yoga postures are one part of yoga. And Yoga itself is, in fact, a very, very detailed and almost scientific system for Spiritual Development for development of the person, like even outside of the spirit, development of the capacity to control the attention, the capacity to move our energy and not be moved by our energy, if that intuitively makes sense to you guys. And when we start to practice daily, we start to see the impacts that it can have for us in and there's a number of like I can I can elaborate on that quite a bit. But I don't I don't want to jump ahead and jump too much into that. Brandon Handley 9:03 No, thank you. And I think that that's awesome. Right. Like you said, Absolutely. There's there's a vagueness, right. And it can it can be a little little maddening. Because like, let's have a conversation. But let's also lay in the plane, right? And understand and come to an understanding of what that looks like. And when you talk about, hey, yoga, yoga, like you said, is been westernized, right, we take, we see something happening, and we see the outside effects of it. And we're like, oh, we want that. And we do all the outside exercise and stuff. And I feel like that's it. Right. But really, as you're saying, as you're as you're talking like there's a there's a greater depth to this. And the development isn't just your glutes, right? Your development isn't just a you look good and yoga pants. It's like there's a whole like there's a whole like inner work as a matter of fact, all of it The should kind of boils down to like this inner work and its inner process, this inner knowing and development that, um, hopefully I think is growing right. I feel like that awareness is growing at this point. Yeah, I Ryan M 10:12 definitely thought that it is, I feel that we're at a, almost a tipping point in terms of the way that the collective subconscious and the way that the collective consciousness is expanding, and I feel that people are definitely like, and the other thing is that, honestly, even when I first started teaching, I never use the word yoga. I never use the word Tantra because I don't necessarily want people to associate these transformative techniques with their prior held notions about what yoga is. And so I feel that, you know, whether it's how popular mindfulness meditation is becoming or meditation in general. You know, Asana is one thing now we got Wim Hof was really spearheading the breathwork movement. And now we're getting more and more breath practitioners who are realizing what a powerful tool for transformation that is, we don't need to call it yoga for it to be a powerful tool, you know, and it doesn't need to necessarily have exactly the same overall goal as the yogi's had, which was liberation, because what is liberation, it's the removal of all of the programs that we've had put into our subconscious. And this is once we are free from that we're free, right? And that's kind of what we're, we're faced with, and what we're more and more, I feel more and more people are starting to become aware of how much in a sense to say it very directly. And a lot of people get very triggered by these kinds of terms, how much we are automatons conditioned by our previous experiences. Rather than being like, consciously engaged with the world, we're really engaged with the world through this filter of past experience. And that, to me, is like the essence of yoga is removing that filter. And I feel that, that that is becoming more and more popular now that that awareness of that those programs and this desire to, to at least choose which programs we have, if not to remove them completely, is becoming more and more widespread. And I feel that that's very beautiful. And the yogic thing is that once we realize that, that's what we want to cultivate. We can see that the yogic technologies, whether it's, you know, Asana is a very useful technology, but even more so when we start getting into working with the breath. When we start getting into one pointed meditation. These are very, very effective tools for exactly that for removing our conditioning, and then making space for us to choose the way that we want to be in the world. Now, I will add one caveat that I think that there is always a danger when things start becoming we can say like more mainstream, that the evidence can get larger. So for example, mindfulness meditation has become very, very popular. And it's become very popular because it now has clinical trials that support its efficacy in certain realms. And it's been shown to be very, very effective for reducing stress for harmonizing the nervous system for reducing reactivity and allowing us more space to choose the way that we want to engage with the world. The trouble with that is that for the yogi's, for example, and even for the Buddha's mindfulness, meditation was not an end in itself, it is a intermediary phase towards a higher state of meditation, where we really enter this, you know, states of silence, which have fallen a little bit out of vogue, because they are quite, you know, the, the learning curve to access them is quite high. And so we've kind of settled for the intermediary stage. The danger is that we'll go ahead Brandon Handley 14:33 go ahead. Well, I mean, so let's let's pause there for a second right, you got a lot a lot in there and then it's awesome. It's all like new stuff that I agree with and subscribe to. So that's why it's awesome. And I'm not looking for an echo chamber though, right? It's like okay, you know, you you've gone and you've lived like you've lived this right? And you're you're currently living it which is great. Yeah, and if you don't mind you mind if I give a little blurb on like, the pre, how you before the before times before you started doing the breath work and other stuff that's on your site, right? Like, I mean, you, you know, and and I bring it up because you know, plant medicine and hallucinogenics and psychedelics are a big part of this, all this right now, right, this mental health space, I went through it too, right and, and the reason I bring it up too is I want to, I want to touch on the idea that the work that you're doing in the breath work and this yogic work, and the stuff that you can do on your own, is almost more intense, cleaner and better, in a sense, right? Like I think of, I think of kind of, like, you know, like LSD or hallucinogens are almost pale in comparison to the reality of what you can create by through this breath work and some of the other stuff, right, and some of the, some of the takeaways and connections that you can establish that are long term versus when the trip wears off, you're like, well, that's over. And that sucks, right? Because now you've got this thing that you've created and sustain, you've got a sustainable connection effect that it doesn't require you Ryan M 16:23 even more dangerous, when it wears off. Yeah, and we don't even realize it's worn off. And we think we're still there. So when we're acting like we're still there, but it's not showing up in how we engage with the world. This, this is something that I've really, what I would say is that there's a difference between experience and integration. And we live in a society now that is far more, I would even say obsessed with the experience, we want to have the intense experience, we think that the experience itself will transform us. But there's no space given to the importance of integration. Without integrating the experience fully. As you said, it wears off, it doesn't really make the deep transformations that we're longing for. And we hold on to this, I like this, somehow mental idea or this memory of the experience as if that transformed us. But it really, most of the time, it's not the experience itself that's transforming to us, it's the integration. And so these tools, what I feel is that psychedelics are an incredibly, incredibly powerful tool to be shown things. So we see a lot when we and I still, you know, since it during my time in the ashram, these kinds of things were strictly forbidden, since leaving, I feel, you know, firstly, and let go of the dogmas that were there. And I want to engage with everything consciously, rather than reject some things and prioritize others. And so for me, I enjoy very much psilocybin and mushrooms in recent times, but what I've noticed is that these are very powerful tools for seeing certain things. But then it's my daily spiritual practice, which are my practice of breath and meditation, my transformational practices, which allow me to integrate the lessons from what I've seen, so that I can actually change the way that I engage with the world. That That makes sense. Brandon Handley 18:40 Right? Yeah, I mean, absolutely. Right. I think that it's like you're saying, The, we've got this propensity to chase the experience, right? Or even hold on, like you said, Hold on to the memory of the experience, even with the breath work, right? I mean, we can have this intense, powerful breath work experience. And the next time we go in, we're like, I want I want what I just had last time. Right? And, you know, to that end, Ryan, since we're talking about it, right. And again, all the conversation about the removal of the filters, right? Talk about that all the time, right? I love the idea too, that you're taking, you're saying, you know, let's remove yoga, let's remove this other any other language that directly identifies this as like yoga or something else, because that makes it that makes it accessible to everybody. So because if you say this is a yogic practice, somebody's like, well, you know, I tried yoga once and that's just not for me, right? Because they've got this memory again, and they created a filter to that. Right? So you remove some of those filters so that they can you know, remove all the filters or like you said, consciously engage in cut like say, hey, you know what? This is dumb. model that I had before this is the program that I had been using previously, I recognize this now as the program. What program do I want to run now? Right? Like, you know, for a while Ryan, you were running the ashram program, now you're running this other program, right? So like, you know, consciously saying, right, this is the this is the, this is the new program, right? This is the old program, it worked for a little while, it got loaded, I changed a couple pieces of code. And we're going to run this new program and see how that that goes, but doing it at a conscious level, like you're talking about, and being fully aware of how you feel in this moment, and whether or not that's an alignment, Ryan M 20:40 are really able to connect to how we feel in each moment, programs become much less necessary. And then you can really, so one, one thing that I've really noticed, and this is I'm going to talk more genuinely about personal development, is that the trend in personal development is this introduced the introduction of new programs to sit on top of the old programs. So if you have somebody that's very shy, one of the examples I use, and I'm not, I'm not necessarily criticizing or judging this, but if you have a man who's very shy, he might go out and learn game so that he gets confident to go out and speak to women, he introduces a new program on top of the shyness, but it doesn't really do anything to heal that that wound that's inside that's, that's causing that, that set of circumstances, it's a new program. And the programs tend to compare against each other. And sometimes one is the dominant program. And other times the other is the dominant program. But the biggest problem with this is that when we introduce new programs, we are introducing the program that we believe is most beneficial to us from the place of the mind. So it might not even be the case. And even if it is the case that that is the program that's best for us, it's best in this circumstance in this moment. If that same man enters into a long term relationship after those experiences, he now has his shyness to contend to in terms of dealing with his lover, and he now has all of these essentially quite objectifying programs which he's introduced, when it comes to dealing with his lover it's not so harmonious for that new situation. So it's a little bit out there but for me, then the best thing from my perspective is not to focus on the introduction of new programs, but to focus on the removal of programs and the connecting to how I feel in each moment being aware of my inner processes in each moment so that I can come from a place that's that's genuine that's not programmed that spontaneous that's fresh and and responsive to reality rather than reactive to my past experiences or my kind of Yeah, I don't want to say program too much but programs beliefs Brandon Handley 23:27 Sure, so I mean your your current your current beliefs, right is kind of how you would just say these are my current beliefs and how do I how do I take a look at my current beliefs and determine whether or not they're still good for me? Right and then you've got a process that sounds like a they're bringing you a quick interruption of this podcast is share a trailer of another podcast this is known as just kind of a podcast trailer exchange of a podcast that you may be interested check it out. Unknown Speaker 24:04 My name is Wil Geary and unlike Mulder and Scully, both want to believe we've embarked on a journey of discovery we've talked to people deeply entrenched in the spiritual and metaphysical world, we've thrown ourselves into weird and wonderful experiences. I've joined a coven of witches. Wait, you joined a coven? Yep, all in the interest of finding something anything that will prove that there's something beyond this physical three dimensional world we all live in? This is the skeptic metaphysicians join us every week as we explore a new corner of this weirdly wonderful universe always keeping a pragmatic eye on the subject. You don't live entirely in the womb, the womb, the womb, what's the womb you know, the womb that doesn't help them go woowoo you know the woowoo Why didn't you say that? I'm sure I did. Catch us on your favorite podcast platform across the world on select radio stations, skeptic metaphysician, your world will never be the same. Brandon Handley 25:00 And now back to our regularly scheduled program. Like where you could help me. So that process focus very Ryan M 25:09 much on these techniques, which I mean, particularly one one technique in particular, which have called diaphragm hacking, which is based in very, very considered to be a very high yogic technology. And it's kind of I don't use the original yogic name for two reasons. The first one because it can be alienating to people who don't care about Sanskrit, but also because that technique will that name has been attributed to a technique, which is not really on the same level, it's, it's, as you said, it's a very superficial understanding of that ancient technique. And what this does is it does a couple of things. But in terms of what we're talking about right now, it has a almost direct capacity to interface with and, and on unright programs. So I'm a completely different person than I was six years ago, when I started to practice this technique. Six years ago, I was someone who was completely controlled by my desires and addictions, I was addicted to weed, I was an alcoholic, I was very addicted to pornography, and addicted to sex. And I was very, very angry all the time. And this was a very heavy program for me to to start to unright. And the main, one of the main tools has been going into, essentially, like, when we work with the breath, we're interfacing directly with the nervous system, the breath is known in yoga, and now in kind of modern terms as the gateway between the conscious and the subconscious, because it's the only one to take it to modern terms, it is the only one of our autonomic nervous functions. So the functions of the nervous system which happen automatically without our conscious, you know, our us putting our hand on it consciously, it's the only one that we can start to control. Without too much prior training, you need a little bit of training, but anybody can sit down. And if you tell them, Okay, slow down your breath, they can start to try to slow down their breath, they have that capacity. And this means that it's this gateway between what we call the somatic nervous system, the functions that we have direct control over, and the autonomic nervous system, the functions that we have, that we normally don't have control of. And through interfacing into the nervous system, this way, we can start to essentially rewire it to underwrite those pathways. Because, again, I don't want to get too technical, but I'm just going to make another relation between ancient yogic science and modern science, modern behavioral science is that in yogic science, we have what's called samskaras. People often talk about karma. It's a very misunderstood concept. And it's very, very, like, it's a very high concept is the thing when when you actually get into it, but what I feel is more relatable is the one of samskaras, which are referred to as these groups. So samskaara literally means this group, and it's this idea that every time we have a thought, every time we do an action, we scrape a groove a little bit deeper. And that means that it's easier for the knife we can say to follow up to fall into that path and follow it again each time. Does that make sense? Brandon Handley 28:59 Absolutely, I mean, look, it's like a meal for anybody that's ever held a record. Right? Like, I mean, this the same thing, right? You've got this. You've got the needle that that's going to keep staying in that track. And so like, you know, it's disrupted, right. So yeah, that makes sense. I love that love the imagery in Ryan M 29:17 terms of yogic science as a result of the groups that we've built up, either in this life or in the yogic idea and past lives also, but we'll keep it a bit more relatable and just say, in this life, we we start to be taught certain behaviors from a very young age, we start to have certain thought patterns from a very young age. And every time we have that thought, every time we do that action, it gets a bit deeper, meaning that we're even more likely to do that thought or action. And so what's the end and this has been shown very much now with modern behavioral science in terms of the way that we form habits. So we know now that the more we'd do a certain action, the more likely we are to pick that up as a habit and to start doing it with with ease or with with less difficulty, or even unconsciously. And I like to use the imagery of a path in a forest. If you're walking through a forest, you can see the path where there's been people who have walked beforehand, it's it doesn't have growth on it, so it's easy for the feet to follow. Now, if we want to change our behavior, sure, there's going to be need for a conscious effort to choose a new path through the forest, which isn't so easy to follow. So we're going to need to have a landmark, for example. So say, at the big tree, the past goes to the left of the big tree, and we're going to say, You know what, I'm going to start going into the right of the big tree. But every time we're not conscious, we're gonna go down that left path, we're not going to go down the right path, it's going to be a conscious effort to keep going down that right path, until we start to go down it enough times that we start to cut a new path through the forest, and the old path starts to grow over. Does that does that make sense? Brandon Handley 31:20 Yeah, yeah. And I love it. Right. And it's just like you're saying, I mean, this is applicable, like anywhere, if you're driving home, and you've got a certain road that you always take, right? You stay on that road, right? Even though there's plenty of other ways home, you have to consciously make an effort to be like, you know, what, I wanted a different direction that I want to see. Right, and to. And see, one of the other things you mentioned, like pass laws before too, and, and while that might might seem for a lot of people to be like, Ah, I don't know, I pass lives, man, let's, let's take this example, then if you don't believe in past lives, and you're one of those people that says, you know, all these things matter, and I believe in science, then let's use a little bit of science, right? It's definitely been proven that freights pass through, or at least like seven generations, right? So the stuff the programming that we are born with, is, maybe we can't and won't call it our past lives. But I'm gonna, I'm gonna go out on a limb and say, you know, just we can, we've just barely begun to know how to read DNA. There's more encoded in that then than we know yet, right? So what's in there could be past lives, records of past lives, right? And the way that you act and react has been scientifically proven to be passed on to you, from your ancestors. So you can call it past lives, you can call it something else. But the truth of the matter is, the way you act and react has definitely been programmed into you. And you through what Ryan's talking about here has the capability. Like, like Brian saying, you know, and Ryan, you can jump in anywhere, but like, you know, as you enter, freeze directly with the nervous system, and you can begin to flip the switches of your genes through this practice. So I just wanted to Yeah, I wanted, I wanted to highlight that because you're not off the mark by saying, you know, bug. When you talk, like, talk about removing the filters, right? This is kind of this is why I went back to that, you know, if somebody's got to think about a hang up on on past lives, then they may not have a hang up with the science. Right. But to me, they're ultimately the same. You saying the same thing, which, Ryan M 33:49 as I said, when we really get into yoga, it's really a lot more scientific than we realize there's very little vagueness to traditional yoga. If you read the original Hatha Yoga manuals, they really read a lot more like an instruction booklet, then some kind of very vague and woowoo New Age spirituality thing. And at the end of the day, whether we believe in past you know, it's a, also just a form of describing certain phenomena, like, like you're saying, even outside of jeans, like even if we don't get into jeans, just the very fact that your grandparents raised your parents in a particular way. And then your parents raised you in a particular way, is already writing these, you know, neurons into certain pathways that are easier to fire down. And that's exactly the same as the path in the forest. When neurons are used. They get easier to fire down and when neurons are not use, they get less receptive to the electrical signal. we'll create our behavior. And so we can even just talk about past lives in terms of well, my parents, my parents, parents, my parents, parents, parents, as you said, and the way that they inscribe certain behaviors or thought patterns into us. And when we start to use these techniques, and not only these techniques, but in my experience, these techniques are, you know, one point at meditation and yogic breath work and these kinds of things, they are particularly effective ways to interface with these patterns. Brandon Handley 35:41 Right, let me jump in the record at one point in meditation, How's that different from you know, from from headspace, for example, or headspace and Ryan M 35:52 Buddhist mindfulness, which is really an intermediary step in a deeper meditation practice. So, one point that meditation is, is very, okay, it's almost, you know, the, the name describes itself, we, we fixed the attention to one point, and then it might run away, we bring it back to that one point. And we just train more and more to be able to keep the attention on one point. And then this leads to very, very incredible effects. Because when I'm gonna go a little bit into detail here, but essentially, we have this one of the great things about mindfulness is that it starts to make us aware that we are not the mind, we start to became able to observe the movements of the mind and realize that the the movements of the mind, and the thoughts are separate from our attention and our being, which is a very, very important step. Because in our society, especially the western society, we are so deeply identified with the mind, we even have philosophers in the Western tradition, saying, I think, therefore I am. And it's not true. We are and the thoughts are an observable phenomena from the place of our true self, which is the, the observer. And this, this can be Brandon Handley 37:28 part of the experience, right, like they're a part of the experience that we ascribe to ourselves. We like event like me jumping in the water and bathtub, Ryan M 37:36 comes in and stirs up the water, you start to freak out, because ah, you've put your hand in me and you're stirring me up. It's not the case, we can, we can take the step back, and we can observe, oh, wait, those are my thoughts. And I'm watching them, so I am something else. And so that that is a very important step. And it's very good that mindfulness has become popular so that more people start to realize that there is something more to their identity than the mental movements. But what one point of meditation does is that through affixing the attention firmly to one point for long enough, the movements of the mind stop. And then we discover that stillness, that statements that used to be associated with meditation, I remember when I was a child, that's what meditation meant. And then that was kind of quite a quite a high goal that people felt a bit intimidated to embark upon. And so this new definition of meditation showed up, which was just basically sitting and listening to music or listening to a guided thing. But meditation is very much this, this state where the mind stops. And one point at meditation, go ahead. Brandon Handley 39:00 Well, I mean, so what I'm hearing you say, though, is that mindfulness is kind of where most people are, at this point in time. And Ryan M 39:12 we're calling lots of things meditation, which is essentially any activity where we maybe introduce a bit of awareness, maybe even not, maybe we're just listening to music, we have a fixed label of meditation to it. And it's a little bit problematic to do so not because these practices or these actions don't have value they do and I'm not denigrating their value. But Brandon Handley 39:44 right now, yeah, I just want to make sure yeah, I want to I want to clarify, right. So if we're, you know, if I like purity as much as the next person, right? Like I'm not going to call butter Ryan M 39:58 right, so margarine, butter And then it gets to the point where nobody knows what butter is anymore. And this is what's happened with a lot of these things with meditation. Nobody wants to get nobody, somebody thinks about what meditation originally meant anymore. And even is aware that there's something there's a next step beyond what's become quite popular in this in the form of mindfulness or in the form of, you know, visualizations and all of these relaxation practices. They're very they're very valuable but they're they're a different thing. And it's sad to see Bata become extinct because Brandon Handley 40:52 right. But But here's, here's what I'm really enjoying about this conversation is to let's reintroduce the distinctions, right, let's come back to it. Let's say hey, listen, this is great. It's not that it's not that you've been doing anything wrong. And it's not that you're doing the wrong thing. But let's, let's understand. And let's be clear that your your mindfulness practice is not meditation, there is something beyond and this is, you know, I'm glad you're bringing this up, because I wasn't familiar with this distinction prior to, because I'm sure my experience has been like, alright, you know, these mindfulness practices and headspace helped a ton. Right? What took me to the next level was, yeah, helped me what helped me a ton. What took me to the next level was breathwork. And finding finding, even just moments of stillness in that space, I've been at it. And I could be totally wrong. I'm going through the Tibetan Book of Living and Dying right now and talking about Bardo states. Right. And for me, that spaced that just that little space of stillness is for me, like artists, they had a transition in between, like, all the crazy, and just this for a minute. Right? And so to me, so as I tell the group, I'm like, Listen, if you tried meditation, if you tried mindfulness, and your mind still fucking crazy, that's because you have, there is absolutely something else to it. And I tell people that when we do, when we do this breathwork then we go into this Bardo state, we go into, like, you know, retention, or something like that, I feel like you definitely is what meditation is, missing a marker, my clothes, a lot Ryan M 42:35 of people when when we speak about this, because, for me, the one point of meditation is very important. A diaphragm hacking, which is a form of, it's a form of breath holding, with a few different added things to it, but its foundation is a breath hold in a void. So in an empty lungs state. And this is exactly what I say to people is that one point at meditation is great if you're really doing it. And even myself, after six years of practice, the majority of time that I'm meditating, I'm sitting, and I'm, I'm waiting for that meditation. Or I'm, I'm aiming to get to that meditation, but I'm not necessarily there. And the trouble with this is that it's to speak very frankly. And it's a practice which we can bullshit ourselves into believing that we're doing. I can sit there and I can say, I just meditated for an hour, I'm so good. But I know that if I'm lucky, meditated for a couple of minutes of that hour that I was sitting, when we start to get into breath holds, you cannot push it, you know, you're either there or you're not. And if you're not there, you know, because you need to take a breath almost immediately and enter a breath. If you're really there, you can hold for one minute, one minute and a half, two minutes. You can hold these, what's called bundles in the yogic tradition, and still hold the breath for for multiple minutes and then you know, hey good. Yeah, exactly. Brandon Handley 44:17 Are you saying about like energy losses that we're seeing work but yeah. So but yeah, I got I got it. Um, what is like, Alright, man, we just met. I not never done breathwork before. Totally interesting. So what's the first thing you're gonna tell me to do? Anyways, Ryan M 44:43 square breathing. Square breathing is a fantastic technique. It's based on a yogic technique called summability pranayama. And the fascinating thing with square breathing is from a couple of levels. Firstly, it's very, very harmonizing to the nervous system. So you are automatically starting to bring the nervous system into a state of equilibrium just just by doing a little bit of square breathing, it's a, it's an incredibly simple technique to do. But it can be very, very powerful because the majority of us exist in a state of constant nervous system excitation, and it just, it brings it back down. But the other great thing about it is that it's already starting to train, what we can call co2 tolerance, which is becoming more and more talked about and more and more popular in the current times. And this is a very, very good indicator of our capacity to deal with stress. So the, if you don't mind if I go on a little bit of a tangent about co2. So we have at the base of our brainstem, oh, four man, absolutely. what's called the chemo receptors of co2. And this is telling us or this is sensing what the partial pressure or the concentration of co2 is in the blood. And co2 has been a very, very misunderstood molecule. Because it's been seen previously, it's just a waste product of the rest of the of cellular metabolism, essentially, of the workings of the body. But more and more, it's being acknowledged to be a very, very important molecule for the function of everything. it dilates the vasculature, which allows for blood to more easily travel into all parts of the body, including the brain, it's also necessary for oxygen to detach from the hemoglobin and actually enter into the tissues. So the more co2 we have, the more efficient we can get oxygen into the tissues, not it's not. Brandon Handley 46:56 Real quick, is it more co2 or the right balance of co2? Ryan M 47:01 A complete answer to that, because it hasn't really been looked at in, like, so what I'll say is that, from my perspective, I am not sure if I can get enough co2. I'm very curious, because my entire, like, my practice has been so focused on these breath holds, so focused on increasing my co2 tolerance. And now my my natural respiration rate, it sits at about five to seven respirations per minute, that's when I'm just when I'm checking it out. Wow. Brandon Handley 47:45 And that's like, just that's just like you not. And for for somebody that doesn't understand what that is. That's and I believe that's about around five seconds and five seconds. If I was counting, right, Ryan M 48:00 that would end up with six. So yeah, exactly. Around that sometimes. Power even. And that. Brandon Handley 48:09 Right, so yeah, so So for the I think there's somebody you know, for listener, right. Try that out for yourself to see what Ryan's regular breath work, you know, breathing. That's your regular breathing, I consciously have to do that. Right. And I think so it's pretty cool as roll call that out. Go Ryan M 48:28 ahead. No, as you mentioned, I have a background, I was a registered nurse. My first rotation was actually ironically in the respiratory ward. And when, when we look at that, in terms of modern science and modern medicine, that would be considered a dangerously low respiration rate. If somebody had that respiration rate on the ward, you would start to worry about that person. And should have certain symptoms, like sluggishness, or like the incapacity to really engage in these kinds of things. But I definitely don't feel like that, you know. And when it comes to recently, I was I was a very avid DJ jujitsu competitor, many, many, many years ago, before I started on this path. And recently I revisited that, and the coach was amazed at the way that I don't seem to get tired, and I'm not fit at all. I'm not strong. I'm not athletic. But what I noticed, after he was commenting on it so much, I was just becoming aware that even with a guy 20 was heavier than me on top of me, my breath was still very calm, very slow, and he wasn't breathing like. And so, for me, I'm not sure I'm not sure and, you know, I don't want to make a statement, but for me, I'm not sure that I can get enough co2 in the system. It's just about increase Taking that tolerance and increasing the amount of co2 gradually. And I'm definitely more centered, more relaxed more still, than I ever have been when people hear that I used to have anger problems, they can't they kind of can't believe it, because that's not the way that I come up. And yeah, go ahead. Brandon Handley 50:21 That's great. That's great. No, I love it, right? I mean, I think you and I could go on for a long time. Unfortunately, we're kind of towards the tail end. So I want to make sure that you also hit on you said, you've got a new course coming out, right, a new platform, you get rid of what's what, what's that going to be? And what can people expect to find there from the five week Ryan M 50:46 trainings in the diaphragm hacking technique. And it was, it was wonderful, it was wonderful experience. And it needs five weeks, because it is a little bit more of an advanced technique. And so I like to build it up level by level so that people really get strong results from it. But what I noticed was, some of the participants were getting very, very amazing results from the technique. And other participants were getting results, but not to the level that I would like it to be. And what I realized the difference was is this kind of foundation that they have. So the ones who tended to have better results were people who were already meditation practitioners, either the past or mindfulness or something else, or ones who already like really into Wim Hof, really into yoga. So they had that foundation already. And so what I decided to do, and the other thing is that I noticed that after the five weeks was over, many of the people would slow down or stop practicing. And without, you know, I was in an ashram for four years, I had that support to my practice of being there. So what I really wanted to do was to solve both of those problems, a new form, which will be more of like building an ongoing community, so that people are supported in continuing to develop their practice. And also, the program itself is being extended to a quiet intensive three months, and people can take it at their own speed. So they can take it over longer than three months, which really lays the foundation so they start to get an awareness of their body, get an awareness of their breath, get an awareness of what's going on with their mind, learn to relax, before having the more powerful but more difficult techniques taught to them. And I'm hoping and I've done this with my one on one clients, and it's been quite effective. I'm hoping this allows everybody who comes to the platform to be able to build that foundation so that when they learn the more powerful techniques, they can really get the full results from it, they can really start to interface with the subconscious and remove whatever heavy programming so controlling them. So we're going to be going nation's Go ahead. Brandon Handley 53:15 Yeah, so I mean, yeah, yeah. Well, I mean, so you're, I think on your site, it's like, you know, if you don't mind, like, you know, part part of what you're talking about is you know, focus and freedom from like anxieties and addictions but also sounds like there's there's some benefits to Ryan M 53:35 with learning more practitioner is because I feel that if I was just upfront with how profoundly impacting they have been, for me and my students so far, I would sound like a snake oil salesman, I had to focus in on certain what's called pain points in the industry, which I don't necessarily love to do, but it's part of the part of the game. But really, the biggest techniques are so effective I get it someone whether they're dealing with anxiety or addiction, or whether they just want to level up to be the next the next capacity in you know, in focus in presence, especially presence in underwriting programs in you know, opening up to be more engaged with their reality and achieve even more and be more in line with their their purpose and their dreams. And this is really what what we're aiming for. Brandon Handley 54:45 100% I love it, man. Well, listen, when I talk about breath work, I talked about it as I'm pretty sure it really is the silver bullet, right. It fixes so many things and it addresses so many things. I'm glad to hear, you know, look, I mean, it's a challenge To quote unquote market it when really all you want to do is share honestly and truthfully, like all the greatness that it can do for anybody, right? You've got to pick and choose though kind of who those any bodies are as you get yourself up and running for the people that are tuning in, guys, you know Ryan's no joke. If you're serious about breath work, and you've had enough of mine, I get it. That's cool. Even if you still hanging out with me, I won't be jealous if I spot you hanging out with Ryan and checking out his breath work because you know, he's going to offer you something that I simply at this point my I'm on cannot so check out Ryan Ryan, where can they go check it out? Ryan M 55:47 And I'm sure that there'll be some link with this. And I'm also I have a website Ryan Michael vinny.com I'd mess you know, I'm mess on top of that. I'm mainly on Instagram these days. So that's that's the best place to find me. Fantastic, Ryan. Brandon Handley 56:12 Hey, man, thank you so much for stopping in today. I know you're just came from Costa Rica. You over in Mexico. You've been very busy. So I appreciate you making the time to be on Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM
Vivir en Nueva York y trabajar en Tech feat. Omar Hernandez

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 26:25


https://youtu.be/DzzqVsMYkVw ¡Episodio Reencuentro! Conversamos con Omar Hernandez, Biz Operations Analyst en #Akamai Technologies.Para los que acabaron de llegar, Omar estuvo en el episodio 78, el ultimo episodio que grabamos en vivo en Febrero 2020 antes de la pandemia. Buscalo por aquiNos pusimos al dia y conversamos sobre su experiencia buscando trabajo despues de la maestria, mudandose de California a NYC y como ha vivido el la experiencia de trabajar remoto.Este episodio es posible gracias a Asana. La mejor solución para manejar proyectos y tareas de equipos remotos. Prueba Asana gratis por 30 días yendo a conexiones.io/ASANARecuerda darnos una reseña en Apple PodcastsConecta con Omar en LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/omargh1/Suscribete en YouTube para enterarte de los nuevos episodios https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiMvsePto4lO10M96B9ojxg/?sub_confirmation=1

The Personal Brain Trainer Podcast: Embodying Executive Functions
#23: Our Personal EF Hacks: Inhibitory Control

The Personal Brain Trainer Podcast: Embodying Executive Functions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 32:33


In this episode, Darius and Erica share some personal life hacks, tools, and technology to develop inhibitory control skills. - how inhibitory control works - personal executive function hacks - Time blocking - Calendars - Reminders - Managing your environment - physical - visual - desk position - Lighting - Clothing - uniform - shoes - glasses - Sound quality - Creating a focused routine Technology - Split screens - Thesaurus - TickTick - Asana - Google Calendar - Google Keep - FM Systems - Airpods and headphones (noise cancelling) - Zoom Links - Eisenhower's Urgent/Important Principle: https://tinyurl.com/yc5r2hs6 - Google Keep: https://keep.google.com/ - Google Calendar: https://calendar.google.com/ - Asana: https://app.asana.com/ - Zoom: https://zoom.us/ - MindMapping - BulletMap Academy: https://bulletmapacademy.com/ - Good Sensory Learning: https://goodsensorylearning.com/ - Access to Work Advice: Contact Darius @ www.dyslexiawork.com - Learning Specialist Courses: https://www.learningspecialistcourses.com/ Brought to you by - www.goodsensorylearning.com - www.learningspecialistcourses.com - www.bulletmapacademy.com

improve it! Podcast – Professional Development Through Play, Improv & Experiential Learning
122: First Time Manager? How to Go from Peer to Manager in 5 Easy Steps with Ramona Shaw

improve it! Podcast – Professional Development Through Play, Improv & Experiential Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:43


Are you transitioning from an individual contributor role to a leadership position?  If yes, you're in for a treat. If no, you're in for truth nuggets aplenty to add to your toolkit. In this episode, Erin brings on leadership coach, Ramona Shaw, to give you five EASY steps to go from peer to manager in no time! In this episode, you will hear:  The biggest mistake first-time managers make  Key leadership habits to become a confident leader Five tangible steps to make a seamless transition from individual contributor to leader  Show Links: Want to get your team Hybrid Hyped? Check out this free download Send us a voice message here! Did today's episode resonate with you? Please leave us a review! About Ramona Shaw: Studies have found that 40-60% of high-performing employees fail or underperform when appointed as managers within their first two years on the job. Since the vast majority of new managers never receive the leadership training essential for success in their role, high rates of failure result. Such situations are costly for both the managers who fear demotions or losing out on salary increases and promotions, as well as the organizations that lose talent and productivity. In response to this issue, Ramona Shaw runs The Leadership Accelerator, a 12-week program that coaches first-time managers to become confident, competent leaders who deliver results and who people love to work with. Through the program, she has helped hundreds of new managers at startups and leading companies — including Google, Twitch, Asana, Lionsgate, and Dropbox — successfully transition into leadership roles. Before becoming a leadership coach, Ramona worked at Partners Group, a global private markets firm with $127B in assets under management and over 1,500 professionals across 20 offices worldwide. At the firm, Ramona moved from a Junior Financial Analyst to Vice President in under six years. Connect with Ramona Shaw:  Instagram  LinkedIn Connect with Erin Diehl: Instagram LinkedIn improve it! TikTok Improve it! Instagram Improve it! Facebook improve it! website Book a Laugh Break Book a Workshop Email Erin: info@learntoimproveit.com   “I love this podcast and I love Erin!!”  If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this podcast! This helps Erin support more people – just like you – move toward the leader you want to be. Click here, click listen on Apple Podcasts, scroll to the bottom, tap to rate with 5 stars, and select “Write a Review.” Then be sure to let Erin know what you loved most about the episode! Also, if you haven't done so already, subscribe to the podcast. That way you won't miss any juicy episodes! Thanks in advance, improve it! Peeps :)

Reyna's Podcast
Ep. 102 - Why My Planner Doesn't Work and What to Do Instead

Reyna's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 27:23


In my new podcast episode, I go over 4 reasons why my planner doesn't work for me anymore and what to use instead. I am definitely that person who loves her planners, but as I wanted to scale my business it no longer was realistic for me to use a planner anymore. Saves me time - I now use a project management tool called Asana where I can organize all my personal and business projects. It saves me time from rewriting everything and I can easily change due dates or task details. Easily delegate and outsource tasks - Once I was ready to add another person to the team to help me with admin tasks, everything was already organized in Asana and I was able to easily guide them on what to do for each particular task. Tasks can repeat - I set up (weekly, monthly, quarterly) repeating tasks in Asana which automatically reminds me what needs to get done. Give tasks more context - I love to attach the images, videos, and audio related to that task. I love having everything all in one place to easily access it. “But Reyna, I don't have a team and it's just me running my business.” It's important to learn now so that when you are ready to scale and add someone you don't have to learn how to use a new tool, you can simply add someone else. Overall, my project management tool, Asana, is much more efficient than my planner, and I highly recommend! If you need more support with this, I can help you organize your project management tool, and specifically, I use Asana. Book a strategy session to share where you are at with organizing your life or business and we can dive deeper into how to efficiently set it all up. Click here to learn more: https://reyna.mykajabi.com/organizeyourlifeandbusiness - Book a Free Consultation to Organize Your Life and Business Join the Latina Lifestyle Legacy Membership and keep up Latina Lifestyle Legacy Instagram Youtube Channel If you liked this episode be sure to submit your anonymous question to be featured in future episodes: Anonymous Question Form RSVP For - OAXACA Trip

On the Brink with Andi Simon
327: Liam Martin—The Workplace is Staying Remote. How Can You Lead it Forward?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 41:07


Hear how to make your business better, remotely It should be no surprise to you that as an anthropologist specializing in helping companies change, I loved my interview with Liam Martin. As we've all experienced, the pandemic has dramatically changed what we think of as “normal.” In particular, the meaning of work has changed and continues to, as each generation moves into the workforce with different values, beliefs and behaviors. Businesses, both small and large, are trying to recruit, retain and develop their talent pool, only to find that today's workers have very different ideas about what matters to them, reflecting fundamental societal questions about what “really matters” to each of us. Enjoy. Watch and listen to our conversation here Today's podcast contains very valuable data, information and insights about how to manage a remote or hybrid workforce Think of it as today's future way of working. But, as so many of our clients are asking, how do you manage a remote workforce, particularly since women really have embraced remote work? My guest Liam Martin, co-founder of a remote-first company which grew eight figures with people in 43 different countries and no office, says, "Remote work has been our way of working for more than 10 years. We observed that almost 99% of new remote companies during the pandemic could not figure out one thing common to all successful remote-first companies: asynchronous communication, the bedrock of every successful remote business. Here are a few of the new counterintuitive principles Liam and I discuss:  Introverts climb to the top faster in remote-first companies because their thoughtfulness is seen as an asset, not a liability. In remote-first organizations, charismatic leaders are not required; in fact, charisma is one of the biggest barriers to business growth, regardless of whether the company is remotely located or not.  Remote teams operate on autonomy, and contrary to popular belief, the more automated measurements you have within your organization, the more freedom you have.  Remote-first companies have, on average, half as many managers as on-premises companies. Management in remote first-organizations is redundant. Contact Liam via LinkedIn or his two websites: Time Doctor and Running Remote.  Enjoy our conversation. Rethink your own organization. It may be time to change. Perhaps we can help you visualize a new business model for the future—which is really today! Please contact us here.  Want to know more about successfully taking your company remote? Start here. Blog: How Are You Changing How You Work? Is It Working? Blog: The Future Of Work: 5 Most Important Trends To Watch Blog: Virtual Organizations, Hybrid Organizations, And The Most Amazing Workplaces For Tomorrow? Podcast: Teresa Douglas—Unleashing Those Secrets To Working Remotely Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business and On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   {{cta('20db9f83-fb49-4483-b118-61d915909275','justifyleft')}} Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. As you know, I'm your host and your guide. I'm also a bit of an explorer. And I go looking for really interesting people who are going to help you see, feel and think in ways so you can soar. These are indeed fast-changing times and so the more unusual people I can bring to you, the happier I am. I'm amazed at where people are listening to our podcasts. So thank you, you've pushed us to the top 5% of podcasts across the globe and that's a pretty impressive place to be. And we're now at 327 podcasts, so we just keep going, trying to find great folks. Today I'm quite honored to have Liam Martin with me. Liam has a very interesting story to share with you about the world that we're in. And I'm going to ask him some questions about what is work, what's remote work. I have my own clients who are trying to bring their employees back into the office. And the employees are saying, "Why?" And they're saying, "Why not? We miss you." And they say, "But we don't miss the commute. And we don't mind working out of the house, and we're getting much more productive and we're actually having a life." It's a very interesting time, even as we go post-pandemic. It's hard to know what's going on and who's coming back, and how to use remote and what we've learned wisely. And I think that's the lesson to be learned today. So let me introduce you to Liam. Liam is a serial entrepreneur. He runs something called Time Doctor and staff.com, one of the most popular time-tracking and productivity software platforms in use by top brands today. He's also co-organizer of the world's largest remote work conference, Running Remote, and he'll tell you a little bit about it because it's already happened. I think you're going to wait for next year to make sure you can get there as well. Liam is an avid proponent of remote work and has published in all the major publications. He targets expansion of remote work, not because it's a gig but because it really does work for work. And I've been talking and doing research a lot about what is work, where do we work? When is the home not a home? How can we talk about life-work balance? It's sort of blended, and the pandemic was a catalytic moment for change. And I love change. But it's also been a catalytic moment for wondering about the core values we've got. Liam, thank you for joining me today. Liam Martin: Thanks for having me, Andi. I'm super excited to be able to get into this subject, because I think we're going to be able to get a little bit deeper than the average podcast. Andi Simon: Well, I think that's what I hope to do. I refuse to say: give me three things to talk about. You have a new book out called Running Remote. And it's focused on remote work methodology. And it's a revolutionary guide. And for the listener and the viewer, it is revolutionary because it isn't simply about what you ought to do, it's also how you should do it and why you should do it. But it raises those fundamental questions we're asking, like, what is work? And how do you get it done? And then how do you review the people who are working this way? And what are all the four things that we have in our company? Liam, tell us about you. Who's Liam, how'd you get here? Why is remote work so important to you? Liam Martin: So first off, I'm currently in a chalet in northern Canada. I'm from French Canada. So I'm fluent in both French and English. And I've been working remotely for almost 20 years. I definitely was doing it before everyone thought it was cool. And the reason why I was doing that was, I actually dropped out of my Ph.D. They gave me a professorship, which was a master's degree for dropping out. And I remember teaching my very first class at McGill University. I was incredibly excited about this because this is where I was going in my career. I started with 300 students and ended up with less than 150. And the worst academic reviews in the history of the department. The department had been up and running for 186 years. So pretty bad. I remember walking into my supervisor's office and looking him very squarely in the face and I said, "I don't think I'm very good at this." And he said, "No, you are not." And I said, "Okay, so what do you think I should do?" He said, "You have to get pretty good at this teaching thing over the next 10 to 20 years before you get to do anything really fun. So figure out how to get better at that or figure out how to do something else." Six weeks later, after I put a master's thesis under his door, I was out into the real world. And that's where I actually started my very first business which was an online tutoring company. And I grew that to dozens of tutors throughout North America and Europe, but I ended up actually really working for the business. I was working 18-hour days. I remember actually chipping one of my teeth. When I went to the dentist to be able to check the tooth, you sat down, you've got the big white light, the chair that goes back, and the dentist gasped. And it's never a good idea when a health professional gasps when they look at you. He said, "Liam, which tooth are you talking about? You've chipped almost all of your teeth." He felt that I had pancreatic cancer because I had had X-rays the year before in which my teeth were perfect. And it was from stress. I was grinding my teeth at night, and grinding them into chalk. So he said, "Figure out how to do this remote work thing better, figure out how to do a business better." And that's where I really started to unlock the secrets of remote work. I've now grown multiple businesses to eight figure run rates and beyond. We have team members in 44 different countries all over the world. And I'm really excited about our mission statement, which is empowering the world's transition towards remote work. Everything that we do feeds into that. Andi Simon: That is just fascinating. But I also remember teaching my first class at Queens College. I had 300 students in the room. And when I was done, my professor came up to me, Dr. Silverman said to me, "You'll do." And I wasn't quite sure what that meant other than spend 10 years as an academic and get my tenure. And I had really rave reviews, except for an occasional non-rave. But then I too left to get into business. I wasn't going to do the same thing in academia for the rest of my life, the idea of being tenured was a very high mark to achieve and then something that I didn't want to pursue. And business has been quite fascinating in terms of change. When you did this, it was early in the remote world, you could see opportunities there. And I'm curious, because as you began to build the companies around this, you learned some things that became really quite a passion of yours, and really probably the substance of your book. So before we get into your book, some of the insights that came from that early business and the remote work workplace. Liam Martin: So for me, I'm always really good at figuring out trends that are moving up into the light. The problem for me, however, is, I don't know how fast they're moving. So are we talking about the market expanding at 2% per year, 10% per year, just to kind of give you context. In February of 2020, 4% of the US workforce was working remotely. By March, 45% of the US workforce was working remotely. That's the biggest transition in work since the industrial revolution. But the industrial revolution took 80 years. And we did that in March. So a complete change of everything that we know as it applies to work. Just a month ago, the US Census actually collected a new data set with regards to remote work, and identified that 7% of the US workforce is currently working remotely. But if you include hybrid work, it's 32% of the US workforce, and less than 10% of that workforce is working remotely due to the pandemic. So over 90% are working, because they want to be able to work from home. So we're at a really interesting transition phase where a lot of people are being pushed back to the office, they're being pushed back to these hybrid work agreements, even though they don't really want to be able to do them. And I think that that feeds into the core of the big problem that we had during the pandemic, which was that instead of actually adopting remote work, we simply recreated the office at home. Andi Simon: Well, yes, we did. Because when in doubt, you know, mimic. Humans are great monkeys. And we knew what we knew. But we were very attached to it. But we may not even have liked it. And now we had something new that we had no idea about, there were no models. So we had to figure out something. There are a couple of problems that have developed. One of which is the worker at home having to navigate. I had my own clients who were trying to navigate family and work and their own self-care. You had your managers who were trying to figure out how to make sure the work got done. And they were also trying to figure out how to evaluate how the work got done and if it got done well. One gentleman said to me, "I used to go out and have coffee with my folks and I learned what they were doing. I don't know how to do that now." And I asked him, "That's the basis on which you evaluated?" And he said, "Yeah, that was pretty much how I evaluated them." I said, "Well, one wonders whether that was good, or now it's bad." So you had the managers and you had the important performance evaluation. And they were working with a group and they are lonely, but they don't want to come back to the office. And so how do you develop a community of remote workers? And how do you do it in such a way as they can begin to develop the trust they need to know who to go to for what kind of problems? So I have a hunch. These are issues that you saw happening, and maybe even have some suggestions about. Can you take me through it any which way? How do you do it at home? How do you manage it? How do you evaluate it? Or how do you build a business? What do you see happening? Liam Martin: Yeah, there's a lot to unpack there. So you're actually addressing all of the problems that we saw when we were developing this book. The first one, which I think is the most important, is, How do you measure success inside of a remote-first organization. And one of the issues that I personally had to deal with because I've come from the remote work world, I've been doing remote work for almost 20 years, I've actually never worked inside of an office. I think, technically, the last time I worked inside of an office was when I got that horrible review, in grad school teaching a first year Sociology course. And the philosophy inside of remote-first organizations, it's the third tenant of what we identify in our book, is detailed metrics. So every single individual inside of our organization has a quantifiable, longitudinal metric that is actually collected by the platform, and not necessarily by the individual. And inside of that, we have a philosophy that we like to call radical transparency, where everyone gets access to that information. So when you join an asynchronous remote organization, you actually don't just get access to what you do or what your department does, but you get access to everything in the organization. The saying is, Can we give you the same informational advantage as the CEO of the company, which is sometimes very difficult for people that live in a synchronous 20th century MBA mindset to get their heads around. But what it does provide to you is, the measurement is actually the platform's responsibility, not the managers. So you have this clear third perspective, and the conversations that happen between managers and employees are, "Your numbers are not where they need to be, I need to be able to help you to get those numbers to where they need to be because I don't control those numbers, I don't control the judgment as to whether or not you succeed or not, these numbers are actually predefined. So we need to be able to work together to be able to get you to where you need to go,' which aligns you with the manager. So you, the manager, is not judging you. It's the platform that's judging you. But more importantly, actually, the manager is also being judged, and in the same way, because the manager is saying, "Well, all your direct reports," where the person above them would say, "All of these numbers don't necessarily seem to be working out and this other department is doing better than you. You might be the problem as the manager." So qualitative versus quantitative measures. Qualitative measures don't really exist inside of asynchronous teams. And we think that that is an advantage. Andi Simon: Now clarify something for our viewers: what does it mean to be asynchronous? I want to go back to your data as data-driven performance. But asynchronous means what? Liam Martin: So fundamentally, it just means building a business without interacting with people simultaneously, or what we call synchronously. But I can give you a good example that kind of alludes to this. I don't know how old you are, but I remember when, back in the day, I would have to watch Friends every Friday at 8:30pm because I knew that if I missed Friends, on Monday I wouldn't be in the conversations that everyone was having because in that episode, you got to find out what Chandler does this week. And sometimes I'd show up at 8:40 and I missed the first 10 minutes of Friends. So I'd have to take another six months before I could check out a rerun of that particular episode. That is synchronous communication at its core. Asynchronous communication and management is more like the Netflix model. So the information is available for you, documented in a digitized platform and it's available to every employee to consume when it's most advantageous to them to consume it, not on a timetable of the manager or the organization. So you as a worker can say, "Well, I don't really want to meet at 3pm to be able to do this meeting because I'm really in a good flow state right now and I'm completing a project, so I can watch the recording or I can read the minutes of that particular meeting at 8pm when it's most advantageous for me to be able to consume that information." It's a very, very small shift in the way that you think but it creates a massive increase in overall productivity by our data. And again, I looked at approximately three dozen companies that are asynchronous at this point and some of the most successful companies in the world, by the way, are asynchronous. WordPress is asynchronous, GitLab is asynchronous, Shopify is in part asynchronous. These are massive companies that run like 30-40% of the internet and they have no zoom calls. They have no phone calls. They all are autonomous nodes in the system because they know exactly what they need to achieve and they have the information available to them through the platform and in order to be able to actually achieve those particular goals. So we see in our data that the average organization is about 33% more productive. And we define productivity by the amount of hard problems that organizations can solve. One of the big philosophical frameworks inside of the book that's been passed around inside of the remote work community for years is a book called Deep Work by Cal Newport. And so we use that at scale. And we're finding that those organizations are 33% more efficient. They cost about 50% less than their on-premise counterparts. And they're generally going to be a lot more effective as we move forward. And if you're not doing this right now, this is probably why you've had difficulty in the past actually deploying remote work at scale. Andi Simon: Now go a little deeper here because as we talk about developing talent, we talk about humans needing autonomy. They need to be in control. They need to believe that it's fair, that there's a fairness lead there. They need to protect their status, they need some certainty. And then they need the mastery, and they need the relationships. That human brain, you don't make decisions based upon what we call score. Nobody needs their status protected. I need my certainty, my autonomy, my relationships and my fairness. As you're talking, I'm saying to myself, Well, this is really fascinating because asynchronous management businesses enable people who are able to become quite autonomous, master their jobs, get the kind of fairness that they require because it's not biased. It's based on the data. You do it or you don't and then they can begin to build the relationships. They need to get their work done, as opposed to the artificial meetings of the past, where you came together, even though there was nothing to discuss, no agenda or takeaways from it. You're smiling and been in too many of those. Liam Martin: I have a saying , which is, No agenda, no agenda. That's my mindset with regards to that kind of stuff. I mean, this is so difficult for people to get their minds around. And it was very, very difficult, by the way, for me to be able to, for the first time ever, be exposed to a synchronous environment in which I would sit around with eight other people in a room. And maybe two of those people would talk for 90 minutes, and then we would leave. And I would think to myself, "Why was I here? I could have written four blog posts or done two podcasts during that time. Why am I here? This could have been an email." Andi Simon: I was an executive at a hospital, I moved from banking to healthcare, and same thing. We would come to meetings, no agenda, no takeaways or work to be done. An FYI kind of meeting I guess. But coming from the outside, which never has straight meetings, and now, it was one of those, what am I supposed to do here? Why am I spending the time? And then I watch people selectively omit the meetings, which is a whole other strategy. But they're also talking about their behavior, and I can get the job done without being synchronous. I couldn't get it done with being an autonomous individual capable of doing this. So take me through your book a little bit. I love the asynchronous part. Other parts to it that your listeners here should know about that you want to make sure they share, because I have a hunch you want them to become remote workers. Liam Martin: Yeah, so really there's three core tenants of the book and it's very simple, because we've seen so many books come out about remote work. There's actually 27 coming out this quarter, based on what my publisher is telling me. And there's no book on asynchronous work. There's no book on asynchronous management, which is a real shame because I actually think it's the core of what all of these real pioneers were doing before the pandemic and this really was a bit of a kind of qualitative journey for me. Looking at all of these different companies and identifying where the trend lines were, I was trying to identify the signal. And then we talked about asynchronous work and I realized every single company that was successful was deploying what I call asynchronous management at scale. So there's three core fundamental pieces to it. There's deliberate over-communication, democratized workflows, and detailed metrics. So over-communication of information shouldn't be easy to understand, it should be impossible to misunderstand. That's a very small switch in your mindset. But an email is not just an introduction to an asynchronous meeting, an email is where the conversation should hopefully start and end. And the less of those forms of communication that you end up having, the clearer that you can be, the extra three minutes that you spend on an email or communicating in a project management tool, as an example, the more effective you're going to be, organizationally. The second one is democratized workflows. So process documentation is at the core of every single asynchronous organization. There is a really great quote from a company called GitLab, which is a $14 billion company. They spend less than 1% of the time communicating synchronously, but they have a $14 billion valuation and are growing incredibly quickly. And they have this saying, which is, We always respond with a link. So whenever someone asks a question inside of the organization, they respond with a link to a process document that answers their question. So they're removing the manager from being the way that people get answers. And they're training them to basically figure out that the platform is really their manager. Again, reinforcing autonomy, allowing individuals to say, "Well, here's where I go to get my information. It's actually in this documentation and I want to actively use it as much as humanly possible." And then the third one, that we had touched on before, is detailed metrics. Every single person inside of an asynchronous organization has a third party, longitudinal quantifiable metric that they do not self-populate, that is populated by the platform itself. And then that information is available to everyone. So everyone knows what everyone else is doing inside of the organization. And counterintuitively, you may think that this impacts autonomy, but in reality, actually, if it were me, I would much rather be managed and measured by a platform that's at its core egalitarian, as opposed to John that says, "Hey, you know what, I don't really like the way that Liam talks to me sometimes so therefore, I'm going to give him a low rating on my three sheets to review," that type of stuff. So between those three core tenants, you can actually build any level of asynchronous organization. And it's really exciting once you get there because then you can do things like, have your employees work wherever they want. So they don't necessarily need to be in a particular location, because you're not dependent upon synchronous communication. They don't have to be located in the same city. We have employees in 44 different countries across the planet. You can have employees that are from any location and are bringing in very different perspectives. We've had one funny week where I had a meeting with someone that was talking about debating their transition from male to female. And then the very next week, I had a discussion with someone who was thinking about having a second wife in their family because in the Middle East, this person was from the Middle East, and that was legal and encouraged in their particular country. And then this other person was transitioning. Where in any organization could you have those two same people interact? Well, you can have an organization in which you don't necessarily have to have that kind of cultural homogenization that you end up having in the vast majority of synchronous organizations. So it's a really exciting time. And I see this going back to another friend of mine, Darren Murph, who was head of remote at WordPress. He said, “This is really a Model T moment where we're really seeing a new way of operating a business.” And that's why I want to kind of get this out to as many people as possible. Andi Simon: How about decision making? As I'm listening to you, you're empowering your folks to make decisions? Or do you have a different asynchronous way of evaluating options or how do you manage expenditures, empowerment, risk taking, things like that. You know, some of my clients are always concerned about, "How much risk shall I take? How do I go up for approval? Where do I manage the dollars?" But as I'm listening to you, it sounds like we're going to empower our people to make those decisions, or how do they work? Liam Martin: Yeah, so I can give you one clear example, which can kind of allude to many more. We have this concept called Silent Meetings inside of our organizations, inside of all asynchronous organizations. And to get very tactical, we use a platform called Asana, which is a task and project management system. And every single week, we have a meeting where we post issues. So the issue might be, we would like to hire 10 more engineers to work on this particular issue. Here's the pros and cons. Here's what we think. Here's why we think we'll succeed. Here's the risks if we fail. And then we debate that issue asynchronously. So we start writing comments inside of that particular issue ticket. And sometimes these issues can go 40, 50, 100 comments long. They are incredibly intense, very rich pieces of information. And if we come to a conclusion, we take that conclusion, and we put it to the top of the ticket, and we clear the ticket. And if we have less than three issues in our agenda, the platform automatically cancels the synchronous meeting. So we do this meeting every week. And we have on average one meeting a month because we don't necessarily need to address all of those issues, all the issues that you think are going to make or break the business and completely change the trajectory of what you're doing as an organization. They don't need to be discussed synchronously the vast majority of the time, they can be discussed asynchronously, and can be just as successful. And the advantage is that, #1: there's documentation. So I can go back two years and I can figure out why did I make this decision in the business. I can look at the 78 comments and the debate. So there's no undocumented conversations inside of asynchronous organizations. The second big advantage, and I don't know if you've had this situation happen to you, but it happens to me all the time. It's very difficult for me to be able to communicate in the moment. I'm much better sitting down and thinking about things, getting the information and processing it in my own time. And when I look at a boardroom, I don't even need to hear what people are saying to figure out whose ideas are going to get adopted. First, it's usually the six foot tall white guy that looks like Captain America because, generally, that person has a charismatic advantage, what I like to call a charisma bias. So we have that person pitch those ideas. Is that person's idea better than anyone else's? Probably not. But can the packaging of that person sell everyone on that idea? Absolutely. So inside of asynchronous organizations, the wallflower like me that doesn't actually want to debate those issues in the moment, because I know I will lose, I don't have that type of skill set. I can communicate in asynchronous meetings and better ideas get adopted more often inside of asynchronous organizations. And over time, that is a killer formula for much higher levels of success inside of your organization. Andi Simon: It sounds like, in your organization, this is how you run the business. So the question is, how do you then develop, attract, retain, and develop your talent? Do they just love this way of working and learn it immediately? Because it's a different way from mine. I'm guessing they've acquired skills in high school and college, about how you get things done. And, you know, a feeder system needs to be created and may actually be you that creates it, but what would you do with employees to make them happy doing it this way? Liam Martin: So the first thing that I think you need to take a look at is, there's a core assumption in there that I think the majority of synchronous organizations take into consideration which we do not, which is the concept of culture. I mean, you're really just boiling it down to, How do we build culture inside of organizations. Asynchronous organizations are more focused on the work than the people. So inside of asynchronous organizations, we do not say that we own a position, we say that we currently operate a position. So I am not the CMO of the company. I currently operate the position of CMO of the company. And at any point I have the documentation in place to be able to completely delegate that responsibility if I want to. So I want to take the year off and write a book about remote work, which I did. I can, within days, delegate all that responsibility to my direct reports, and the organization continues on. But going back to the work concept, it entirely is focused on, Are people really passionate about the problem that you're trying to solve? Our mission as a company is, we're trying to empower the world's transition towards remote work that feeds into everything that we currently do as an organization. And our measurement for new people that are coming into the organization is, "Are you as passionate about that as us? Do you have a cult-like commitment to that particular mission? If you don't, don't work here. We'll find you a job somewhere else that's way better. And will probably pay you more, but we can't pay you as much. It's going to be more difficult. But at the end of the day, we're going to try to put a dent in the universe that I think you will be fundamentally proud of because you're so incredibly passionate about this particular subject." And that's what almost the majority of people miss is, it doesn't matter how qualified someone is, are they actually excited about what they're doing? Because if they're not excited about what they're doing, then you might as well not even start. So that's where we start. And as an example, we have an ENPS rating, which is an Employee Net Promoter Score, basically, how engaged employees are in the organization. The industry average is 36. And when I studied these asynchronous organizations, I found on average, they had a score of 72. So they're much more engaged. And the two major reasons that they give for why they like working there is autonomy and access to information. So having an open organization like that allows for people to be more autonomous, enjoy what they're doing. They're not necessarily interacting with coworkers as much because asynchronous organizations just by default don't do that. But there are different ways that we interact. Like one of the companies that I studied in the book is a company called Todoist, which is a task management app that has millions of users all over the world. And they play a kind of version of Dungeons and Dragons on their instant messaging platform. And as a group, they all have a little community and they say, Well, do we go left or we do we go right? And some of them are wizards and rogues and warriors, and they fight a fight. And they have this actually through text. So it's a really fun kind of experience. And they'll say, Hey, within the next 24 hours, everyone's got to log in. And you've got to make your decision as to what you do because we're going to be moving our party forward. And that's a very nerdy example. But that's just some of the ways that we interact asynchronously. Andi Simon: Liam, I'm enjoying our conversation and I'm also watching our time. And when is your book coming out? Liam Martin: The book is going to be out August 16. So dependent upon when this session comes out, it may be available. And if people want to go check it out, go to runningremotebook.com. And then you can obviously pick it up at Barnes and Noble. Amazon is probably the easiest place to be able to get it. Andi Simon: But we all do want to keep Barnes and Noble happy. But to your point, this is really cool if you do consulting? And do you help people create asynchronous organizations? Is that part of your toolkit as well? Liam Martin: No, because I don't have time to be able to do that. I have to stay an operator inside of the inside of remote work. But if you go to runningremotebook.com, I actually do have a network of consultants that I can refer you to if you're really interested in deploying asynchronous itself. Andi Simon: Because the last thing I like to do is raise expectations. This is really cool. And why would I like to do this with all of my remote workers? Can I take the opportunity and turn it into something better? And then they say, But how do you do this? And you know, you can't learn to play golf without a coach and some idea of how you hit the ball. And you gotta hit it 700 times before you hit it well, so there's lots to do between the lip and the top here. But this has been so fascinating. As you are wrapping up: two or three things you might like to leave the listeners with? They often remember the end even better than your beginning. And your beginning was wonderful. Liam Martin: Well, so I think first off, to your point: I'm not trying to build a million asynchronous organizations, I'm trying to get a million organizations to be 1% more asynchronous. So if you pick up this book and you're able to pick up two or three strategies to be able to remove one or two meetings from every single individual, that is going to be a net gain to the universe, in my opinion. So it's really important to be able to check out the book see what you think. The second point that I'll leave you with is: If you think that this is not going to be the norm moving forward, you are unfortunately not understanding how history works. We're at 30% of the US workforce working remotely. I believe that within the next five years, we're going to be back up to 50% of the US workforce working remotely in part. And this is a permanent civilizational shift. So you can either stick your head in the sand, and think that the old way is the way to be able to do it, going back to the horse and buggy concept, or you can jump onto those Model Ts and right into the future. So it's up to you. But I would highly suggest that if you think that this is a trend, or just kind of a speed bump in history, definitely pick up the book, because you need to be able to adapt for those changes. Andi Simon: Well, you know, the comment that this is the Model T for work is a very interesting metaphor. I'm sure you've read that Henry Ford invented the modern age. And now we have electronic vehicles, electric vehicles coming out, transforming the car from a combustible engine to basically a computer with a battery. And so there are lots of great transformations happening at this moment. And I think that work, and I love catalytic moments, which the pandemic did create a crisis and I preach, Don't waste a crisis, because you learned a lot. And I do a tremendous amount of virtual workshops and speaking engagements. And people say, "We want you to come." And I'm trying really hard to tell them that that's a waste of my time, and not probably more valuable for them. Because I'm not there to entertain you with my charismatic life. I mean, I'm there to inform you and educate you, perhaps with a little edutainment. But if we can do it remotely, it's really cool for me and for you. And it's cheaper for you too, and so I did 49 of them this year with great reviews. I have them starting to book up for next year. And I'm saying to myself, I don't really need to do it in person. It's a little asynchronous in a sense, but it's not too far for what you're talking about. That's a great transformation, we learned a lot. And boy, you can listen in and find yourself coming away transformed, like our listeners are going to be after listening to you. This has been such fun. Thank you for joining me today. I know you're doing a lot of podcasts. I hope this has been a fun one for you. Because part of it is really fun taking your ideas and sharing it. So you don't have to tell me if it was fun or not. You can just smile for our viewers. Liam Martin: It was actually very enjoyable. And thank you so much for having me. Andi Simon: Well, and thank you, both viewers and listeners for coming today. Now remember, my job is to help you see, feel and think in new ways so that you can do things better. My job is to get you off the brink so you can soar. And the times, they're changing, you often become stuck in the mud. You're the deer in the headlight, you stand still, you're attached to your shiny object. And until you see something new, you don't know how to change. And that's because your body protects you from the unfamiliar or the unknown. And so today, we've been hearing a lot about the changing nature of work. It's happened. And now you can sustain it, but also turn it into a better way to do business, because quite frankly, your customers are looking to do it as well. And it's not just inside, but it's outside, which is what we love to do. My books are available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business has been doing really well and won an award for the 2022 best business book for women in business. And my On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights has been hustling along. They're showing you how a little anthropology can help your business grow. And remember my job is to help you change. You hate change but the times are changing. So come along and let's have some fun. You can reach me of course at info@Andisimon.com or info@Simonassociates.net and our new Simon Associates website is out, which is www.simonassociates.net. Come take a look and see what you can learn about how to change. Bye for now. And thank you again for coming. Bye-bye.

Just Great Yoga
#189 The Expanse

Just Great Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 77:43


A great nostalgic kind of flow tonight. Strong up front with lots of fundamental standing postures and vinyasa, soft down the back with a lot of hip opening and a deep savasana.

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM
Cómo es trabajar en Microsoft y consejos para conseguir tu sitio en tech feat. David Israwi

Conexiones: Historias de Latinos en STEM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 66:33


https://youtu.be/WTTSoEOB86s Cuentame que te parecio el episodio mandandome un email a hugo@conexiones.io o mis DMs en Twitter Este episodio es posible gracias a Asana. La mejor solución para manejar proyectos y tareas de equipos remotos. Prueba Asana gratis por 30 días yendo a conexiones.io/ASANA En este episodio conversamos sobre Como llego David a MicrosoftEl día a día de un Tech LeadComo es el tema de instalarse en una ciudad nueva como Seattle y crear comunidadInfluencers tech como JOMA Tech y The Tech LeadMicrosoft LoopWhat Color is Your Parachute: Un libro y curso para darle forma a tu carrera profesional