Podcasts about Scientific Reports

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Best podcasts about Scientific Reports

Latest podcast episodes about Scientific Reports

Physique Development Podcast
The GREATEST—LEGAL—Performance-Enhancing Drug You Are Probably Neglecting (the complete guide to getting your best night's sleep) | PD Podcast Ep.97

Physique Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 76:36


Today we are discussing the greatest, LEGAL, performance-enhancing drug—and that's not clickbait. Listen in as Sue and Alex talk about some things happening personally in their lives, but also the value of sleep and ways you can improve your sleep. As you know, here at PD we live by the motto, "sleep is for the elite." So, let's get into how you can get the best sleep of your life and continue to recover properly while you catch your ZZZs. As always, it is our goal not only to supply you, the listener, with valuable insights on the topics or questions but also to plant some seeds for further research and thought. Without further ado, let's get into today's episode. Timestamps: (0:00) Intro—Catching up with Sue & Alex (4:41) Introducing today's topic (6:37) Things sleep affects (14:50) Best ways to improve sleep (16:22) Routine (22:33) Winding down before bed (30:40) Caffeine (36:16) Environment (42:15) Darkness & light exposure (49:56) Training & nutrition (58:59) Supplements (01:07:09) Some final tips (01:13:34) Wrap-up Products Mentioned: Sage Sleep (pillows) - https://sagesleeporganics.com Cort-Eaze (use code BUSH) - https://nuethix.com/products/cort-eaze Legion Lunar (rutaecarpine supplement - use code SUE) - https://legionathletics.com/products/supplements/lunar-sleep-aid Research: Early evening light mitigates sleep compromising physiological and alerting responses to subsequent late evening light (Scientific Reports) - https://go.nature.com/3iBkPnP Recommendations for daytime, evening, and nighttime indoor light exposure to best support physiology, sleep, and wakefulness in healthy adults (PLOS Biology) - https://bit.ly/3GZbfob Meal Timing Regulates the Human Circadian System (Current Biology) - https://bit.ly/3H1eNWP Books: Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams - https://amzn.to/3H2amer Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art - https://amzn.to/3ILvhUh Have questions for future episodes or have a topic you'd like us to cover? Submit them here - https://forms.gle/AEu5vMKNLDfmc24M7 Looking to hire the last coach you'll ever need? Apply here - https://physiquedevelopment.typeform.com/to/ewAMxk1w Interested in competition prep? Apply here - https://physiquedevelopment.typeform.com/to/Ii2UNA For more videos, articles, and information, head to - https://physiquedevelopment.com Check out the PD Nutrition Calculator - https://physiquedevelopment.com/calculator Band tee sale! 10% off for podcast listeners. Use code PDPOD at checkout - https://physiquedevelopment.com/product-category/gear To follow the team on Instagram: Coach Alex - https://www.instagram.com/alexbush__ Coach Austin - https://www.instagram.com/austincurrent_ Coach Sue - https://www.instagram.com/suegainz Physique Development - https://www.instagram.com/physiquedevelopment_ If you would like to support Physique Development and this podcast, please head over to your favorite podcast app and leave us a rating and review! This goes a long way in supporting this podcast and helps us continue to bring high-quality, honest, content to you in the form of a podcast. Thank you for listening and we will see you all next time! ---- Produced by: David Margittai | In Post Media Website: https://www.inpostmedia.com Email: david@inpostmedia.com © 2023, Physique Development LLC. All rights reserved.

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
#157 On Beyond Antibodies (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 131:03


In this 157th in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss the state of the world through an evolutionary lens. This week, we discuss antibodies. Why is the public health messaging around immunity focused on antibodies, when there is so much more to immunity? Also, the Department of Defense has finally dropped vaccine mandates for the military, and the federal government has affirmed that we are in the middle of a Covid-19 “health emergency” for the 11th consecutive time. The American Academy of Pediatrics is now suggesting the remedy of drugs (at 12 years old) and surgery (at 13) for children suffering from the “disease of obesity.” We're no longer supposed to use the word field, according to both USC and Michigan's Dept of Health and Human Services. And male pufferfish make elaborate geometric designs in the sand, all for the love of female pufferfish. ***** Our sponsors: MDHearingAid: Use promo code DARKHORSE to receive a significant discount off your order of already inexpensive, high-quality hearing aids, plus receive a free extra charging case. https://www.mdhearingaid.com Moink: Grass-fed and grass-finished beef and lamb, pastured pork and chicken, and wild caught Alaskan salmon. Visit www.moinkbox.com/darkhorse to get a year's worth of filet mignon free when you sign up.  Vivo Barefoot: Shoes for healthy feet—comfortable and regenerative, enhances stability and tactile feedback. Go to www.vivobarefoot.com/us/darkhorse to get 20% off, and a 100-day free trial.  ***** Our book, A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century, is available everywhere books are sold, and signed copies are available here: https://darvillsbookstore.indielite.org Check out our store! Epic tabby, digital book burning, saddle up the dire wolves, and more: https://darkhorsestore.org Heather's newsletter, Natural Selections (subscribe to get free weekly essays in your inbox): https://naturalselections.substack.com Find more from us on Bret's website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather's website (http://heatherheying.com). Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon. Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret's Paypal. Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Check out our other channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAWCKUrmvK5F_ynBY_CMlIA Theme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music. ***** Mentioned in this episode: Why antibody levels do not equal "immunity": Part 1. By Joomi Kim, January 14, 2023: https://joomi.substack.com/p/why-antibody-levels-do-not-equal Chevaisrakul et al 2023. Hybrid and herd immunity 6 months after SARS-CoV-2 exposure among individuals from a community treatment program. Scientific Reports 13 Article number: 763 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-023-28101-5 Health and Human Services' Declarations of a Public Health Emergency: https://aspr.hhs.gov/legal/PHE/Pages/default.aspx Consider drugs and surgery early for obesity in kids, new guidelines say: "Waiting doesn't work: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/obesity-kids-teens-drugs-surgery-early-new-guidelines/ Clinical Practice Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics: https://www.aap.org/en/patient-cSupport the show

Herpetological Highlights
142 Alligators can regrow their tails

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 29:06


Tail regrowth is a weird and wonderful trait some herpetofauna possess. But there's a new paper about the regrowing tails of alligators. Species of the Bi-week is more like Genus of the Bi-week. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Xu C, Palade J, Fisher RE, Smith CI, Clark AR, Sampson S, Bourgeois R, Rawls A, Elsey RM, Wilson-Rawls J, Kusumi K. 2020. Anatomical and histological analyses reveal that tail repair is coupled with regrowth in wild-caught, juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Scientific Reports 10:20122. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-77052-8. Species of the Bi-Week: Blair C, Bryson RW, García-Vázquez UO, Nieto-Montes De Oca A, Lazcano D, Mccormack JE, Klicka J. 2022. Phylogenomics of alligator lizards elucidate diversification patterns across the Mexican Transition Zone and support the recognition of a new genus. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 135:25–39. DOI: 10.1093/biolinnean/blab139. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Seifert, A.W., Kiama, S.G., Seifert, M.G., Goheen, J.R., Palmer, T.M. and Maden, M., 2012. Skin shedding and tissue regeneration in African spiny mice (Acomys). Nature, 489(7417), pp.561-565. Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

Conversations in Equine Science
The most popular episode of 2022....The Equine Gut Brain Connection.

Conversations in Equine Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 26:59


This week Nancy and Kate revisit the episode with the most downloads of 2022. Reference: Mach, N., Ruet, A., Clark, A. et al (2020). Priming for welfare: gut microbiota is associated with equitation conditions and behavior in horse athletes. Scientific Reports 10, 8311. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-65444-9 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nancy-mclean/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nancy-mclean/support

Exercício Físico e Ciência
#314 - A ciência do exercício em 2022!

Exercício Físico e Ciência

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 14:30


Saiba nesse podcast quais os estudos publicados em 2022 que trouxeram importantes notícias sobre atividade física e exercício físico! Uma retrospectiva especial, uma seleção de 9 artigos científicos. - Siga no Instagram: @fabiodominski https://www.instagram.com/fabiodominski/ Gostou do podcast? Você vai gostar mais ainda desse livro! - Livro Exercício Físico e Ciência: Fatos e mitos de Fábio Dominski https://www.amazon.com.br/dp/6586363187?ref=myi_title_dp - Grupo Exercício Físico e Ciência no Telegram: https://t.me/+VazaFBxgPq0y5v8p - Inscreva-se no canal no YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4Dwwly0tJa49CfHC0MSQ7A Referências 1. Coleman CJ, McDonough DJ, Pope ZC, Pope CA. Dose-response association of aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity with mortality: a national cohort study of 416 420 US adults. Br J Sports Med. 2022 2. Garcia-Hermoso A, López-Gil JF, Ramírez-Vélez R, et al. Adherence to aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 3.3 million participants across 31 countries. British Journal of Sports Medicine Published Online First: 23 November 2022 3. Zavorsky, G. S., & Brooks, R. A. (2022). The influence of sexual activity on athletic performance: a systematic review and meta-analyses. Scientific Reports, 12(1), 1-10. 4. Recchia F, Leung CK, Chin EC, Fong DY, Montero D, Cheng CP, Yau SY, Siu PM. Comparative effectiveness of exercise, antidepressants and their combination in treating non-severe depression: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Br J Sports Med. 2022 Dec;56(23):1375-1380. 5. Sudimac, S., Sale, V. & Kühn, S. How nature nurtures: Amygdala activity decreases as the result of a one-hour walk in nature. Mol Psychiatry 27, 4446–4452 (2022). 6. Ferguson, T., Olds, T., Curtis, R., Blake, H., Crozier, A. J., Dankiw, K., ... & Maher, C. (2022). Effectiveness of wearable activity trackers to increase physical activity and improve health: a systematic review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The Lancet Digital Health, 4(8), e615-e626. 7. Pearce, M., Garcia, L., Abbas, A., Strain, T., Schuch, F. B., Golubic, R., ... & Woodcock, J. (2022). Association Between Physical Activity and Risk of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA psychiatry. 8. Stamatakis, E., Ahmadi, M.N., Gill, J.M.R. et al. Association of wearable device-measured vigorous intermittent lifestyle physical activity with mortality. Nat Med (2022). 9. Ezzatvar Y, Ramírez-Vélez R, Izquierdo M, Garcia-Hermoso A. Physical activity and risk of infection, severity and mortality of COVID-19: a systematic review and non-linear dose-response meta-analysis of data from 1 853 610 adults. Br J Sports Med. 2022 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fabiodominski/support

Earth Wise
Examining The Decline Of Honey Bees | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 2:00


For many years, scientists have been sounding the alarm on the global struggle of pollinators.  Many of the invertebrate pollinator species, such as bees and butterflies, are facing extinction. And since 75% of the world's food crops depend on pollination to some extent, the decline of pollinators poses a major threat to global food security. […]

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.27.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 58:38


Study links nutrients in blood to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults University of Illinois, December 20, 2022 A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults. The study, reported in the journal NeuroImage, looked at 32 key nutrients in the Mediterranean diet, which previous research has shown is associated with better brain function in aging. It included 116 healthy adults 65-75 years of age. "We wanted to investigate whether diet and nutrition predict cognitive performance in healthy older adults," said University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher Christopher Zwilling, who led the study with U. of I. psychology professor Aron Barbey in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. The analysis linked specific patterns of a handful of nutrient biomarkers in the blood to better brain health and cognition. The nutrient patterns included omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in fish, walnuts and Brussels sprouts; omega-6 fatty acids, found in flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts and pistachios; lycopene, a vivid red pigment in tomatoes, watermelon and a few other fruits and vegetables; alpha- and beta-carotenoids, which give sweet potatoes and carrots their characteristic orange color; and vitamins B and D. The researchers relied on some of the most rigorous methods available for examining nutrient intake and brain health, Barbey said. Rather than asking participants to answer food-intake surveys, which require the accurate recall of what and how much participants ate, the team looked for patterns of nutrient "biomarkers" in the blood. The team also used functional magnetic resonance imaging to carefully evaluate the efficiency with which various brain networks performed. The analysis found a robust link between higher levels of several nutrient biomarkers in the blood and enhanced performance on specific cognitive tests. These nutrients, which appeared to work synergistically, included omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, carotenoids, lycopene, riboflavin, folate, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. The analysis also revealed that a pattern of omega-3s, omega-6s and carotene was linked to better functional brain network efficiency. Different nutrient patterns appeared to moderate the efficiency in different brain networks. For example, higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids paralleled the positive relationship between a healthy frontoparietal network and general intelligence. The frontoparietal network supports the ability to focus attention and engage in goal-directed behavior. "Our study suggests that diet and nutrition moderate the association between network efficiency and cognitive performance," Barbey said. "This means that the strength of the association between functional brain network efficiency and cognitive performance is associated with the level of the nutrients." (NEXT) Sunlight offers surprise benefit -- it energizes infection fighting T cells Georgetown University Medical Center, December 20, 2022 Sunlight allows us to make vitamin D, credited with healthier living, but a surprise research finding could reveal another powerful benefit of getting some sun. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers have found that sunlight, through a mechanism separate than vitamin D production, energizes T cells that play a central role in human immunity. Their findings, published in Scientific Reports, suggest how the skin, the body's largest organ, stays alert to the many microbes that can nest there. "We all know sunlight provides vitamin D, which is suggested to have an impact on immunity, among other things. But what we found is a completely separate role of sunlight on immunity," says the study's senior investigator, Gerard Ahern, PhD, associate professor in the Georgetown's Department of Pharmacology and Physiology. "Some of the roles attributed to vitamin D on immunity may be due to this new mechanism." They specifically found that low levels of blue light, found in sun rays, makes T cells move faster -- marking the first reported human cell responding to sunlight by speeding its pace. "T cells, whether they are helper or killer, need to move to do their work, which is to get to the site of an infection and orchestrate a response," Ahern says. "This study shows that sunlight directly activates key immune cells by increasing their movement." Ahern also added that while production of vitamin D required UV light, which can promote skin cancer and melanoma, blue light from the sun, as well as from special lamps, is safer. And while the human and T cells they studied in the laboratory were not specifically skin T cells -- they were isolated from mouse cell culture and from human blood -- the skin has a large share of T cells in humans, he says, approximately twice the number circulating in the blood. What drove the motility response in T cells was synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, which then activated a signaling pathway that increases T cell movement. Hydrogen peroxide is a compound that white blood cells release when they sense an infection in order to kill bacteria and to "call" T cells and other immune cells to mount an immune response. "We found that sunlight makes hydrogen peroxide in T cells, which makes the cells move. And we know that an immune response also uses hydrogen peroxide to make T cells move to the damage," Ahern says. "This all fits together." (NEXT)  Capsaicin molecule inhibits growth of breast cancer cells Centre of Genomics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany), December 22, 2022  Capsaicin, an active ingredient of pungent substances such as chilli or pepper, inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. This was reported by a team headed by the Bochum-based scent researcher Prof Dr Dr Dr habil Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber, following experiments in cultivated tumour cells. The experiments were carried out with the SUM149PT cell culture, a model system for a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer, i.e. the triple-negative type. Chemotherapy is currently the only available treatment for this type of cancer. In the cultivated cells, the team detected a number of typical olfactory receptors. One receptor occurred very frequently; it is usually found in the fifth cranial nerve, i.e. the trigeminal nerve. It belongs to the so-called Transient Receptor Potential Channels and is named TRPV1. That receptor is activated by the spicy molecule capsaicin as well as by helional – a scent of fresh sea breeze. In collaboration with Dr Gabriele Bonatz from the Augusta clinics in Bochum (Brustzentrum), Hatt's team confirmed the existence of TRPV1 in tumour cells in nine different samples from patients suffering from breast cancer. The researchers activated the TRPV1 receptor in the cell culture with capsaicin or helional, by adding the substances to the culture for a period of several hours or days. As a result, the cancer cells divide more slowly. Moreover, the treatment caused tumour cells to die in larger numbers. The surviving cells were no longer able to move as quickly as heretofore; this implies that their ability to form metastases in the body was impeded. Earlier studies had demonstrated that the chemical arvanil – with a chemical make-up similar to that of the spicy molecule capsaicin – was effective against brain tumours in mice; it reduces tumour growth in the animals. Due to its side effects, however, this substance is not approved for humans. In addition to capsaicin and helional, the endovanilloids, produced naturally in the body, also activate the TRPV1 receptor. (NEXT)  Losing body fat could be facilitated by light evening exercise and fasting Baylor College of Medicine, December 20, 2022 Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose can increase exercise endurance, but could simultaneously cause diabetes, says a team of scientists from Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions. Mouse muscles use glucose (carbohydrate) as fuel when the animals are awake and active and switch to fat (lipid) when they are asleep. The team discovered that disrupting this natural cycle may lead to diabetes but, surprisingly, can also enhance exercise endurance. The switch is controlled by a molecule called histone deacetylase 3, or HDAC3. This finding opens the possibility of selecting the right time to exercise for losing body fat but also raises the concern of using HDAC inhibitors as doping drugs for endurance exercise. The study appears in Nature Medicine. Skeletal muscles, the voluntary muscles, are important in the control of blood glucose in the body. They consume most of the glucose, and if they develop insulin resistance and consequently are not able to use glucose, then diabetes likely will develop. To study the role of HDAC3 in mouse skeletal muscle, Sun and colleagues genetically engineered laboratory mice to deplete HDAC3 only in the skeletal muscles. Then they compared these knocked out mice with normal mice regarding how their muscles burn fuel. When normal mice eat, their blood sugar increases and insulin is released, which stimulates muscles to take in and use glucose as fuel. "When the knocked out mice ate, their blood sugar increased and insulin was released just fine, but their muscles refused to take in and use glucose," said Sun. "Lacking HDAC3 made the mice insulin resistant and more prone to develop diabetes." Yet, when the HDAC3-knocked out mice ran on a treadmill, they showed superior endurance, "which was intriguing because diabetes is usually associated with poor muscle performance," said Sun. "Glucose is the main fuel of muscle, so if a condition limits the use of glucose, the expectation is low performance in endurance exercises. That's the surprise." The researchers then studied what fueled the HDAC3-knocked out mice's stellar performance using metabolomics approaches and found that their muscles break down more amino acids. This changed the muscles' preference from glucose to lipids and allowed them to burn lipid very efficiently. This explains the high endurance, because the body carries a much larger energy reservoir in the form of lipid than carbohydrate. The team performed a number of functional genomics studies that established the link between HDAC3 and the circadian clock. "In normal mice, when the mouse is awake, the clock in the muscle anticipates a feeding cycle and uses HDAC3 to turn off many metabolic genes. This leads the muscles to use more carbohydrate," said Sun. "When the animal is about to go to sleep and anticipates a fasting cycle, the clock removes HDAC3. This leads the muscles to use more lipid." Although these studies were done in mice, the researchers speculate that human muscles most likely will follow the same cycle. The study opens the possibility of promoting body fat burning by increasing exercise activity during the periods in which muscles use lipid, which is at night for people. "Losing body fat would be easier by exercising lightly and fasting at night," said Sun. "It's not a bad idea to take a walk after dinner." (NEXT)  Employees who are open about religion are happier, study suggests Kansas State University, December 17, 2022 It may be beneficial for employers to not only encourage office Christmas parties but also celebrate holidays and festivals from a variety of religions, according to a Kansas State University researcher. Sooyeol Kim was involved in a collaborative study that found that employees who openly discuss their religious beliefs at work are often happier and have higher job satisfaction than those employees who do not. "For many people, religion is the core of their lives," Kim said. "Being able to express important aspects of one's life can influence work-related issues, such as job satisfaction, work performance or engagement. It can be beneficial for organizations to have a climate that is welcoming to every religion and culture." Kim said employers might even want to consider a religion-friendly policy or find ways to encourage religious expression. For example, organizations could have an office Christmas party, but also could celebrate and recognize other religious holidays and dates, such as Hanukkah, Ramadan or Buddhist holidays. For the cross-cultural study, the researchers surveyed nearly 600 working adults from a variety of industries -- including education and finance -- in the U.S. and South Korea. The surveyed employees were all Christian, but identified with a variety of denominations, including Presbyterian, Baptist and Methodist, among others. Results showed that employees who valued religion as a core part of their lives were more likely to disclose their religion in the workplace. Employees who felt pressure to assimilate in the workplace were less likely to disclose their religious identity, Kim said. But most significantly, the researchers found that the employees who disclosed their religion in the workplace had several positive outcomes, including higher job satisfaction and higher perceived well-being. "Disclosing your religion can be beneficial for employees and individual well-being," Kim said. "When you try to hide your identity, you have to pretend or you have to lie to others, which can be stressful and negatively impact how you build relationships with co-workers." Kim said the research on religion in the workplace plays a part into work-life balance. Research continues to show that individual characteristics -- such as family and religion -- can influence work-related issues. (NEXT) New Cannabis Capsule Is So Powerful It's Going To Completely Replace All Pain Killers University of Pennsylvania, December 19, 2022    In places where medical marijuana is legal, opioid abuse and addiction has fallen by 25%, but the government maintain they are stumped as to why Opioid abuse and addiction is a massive problem all over the US, hence why people are eager to find natural alternatives. The health benefits of cannabis are become more and more accepted in mainstream society, as more studies which support cannaboid use are published. This doesn't sit well with big pharma, who are desperate to hold on to the monopoly they control. In the U.S. states where medical marijuana is legal to use, deaths from opioid overdoses have decreased by almost 25 percent, according to a new data. The study was done by Bachhuber, of the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania, and his colleagues who used state-level death certificate data for all 50 states. According to JAMA Medicine, in states with a medical marijuana law, overdose deaths from opioids like morphine, oxycodone and heroin decreased by an average of 20 percent after just one year. After two years, they continued to decrease to 25 percent. In the mean time, opioid overdose deaths across the country skyrocketed. The cannabis capsules are made from the extract of cannabis flower. The active ingredients are processed without microbials and then packaged with a specific mix of 60 mg of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and 10 mg of CBD (cannabidiol). The combination together creates the perfect effect to relieve pain. The THC helps send happy feelings to the brain, while the CBD helps promote relaxation of the muscles. This helps reduce muscle spasms as well as inflammation.

Do you really know?
Why does Christmas boost our libido?

Do you really know?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 3:37


According to a study published in the Scientific Reports journal in 2017, the holiday season sees a peak in sex-related searches on Google and Twitter. The researchers behind the study also identified an increase in birth rates in late September, in other words nine months after Christmas of the previous year. So the evidence is there: for many of us, sexual desire increases at Christmas time. The study was called “Human Sexual Cycles are Driven by Culture and Match Collective Moods”, suggesting there's something about our mood during the holiday season. And it's not just Christmas. What's the science behind all that then? Does it apply to other culture holidays? Christmas can also be a stressful period though, can't it? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen to the latest episodes, click here: Why does Norway offer a Christmas tree to London every year? How to have an eco-friendly Christmas? Why do Christmas decorations make me feel happier? A Bababam Originals podcast, written and produced by Joseph Chance. In partnership with upday UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.21.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 62:48


VIDEOS: CRY FOR FREEDOM – Why cyborgs won't save the world (FILM) Gravitas: Did the US help China cover-up Covid-19 outbreak? (10:57) MEP Clare Daly   Drinking hot tea every day linked to lower glaucoma risk Brown University and UCLA, December 14, 2022 Drinking a cup of hot tea at least once a day may be linked to a significantly lower risk of developing the serious eye condition, glaucoma, finds a small study published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. The researchers looked at data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the US. This is a nationally representative annual survey of around 10, 000 people that includes interviews, physical examinations, and blood samples, designed to gauge the health and nutritional status of US adults and children. In this particular year, it also included eye tests for glaucoma. Among the 1678 participants who had full eye test results, including photos, 84 (5%) adults had developed the condition. They were asked how often and how much they had drunk of caffeinated and decaffeinated drinks, including soft drinks and iced tea, over the preceding 12 months, using a validated questionnaire (Food Frequency). Compared with those who didn't drink hot tea every day, those who did, had a lower glaucoma risk, the data showed. After taking account of potentially influential factors, such as diabetes and smoking, hot tea-drinkers were 74 per cent less likely to have glaucoma. But no such associations were found for coffee—caffeinated or decaffeinated—decaffeinated tea, iced tea or soft drinks. This is an observational study so no firm conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, and the absolute numbers of those with glaucoma were small. Information on when glaucoma had been diagnosed was also unavailable. But tea contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective chemicals, which have been associated with a lowered risk of serious conditions, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, say the researchers. (NEXT) Effects of Resveratrol on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial. Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Poland), November 29, 2022 Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women of reproductive age. Hyperandrogenism is the central feature of PCOS. Studies on isolated ovarian theca-interstitial cells suggest that resveratrol, a natural polyphenol, reduces androgen production. This study was designed to evaluate endocrine and metabolic effects of resveratrol on PCOS. This was a randomized (1:1) double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that evaluated the effects of resveratrol over a period of 3 months in an academic hospital. Resveratrol (1,500 mg p.o.) or placebo were administered daily. Primary outcome was the change in the serum total T. Resveratrol treatment led to a significant decrease of total T by 23.1% . In parallel, resveratrol induced a 22.2% decrease of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, a decrease of fasting insulin level by 31.8% and an increase of the Insulin Sensitivity Index (Matsuda and DeFronzo) by 66.3%. Levels of gonadotropins, the lipid profile as well as markers of inflammation and endothelial function were not significantly altered. Resveratrol significantly reduced ovarian and adrenal androgens. This effect may be, at least in part, related to an improvement of insulin sensitivity and a decline of insulin level. (NEXT) Encouraging risk-taking in children may reduce the prevalence of childhood anxiety Macquarie University's Centre for Emotional Health (Netherlands), December 13, 2022 A new international study suggests that parents who employ challenging parent behavioural (CPB) methods – active physical and verbal behaviours that encourage children to push their limits – are likely protecting their children from developing childhood anxiety disorders. Researchers from Macquarie University's Centre for Emotional Health, along with partners from the University of Amsterdam and the University of Reading, surveyed 312 families with preschool-aged children across the Netherlands and Australia. Results showed that the parents who scored higher in their CPB methods, thereby encouraging their kids to push their limits to a greater extent, had children who were less at risk of exhibiting anxiety disorder symptoms, demonstrating that CPB was related to significantly less anxiety in children. CPB encourages safe risk-taking in children such as giving them a fright, engaging in rough-and-tumble play or letting them lose a game, as well as encouraging them to practice social assertion and confidently enter into unfamiliar situations. This study aimed to build upon existing research that establishes a relationship between parenting behaviours – particularly overinvolvement and overcontrol – and the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety disorders. To determine the effects of CPB on preschool-aged children, parents' CPB was assessed via a questionnaire assessing how much the parents encourage the exhibition of risky behaviour in their children, as well as the extent to which they encourage their children to venture beyond their comfort zones. “While Dutch and Australian mothers showed no differences in CPB towards their sons or daughters, both Dutch and Australian fathers of sons demonstrated more competition towards their sons than fathers of daughters. Dutch fathers in particular reported more rough-and-tumble play than the other groups of parents,” says Rebecca Lazarus from Macquarie University, another co-author of the study. The results are promising in raising the clinical relevance of CPB methods, which could potentially be used to aid parents in helping their children's wellbeing. (NEXT) Music therapy reduces pain and anxiety for patients with cancer and sickle cell disease University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, December 19, 2022 A new study found patients with cancer and patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) treated at an academic cancer center reported clinically significant reductions in pain and anxiety in response to music therapy. Furthermore, patients with SCD who received music therapy reported significantly higher pain and anxiety at baseline than patients with hematologic and/or oncologic conditions excluding SCD. The findings from this study were recently published in the journal, Integrative Cancer Therapies, a leading journal focusing on understanding the science of integrative cancer treatments. In this retrospective study conducted between January 2017 and July 202, music therapists at UH Connor Whole Health provided 4,002 music therapy sessions to 1,152 patients across 2,400 encounters at UH Seidman Cancer Center, making this the largest investigation of the real-world effectiveness of music therapy within hematology and oncology to date. This study builds upon a history of seminal music therapy studies funded by the Kulas Foundation, the country's leading foundation for funding scientific research in music therapy, that have investigated the efficacy of music therapy in palliative care, surgery, and sickle cell disease at UH. Music therapists provided interventions including live music listening, active music making, and songwriting to address patients' needs including coping, pain management, anxiety reduction, and self-expression. As part of clinical care, the music therapists assessed patients' self-reported pain, anxiety, and fatigue on a 0 to 10 scale at the beginning and end of each session and documented their sessions in the electronic health record. “This research highlights the increased symptom burden that adults with SCD face in the hospital and the significant impact that a single session of music therapy can have on their pain and anxiety.” These studies support the benefits of music therapy for managing acute pain, improving self-efficacy and quality of life, and improving sickle cell disease knowledge in adolescents and young adults transitioning from pediatric to adult care. Music therapy sessions differed between the two groups, with interventions including active music making, songwriting, and song recording being much more prevalent in the SCD group than the HemOnc group. Furthermore, in an analysis of patients' comments about music therapy, patients expressed themes including enjoyment, gratitude, and improvements in mood, pain, and anxiety. “Integrative Oncology utilizes complementary therapies, such as music therapy discussed in this study, to improve well-being for those affected by cancer. Using an evidence-based approach and building off research allows us to confidently build a program around supporting patients with integrative modalities as part of a strategy to manage symptoms that they may encounter through therapies or from cancer,” explained Santosh Rao, MD, a board-certified medical oncologist and integrative medicine provider and Medical Director of Integrative Oncology at UH Connor Whole Health. (NEXT) Study links health risks to electromagnetic field exposure Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, December 16, 2022 A study of real-world exposure to non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields in pregnant women found a significantly higher rate of miscarriage, providing new evidence regarding their potential health risks. The Kaiser Permanente study was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are in use and electricity is flowing. It can be generated by a number of environmental sources, including electric appliances, power lines and transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks. Humans are exposed to magnetic fields via close proximity to these sources while they are in use. While the health hazards from ionizing radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionizing radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, MD, PhD, principal investigator of the study and a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California. In a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, researchers asked women over age 18 with confirmed pregnancies to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours. Participants also kept a diary of their activities on that day, and were interviewed in person to better control for possible confounding factors, as well as how typical their activities were on the monitoring day. Researchers controlled for multiple variables known to influence the risk of miscarriage, including nausea/vomiting, past history of miscarriage, alcohol use, caffeine intake, and maternal fever and infections. Objective magnetic field measurements and pregnancy outcomes were obtained for 913 pregnant women, all members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Miscarriage occurred in 10.4 percent of the women with the lowest measured exposure level (1st quartile) of magnetic field non-ionizing radiation on a typical day, and in 24.2 percent of the women with the higher measured exposure level (2nd, 3rd and 4th quartiles), a nearly three times higher relative risk. The rate of miscarriage reported in the general population is between 10 and 15 percent, Dr. Li said. “This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionizing radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” he said. (NEXT) Common food dye can trigger inflammatory bowel diseases, say researchers McMaster University (Ontario), December 20 2022 Long-term consumption of Allura Red food dye can be a potential trigger of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, says McMaster University's Waliul Khan. Researchers using experimental animal models of IBD found that continual exposure to Allura Red AC harms gut health and promotes inflammation. The dye directly disrupts gut barrier function and increases the production of serotonin, a hormone/neurotransmitter found in the gut, which subsequently alters gut microbiota composition leading to increased susceptibility to colitis. Khan said Allura Red (also called FD&C Red 40 and Food Red 17), is a common ingredient in candies, soft drinks, dairy products and some cereals. The dye is used to add color and texture to foodstuffs, often to attract children. The use of synthetic food dyes such as Allura Red has increased significantly over the last several decades, but there has been little earlier study of these dyes' effects on gut health. Khan and his team published their findings in Nature Communications. Yun Han (Eric) Kwon, who recently completed Ph.D. in Khan's laboratory, is first author. “This study demonstrates significant harmful effects of Allura Red on gut health and identifies gut serotonin as a critical factor mediating these effects. These findings have important implication in the prevention and management of gut inflammation,” said Khan, the study's senior author, a professor of the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and a principal investigator of Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute.”What we have found is striking and alarming, as this common synthetic food dye is a possible dietary trigger for IBDs. This research is a significant advance in alerting the public on the potential harms of food dyes that we consume daily,” he said. “The literature suggests that the consumption of Allura Red also affects certain allergies, immune disorders and behavioral problems in children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.”

Don't Panic Geocast
Episode 351 - "Our Favorite Things"

Don't Panic Geocast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 72:41


2022 flew past, so this week John and Shannon review their favorite things, experiences, classes, and more of 2022. Everything from bee keeping to kitchen appliances to multimeters to books! John's Favorite Things 2022 Hantek 2D72 (https://amzn.to/3hAVsSB) GEARS Workshop (https://leemangeophysical.com/gears-2022-workshop/) Collapsing Wagon (https://amzn.to/3YyBUyJ) Milwaukee Packouts (https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Storage-Solutions/PACKOUT) and Ratchet Wrenches (https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-144-Position-Flex-Head-Ratcheting-Combination-Wrench-Set-SAE-and-METRIC-30-Piece-48-22-9413-48-22-9513/317521332?source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=SHOPPING-CM-CML-GGL-D25T-025_001_HAND_TOOLS-NA-MILWAUKEE-NA-SMART-3047250-NA-NA-NA-NBR-NA-NA-NA-HandTools&cm_mmc=SHOPPING-CM-CML-GGL-D25T-025_001_HAND_TOOLS-NA-MILWAUKEE-NA-SMART-3047250-NA-NA-NA-NBR-NA-NA-NA-HandTools-71700000088116572-58700007476412636-92700071623539228&gclid=CjwKCAiAkfucBhBBEiwAFjbkr23O-B7M3m6UF9IxbpvJ96Zkt7R-SzeBq2h2z0RStfORXBKAlEDFEhoCpvQQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds) Soda Stream (https://amzn.to/3jfqL60) Confluence (https://www.atlassian.com/software/confluence?&aceid=&adposition=&adgroup=138055852541&campaign=18312196225&creative=621361287748&device=c&keyword=confluence&matchtype=e&network=g&placement=&ds_kids=p72969649871&ds_e=GOOGLE&ds_eid=700000001542923&ds_e1=GOOGLE&gclid=CjwKCAiAkfucBhBBEiwAFjbkr8Y9IrE7dhKydNHQm-5AMX2jYubYcx0dGsmmqqiuOb25oduuS2tboRoC8wMQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds) Shannon's Favorite Things 2022 Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/) and the Three Body Problem Triology (https://amzn.to/3HMdbRJ) Camping in the Mohave Desert Regents Teaching Award (https://www.ou.edu/web/news_events/articles/news_2022/faculty-tribute-2022#3.1) Samsuing Tab S8 (https://www.samsung.com/us/tablets/galaxy-tab-s8/buy/?modelCode=SM-X700NZAAXAR&cid=pla-ecomm-pfs-tab-us-google-na-04272021-170088-&ds_e=GOOGLE-cr:0-pl:284415216-&ds_c=FF~Tablets+Smart+Shopping+Campaign_CN~Tablets+SSC_ID~B0000KGS_PH~teas_MK~us_BS~im_PR~tab_SB~immulti_FS~hqloe_CA~smp_KS~nag_MT~na-&ds_ag=AG~Tablets+Smart+Shopping_ID~E0000YF6_MK~us_AT~imag_MD~h_PK~roah_PB~google_AI~n-&ds_k=PRODUCT_GROUP&gclid=CjwKCAiAkfucBhBBEiwAFjbkr-V0FW6QnRDAXcqic9w4iDeVo0dvIjDlGyecNsfOcUmuOvI0BLZT6BoCoakQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds) Bee Keeping Workshop (https://neoba.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=932348&module_id=283100) 17 Inches of snow before field camp Fun Paper Friday Did dinos use their tails as a whip and weapon? These scientists think they have the answer. Conti, Simone, et al. "Multibody analysis and soft tissue strength refute supersonic dinosaur tail." Scientific Reports 12.1 (2022): 1-9. (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-21633-2) Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! (https://www.patreon.com/dontpanicgeo) www.dontpanicgeocast.com (http://www.dontpanicgeocast.com) SWUNG Slack (https://softwareunderground.org) @dontpanicgeo (https://twitter.com/dontpanicgeo) show@dontpanicgeocast.com John Leeman - www.johnrleeman.com (http://www.johnrleeman.com) - @geo_leeman (https://twitter.com/geo_leeman) Shannon Dulin - @ShannonDulin (https://twitter.com/ShannonDulin)

LabAnimal
Kidney organoid vascularisation, implementing masking and quantitatively assessing experiment severity

LabAnimal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 4:28


December 2022The papers behind the pod: Menéndez ABC et al. (2022). Creating a kidney organoid-vasculature interaction model using a novel organ-on-chip system. Scientific Reports 12:20699. doi: 10.1038/s41598-022-24945-5Karp N et al. (2022). A qualitative study of the barriers to using blinding in in vivo experiments and suggestions for improvement. PLOS Biology 20(11): e3001873. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3001873Talbot S et al. (2022). RELSA—A multidimensional procedure for the comparative assessment of well-being and the quantitative determination of severity in experimental procedures. Frontiers in Veterinary Science 9:937711. doi: 10.3389/fvets.2022.937711 It's the third Thursday of December, and you're listening to 3 Minute 3Rs, your monthly recap of efforts to replace, reduce and refine the use of animals in research. To round off 2022 we are highlighting a paper for each R.Follow this link for the full transcript: https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/3-minute-3rs-podcast-december-2022-transcript Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 自然科學相關時事趣聞 All about 2021 Science

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 8:55


歡迎留言告訴我們你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/cl81kivnk00dn01wffhwxdg2s/comments Topic: Ants have the ability to sniff out cancer in humans, study reveals Ants have the ability to sniff out cancerous cells in humans, a new study has discovered, suggesting they could be used for cancer diagnosis in future. 一項新研究發現,螞蟻能嗅出人體內的癌細胞,這表明螞蟻可用於未來對癌症的診斷。 Researchers from the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) discovered that ant species Formica fusca has a well developed sense of smell. 法國國家科學研究中心(CNRS)的研究人員發現,「黑山蟻」(學名:Formica fusca )這種螞蟻品種,嗅覺非常發達。 It was able to differentiate cancerous cells from healthy cells in humans, thanks to their sense of smell, limited trials revealed. But more clinical tests must be carried out before they could be used in clinical settings like hospitals, the team said. 有限的實驗顯示,這種螞蟻的嗅覺超強,能夠將人體的癌細胞與健康細胞區分開來。但是該研究團隊表示,還需要進行更多臨床測試,才能將黑山蟻用於醫院等臨床環境中。 They suggest that in future, ants could turn out to be better at dogs when it comes to locating cancerous cells in humans. 他們員指出,未來在識別人體癌細胞方面,螞蟻可能會比狗做得更出色。 Next Article Topic: 科學家使用細胞再生技術讓老鼠回春 Scientists Reverse Aging In Mice Using Cell Rejuvenation Technique Researchers in the US treated healthy mice with a form of gene therapy that refreshed older cells, making the animals more youthful according to biological markers that are used to measure the effects of ageing. 美國研究人員對健康老鼠實施一種更新老化細胞的基因療法,他們透過用來衡量老化效應的生物標記法,測出這些老鼠變年輕了。 Repeating the trick in humans is far from straightforward, but the findings will fuel interest in radical new therapies that aim to slow or reverse the ageing process as a means of tackling age-related diseases such as cancer, brittle bones and Alzheimer's. 儘管難以用同樣的方法讓人類返老還童,但這一發現將點燃人們對以延緩或逆轉衰老為目標的激進新療法的興趣,這種療法可以用來治療諸如癌症、骨質疏鬆和阿茲海默症等與年齡相關的疾病。 The scientists drew on previous work by the Japanese Nobel laureate Prof Shinya Yamanaka, who showed that a mixture of four molecules – known as Yamanaka factors – can rewind adult cells into youthful stem cells that are capable of forming almost any tissue in the body. 科學家這一療法借鑑日本諾貝爾獎得主山中伸彌教授先前的研究成果。山中伸彌向世人展示,被稱為「山中因子」的4種分子組合在一起,可以讓成人細胞逆生長為年輕的幹細胞,而幹細胞可以分化成人體的任何組織。Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1506995 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1508339 Next Article Topic: World's oldest DNA sequenced from million-year-old mammoths Teeth from mammoths buried in the Siberian permafrost for more than a million years have yielded the world's oldest DNA ever sequenced, according to a study published on Wednesday, shining the genetic searchlight into the deep past. 據週三公布的研究,埋在西伯利亞永凍土層超過100萬年的猛獁象牙齒,提供全球最古老的去氧核醣核酸(DNA)定序,讓基因研究的探照燈指向遙遠的過去。 Researchers said the three specimens, one roughly 800,000 years old and two over a million years old, provide important insights into the giant Ice Age mammals, including the ancient heritage of the woolly mammoth. 研究人員表示,這3個樣本,一個約有80萬年歷史,另2個來自超過100萬年前,為現代人瞭解冰河時代猛獁象,包括「真長毛象」(woolly mammoth)的古老傳承,提供重要觀察角度。 The genomes far exceed the oldest previously sequenced DNA - a horse dating between 780,000 to 560,000 years ago. 此前,最古老的DNA定序來自78萬年前到56萬年前的一匹馬,而這些猛獁象基因組的年代更久遠得多。 The mammoths were originally discovered in the 1970s in Siberia and held at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. 這幾頭猛獁象起初於1970年代在西伯利亞地區被發現,由莫斯科的俄羅斯科學院保管。 Next Article Topic: Comet from edge of solar system killed the dinosaurs: study 研究:來自太陽系邊緣的彗星讓恐龍滅絕 Sixty-six million years ago, a huge celestial object struck off the coast of what is now Mexico, triggering a catastrophic "impact winter" that eventually wiped out three-quarters of life on Earth, including the dinosaurs. 6600萬年前,一個巨大星體撞上現在的墨西哥外海,引發釀成巨災的「衝擊性寒冬」,最後導致恐龍在內的地球上4分之3物種滅絕。 A pair of astronomers at Harvard say they have now resolved long standing mysteries surrounding the nature and origin of the "Chicxulub impactor." 哈佛大學2位天文學家表示,他們已經解開長久以來關於「希克蘇魯伯衝擊體」(Chicxulub impactor)的本質和來源之謎。 Their analysis suggests it was a comet that originated in a region of icy debris on the edge of the solar system, that Jupiter was responsible for it crashing into our planet, and that we can expect similar impacts every 250 million to 750 million years. 他們的分析顯示,這是源自太陽系邊緣冰冷碎片區域的一顆彗星,且木星也要為此彗星撞上地球負責。類似規模的彗星撞地球頻率為每2億5000萬年到7億5000萬年。 The duo's paper, published in the journal Scientific Reports this week, pushes back against an older theory that claims the object was a fragment of an asteroid that came from our solar system's Main Belt. 2人的論文本週在《科學報告》期刊發表,推翻了之前認為這個物體是來自太陽系「主小行星帶」小行星碎片的理論。 Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1435663 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1437161 Topic: Spanking may affect brain development in children Spanking may affect a child's brain development in similar ways to more severe forms of violence, according to a new study led by Harvard researchers. 哈佛大學研究人員領導的一項新研究表明,打屁股對兒童大腦發育的影響,可能與更嚴重的暴力虐待造成的後果類似。 The research, published recently in the journal Child Development, builds on existing studies that show heightened activity in certain regions of the brains of children who experience abuse in response to threat cues. 這篇最近發表在《兒童發育》期刊上的研究,以現有的一些研究為基礎,這些研究發現,遭受虐待的兒童在回應威脅提示時,大腦的特定區域活動會增強。 The group found that children who had been spanked had a greater neural response in multiple regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). These areas of the brain respond to cues in the environment that tend to be consequential, such as a threat, and may affect decision-making and processing of situations. 研究團隊發現,打屁股會增強兒童大腦前額葉皮層(PFC)多個區域的神經反應。大腦的這些區域會根據環境中的威脅等重要線索做出反應,並可能影響兒童的決策,以及對局勢的分析能力。 According to the study's authors, corporal punishment has been linked to the development of mental health issues, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and substance use disorders. 研究作者指出,體罰一直和心理健康問題、焦慮、憂鬱、行為問題及藥物濫用有關。 Next Topic: Coffee before exercise increases fat-burning/運動前喝咖啡增加燃脂 If you're looking to maximize the amount of fat burned in your next workout, think about having a coffee half an hour before you get started – as a new study suggests it can make a significant difference to fat burning, especially later on in the day. 如果你希望在下次運動健身時最大程度地燃燒脂肪,不妨考慮在開始之前半小時喝咖啡—因為有新研究表明,它可以使脂肪燃燒量明顯變化,尤其是在下午。 Researchers found that 3 milligrams of caffeine per kilogram of body weight can boost the rate of fat burning during aerobic exercise, based on results gathered from 15 male volunteers. 研究人員發現,根據從15名男性志願者收集到的結果,按每公斤體重3毫克的量來攝取咖啡因,就可以提高有氧運動期間的脂肪燃燒率。 The coffee dose was shown to increase maximal fat oxidation rate(MFO, a measure of how efficiently the body burns off fat)by an average of 10.7 percent in the morning and 29 percent in the afternoon. 研究表明,這個咖啡攝取量可以增加最大脂肪氧化率(MFO,衡量人體燃燒脂肪效率的指標),上午平均增加10.7%,下午增加29%。 This is a study with a fairly small sample of participants, so it's important not to jump to too broad a conclusion, but the results are clear enough to suggest that there is some kind of association there. 由於該研究的參與者樣本數很少,因此重要的是不要過於廣泛下結論,但結果足夠清楚,表明存在某種關聯。 Next Topic: Study Shows Baldness Can Be a Business Advantage 研究:光頭可成職場優勢 Men with shaved heads are perceived to be more masculine, dominant and, in some cases, to have greater leadership potential than those with longer locks or with thinning hair, according to a recent study out of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. 賓州大學華頓商學院最近的一項研究顯示,剃光頭的男人讓人覺得更有男人味和支配地位,在某些情況下,他們比頭髮較長或者頭髮稀疏的男人看起來更具領導潛力。 Some executives say the style makes them appear younger—or at least, makes their age less evident—and gives them more confidence than a comb-over or monk-like pate. 一些主管認為,光頭的髮型讓他們看起來更年輕,至少沒那麼顯老,而且相較於將頭髮梳向一邊或像修道士一樣的腦袋瓜,這種髮型能讓他們感到更自信。 The study found that men with thinning hair were viewed as the least attractive and powerful of the bunch, a finding that tracks with other studies showing that people perceive men with typical male-pattern baldness as older and less attractive. For those men, the solution could be as cheap and simple as a shave. 該研究發現,頭髮稀疏的男人被認為最沒有魅力、最沒有力量的一群人。這一結果也與其他研究相符,這些研究表明,人們認為典型的雄性禿頭讓男人看上去更老,更缺乏魅力。對於這些男人來說,既便宜又簡單的解決辦法就是剃個頭。 Powered by Firstory Hosting

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Klospülung, Haifriedhof, Tierbestattungen

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 6:11


Die Themen in den Wissensnachrichten: +++ Klospülung schleudert blitzschnell Partikel in die Luft +++ Haifriedhof vor Australien entdeckt +++ Tierbestattungen sind wegen Energiekrise teurer geworden +++ **********Weiterführende Quellen zu dieser Folge:Commercial toilets emit energetic and rapidly spreading aerosol plumes/ Scientific Reports, 08.12.2022Scientists discover shark graveyard at the bottom of the ocean/ CSIRO, 07.12.2022Infos vom Bundesverband der Tierbestatter/ abgerufen am 08.12.2022A 2-million-year-old ecosystem in Greenland uncovered by environmental DNA/ Nature, 07.12.202225 Jahre Stabsstelle Krebsprävention 20 Jahre WHO-Kollaborationszentrum für Tabakkontrolle Prävention stärken – Krebsfälle vermeiden/ DKFZ, 11.2022Weihnachtsstudie 2022: Mit Optimismus durch die Krise/ Universität der Bundeswehr München, 05.12.2022**********Ihr könnt uns auch auf diesen Kanälen folgen: Tiktok und Instagram.**********Weitere Wissensnachrichten zum Nachlesen: https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/nachrichten

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Künstliche Intelligenz, Grippe-Impfung, Bierhefe

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 5:46


Die Themen in den Wissensnachrichten: +++ EU-Länder legen erstmals Regeln für Künstliche Intelligenz fest +++ Diesjährige Grippeimpfung hilft gegen aktuelle Virus-Typen +++ "Mutter" der untergärigen Biere nun auch in Europa wiedergefunden +++ **********Weiterführende Quellen zu dieser Folge:Gesetz über künstliche Intelligenz: Rat will sichere und die Grundrechte wahrende KI fördern, Rat der EU und Europäischer Rat, 6.12.2022Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report, CDC, 2.12.2022Noise from above: a summary of studies regarding the perceived annoyance due to impact sounds, Konferenz-Paper für die Acoustical Society of America, 6.12.2022Genomic analysis of sewage from 101 countries reveals global landscape of antimicrobial resistance, Nature Communications, 1.12.2022Increasing freshwater supply to sustainably address global water security at scale, Scientific Reports, 6.12.2022Identification of European isolates of the lager yeast parent Saccharomyces eubayanus, FEMS Yeast Research, 7.12.2022**********Ihr könnt uns auch auf diesen Kanälen folgen: Tiktok und Instagram.**********Weitere Wissensnachrichten zum Nachlesen: https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/nachrichten

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? In the latest research, it was revealed that the mega tsunami, which is thought to have occurr

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 5:17


"Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? In the latest research, it was revealed that the mega tsunami, which is thought to have occurred on Mars about 3.4 billion years ago, may have been caused by an asteroid impact similar to the Chicxu" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."""" #Jesus #Catholic. Smooth Radio Malta is Malta's number one digital radio station, playing Your Relaxing Favourites - Smooth provides a ‘clutter free' mix, appealing to a core 35-59 audience offering soft adult contemporary classics. We operate a playlist of popular tracks which is updated on a regular basis. https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/themummichogblogofmalta Blogspot: https://themummichogblogofmalta.blogspot.com/ END AD---" "lub effect, which contributed to the mass extinction of all flightless dinosaurs on Earth 66 million years ago. Past research suggests that a mega tsunami occurred about 3.4 billion years ago by asteroid or comet impact on the ocean floor north of Mars, but the location of the resulting ""impact crater"" remained unclear. The latest research, published in Scientific Reports, has brought new findings to light. Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? - 2 Within the scope of the research, maps of the surface of Mars, created by combining images from previous research on the planet, were analyzed and the impact crater that could cause the mega tsunami was determined. Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? - 3 The crater, called ""Pohl"", has a diameter of 110 kilometers and is believed to lie about 120 meters below sea level on the northern plains thought to be covered by the ocean. Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? - 4 Asteroid and comet impacts were simulated to test what kind of impact might have caused Pohl, which is claimed to have appeared about 3.4 billion years ago, and whether it would cause a mega tsunami. Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? - 5 The simulated impacts were seen to form craters 110 kilometers in diameter, causing mega tsunamis. Analysis of the mega tsunami caused by the 3-kilometer asteroid impact showed that this tsunami could reach a height of about 250 meters on land. Mega tsunami on Mars similar to Earth! Will the mystery of the extinction of the dinosaurs be solved? - 6 The impact was noted to be similar to the Chicxulub effect, which contributed to the mass extinction of all flightless dinosaurs on Earth 66 million years ago. https://www.ntv.com.tr/galeri/teknoloji/marsta-dunyadakine-benzer-mega-tsunami-dinozorlarin-yok-olusundaki-gizem-cozulecek-mi,QQZgn5ne4keEHoF3WCNjow "

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"Meteorite formed mega tsunami on the surface of Mars It turned out that the mega tsunami of about 3.4 billion previous mega tsunami may have been caused by a meteorian hit. Researches in EÇMİŞE,

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 3:47


"Meteorite formed mega tsunami on the surface of Mars It turned out that the mega tsunami of about 3.4 billion previous mega tsunami may have been caused by a meteorian hit. Researches in EÇMİŞE, about 3.4 billion years ago with the effect of asteroid or comet on the ocean base in the north of Mars" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."""" #Jesus #Catholic. Smooth Radio Malta is Malta's number one digital radio station, playing Your Relaxing Favourites - Smooth provides a ‘clutter free' mix, appealing to a core 35-59 audience offering soft adult contemporary classics. We operate a playlist of popular tracks which is updated on a regular basis. https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/themummichogblogofmalta Blogspot: https://themummichogblogofmalta.blogspot.com/ END AD---" " It shows that Mega tsunami took place. Scientific Reports published in the latest research, the location of the crater was also identified. Within the scope of the research, the images taken from the previous researches on the planet were combined and the maps of the Mars surface were analyzed. CRATER FOUND According to AA, as a result of the studies, the multiplication crater that could cause mega tsunami was determined. The crater, called ""Pohl"", has an diameter of 110 kilometers and is believed to be located in the north plains that are thought to be covered by the ocean, about 120 meters below the sea level. Meteorite and comet impacts were simulated to test whether POHL, which was claimed to have emerged about 3.4 billion years ago, may have created a mega tsunami. Simulated impacts were 110 kilometers of craters and caused mega tsunamis. The analysis of the mega tsunami caused by a 3 -kilometer asteroid impact showed that this tsunami can reach a height of approximately 250 meters on land. https://www.yenisafak.com/teknoloji "

Artribune
Cesare Pietroiusti e Ginestra Bianconi - Contemporaneamente a cura di Mariantonietta Firmani

Artribune

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 71:57


In questo audio il prezioso incontro con Cesare Pietroiusti artista Ginestra Bianconi matematica. L'intervista con Moni Ovadia nata per Parallelo42 06 collection, è nel podcast Contemporaneamente di Mariantonietta Firmani, il podcast pensato per Artribune.In Contemporaneamente podcast trovate incontri tematici con autorevoli interpreti del contemporaneo tra arte e scienza, letteratura, storia, filosofia, architettura, cinema e molto altro. Per approfondire questioni auliche ma anche cogenti e futuribili. Dialoghi straniati per accedere a nuove letture e possibili consapevolezze dei meccanismi correnti: tra locale e globale, tra individuo e società, tra pensiero maschile e pensiero femminile, per costruire una visione ampia, profonda ed oggettiva della realtà. Con Cesare Pietroiusti e Ginestra Bianconi, tra arte e matematica, un affondo nei meandri del pensiero e dei numeri. L'arte relazionale, scardina il concetto di individualità, il senso non va cercato nel singolo soggetto ma nella rete di relazioni tra soggetto e società. Nella teoria delle reti è necessario combinare in maniera scientifica e creativa dati che vengono da altri cambi disciplinari. In arte i comportamenti diventano invenzioni e i casi sono sempre unici. La creatività è fondamentale nello sviluppo della ricerca scientifica, saldamente fondata sul rigore degli studi di matematica e fisica. L'artista fa mostra della possibilità di mantenere la libertà, come generalizzazione e autoriferimenti sono le caratteristiche fondamentali del delirio, e molto altro.GUARDA IL VIDEO https://youtu.be/-wTI4vcECnc BREVI NOTE BIOGRAFICHE DEGLI AUTORICesare Pietroiusti vive e lavora a Roma. Laurea in Medicina con tesi in Clinica Psichiatrica nel 1979; nel 1977 è co-fondatore del Centro Studi Jartrakor, e della Rivista di Psicologia dell'Arte, Roma. Dal 1977 ha esposto in personali e collettive, in prestigiosi spazi privati e pubblici, deputati e non, in Italia e all'estero.Dal 1997 al 2001 è uno dei coordinatori delle residenze e dei progetti “Oreste”. Pietroiusti individua nella prassi laboratoriale un modello che, coniugando attività formativa ed espositiva, offre possibilità di sviluppo orizzontale e collettivo del pensiero e forme di superamento delle specificità disciplinari. Presidente dell'Azienda Speciale PalaExpo di Roma, 2018-2022. Co-Fondatore e Presidente della Fondazione Lac o Le Mon, San Cesario di Lecce, 2015. Docente di “Laboratorio Arti Visive”: IUAV di Venezia 2004–2015; MFA Faculty, LUCAD, Lesley University, Boston (2009-2016). Negli ultimi anni il suo lavoro si è concentrato soprattutto sul tema dello scambio e sui paradossi che possono crearsi nelle pieghe dei sistemi e degli ordinamenti economici. Ginestra Bianconi Professoressa al Dipartimento di Scienze Matematiche alla Queen Mary University of London and Alan Turing Fellow all' Alan Turing Institute, UK. Fisica di formazione, nella sua ricerca combina concetti fondamentali di fisica con metodi di matematica. Come la topologia e la teoria dell'informazione per affrontare argomenti di frontiera nella teoria delle reti con risvolti importanti per lo studio dei sistemi complessi.La sua attenzione particolare è rivolta a fondare una teoria delle reti complesse, a volte formulando modelli matematici molto astratti. Affronta anche le urgenti sfide che sistemi complessi propongono alla società moderna. Autrice di due pubblicazioni: “Multilayer Networks” (Oxford University Press, 2018) e “Higher-order networks” (Cambridge University Press, 2021). È caporedattrice di “Journal of Physics Complexity (IOP)” e editrice di Plos One, Scientific Reports, Entropy, Chaos Solitons & Fractals. Nel 2020 riceve il premio Network Science Fellowships dalla Società di Network Science per “contributi fondamentali alla Scienza delle Reti in particolare per la formulazione della condensazione di Bose-Einstein nelle reti complesse e per progressi scientifici inerenti alla relazione tra struttura e dinamica delle reti multilayer.”

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 67:55


VIDEOS: Video Emerges Where Fauci and Others Planned for a “Universal mRNA Flu Vaccine” Which Became the “COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine” Because People were not Afraid Enough of the Flu Virus (1:51) You're Not Going To Believe This! | Mark Steyn & Eva Vlaardingerbroek (3:03) Neil Oliver – ‘…it's a toxic hell…' (START @ 9:00) Gravitas: Who helped Taliban repair the abandoned American aircraft? (7:25)   Healthy plant-based diets associated with lower colorectal cancer risk in men Kyung Hee University, South Korea, November 28, 2022 Eating a plant-based diet rich in healthy plant foods—such as whole grains, vegetables, and legumes—and low in unhealthy plant foods—including refined grains, fruit juices, and added sugars—is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in men. The findings are published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.Jihye Kim, the corresponding author, said, “Colorectal cancer is the third-most common cancer worldwide, and the risk of developing colorectal cancer over a lifetime is one in 23 for men and one in 25 for women. Although previous research has suggested that plant-based diets may play a role in preventing colorectal cancer, the impact of plant foods' nutritional quality on this association has been unclear. Our findings suggest that eating a healthy plant-based diet is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer.” Researchers from Kyung Hee University, South Korea found that among a population of 79,952 American men, those who ate the highest average daily amounts of healthy plant-based foods had a 22% lower risk of colorectal cancer, compared to those who ate the lowest amounts of healthy plant foods. However, the authors did not identify any significant associations between the nutritional quality of plant-based diets and colorectal cancer risk among a population of 93,475 American women. Jihye Kim said, “We speculate that the antioxidants found in foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains could contribute to lowering colorectal cancer risk by suppressing chronic inflammation, which can lead to cancer. As men tend to have a higher risk of colorectal cancer than women, we propose that this could help explain why eating greater amounts of healthy plant-based foods was associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk in men but not women.” The authors found that the association between the nutritional quality of plant-based diets and colorectal cancer risk among men varied by race and ethnicity. Among Japanese American men, colorectal cancer risk was 20% lower for those who ate the highest amount of healthy plant foods per day than for those who ate the lowest amount. Among white men, those who ate the highest amount of highest amount of healthy plant foods had a 24% lower colorectal cancer risk than those who ate the lowest amount. The authors did not identify any significant associations between plant-based diets and colorectal cancer risk among African American, Latino or Native Hawaiian men. (next) Green Mediterranean diet reduces twice as much visceral fat as traditional Mediterranean diet Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel), November 28, 2022 Following the green Mediterranean diet significantly reduces visceral adipose tissue, a type of fat around internal organs that is much more dangerous than the extra “tire” around your waist. Recently, researchers compared the green Mediterranean diet to the traditional Mediterranean diet and a non-Mediterranean healthy diet in a large-scale clinical interventional trial—the DIRECT PLUS. Subsequent analysis found that the green Mediterranean diet reduced visceral fat by 14%, the Mediterranean diet by 7% and the non-Mediterranean healthy diet by 4.5%. The study was published in BMC Medicine. Reducing visceral fat is considered the true goal of weight loss, as it is a more important indicator than a person's weight or the circumference of their waist. Visceral fat aggregates over time between organs, and produces hormones and poisons linked to heart disease, diabetes, dementia and premature death. The DIRECT-PLUS trial research team was the first to introduce the concept of the green Mediterranean diet. This modified Mediterranean diet is further enriched with dietary polyphenols and is lower in red/processed meat than the traditional Mediterranean diet. On top of a daily intake of walnuts (28 grams), the participants consumed 3-4 cups of green tea/day and 100 grams (frozen cubes) of duckweed green shake/day. The aquatic green plant duckweed is high in bioavailable protein, iron, B12, vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols and substituted meat intake. The team has shown in previous studies that the green Mediterranean diet has a variety of salutary effects ranging from the microbiome to age-related degenerative diseases. A group of 294 participants took part in the 18-month long trial. “A 14% reduction in visceral fat is a dramatic achievement for making simple changes to your diet and lifestyle. Weight loss is an important goal only if it is accompanied by impressive results in reducing adipose tissue,” notes Dr. Hila Zelicha. (next) Are older women being over-screened for cervical cancer? University of Illinois at Chicago, November 28, 2022 A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that women over the age of 65 may be undergoing unnecessary cervical cancer screenings and that more public health data is needed on the utilization of cervical cancer screening-associated services among older women to prevent potential harm and unnecessary costs. The study, which is authored by experts from the University of Illinois Chicago, the University of California San Francisco and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, looked at Medicare claims data from 1999 to 2019 for fee-for-service care for women over the age of 65. The analysis showed that in 2019 more than 1.3 million women received cervical cancer screening-associated services, such as a Pap test, colposcopy, and other cervical procedures after age 65. While these services cost more than $83 million, the researchers concluded they were of “unclear clinical appropriateness.” “Cervical cancer screening and other preventive services are among our most important tools for keeping people healthy throughout life, but screenings should also follow evidence-based guidelines to prevent overspending, potential complications and patient discomfort,” said study co-author Dr. Hunter Holt, assistant professor of family and community medicine at the University of Illinois Chicago. According to recommendations and guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the American Cancer Society and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, women considered to be of average risk can stop undergoing routine cervical cancer screening once they reach the age of 65 if they have had adequate prior screening. “The decision to end cervical cancer screening for women after age 65 requires review of past screening results and related medical history. This process can promote cervical cancer prevention and prevent harms and costs from unnecessary tests and procedures,” said Jin Qin, study co-author and epidemiologist in CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. The researchers say that the high rates of screening among older women is potentially concerning. “It could be that women are getting screened when they do not need to, or that these women are considered to be at higher-than-average risk, for example, because they have not been adequately screened prior to 65. We do not want to see either of these things and unfortunately, there is not enough public health data to shed light on the causes,” said Holt, who is also affiliated with the University of Illinois Cancer Center at UIC. (next) Chemotherapy could increase disease susceptibility in future generations Washington State University, November 28, 2022 A common chemotherapy drug could carry a toxic inheritance for children and grandchildren of adolescent cancer survivors, Washington State University-led research indicates. The study, published online in iScience, found that male rats who received the drug ifosfamide during adolescence had offspring and grand-offspring with increased incidence of disease. While other research has shown that cancer treatments can increase patients' chance of developing disease later in life, this is one of the first-known studies showing that susceptibility can be passed down to a third generation of unexposed offspring. “The findings suggest that if a patient receives chemotherapy, and then later has children, that their grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren, may have an increased disease susceptibility due to their ancestors' chemotherapy exposure,” said Michael Skinner, a WSU biologist and corresponding author on the study. Given this study's implications, the researchers recommend that cancer patients who plan to have children later take precautions, such as using cryopreservation to freeze sperm or ova before having chemotherapy. In the study, researchers exposed a set of young male rats to ifosfamide over three days, mimicking a course of treatment an adolescent human cancer patient might receive. Those rats were later bred with female rats who had not been exposed to the drug. The resulting offspring were bred again with another set of unexposed rats. The first-generation offspring had some exposure to the chemotherapy drug since their fathers' sperm was exposed, but researchers found greater incidence of disease in not only the first- but also the second-generation, who had no direct exposure to the drug. While there were some differences by generation and sex, the associated problems included greater incidence of kidney and testis diseases as well as delayed onset of puberty and abnormally low anxiety, indicating a lowered ability to assess risk. The results of the researchers' analysis showed epigenetic changes in two generations linked to the chemotherapy exposure of the originally exposed rats. The fact that these changes could be seen in the grand-offspring, who had no direct exposure to the chemotherapy drug, indicates that the negative effects were passed down through epigenetic inheritance. (next) Saffron can fight liver cancer, reveal UAE researchers United Arab Emirates University, November 20, 2022 It may be an expensive spice but you cannot put a label or price on health, said Professor Amr Amin who has researched a breakthrough in the properties of saffron in fighting liver cancer. Professor Amin from Cellular & Molecular Biology at United Arab Emirates University said that researchers have investigated and found saffron to have anti-liver cancer properties. “Safranal, a major biomolecule of the golden spice saffron arrests and stops the cancer cell division at two different stages,” he said. The UAE researchers have been working on this project since 2011 when they first published the research in the Hepatology Journal. The study suggests a novel mechanism of anti-proliferative activity of safranal against human liver cancer cells. “This molecule could serve as a novel and/or adjuvant drug to treat liver cancer,” said Dr Amin. The findings are now also published in a Nature journal Scientific Reports. “The ingredient works in two ways; it stops cell division and promotes cell death,” he explained. Prof Amin and colleagues concluded that safranal exerts its anticancer effect in HepG2 cells by inhibiting DNA repair, resulting in increased DNA damage. (next) Japanese researchers say that ultrasound therapy can be used to treat patients with dementia Tohoku University (Japan), November 20, 2022 A new therapy based on ultrasound waves might be able to improve the cognitive powers of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. According to an article on the Tohoku University news page, the approach improved the condition of mice with symptoms similar to human dementia. In their experiment, the Tohoku University research team sent low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) waves through the brain of the mice. They found that the waves improved the creation of blood vessels and the rate of regeneration of nerve cells. Furthermore, the treatment did not cause any notable side effects on the mice. The results led the researchers to believe that they can replicate their experimental success in actual human patients one day. “The LIPUS therapy is a non-invasive physiotherapy that could apply to high-risk elderly patients without the need for surgery or anaesthesia, and could be used repeatedly,” explained TU researcher Hiroaki Shimokawa. The Tohoku researchers applied LIPUS therapy to the whole brain of mice with symptoms that resemble those of Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia. They did this three times a day, with each session lasting for 20 minutes. The mice that simulated vascular dementia underwent surgery that reduced the amount of blood that reached the brain. These animals underwent LIPUS treatment on the first, third, and fifth days after that surgery. Meanwhile, the mice that modeled Alzheimer's disease got 11 LIPUS treatments over a three-month-long trial period. By the end of the experiment, the researchers found that LIPUS activated genes involved with the cells that made up the inner lining of blood vessels. Furthermore, an enzyme that promoted blood vessel formation displayed increased activity, as did a protein which helped nerve cells grow. Based on their findings, whole-brain LIPUS therapy can help alleviate the symptoms of certain forms of dementia by encouraging the development of cells that are normally affected by the condition. The technique is currently undergoing initial clinical trials that will determine its efficacy and safety.

天方烨谈
经常挖鼻孔可能增加阿尔茨海默病风险

天方烨谈

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 3:33


近日,发表在《Scientific Reports》上的一项新研究发现:经常挖鼻孔,可能会引起肺炎衣原体介导鼻腔和大脑之间的神经作为入侵路径,侵入中枢神经,诱发大脑细胞β淀粉样蛋白的沉积,从而增加患阿尔茨海默症和痴呆症的风险!

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Haustierfutter, Meteoriten-Wasser, Hai-Schutz

Wissensnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 5:52


Die Themen aus den Wissensnachrichten: +++ Umweltfolgen von trockenem Haustierfutter am besten +++ Meteoriten-Einschlag stützt These zu Wasser aus dem All +++ 60 Hai-Arten sollen international geschützt werden +++ **********Weiterführende Quellen zu dieser Folge:Environmental impact of diets for dogs and cats, Scientific Reports, 17.11.2022The Winchcombe meteorite, a unique and pristine witness from the outer solar system, Science Advances, 16.11.2022Association of Autologous Tumor Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cell Vaccination With Extension of Survival Among Patients With Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Glioblastoma, JAMA Oncology, 17.11.2022Rapid rise in urban sprawl: Global hotspots and trends since 1990, PLOS Sustainability and Transformation, 09.11.2022Initial impressions of compatibility and mate value predict later dating and romantic interest, PNAS, 02.11.2022**********Ihr könnt uns auch auf diesen Kanälen folgen: Tiktok und Instagram.**********Weitere Wissensnachrichten zum Nachlesen: https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/nachrichten

Veterinary Clinical Podcasts
136 Heat Related Illness

Veterinary Clinical Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 46:40


Joining Brian and myself in our virtual studio we are delighted to have Dr Emily Hall, one of our lecturers in Veterinary Education here at the RVC. Emily has been working with the VetCompass group looking at Heat Related Illness in the UK and we thought we'd talk to her to about her research in this field and the questions that left unanswered.  We hope that you enjoy. Emily has her own blog on this topic too, where you can find links to the papers. http://heatstroke.dog/ There is even an infographic: https://www.rvc.ac.uk/Media/Default/VetCompass/210324%20EH%20Heat%20Stroke%20infographic.pdfAnd Congress abstract recordings to watch:  https://www.rvc.ac.uk/vetcompass/audio-visual-resources/conference-presentations Some references of interest: Hall, Hall, E. J., Carter, A. J., & O’Neill, D. G. (2020). Incidence and risk factors for heat related illness (heatstroke) in UK dogs under primary veterinary care in 2016. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 9128. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66015-8Hall, E. J., Carter, A. J., & O’Neill, D. G. (2020). Dogs Don’t Die Just in Hot Cars—Exertional Heat-Related Illness (Heatstroke) Is a Greater Threat to UK Dogs. Animals, 10(8), 1324. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10081324Hall, E. J., Carter, A. J., Bradbury, J., Barfield, D., & O’Neill, D. G. (2021). Proposing the VetCompass clinical grading tool for heat-related illness in dogs. Scientific Reports, 11(1), 6828. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-86235-wE. J., Carter, A. J., Chico, G., Bradbury, J., Gentle, L. K., Barfield, D., & O’Neill, D. G. (2022). Risk Factors for Severe and Fatal Heat-Related Illness in UK Dogs—A VetCompass Study. Veterinary Sciences, 9(5), 231. https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9050231Carter, A. J., & Hall, E. J. (2018). Investigating factors affecting the body temperature of dogs competing in cross country (canicross) races in the UK. Journal of Thermal Biology, 72, 33–38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.12.006 To Cite this podcast as: Dom Barfield. RVC Clinical Podcast 136 Heat Related Illness with Emily Hall. Published on November 18 2022 If you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch: email dbarfield@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @dombarfield. We would greatly appreciate your time to rate us on Apple podcast, podbean or Acast and kindly write us a review.  

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.16.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 62:10


Videos : Did Joe Biden Just Say That Out Loud (0:23) Bill Maher Gets B*tch Slapped By Jimmy Dore (6:00) Why the economy really sucks (blame Goldman Sachs) (10:26) Niall Ferguson – Woke Totalitarianism (0:19 to 18:14) Just in case: Is Government the New God? – The Religion of Totalitarianism (13:27) Taurine Supplementation Benefits Diabetes Patients Capital Medical University (China), October 6, 2022 People with diabetes who received taurine supplements experienced improvements in glucose and other factors, according to the results of a review and meta-analysis of clinical trials, published in Food Chemistry: Molecular Sciences.Researchers analyzed five controlled trials including 209 participants, that evaluated the effects of taurine on individuals with type I or type II diabetes. Taurine doses ranged from 500 mg daily to 1,000 mg three times per day.Participants who received taurine had lower fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, a marker of long-term glucose control), and insulin resistance, compared to those given a placebo.“Taurine emerges as a new option for the management of patients with diabetes,” the scientists asserted. (next) Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Breast Cancer Ankara Numune Research Oncology Clinic (Turkey), November 1, 2022 Most women with breast cancer were found to be deficient in vitamin D, according to the results of a study published in the journal Progress in Nutrition.Researchers analyzed the vitamin D status of 561 women, average age 55, with non-metastatic breast cancer.In this group, 81% of the women were deficient in vitamin D, and 11% had insufficient levels of the vitamin.Median 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood levels were only 13.91 ng/mL in this group of Turkish women.Optimal ranges by U.S. standards are 30-80 ng/mL. Life Extension's minimal target for 25-hydroxyvitamin D is around 50 ng/mL.The researchers concluded that vitamin D levels should be measured in breast cancer patients and low levels should be corrected whenever diagnosed. (next) Marijuana smokers show higher rates of emphysema, airway diseases than tobacco smokers University of Ottawa (Ontario), November 15, 2022 Researchers from the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital have found marijuana smokers have a higher rate of emphysema and airway diseases compared to cigarette smokers.The findings, published in Radiology, examined the chest CT examinations of 56 marijuana smokers, 57 non-smokers and 33 tobacco-only smokers between 2005 and 2020. They determined higher rates of paraseptal emphysema and airway inflammatory changes, such as bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, and mucoid impaction, in the marijuana smokers.”What's unique about this study is that there hasn't been anything comparing the imaging findings in tobacco smokers to marijuana smokers before. In fact, there is a lack of imaging research in marijuana, probably because it's still illegal in many parts of the world, and in many U.S. states, which is why I think we were the first to do a project like this.” Despite the small sample size, Revah's findings suggest that marijuana smokers saw additional effects on the lungs above tobacco alone, including more instances of large and small airways diseases. (next) Morning physical activity is associated with the lowest risk of heart disease and stroke Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands), November 14, 2022 Morning physical activity is associated with the lowest risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study in more than 85,000 individuals published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The findings were consistent regardless of the total amount of daily activity.The study included 86,657 adults aged 42 to 78 years who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. The average age was 62 years and 58% were women. Participants wore an activity tracker on their wrist for seven consecutive days. During six to eight years of follow up, 2,911 participants developed coronary artery disease and 796 had a stroke. Comparing peak activity times across a 24 hour period, being most active between 8 am and 11 am was linked with the lowest risks of both heart disease and stroke. In a second analysis, the investigators divided participants into four groups based on the peak time of physical activity: 1) midday; 2) early morning (~8 am); 3) late morning (~10 am); and 4) evening (~7 pm). The categories were selected according to peak times of activity in the study population, rather than being pre-determined before the study began.Participants who were most active in the early morning or late morning had 11% and 16% lower risks of incident coronary artery disease, respectively, compared to the reference group. In addition, those who were most active in the late morning had a 17% decreased risk of incident stroke compared with the reference group.When the results were analyzed separately according to sex, the investigators found that the results were particularly prominent in women but no longer significant in men. Women who were most active in the early morning or late morning had 22% and 24% lower risks of incident coronary artery disease, respectively, compared to the reference group. In addition, women who were most active in the late morning had a 35% decreased risk of incident stroke compared with the reference group. (next) New study shows astaxanthin is effective against daily mental and physical fatigue AstaReal Research (Japan), November 7, 2022 Japanese nutraceutical firm AstaReal says its astaxanthin has been found to be simultaneously effective against both mental and physical fatigue in a new published study. The research, published in the Journal of Clinical Therapeutics & Medicines, states that individuals were treated with astaxanthin for eight weeks in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The study was designed to induce fatigue and stress, similar to that encountered in daily life. There was a mental challenge, where individuals were subjected to a number of timed calculations (the Uchida-Kraepelin test), and a physical test with a bicycle ergometer. Metrics of fatigue were assessed both before and after the stressor tests. The study states: “Thirty-nine healthy subjects reporting awareness of fatigue were divided onto two groups. The subjects in one group (Astaxanthin group) ingested 12mg of astaxanthin and 20mg of tocotrienols for eight weeks. The other group (control group) ingested 20mg of tocotrienols for eight weeks.” Analysis showed that astaxanthin significantly reduced perceived symptoms of mental and physical fatigue compared to the placebo. These included improvements in clarity of thinking, concentration, motivation, and mood. Irritation and feeling of body heaviness were reduced. In the calculation test, an increase in errors observed in the placebo during the second half of the test was almost eliminated in the astaxanthin group. Supplementation with astaxanthin also significantly reduced salivary cortisol, a biomarker for stress. The study concludes: “The results suggest that astaxanthin supplementation has beneficial effects on fatigue encountered in daily life.” (next) High-fat diet can provoke pain sensitivity without obesity or diabetes University of Texas at Dallas, November 14, 2022 A new study in mice from researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas suggests that a short-term exposure to a high-fat diet may be linked to pain sensations even in the absence of a prior injury or a pre-existing condition like obesity or diabetes. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, compared the effects of eight weeks of different diets on two cohorts of mice. One group received normal chow, while the other was fed a high-fat diet in a way that did not precipitate the development of obesity or high blood sugar, both of which are conditions that can result in diabetic neuropathy and other types of pain. The researchers found that the high-fat diet induced hyperalgesic priming—a neurological change that represents the transition from acute to chronic pain—and allodynia, which is pain resulting from stimuli that do not normally provoke pain.

Herpetological Highlights
136 Set a course for Tiny Boa Island

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 30:59


Central American boas are the focus of this episode - we disentangle why some are large, and others are very small. Followed up by a Species of the Bi-Week with a stubby tail. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Card DC, Adams RH, Schield DR, Perry BW, Corbin AB, Pasquesi GIM, Row K, Van Kleeck MJ, Daza JM, Booth W, Montgomery CE, Boback SM, Castoe TA. 2019. Genomic Basis of Convergent Island Phenotypes in Boa Constrictors. Genome Biology and Evolution 11:3123–3143. DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evz226. Species of the Bi-Week: Oliver PM, Donnellan SC, Gunn BF. 2022. Plio–Pleistocene vicariance across arid Australia in the ‘Spiny Knob-tailed Geckos' (Nephrurus asper group), with the description of a new species from western Queensland. Australian Journal of Zoology 69:216–228. DOI: 10.1071/ZO22008. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Card, D. C., Schield, D. R., Adams, R. H., Corbin, A. B., Perry, B. W., Andrew, A. L., ... & Castoe, T. A. (2016). Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism. Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, 102, 104-116. Jack, K. M., Brown, M. R., Buehler, M. S., Cheves Hernadez, S., Ferrero Marín, N., Kulick, N. K., & Lieber, S. E. (2020). Cooperative rescue of a juvenile capuchin (Cebus imitator) from a Boa constrictor. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 1-7. Reynolds, R. G., Niemiller, M. L., & Revell, L. J. (2014). Toward a Tree-of-Life for the boas and pythons: Multilocus species-level phylogeny with unprecedented taxon sampling. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 71, 201-213. Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

Herpetological Highlights
135 I should have stayed an egg

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 24:20


A look at the world's shortest-lived tetrapod, a tiny chameleon, Labord's chameleon. What is their life like? And where do they go in the short months when they are not an egg? Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Hudel L, Kappeler PM. 2022. Sex-specific movement ecology of the shortest-lived tetrapod during the mating season. Scientific Reports 12:10053. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-022-14156-3. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Cuadrado M. 2001. Mate guarding and social mating system in male common chameleons (Chamaeleo chamaeleon). Journal of Zoology 255:425–435. DOI: 10.1017/S0952836901001510. Palmisano, J. N., Bockoven, C., McPherson, S. M., Ossiboff, R. J., Walden, H. D., & Farrell, T. M. 2022. Infection Experiments Indicate That Common Florida Anurans and Lizards May Serve as Intermediate Hosts for the Invasive Pentastome Parasite, Raillietiella orientalis. Journal of Herpetology, 56(3): 355-361. DOI: 10.1670/21-061. Other Links/Mentions: Tomato frog call from amphibiaweb.org: https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_query?where-scientific_name=Dyscophus+antongilii&rel-scientific_name=contains&include_synonymies=Yes Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.25.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:02 Very Popular


Video: 1.Putin just EXPOSED the NATO nuclear plan and they are P*SSED | Redacted w Natali and Clayton Morris  2.Reaction To PayPal Threatening To Fine Users $2,500 Over ‘Misinformation' (4:20) 3.The Genius Behind PayPal's Bad Idea (7:36) 4.Clare Daly Latest Top 7 Contributions in the EU. (First 2 of 7 ) (start @ 1:56) 5. Tulsi Gabbard Speech LIVE | Tulsi Gabbard Accuses Joe Biden | US News Latest | English News LIVE   Polyphenol consumption in adolescents is associated with better cardiovascular health University of Barcelona (Spain), October 24, 2022 The consumption of polyphenols in adolescents is associated with a better cardiovascular health, according to a collaborative research study which includes the University of Barcelona. The study has been published in Scientific Reports. As part of the study, the researchers analyzed the amount of polyphenols in the urine of 1,326 adolescents that took part in the SI! Program (Integral Health) of 24 secondary education schools in Madrid and Barcelona. Polyphenols are bioactive compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties found in several plant-based foods, mainly in fruit, vegetables, nuts and olive oil. To date, there were few studies on the intake of polyphenols in children and adolescents. “With the results of this study, we observed that a higher urinary polyphenol excretion is linearly associated with a higher cardiovascular health index in adolescents aged 11-14, specially in children. This cardiovascular health index is defined by the criteria established by the American Heart Association (AHA), which considers seven variables: body mass index, physical activity, smoking, diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol and blood glucose,” says Professor Rosa M Lamuela, director of the Institute for Research in Nutrition and Food Safety of the University of Barcelona NAC supplements may benefit cardiovascular health: Human data University of Marburg (Germany), October 16, 2022 Four weeks of supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may reduce levels of homocysteine and improve blood pressure, says a new analysis of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. A daily dose of 1.8 grams of NAC could lower homocysteine levels by about 12%, and may improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure, according to findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . Elevated levels of the amino acid homocysteine have been reported to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This has led some to point to the potential of the B-vitamins to reduce homocysteine levels and reduce the risk of CVD. B vitamins are cofactors for enzymes involved in homocysteine metabolism and therefore giving people vitamin B supplements is hypothesized to reduce homocysteine levels and therefore reduce cognitive impairment. However, clinical trials including participants at risk of, or already suffering from, cardiovascular disease have produced null results, with some experts arguing that short term B vitamin supplementation should not be expected to reverse the long-term development of heart disease. “Because recent analyses that controlled for confounders such as statins or folate fortification detected a benefit of folate/B-vitamins for stroke (22–24), homocysteine may conditionally be a therapeutic target,” wrote the authors of the new study, led by Prof Wulf Hildebrandt, formerly with the German Cancer Research Center and now at the University of Marburg (Germany). “Therefore, an alternative agent for (more) effective homocysteine lowering may be desirable, especially for conditions in which B-vitamins are ineffective [e.g., in renal disease] or if a reduction in homocysteine of >25% is intended.” There is a known link between homocysteine and NAC, and some studies have shown that NAC may reduce levels of the amino acid, but the data is somewhat mixed. Results showed that NAC supplementation significant decreased homocysteine levels by an average of 11.7% (versus 4.1% in the placebo groups), which cysteine levels increased by an average of 28.1% (versus 4% in the placebo groups). There were no significant differences between the hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic men, and the smoking status also did not affect the results. The researchers also found that NAC significantly decreased blood pressure in all the men. However, significant decreases in diastolic BP were observed only for the hyperlipidemic men, and not for the normolipidemic men. Study: Late afternoon exercise helps control blood sugar, cholesterol and triglyceride levels Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China), October 22, 2022 Results of a study published in the journal Front Endocrinol show that exercising at around 4 to 6 p.m. helps to control blood sugar, cholesterol and triglyceride levels better than exercising in the morning, or around 9 to 11 a.m. For the study, researchers observed 12 healthy young men. The volunteers were told to walk on a treadmill for one hour at 60 percent of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The volunteers were all tested during and after a week of exercising only in the morning or just in the afternoon. After continuous 24-hour monitoring of their blood sugar levels, the total blood sugar levels of the men were lower when they exercised in the afternoon. Their blood sugar levels after meals were also lower following afternoon exercise. Most cell damage from high blood sugar is linked to a high rise in blood sugar at least one to two hours after eating a meal. The volunteers' triglyceride levels were also lower after afternoon exercise. This is crucial since your blood sugar level rises after you eat. If it rises too high, sugar sticks to cell membranes and damages them. That's why diabetes can damage every cell in your body. When your blood sugar level increases, your pancreas releases insulin to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high. Insulin lowers blood sugar by then driving sugar from the bloodstream into the liver. But if your liver is full of sugar, the liver does not accept more sugar and all the extra sugar is converted to fatty triglycerides. Having a blood triglyceride level greater than 150 indicates that your blood sugar rises too high after meals and that you are already diabetic or prediabetic. Blood levels of the good high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were also higher after afternoon exercise. When triglycerides rise too high, you are at increased risk for clots. To protect your body from a high rise in triglycerides, your HDL cholesterol carries the triglycerides from your bloodstream into your liver and a high rise in triglycerides causes a drop in blood levels of the HDL cholesterol. So the lower your HDL, the more likely you are to suffer a heart attack. Scientists reveal the relationship between sugar and cancer Flanders Institute for Biotechnology, October 16, 2022 A nine-year joint research project has led to a crucial breakthrough in cancer research. Scientists have clarified how the Warburg effect, a phenomenon in which cancer cells rapidly break down sugars, stimulates tumor growth. This discovery provides evidence for a positive correlation between sugar and cancer, which may have far-reaching impacts on tailor-made diets for cancer patients. The research has been published in the leading academic journal Nature Communications. This project main focus was the Warburg effect, or the observation that tumors convert significantly higher amounts of sugar into lactate compared to healthy tissues. As one of the most prominent features of cancer cells, this phenomenon has been extensively studied and even used to detect brain tumors, among other applications. But thus far, it has been unclear whether the effect is merely a symptom of cancer, or a cause. Prof. Johan Thevelein (VIB-KU Leuven): “Our research reveals how the hyperactive sugar consumption of cancerous cells leads to a vicious cycle of continued stimulation of cancer development and growth. Thus, it is able to explain the correlation between the strength of the Warburg effect and tumor aggressiveness. This link between sugar and cancer has sweeping consequences. Our results provide a foundation for future research in this domain, which can now be performed with a much more precise and relevant focus.” Living with others and community engagement are keys to reduced dementia risk University of New South Wales (Australia), October 24, 2022 Research published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity provides evidence to support that living with others, community group engagement and never feeling lonely are associated with slower cognitive decline. It is widely recognized that poor social connections such as small networks, infrequent interactions, and loneliness are modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline, with the 2020 Lancet Commission on dementia prevention estimating that tackling social isolation could prevent 4% of dementia cases worldwide. This research, led by UNSW Sydney's Centre for Healthy Brain Aging (CHeBA), investigated a range of measures of social connectedness to discover which had the most robust findings in relation to risk reduction of cognitive decline—and dementia. “We looked at a range of measures of social connections, in approximately 40,000 people across 13 international studies,” says lead author Dr. Suraj Samtani, Postdoctoral Fellow and social health expert at CHeBA. “Previous analyses of multiple international studies have many limitations. Co-author and CHeBA Co-Director Professor Henry Brodaty said that the findings have socio-economic significance. “We found that sharing a home with one or more person[s] and weekly community group engagement had the most robust results across studies, indicating these factors are fundamental components in the link with less cognitive decline,” says Professor Brodaty. “We also identified an association between never feeling lonely and a slower rate of cognitive decline.” Carrots Do Help Aging Eyes, Study Shows University of Utah School of Medicine, October 21, 2022 Your parents may have told you, “Eat your carrots, they're good for your eyes,” and a new study suggests they were on to something. Pigments called carotenoids — which give red or orange hues to carrots, sweet potatoes and orange peppers, or deep greens to produce like spinach, broccoli and kale — may help ward off the age-linked vision ailment known as macular degeneration, researchers said. “I tell my patients that fruit and vegetable consumption are very important for eye health — this study validates that notion,” said Dr. Paul Bernstein, a professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the most common causes of vision loss, especially in the elderly. It affects the macula, the center part of the retina, and can lead to declines in sharp central vision and even blindness, experts say. Scientists have already linked a variety of factors to the condition including genetics, smoking and nutrition, said Bernstein, who was not involved in the new study. However, treatment for AMD may be limited depending on the type of macular degeneration that a person develops, he said. In the new study, Wu's team looked at data from health surveys that tracked people aged 50 and older — more than 63,000 women and almost 39,000 men -over a 25 year period. Participants were all nurses and other health professionals. Overall, about 2.5 percent of study participants developed either intermediate or advanced forms of the eye condition during the years of the study. Wu's team found that people who consumed the very highest levels of carotenoids known as lutein and zeaxanthin had a 40 percent lower risk of the advanced form of AMD compared to those who ate the very least. “Other carotenoids, including beta cryptoxanthin, alpha carotene and beta carotene, may also play protective roles,” Wu added. People who consumed the very highest amount of these carotenoids — found in foods such as carrots and sweet potato — had a 25 to 35 percent lower risk of the advanced form of the illness, the findings showed. Researchers did not find any link between the carotenoids and the intermediate form of macular degeneration, however. Lutein is found in eggs and dark leafy vegetables including broccoli, kale and spinach, Bernstein said. Zeaxanthin is harder to find in the diet, he said, but you can get it from corn, orange peppers and goji berries. Wu noted that both lutein and zeaxanthin concentrate in the macula, where they are thought to protect it from damage from oxygen and light.

Brain Health and Beyond with Team Sherzai, MD
Dispelling Brain Health Misunderstandings: A Response to Joe Rogan and Max Lugavere

Brain Health and Beyond with Team Sherzai, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 169:58 Very Popular


This episode is dedicated to clarification of a podcast between Joe Rogan and Max Lugavere, two popular influencers that have a large audience. They discussed Alzheimer's disease and brain health in general and some of the information that was shared was not accurate, which can be really harmful. This is by no means an attack on Rogan or Lugavere. After listening to the conversation, we think Lugavere may not be quite familiar with the data regarding brain health, and it would be important to set the record straight and share the evidence with people and let them decide what's best for them. Having seen thousands of patients with dementia, whether it's Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia, Lewy Body Dementia and others, we feel it's our responsibility to share evidence based data as opposed to feel-good, self confirming anecdotes. Relevant references: Ketogenic Diet: Phillips, M. C et al. (2021). Randomized crossover trial of a modified ketogenic diet in Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's research & therapy, 13(1), 1-12. Lilamand, M et al. (2022). Efficacy and Safety of Ketone Supplementation or Ketogenic Diets for Alzheimer's Disease: A Mini Review. Frontiers in Nutrition, 1324. Włodarek, D. (2021). Food for thought: the emerging role of a ketogenic diet in Alzheimer's disease management. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 21(7), 727-730. Cronjé, H et al. (2021). Ketogenic therapies in mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Current Opinion in Lipidology, 32(5), 330-332. LDL Cholesterol metabolism and risk of Alzheimer's: Andrews, S et al., collaborators of the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium. (2021). Causal associations between modifiable risk factors and the Alzheimer's phenome. Annals of neurology, 89(1), 54-65. Olmastroni, E et al. (2022). Statin use and risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 29(5), 804-814. Iwagami, M et al. (2021). Blood cholesterol and risk of dementia in more than 1· 8 million people over two decades: a retrospective cohort study. The Lancet Healthy Longevity, 2(8), e498-e506. Tan, Z. S et al. (2003). Plasma total cholesterol level as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: the Framingham Study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163(9), 1053-1057. Kivipelto, M et al. (2002). Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele, elevated midlife total cholesterol level, and high midlife systolic blood pressure are independent risk factors for late-life Alzheimer disease. Annals of internal medicine, 137(3), 149-155. Zhou, Z et al. (2020). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Frontiers in aging neuroscience, 12, 5. Sáiz-Vazquez, O et al. (2020). Cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease risk: a meta-meta-analysis. Brain sciences, 10(6), 386. Wingo, A. P et al. (2022). LDL cholesterol is associated with higher AD neuropathology burden independent of APOE. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 93(9), 930-938. The Nigerian Paradox Study: Hall, K et al. (2006). Cholesterol, APOE genotype, and Alzheimer disease: an epidemiologic study of Nigerian Yoruba. Neurology, 66(2), 223-227. Vascular health and Alzheimer's disease: Levit, A et al. (2020). Neurovascular unit dysregulation, white matter disease, and executive dysfunction: the shared triad of vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Geroscience, 42(2), 445-465. The Effect of Lifestyle on Alzheimer's Risk: Dhana, K et al. (2020). Healthy lifestyle and the risk of Alzheimer dementia: Findings from 2 longitudinal studies. Neurology, 95(4), e374-e383.  Risk Reduction of Cognitive Decline and Dementia: WHO Guidelines. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2019.  https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/312180/9789241550543-eng.pdf. Accessed December 4, 2019. MIND Diet: Morris, M. C et al. (2015). MIND diet associated with reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 11(9), 1007-1014. Morris, M. C et al. (2015). MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging. Alzheimer's & dementia, 11(9), 1015-1022. van den Brink, A. C et al. (2019). The Mediterranean, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diets are associated with less cognitive decline and a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease—a review. Advances in Nutrition, 10(6), 1040-1065. Kheirouri, S., & Alizadeh, M. (2021). MIND diet and cognitive performance in older adults: a systematic review. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 1-19. Hosking, D. E et al. (2019). MIND not Mediterranean diet related to 12-year incidence of cognitive impairment in an Australian longitudinal cohort study. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 15(4), 581-589. Melo van Lent, D et al. (2021). Mind diet adherence and cognitive performance in the Framingham heart study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 82(2), 827-839. Dhana, K et al. (2021). MIND diet, common brain pathologies, and cognition in community-dwelling older adults. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 83(2), 683-692. Thomas, A et al. (2022). Association of a MIND Diet with Brain Structure and Dementia in a French Population. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, 1-10. Arjmand, G et al. (2022). Effect of MIND diet intervention on cognitive performance and brain structure in healthy obese women: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific Reports, 12(1), 1-14. Nutrition and Dementia Prevention: Yassine, H. N et al. (2022). Nutrition state of science and dementia prevention: recommendations of the Nutrition for Dementia Prevention Working Group. The Lancet Healthy Longevity, 3(7), e501-e512. Scarmeas, N et al. (2018). Nutrition and prevention of cognitive impairment. The Lancet Neurology, 17(11), 1006-1015.   Publications by Lugavere's mentor, Dr. Richard Isaacson: Isaacson, R. S et al. (2019). Individualized clinical management of patients at risk for Alzheimer's dementia. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 15(12), 1588-1602. Amini, Y., Saif, N., Greer, C., Hristov, H., & Isaacson, R. (2020). The role of nutrition in individualized Alzheimer's risk reduction. Current nutrition reports, 9(2), 55-63.  Isaacson, R. S. (2019). Advances in early diagnosis and treatment strategies in the management of Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Managed Care Medicine, 22(4), 17-21. Berkowitz, C. L., Mosconi, L., Rahman, A., Scheyer, O., Hristov, H., & Isaacson, R. S. (2018). Clinical application of APOE in Alzheimer's prevention: a precision medicine approach. The journal of prevention of Alzheimer's disease, 5(4), 245-252. BOOK: The Alzheimer's Prevention & Treatment Diet: Using Nutrition to Combat the Effects of Alzheimer's Disease. Isaacson, R. S., & Ochner, C. N. (2016). Square One Publishers, Inc. Podcast episodes mentioned: The Proof with Simon Hill: The carnivore diet, veganism and nutrition misinformation | Dr Alan Flanagan.  The Proof with Simon Hill: Debate: Seed Oils And Heart Disease | Tucker Goodrich And Dr Matthew Nagra   Our publications relevant to this topic: Sherzai, A., Edland, S. D., Masliah, E., Hansen, L., Pizzo, D. P., Sherzai, A., & Corey-Bloom, J. (2013). Spongiform change in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 27(2), 157-161. Whitehair, D. C., Sherzai, A., Emond, J., Raman, R., Aisen, P. S., Petersen, R. C., & Fleisher, A. S. (2010). Influence of apolipoprotein E ɛ4 on rates of cognitive and functional decline in mild cognitive impairment. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 6(5), 412-419. Lazar, E., Sherzai, A., Adeghate, J., & Sherzai, D. (2021). Gut dysbiosis, insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease: review of a novel approach to neurodegeneration. Frontiers in Bioscience-Scholar, 13(1), 17-29. Sherzai, D., & Sherzai, A. (2019). Preventing Alzheimer's: Our most urgent health care priority. American journal of lifestyle medicine, 13(5), 451-461. Sherzai, A. Z., Sherzai, A. N., & Sherzai, D. (2022). A Systematic Review of Omega-3 Consumption and Neuroprotective Cognitive Outcomes. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 15598276221117102. Sherzai, D., Sherzai, A., & Sherzai, A. (2022). Lifestyle Intervention and Alzheimer Disease. The Journal of Family Practice, 71(1 Suppl Lifestyle), eS83-eS89. Sherzai, D., Sherzai, A., Lui, K., Pan, D., Chiou, D., Bazargan, M., & Shaheen, M. (2016). The association between diabetes and dementia among elderly individuals: a nationwide inpatient sample analysis. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 29(3), 120-125. Sherzai, A., Sherzai, D., Pilot, M., & Ovbiagele, B. (2016). Prevalence of the Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Dementia, Non-Alzheimer's Dementia and Vascular Dementia Among Hospitalized Stroke Patients: A National Inpatient Sample Analysis, 1999-2012 (P1. 125).   Follow us on social media: Instagram: The Brain Docs @thebraindocs Facebook: The Brain Docs Website: TheBrainDocs.com

Naruhodo
Naruhodo #356 - Prêmio IgNobel 2022 - Parte 2 de 2

Naruhodo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 51:44


Chegou o momento do já tradicional episódio duplo sobre o IgNobel, que tem como missão "honrar estudos e experiências que primeiro fazem as pessoas rir e depois pensar", com as descobertas científicas mais estranhas do ano.Esta é a segunda e última parte sobre a edição 2022 do prêmio, trazendo as categorias Engenharia, História da Arte, Física, Economia e o IgNobel da Paz.Confira no papo entre o leigo curioso, Ken Fujioka, e o cientista PhD, Altay de Souza.> OUÇA (51min 44s)*Naruhodo! é o podcast pra quem tem fome de aprender. Ciência, senso comum, curiosidades, desafios e muito mais. Com o leigo curioso, Ken Fujioka, e o cientista PhD, Altay de Souza.Edição: Reginaldo Cursino.http://naruhodo.b9.com.br*PARCERIA: ALURAAprofunde-se de vez: garantimos conhecimento com profundidade e diversidade, para se tornar um profissional em T - incluindo programação, front-end, data science, devops, ux & design, mobile, inovação & gestão.Navegue sua carreira: são mais de 1300 cursos e novos lançamentos toda semana, além de atualizações e melhorias constantes.Conteúdo imersivo: faça parte de uma comunidade de apaixonados por tudo que é digital. Mergulhe na comunidade Alura.Aproveite o desconto para ouvintes Naruhodo no link:https://bit.ly/naruhodo_alura*CATEGORIAS PARTE 2Prêmio Engenharia [JAPÃO]Gen Matsuzaki, Kazuo Ohuchi, Masaru Uehara, Yoshiyuki Ueno, and Goro Imura por tentar descobrir a maneira mais eficiente de as pessoas usarem os dedos ao girar um botão.Prêmio de História da Arte [THE NETHERLANDS, GUATEMALA, USA, AUSTRIA]Peter de Smet and Nicholas Hellmuth por seu estudo “Uma abordagem multidisciplinar para cenas rituais de enema na cerâmica antiga Maia”.Prêmio de Física [CHINA, UK, TURKEY, USA]Frank Fish, Zhi-Ming Yuan, Minglu Chen, Laibing Jia, Chunyan Ji, and Atilla Incecik por tentar entender como os patinhos conseguem nadar em formação.Prêmio de Economia [ITALIA]Alessandro Pluchino, Alessio Emanuele Biondo, and Andrea Rapisarda para explicar, matematicamente, por que o sucesso na maioria das vezes não vai para as pessoas mais talentosas, mas sim para as mais sortudas.Prêmio IgNobel da Paz [CHINA, HUNGARY, CANADA, THE NETHERLANDS, UK, ITALY, AUSTRALIA, SWITZERLAND, USA]Junhui Wu, Szabolcs Számadó, Pat Barclay, Bianca Beersma, Terence Dores Cruz, Sergio Lo Iacono, Annika Nieper, Kim Peters, Wojtek Przepiorka, Leo Tiokhin and Paul Van Lange para desenvolver um algoritmo para ajudar os fofoqueiros a decidir quando dizer a verdade e quando mentir.*REFERÊNCIAS“Physiological Synchrony is Associated with Attraction in a Blind Date Setting,” Eliska Prochazkova, Elio Sjak-Shie, Friederike Behrens, Daniel Lindh, and Mariska E. Kret, Nature Human Behaviour, vol. 6, no. 2, 2022, pp. 269-278.“Poor Writing, Not Specialized Concepts, Drives Processing Difficulty in Legal Language,” Eric Martínez, Francis Mollica, and Edward Gibson, Cognition, vol. 224, July 2022, 105070.“Short- and Long-Term Effects of an Extreme Case of Autotomy: Does ‘Tail' Loss and Subsequent Constipation Decrease the Locomotor Performance of Male and Female Scorpions?” Solimary García-Hernández and Glauco Machado, Integrative Zoology, epub 2021.“Fitness Implications of Nonlethal Injuries in Scorpions: Females, but Not Males, Pay Reproductive Costs,” Solimary García-Hernández and Glauco Machado, American Naturalist, vol. 197, no. 3, March 2021, pp. 379-389.‘Tail' Autotomy and Consequent Stinger Loss Decrease Predation Success in Scorpions,” Solimary García-Hernández and Glauco Machado, Animal Behaviour, vol. 169, 2020, pp. 157-167.“Ice-Cream Used as Cryotherapy During High-Dose Melphalan Conditioning Reduces Oral Mucositis After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation,” Marcin Jasiński, Martyna Maciejewska, Anna Brodziak, Michał Górka, Kamila Skwierawska, Wiesław W. Jędrzejczak, Agnieszka Tomaszewska, Grzegorz W. Basak, and Emilian Snarski, Scientific Reports, vol. 11, no. 22507, 2021.“How to Use Fingers during Rotary Control of Columnar Knobs,” Gen Matsuzaki, Kazuo Ohuchi, Masaru Uehara, Yoshiyuki Ueno, and Goro Imura, Bulletin of Japanese Society for the Science of Design, vol. 45, no. 5, 1999, pp. 69-76.“Experimental Studies on the Rotary Control of Columnar Knobs — The Number of Fingers used at the Time of starting Rotary Control,” Gen Matsuzaki, Goro Imura, and Maseru Uehara, Proceedings of the Third Asia Design Conference, 1998, pp. 37-40.“A Multidisciplinary Approach to Ritual Enema Scenes on Ancient Maya Pottery,” Peter A.G.M. de Smet and Nicholas M. Hellmuth, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 16, no. 2-3, 1986, pp. 213-262.“Energy Conservation by Formation Swimming: Metabolic Evidence from Ducklings,” Frank E. Fish, in the book Mechanics and Physiology of Animal Swimming, 1994, pp. 193-204.“Wave-Riding and Wave-Passing by Ducklings in Formation Swimming,” Zhi-Ming Yuan, Minglu Chen, Laibing Jia, Chunyan Ji, and Atilla Incecik, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 928, no. R2, 2021.“Honesty and Dishonesty in Gossip Strategies: A Fitness Interdependence Analysis,” Junhui Wu, Szabolcs Számadó, Pat Barclay, Bianca Beersma, Terence D. Dores Cruz, Sergio Lo Iacono, Annika S. Nieper, Kim Peters, Wojtek Przepiorka, Leo Tiokhin and Paul A.M. Van Lange, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, vol. 376, no. 1838, 2021, 20200300.“Talent vs. Luck: The Role of Randomness in Success and Failure,” Alessandro Pluchino, Alessio Emanuele Biondo, and Andrea Rapisarda, Advances in Complex Systems, vol. 21, nos. 3 and 4, 2018.“Moose Crash Test Dummy,” Magnus Gens, Master's thesis at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, published by the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, 2001.Naruhodo #338 - Por que fofocamos?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ij9ocesTc50&ab_channel=Cient%C3%ADstica%26PodcastNaruhodo*APOIE O NARUHODO PELA PLATAFORMA ORELO!Um aviso importantíssimo: o podcast Naruhodo agora está no Orelo: https://bit.ly/naruhodo-no-oreloE é por meio dessa plataforma de apoio aos criadores de conteúdo que você ajuda o Naruhodo a se manter no ar.Você escolhe um valor de contribuição mensal e tem acesso a conteúdos exclusivos, conteúdos antecipados e vantagens especiais.Além disso, você pode ter acesso ao nosso grupo fechado no Telegram, e conversar comigo, com o Altay e com outros apoiadores.E não é só isso: toda vez que você ouvir ou fizer download de um episódio pelo Orelo, vai também estar pingando uns trocadinhos para o nosso projeto.Então, baixe agora mesmo o app Orelo no endereço Orelo.CC ou na sua loja de aplicativos e ajude a fortalecer o conhecimento científico.https://bit.ly/naruhodo-no-orelo