Podcasts about JS

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Latest podcast episodes about JS

Lehman Ave Church of Christ
”What Is That In Your Hand?” by Neal Pollard

Lehman Ave Church of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 30:01


September 25, 2022 - Sunday AM Sermon   "What Is That In Your Hand?" - (Exodus 4:1-5) Neal Pollard A. Can You Imagine Having _________ With The _______ Of It All? B. As With Moses, God Asks Us, "What Is That In Your Hand?" I. THERE IS _____________ "IN OUR HAND" (2)  A. For Moses, That Was A _________  B. We All Hold _______________ In Our Hands, Too. What? II. GOD WANTS US TO ______ SOMETHING WITH IT (3)  A. Sometimes We Say The ________ Isn't Right (Jn. 4:35; Hag. 1:2-4; 2 Ki. 7:9)  B. Sometimes We Belittle Our _________ (Nu. 13:31; Acts 17:25; Js. 1:17; Mt. 25:34)  C. Sometimes We Minimize Or Misuse Our ______________ (Ec. 7:8) III. GOD CAN DO ________ _________ WITH IT (3-4)  A. If It's Your ______, Look What God Can Do With It  B. If It's Your ________, Look What God Can Do With It  C. If It's Your ___________, Look At What God Can Do With I  (Exodus 4:5 Proves There's A _________ To The Thing In Our Hand)   Duration 30:02

Eclectically Sexual Sounds
Season Seven Finale - Episode 20: "Heauxs Tell, Pt. 3"

Eclectically Sexual Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 25:56


As Season Seven comes to an end, JS is wrapping up the season with the last heaux tale...and boy is it a doozy! How would you react? What...would you do? Take a seat, because this one will make you jump out of it!

How I Grew This
[Greatest Hits] Chief Growth Officer at Tilting Point: Jean-Sebastien Laverge - Driving Growth in the Gaming Industry

How I Grew This

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 24:05


Jean-Sebastien Laverge, the Chief Growth Officer at Tilting Point, joins us in the next episode of How I Grew This podcast. As a CGO, JS oversees more than forty game titles. Before Tilting Point, he worked for twelve years at Gameloft, where he helped generate significant annual revenues by developing retention and monetization strategies. Tilting Point is a leading award-winning free-to-play games publisher that empowers independent developers to accelerate their growth. It started as a premium game publisher then shifted to the freemium model. The team has now built a new model called progressive publishing. Some of the company's most successful games include Star Trek Timelines, Warhammer: Chaos & Conquest, and SpongeBob: Krusty Cook-Off. Tilting Point approaches growth in three directions. Firstly, paid growth, which is about user acquisition. Secondly, organic growth includes ASO, distribution platform optimization, IP integration, and marketing buzz. And lastly, monetization growth improves the user's LTV. Some of the most impactful paid channels remain Facebook and Google. When you synchronize the three axes you can unlock maximum growth for your game. According to JS, to engage and bring people back into the game, you can advertise specific offers or push notifications and emails. If you want to start in the gaming industry, you need to be passionate about it, be analytical, and understand data and statistics. If you are a leader in the gaming industry, be transparent and find good talent to help and support you.

Daily UI/UX Inspirationals
EP3 Twitter Bootstrap

Daily UI/UX Inspirationals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 32:33


A look into Twitter Bootstrap CSS and JS library. I share some background and lot of rumbling

COMPRESSEDfm
84 | Building a SvelteKit Wordle Clone

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:14


In this episode, James talks about his experience using SvelteKit to re-create the famous guessing game, Wordle.SponsorsZEALZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit codingzeal.comVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes00:00:00 - Intro00:03:57 - Svelte vs SvelteKit and Wordle00:10:29 - Sponsor: Vercel00:11:36 - How Wordle Works00:15:51 - SvelteKit Stores for Game State00:19:01 - Sponsor: Zeal00:19:53 - More on Game State00:21:33 - Working with LocalStorage00:27:43 - Creating the Keyboard00:29:53- Game Logic for Guessing Letter00:31:12 - Sponsor: DatoCMS00:32:05 - Color-coded Feedback On Guesses00:36:46 - Adding Transitions on Guessed Letters00:38:19 - Custom Overlay and Alert Components00:47:17 - Grab Bag Questions00:50:20 - Picks and PlugsLinksSource Code - https://github.com/jamesqquick/sveltekit-wordle-cloneWordle Game - https://www.nytimes.com/games/wordle/index.html(Amy Plug) Advent of CSS - https://adventofcss.com/(Amy Plug #2) Advent of JS - https://adventofcss.com/(James Pick) - https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Charging-Case-Compatible-Microphones/dp/B09C1G9Z1D(James Plug) - https://www.youtube.com/c/jamesqquick

Mintymist Talks About Warrior Cats
Remaking "Talking about Firestar"!

Mintymist Talks About Warrior Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 4:51


This is my remake of my first episode. Js it better/worst than the original? Answer the Q&A with your opinion!!!!

Musik für einen Gast
Annedore Neufeld - Dirigentin

Musik für einen Gast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 64:31


Annedore Neufeld ist Chefdirigentin der Basler Münsterkantorei, des Zürcher Bach Chores und des Kammerorchesters des Musik-Collegiums Schaffhausen. Zudem hat sie kürzlich das Sinfonische Orchester Schweiz SOS gegründet. In Süddeutschland geboren wuchs Annedore Neufeld in einer musikalischen Familie auf. Bereits als junges Mädchen war sie als Organistin tätig, ihre kirchenmusikalische Ausbildung schloss sie mit nur 15 Jahren ab. Später fokussierte sie auf die Fächer Chor- und Orchesterdirigieren und studierte in Stuttgart, Tübingen, Berlin und Zürich. In zahlreichen Workshops und Meisterkursen im In- und Ausland sammelte sie Erfahrungen und verfeinerte ihr Können. Zu den Sternstunden ihrer beruflichen Karriere zählt sie ihre erste h-Moll-Messe mit dem Københavns Bachkor, Mendelssohns Reformationssinfonie mit dem Kammerorchester Basel, Bachs Matthäuspassion zum 1000-Jahr-Jubiläum des Basler Münsters, sowie die Zusammenarbeit mit musikalischen Grössen wie Fazil Say oder Miriam Feuersinger, die an ihrem Festival «5 x Bach um 5» mit dabei war. Mit der Gründung des Sinfonischen Orchesters Schweiz möchte Neufeld jungen Musikerinnen und Musikern zwischen Studium und Beruf zu Auftrittsmöglichkeiten verhelfen. Annedore Neufelds Musikwünsche umfassen Werke von J. S. Bach, Sergej Rachmaninow, Einojuhani Rautavaara, Frank Martin und Keith Jarrett.

Lectio Divina Dominical
Setembro: Mês da Bíblia (T1E16)

Lectio Divina Dominical

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 1:07


"O Senhor é o nosso Deus, ele que nos tirou, a nós e a nossos pais, da terra do Egito, da casa da servidão; e que operou à nossa vista maravilhosos prodígios e guardou-nos ao longo de todo o caminho que percorremos, entre todos os povos pelos quais passamos" (Js 24, 17) • Percebo a ação de Deus em minha vida? O que tenho feito como gratidão? Produção: Grupo de Leitura Orante (Jataizinho/PR) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ldd/message

Changelog Master Feed
Smile! HTML can access your camera (JS Party #243)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 66:36


Austin Gil joins the show and KBall continues an old email correspondence about the JS community and growth. Then, the gang plays a round of TIL where Austin shares his learnings about the HTML capture attribute. Finally, Austin shares what it's like to have a blog post blow up.

JS Party
Smile! HTML can access your camera

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 66:36


Austin Gil joins the show and KBall continues an old email correspondence about the JS community and growth. Then, the gang plays a round of TIL where Austin shares his learnings about the HTML capture attribute. Finally, Austin shares what it's like to have a blog post blow up.

Healthy Lifestyle Made Simple​ With Rimon N. Lumen
RESVERATROL MYSTERY: Why Taking Too Much HURTS Your Longevity

Healthy Lifestyle Made Simple​ With Rimon N. Lumen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 28:39


If you take resveratrol… did you know resveratrol works differently in your body depending on how much you take every day? If you're not careful about how you take resveratrol, you may achieve completely different benefits from the ones you intended! I couldn't believe it either until I saw it too. And it is one of resveratrol's biggest secret. And it's kept within its polyphenol family. Which includes fisetin, quercetin, pterostilbene, and others. This secret is one that was never covered in any other place, guaranteed. You will clearly see what these powerful molecules do to our bodies and even to our DNA after we take them. We'll answer the following questions: 1. And if, in Sinclair's study, the small dose resveratrol lived longer in both groups,why this sudden change of impact when going to high resveratrol? 2. What does resveratrol do to cancer cells? Is resveratrol a good supplement to kill cancer? Let's continue with our investigation. If you missed previous videos of the investigation: ✅ Part 1: David Sinclair Study on Resveratrol: Fascinating Discovery https://youtu.be/Js_l_G1x8V4 ✅ Part 2: "How RESVERATROL affects your heart?" https://youtu.be/yT4rqxADvQI ✅ Part 3: Could JUST 1mg of RESVERATROL Affect Your Longevity? https://youtu.be/XFgSA7gbtus ✅ Part 4: RESVERATROL Impact On Metabolism: 2021 Human Study https://youtu.be/MNO4U5wbF08---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ✅ Become a channel member on Patreon: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/WellnessMessiah --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wellnessmessiah/message

NBC PODSCAT
A-z serie de música instrumental Para Trabajar

NBC PODSCAT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 50:20


Cordial saludo desde la cabina de nbc podcast presentamos a ustedes esta serie de música instrumental Te saluda Js. Suárez --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

React Round Up
The Controversies Panelist Episode - RRU 197

React Round Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 54:12


In today's all panelist episode we address web development controversies: state management tools, CSS in JS, GraphQL or REST, and, of course, tabs versus spaces. And the rule is: there's no saying "It depends." Listen to the panelists take hard line stances on things that matter (and things that don't), and try to defend their choices. It's a fun episode for everyone, and we'd love to hear about your own controversial coding decisions.  Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs LinksDiscord - A New Way to Chat with Friends & CommunitiesPicks Jack- Solo Stove Paige- BULLET TRAIN TJ- Portal Companion Collection for Nintendo Switch - Nintendo Official Site

Mordlust
#103 Der Kampf danach

Mordlust

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 89:02


Triggerwarnung: Im zweiten Fall geht es um sexualisierte Gewalt. Der Staat ist verpflichtet, Opfer von Gewalttaten zu entschädigen, wenn er sie nicht schützen konnte. Doch genau dagegen verwehrt er sich in vielen Fällen. In dieser Folge von „Mordlust - Verbrechen und ihre Hintergründe“ geht es um das, was nach der Tat passiert. Es wird gefeiert, angestoßen und auf sein Wohl getrunken. Daniel ist auf dem Geburtstag eines Freundes eingeladen. Doch wenig später ist er in der Menge verschwunden und taucht auch nicht mehr wieder auf. Nichts ungewöhnliches für ihn, er macht öfter mal einen „Polnischen“. Doch dann wird der 23-Jährige wenig später stark verletzt auf der Autobahn gefunden. Wie er dahin gekommen ist und was mit ihm passiert ist, kann er selbst nicht beantworten. Tanja liebt es von einer Kneipe zur nächsten zu ziehen. An diesem Freitagabend lernt die 32-Jährige in einer Bar auf der Schönleinstraße in Berlin dann einen jungen Mann kennen. Es wird angestoßen und ein Drink nach dem anderen gekippt. Und so bekommt Tanja immer weniger mit, was um sie herum geschieht. Auch nicht, dass sie gegen 5 Uhr morgens die Kneipe mit dem Fremden verlässt. Doch es dauert nicht lange, da wird sie wieder klar: Denn plötzlich findet sich Tanja unter dem Gewicht des Mannes wieder, der seine Hände um ihren Hals schließt. Die beiden Fälle zeigen, dass es noch einen Kampf „danach“ gibt. Gegen Ämter und um die Anerkennung dessen, was den Betroffenen zugestoßen ist. In dieser Folge zeigen wir wie es für die Opfer ist, durch den Staat ein zweites Mal in diese Rolle gedrängt zu werden. **Kapitel** 00:05:47 - Fall “Daniel” 00:34:07 - Aha: Wer hat Anspruch? 00:39:53 - Dritte Schockschäden 00:43:56 - Fall “Tanja” 01:11:58 - Aha: Leistungen & Grad der Schädigungsfolgen 01:15:32 - Was macht das OEG-Verfahren mit den Opfern? 01:17:51 - Ablehnungsquote 01:22:15 - Der Weiße Ring **Shownotes** *Beratungsstellen & Informationen für Anträge* BMAS: Opferentschädigungsrecht: https://bit.ly/3d5eO01 Hilfetelfon: https://bit.ly/2zpno1C Verkehrsopferhilfe: https://bit.ly/3d82iwy BMJ: Übersicht Traumaambulanzen: https://bit.ly/3S2dhXs ODABS: Wurden Sie Opfer einer Straftat?: https://bit.ly/3U37HWp *Fall “Daniel”* Dieser Fall ist in Zusammenarbeit mit der Journalistin Aylin Mercan produziert worden, die engen Kontakt zur Mutter von Daniel pflegt. Express: Bonner Kriminalfall bei “Aktenzeichen XY”: https://bit.ly/3S0W4O4 TZ: Schwer verletzt auf Autobahn entdeckt: https://bit.ly/3DlTrCm *Aha: Wer hat Anspruch? * JuraForum: OEG: https://bit.ly/3dausHe Rechtsindex: Opferentschädigung: https://bit.ly/3QGHVo1 Soziales Entschädigungsrecht: Opferentschädigungsgesetz: https://bit.ly/3dfXi9b Bayer.Recht: Opferentschädigung: https://bit.ly/3RVeJeB Rechtsportal: Opferentschädigungsansprüche nach dem Amoklauf im Olympia-Einkaufszentrum München: https://bit.ly/3L7zOQg *Fall Tanja* Urteil: (504 KLs) 284 Js 1011/16 (25/16) *Diskussion* Weisser Ring: Das neue Entschädigungsrecht:https://bit.ly/3xjMKgl Bürgerratgeber: OEG: https://bit.ly/3RGyfeA T. Soliman: Ohne Erbarmen: https://bit.ly/3xikHO0 BMAS: Entschädigung für Opfer von Gewalttaten: https://bit.ly/3eK5W06 BMAS: Hilfe für Opfer von Gewalttaten: https://bit.ly/3S0wSao Weisser Ring: staatliche Opferentschädigung in Deutschland im Jahr 2021: https://bit.ly/3qA1nIu Panorama: Ohne Erbarmen: https://bit.ly/3U5ljR2 Panorama: Opferentschädigung: https://bit.ly/3xjeb9V **Credit** Produzentinnen/Hosts: Paulina Krasa, Laura Wohlers Recherche: Paulina Krasa, Laura Wohlers, Aylin Mercan Schnitt: Pauline Korb **Partner der Episode** Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte: https://linktr.ee/Mordlust

The Joe and Smith Podcast: Read the Book of Mormon with us

Joe questions whether reading the BOM is good for him. Smith suggests for the listener to order a free one, but the missionaries will bring it. The guys accidentally stumble into the church's new branding campaign to have a BOM in your crotch. They return to the well until the end of the episode. In this chapter, JS warns us that there are some Isaiah chapters coming. Like 13 of them. There are 2 more BOMs in crotches. Smith has a story about a TBM friend, who may be a deer. The guys remember D'ump from Tim and Eric. Joe passes along a book recommendation from someone he trusts- Jennette McCurdy's I'm Glad My Mom Died Smith opens some mail that he got from Joe. Joe included his testimony of the BOM in the package. Smith re-reads a previous verse. JS, he has a BOM in his crotch. Joe doesn't like the use of the word proving in the BOM. 5 more BOMs in crotches. The BOM just isn't going to burn in some house fires. Is Santa a lie for children? There is more BOM logic about why God exists. Also the LDS Godhead is confusing. Mysterious vmail- Phoenix Gem and Mineral Show (07/26/2012) Joe poses a hypothetical scenario about guys arguing over the bible. Joe gets the Kinderhook Plates mixed up with View of the Hebrews. Joe liked hearing that Australia has more restrictive standards for what is and is not considered a religion. Joe tries to quiz Smith about the names of some of the brethren's wives. They find out that Joe is reading from an old list. Also, that LDS guys technically get more virgins than some of the other religions' afterlife. Some more BOMs in crotches. Smith has a story about his earthly father. Joe asks how Smith's dad is doing. Joe tells a story about catching up with an old friend. Joe tells an embarrassing story about the guys' friend, Sam the Eagle. One more BOMcrotch. Joe reads a ‘yo child is so perished' from their listener. Smith presents Joe with a challenge that he will not take on. Joe presents a scenario that would send Smith into a rage. OK, just one more.    Music Provided by Eric VanAusdal with permission from the artist. The Book of Mormon is publicly available at churchofjesuschrist.org  Remember who you are and what you stand for

Diagnosis Success
S5 Ep10: Sync Music Mondays - The 5 W's

Diagnosis Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 14:27


Are you a musician seeking to get your music in Television & Film? Rhythm Couture is proud to present Sync Music Mondays. A podcast dedicated to financial literacy for musicians in regards to monetizing their music, and how to get sync placements. In this episode Co-Host K. Sparks & JS aka The Best discuss The 5 W's. The who, what, when, where, and why in regards to Sync Music Mondays. K and J breakdown the reason behind Sync Music Mondays and why they want to help educate artists in regards to Music Licensing and Sync Placements. Music Licensing is multi-million dollar industry. Sync Music Mondays educates musicians in regards to sync music, music supervisors, performing rights organizations, how to pitch music, and much more! Subscribe with E-Mail: https://www.rhythmcouture.com Join our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/RcPsVCJ3gr Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2ZGjbGjYxcVzRFAvnMaw4Q?si=9cc034eef0c24173 Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8UiuXLNtEywOIFUOWpSC6Q/featured Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rhythmcouturebiz/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RhythmCoutureBIZ Twitter: https://twitter.com/rhythm_couture (Host) K. Sparks: https://www.instagram.com/ksparksmusic/ (Host) JS aka The Best: https://www.instagram.com/jsakathebest/ (Engineer) Es-K: https://www.instagram.com/beatsbyesk/

The Nonlinear Library
AF - The interpretable composition hypothesis: mundane lessons from golang by Luke H Miles

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 7:22


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: The interpretable composition hypothesis: mundane lessons from golang, published by Luke H Miles on September 13, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. An AGI will probably rely on correctly-implemented multithreaded software and networking code. Go has some lessons in this exact domain of course but I claim there are broader implications. How much better is go? Most smart contracts are written in macro-crusted rust or in solidity. Most major smart contracts have been hacked. Most blockchain validators were written in go and have not been hacked. The validators are implementing objectively more complex and difficult-to-secure algorithms than the smart contracts in most cases. Simple deposit + releases contracts have had losses in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Most JavaScript and Python server libraries have had major vulnerabilities. Most go server libs have not. Go has the advantage of being created twenty years later than Python and Js but much of its innovation is just the removal of confusing stuff. Well-understood primitives and a small feature set go a long way. Often far enough to be the difference between hacked and not hacked. Go does not have compile time array bounds checking or verification of input & output constraints or anything else sophisticated like this. People simply write code line by line and check it line by line. If you have a small primitive set and careful review then can you build towers that do not fall? Is that alone enough? It seemed to work in math. Interpretable composition hypothesis: weak form Extremely complex systems can consistently be controlled, reliable, and interpretable if they are hand-made of 100% understood parts. Breaking this down: (This is not completely crisp; it is a claim about what humans can achieve under good circumstances; it cannot be outright proven or disproven. I expect strong evidence towards one side or the other to be relatively easy to find, to the point of making it practically falsifiable/provable.) A part being 99% understood is inadequate because adversaries (or gradient descent) can exploit footguns. eg most js developers mostly understand js prototyping, but some people missed the __proto__ secret feature and it caused countless vulnerabilities. The parts must be understood by the composers themselves. It is not adequate for someone somewhere to understand the parts. (Related thought: Interpretability work will likely achieve little if it is not strongly used by the AI builder or not fully understood in its use.) By "can consistently be" I mean that there exists some structure of people and method of work or review such that they produce a reliable and understood product for almost any task assigned. The parts must be put together by hand! If you do an evolutionary algorithm on a million transistors then who knows what you'll get. But transistors were pretty much perfectly understood and we got pretty much perfect adders etc with them. (I cannot find John Wentworth's post where he gives the trillion transistors example.) Observe that we do have a few samples of complex code in the wild that has basically never fallen down despite harsh or adversarial conditions, such as Voyager or the Bitcoin validators. Interpretable composition hypothesis: strong form General optimizers can consistently be controlled, reliable, and interpretable across environments if they are hand-made of 100% understood parts, even as they gain superhuman capabilities, and even if they are very complex. (Again, "can consistently be" means roughly "there exists a process that humans can follow without fail". Think of the confidence we have in a mathematical proof that has been checked by a handful of qualified people.) A standard game tree search algorithm will solve tic tac toe and will do nothing surprising if you give it a bi...

The Business of Authority
Making Email Work For You

The Business of Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:59


How to think about email as a tool to spread your ideas and share your expertise.Why simple is often best—and what to focus on to keep it that way.Basic automations that will allow you to help more people at scale (without overcomplicating your life).Creating the client and buyer experience that stays true to your brand and message (hint: you'll want to test how it's working).Quotables“If you're in the business of changing people's minds… it's a pretty good strategy to do it slowly over time, like drip information out in digestible bits, until finally it clicks.”—JS“We want email to work for us. We want it to engage people in our revolution—engage them in buying things from us, learning things from us.”—RM“Having things scheduled in advance and set to go out on a particular schedule is really useful from an impact standpoint, because you can help people for free at scale.”—JS“A welcome or nurture sequence…is where you're bringing them in a very nurturing, welcoming way. That's really important when we're talking about expertise, authority.”—RM“The cautionary tale is it's really easy to overcomplicate this at the beginning and think that you need to know every move each person makes to get it customized to the situation.”—JS“There's just something different about when you look at your emails from the buyer's point of view.”—RM“Periodically I'll have a big jump up in subscribers and it'll like, push me into a new category price wise and I'll be like, eh, maybe it's time to prune.”—JS “It's the brand experience—what do you want people to experience as they go through these different emails with you?”—RMLinksDitching Hourly with Jason Resnick 

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)
Justice, Liberty, & Love (KC)

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 48:49


INTRODUCTION Justice, freedom, and love are the buzz words of our culture, but it is not at all clear that many of our neighbors know what these words mean. The Bible teaches that all three of these gifts originate in the Triune God and are only received and enjoyed through the Cross of Jesus. THE TEXT “For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself…” (Gal. 5:13-23). SUMMARY OF THE TEXT True liberty is the ability to love our neighbors, through serving them lawfully from the heart (Gal. 5:13-14). The opposite of liberty (slavery) destroys community, through biting and devouring, driven by lusts and envy (Gal. 5:15, cf. Js. 4:1-3). Those who walk in the Spirit are led by the Spirit and therefore free from the lust of the flesh (Gal. 5:16). There is a battle in true Christians, where they sometimes find themselves doing what they do not want to do (Gal. 5:17). But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not under the condemnation of the law (Gal. 5:18, cf. Rom. 8:1). You can tell you are under the condemnation of the law because you are enslaved to the works of the flesh (Gal. 5:19-21). The marks of true freedom are the fruit of the Spirit, against which the law can bring no charge (Gal. 5:22-23). NEGATIVE V. POSITIVE JUSTICE The Bible teaches that justice is primarily negative and punitive (Rom. 13:3). It is only positive in declaring innocence, affirming or praising the righteous (Rom. 13:3), but otherwise it condemns and punishes, executing God's wrath (Rom. 13:4). Lady Justice is pictured in all the old paintings and statues as blind or blindfolded holding a set of scales in one hand and a sword in the other. Her job is simply to weigh out certain actions and demand equity – retribution and/or restitution that restores balance to the world, according to the law of God (cf. Ex. 22:1-15). Related to the notion of justice is the notion of “rights,” and rights always imply obligations. If you have a right to life, everyone around you is obligated not to harm you. If you have a right to private property, everyone around you has an obligation not to take or damage what belongs to you. If you are a wife, you have a right to be provided for, and your husband is obligated to provide for you as himself (Eph. 5:29). Justice is called for when one of these obligations has been breached, defied, or severely neglected — eye for eye, tooth for tooth, life for life (Dt. 19:21). However, when someone claims they have a right to a job, education, health care, or welfare, the implication is that someone else is obligated to give it to them. But who? God has assigned the family government the ministry of health, welfare, and education. God has assigned the church government the ministry of worship in the word and sacraments. God has assigned the civil government the ministry of justice, punishing evil doers. LOVE IS LIBERTY TO SERVE The problem with coerced “love” from the state is like that demon-possessed guy in the tombs from the gospels – his name is Legion. First, the state is presuming to know how my resources are best used for the good of others. Second, the state is presuming to know how my neighbors will be best cared for and served. Third, the coercion of the state destroys the personalism of individuals freely giving and serving and receiving, reducing “love” to a merely material transaction or wealth transfer. Fourth, the automated provision of the state creates weak, irresponsible, immature, and ungrateful dependents. Fifth, the coercive automation of the state is massively inefficient. In all of these ways (and more), love and liberty are destroyed by the threatened violence of the state. True liberty is the room to exercise true wisdom and generosity with time and resources to care for the needs of your neighbors, and in particular, those entrusted to your care (Eph. 5:28-29, 6:4, 1 Tim. 5:8). SINS & CRIMES Many moderns confuse jurisdictions by conflating sins and crimes. Crimes are those acts that harm the person or property of others or are designated by God to corrupt society and therefore fall under the jurisdiction of the civil magistrates for punishment. Sins are those thoughts and acts that break fellowship with God and others, many of which fall under the jurisdiction of families and churches. True love, liberty, and justice occur when each jurisdiction submits to God's assigned sphere. In a Christian civil order, all crimes would also be sins, but in most civil orders, there are a mix of crimes that may or may not be sins. So if the magistrate orders that meeting for worship is a crime, it would not be a sin to disobey that order (Dan. 3:18, Acts 5:29). But the other point is that not all sins are or should be crimes. So for example, covetousness is a sin and it may reveal itself in bad thoughts or words, but it isn't a crime until it turns into overt theft or vandalism. The point is that Lady Justice deals with black and white actions, punishing evil doers upon the testimony of two or three witnesses, but she is not entrusted with matters of the heart, house rules, or matters of worship. When “justice” tries to meddle in those things assigned to the family or church, you don't get love, liberty, or justice. CONCLUSIONS The greatest act of liberty ever performed was also the greatest act of love and justice: Jesus laid His life down freely as a ransom for sinners. No one took His life from Him, He laid it down freely (Jn. 10:18). And He had that freedom because it was obedience to His Father. But the sinful heart of man always wants to get this backwards and upside down. The sinful, prideful heart of man wants to collapse and confuse justice, liberty, and love in order to remake the world according to its own wisdom, which always involves manipulation and coercion and demands that you must acquiesce to the demands of government thugs. But justice only punishes or exonerates. That's all it does. And that is what it did in the Cross. God's perfect justice punished Jesus in our place, and then because our debts were fully paid, God's justice exonerates all who trust in Him. That is a supreme manifestation of God's love and liberty, but you cannot mix them up without confusing the gospel. Those who receive this gospel really are set free, and the Spirit begins to lead them to love their neighbors freely and generously in imitation of Jesus in obedience. But slavery to the flesh is manifest and obvious. So which one are you? What characterizes your life? Is it the fruit of the Spirit or the works of the flesh? If it is the works of the flesh, then any demand for justice is only to have the law of God fall upon you with all of its fierce condemnation. But if it is the fruit of the Spirit, you are truly free, and you are a manifestation of the righteousness of God in Christ.

Eclectically Sexual Sounds
Season Seven: Episode 19 - "Heauxs Tell, Pt. 2"

Eclectically Sexual Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 31:35


Whew! It's another scorcher! JS is back with more heaux tales - indiscreet and in your motherfucking face stories of heauxs being, well, you know - hoes! Submissions pouring in and JS sorting through the juicy, erotic, most delicious ones to tell. Listen in...is this one yours?

The Joe and Smith Podcast: Read the Book of Mormon with us

A Smith and Joe exclusive! Joe takes it upon himself to read this week. It doesn't take long before the guys devolve into adolescent pp jokes. They wonder who took the longest to take out their endowments out of the last few leaders of the church. Smith doesn't like to use the word scripture. Joe makes a promise (that he later breaks) about a ‘yo kids are so perished' joke. This chapter teaches us that there is no other nation that would crucify their god. God reminds Smith about John 3:16. Smith talks about how being raised in the Western US is different from the East. Wanton eyes will probably not come up again (sad face). Joe suggests skipping to an Isaiah chapter because it sounds more interesting, even Seuss-y. The guys take turns doing bad Cosbys too. This chapter denounces priestcraft, while the guys in SLC probably had their grandkids help them sign up for direct deposit. And updated: Joe, or JS, may be ant wizards. The LDS godhead is confusing in the BOM. This chapter is very jingoistic, like maybe the worst one yet, USA! USA! Joe criticizes the church's reaction to news stories about child molestation in the church. Smith polls the audience, but they don't respond. The spirit shows up to weigh in on who is the better reader. Joe didn't know that JS had an actual sword. The spirit tries to spread a rumor about Lucifer having some of his ribs removed. The black-and-white thinking is pretty heavy in this chapter as well. The guys are reminded of some David Bazan lyrics where he's arguing with a god who sounds like the god of this BOM chapter. Joe still says oh my gosh. The US is a choice land above all other lands…barf. Joe gets excited about photos from the James Webb telescope. It sounds like Joe may have a hard copy of the BOM which tickles Smith for some reason. In this chapter, JS tells us to cheer up and choose happiness. It's very ‘of its time' sort of thinking. Will and Defoe. SWK was short, and boil-ridden. Bummer. Smith reminds us that his childhood friends who didn't take the church as seriously at the time are still in the church now. Smith has a teaser for a sort-of unboxing on the next ep.  David Bazan When We Fell   Music Provided by Eric VanAusdal with permission from the artist. The Book of Mormon is publicly available at churchofjesuschrist.org  Remember who you are and what you stand for  

Hack Music Theory
Make Music like Gorillaz

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 3:58


    How to Write a Bass Line like Gorillaz "New Gold"   In the new Gorillaz single “New Gold”, there's a music theory secret that makes their song feel totally different to the other new releases out this week. That's what you'll learn in this lesson, as well as how to use it to write a Gorillaz-style bass line. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SECRET Alright, so what's the music theory secret behind this song? Well, it's in 6|4. The time signature of 6|4 contains six 1/4 notes in a bar, instead of the usual four 1/4 notes in a bar that you get in 4|4. The brilliance of 6|4 is that it doesn't sound weird, because six is still an even number. Also, you can still nod along to the 1/4 notes, just like you do in 4|4. But, every bar is longer than you're expecting. And this extended bar makes the music feel more laid back, as it takes longer to loop back around to beat 1. So, you can think of 6|4 as the scenic route, whereas 4|4 is the direct route. To balance out this relaxed vibe, though, Gorillaz use a dancey four-on-the-floor drum beat. Well, it's actually a six-on-the-floor drum beat, because there are six 1/4 notes in a bar, and each one of those 1/4 notes has a kick drum on it. So that's their secret: it's that contrasting combination of the dancey drum beat and the laid-back time signature of 6|4, which creates that unique vibe in this song.   BASS Alright, so now that you know their music theory secret, you're gonna learn how to use it to make a Gorillaz-style bass line. So, set your time signature to 6|4 and your tempo to 108 BPM, then create a one bar loop on your bass track. Gorillaz use the F♯ natural minor scale in this song, so we'll use it too: F♯, G♯, A, B, C♯, D, E. The music theory in this song is all about contrast, so that theme continues in their bass line, where they use a contrasting combination of legato and staccato notes. And if those terms are new to you: legato notes are connected to each other, and staccato notes are disconnected from each other. So their bass line is divided into two sections, the first section is legato and the second section is staccato. This results in the first section sounding smooth and chill, and the second section sounding more energetic and funky. For the legato section, use longer notes like 1/8 notes and dotted 1/8 notes. For the staccato section use 1/16 notes with rests in between. Also, their bass has a ton of syncopation (which is an off-beat accent), so be sure to use a bunch of that too.   NEXT If there's an artist you'd like us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our latest YouTube video. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this course is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. 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Hack Music Theory
Gorillaz HACK for Better Bass Lines

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 3:58


    How to Write a Bass Line like Gorillaz "New Gold"   In the new Gorillaz single “New Gold”, there's a music theory secret that makes their song feel totally different to the other new releases out this week. That's what you'll learn in this lesson, as well as how to use it to write a Gorillaz-style bass line. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SECRET Alright, so what's the music theory secret behind this song? Well, it's in 6|4. The time signature of 6|4 contains six 1/4 notes in a bar, instead of the usual four 1/4 notes in a bar that you get in 4|4. The brilliance of 6|4 is that it doesn't sound weird, because six is still an even number. Also, you can still nod along to the 1/4 notes, just like you do in 4|4. But, every bar is longer than you're expecting. And this extended bar makes the music feel more laid back, as it takes longer to loop back around to beat 1. So, you can think of 6|4 as the scenic route, whereas 4|4 is the direct route. To balance out this relaxed vibe, though, Gorillaz use a dancey four-on-the-floor drum beat. Well, it's actually a six-on-the-floor drum beat, because there are six 1/4 notes in a bar, and each one of those 1/4 notes has a kick drum on it. So that's their secret: it's that contrasting combination of the dancey drum beat and the laid-back time signature of 6|4, which creates that unique vibe in this song.   BASS Alright, so now that you know their music theory secret, you're gonna learn how to use it to make a Gorillaz-style bass line. So, set your time signature to 6|4 and your tempo to 108 BPM, then create a one bar loop on your bass track. Gorillaz use the F♯ natural minor scale in this song, so we'll use it too: F♯, G♯, A, B, C♯, D, E. The music theory in this song is all about contrast, so that theme continues in their bass line, where they use a contrasting combination of legato and staccato notes. And if those terms are new to you: legato notes are connected to each other, and staccato notes are disconnected from each other. So their bass line is divided into two sections, the first section is legato and the second section is staccato. This results in the first section sounding smooth and chill, and the second section sounding more energetic and funky. For the legato section, use longer notes like 1/8 notes and dotted 1/8 notes. For the staccato section use 1/16 notes with rests in between. Also, their bass has a ton of syncopation (which is an off-beat accent), so be sure to use a bunch of that too.   NEXT If there's an artist you'd like us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our latest YouTube video. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this course is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. 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Japanese Swotter - Speaking Drill + Shadowing
118[✐2,3] Hot und humid/sticky - Onomatopoeia

Japanese Swotter - Speaking Drill + Shadowing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 17:09


[2.Andante][3.Moderato] “It's humid (sticky) and hot, isn't it?” [00:07] Hello everyone. How are you doing? We will practice onomatopoeia today. Please try also JS 90. Note: オノマトペ = A word that expresses various states and movements with sound, including a sensory expression, although the sound is not actually heard. Even the same onomatopoeia has different meanings depending on the context; e.g. “peko peko” could mean 1) “very hungry”, or 2) “be very humble” or “touch one's forelock” = “He apologized humbly. / He apologized over and over again.”[00:18] First, let's do on weather. How is the weather? Listen to the onomatopoeia ♫, then repeat the sentence. Repeat after me [00:27] 1. za- za- → It's pouring. 2. para para → It's sprinkling. 3. byu- byu- → The wind is blowing/wuthering. 4. poka poka → It's warm and feel nice. 5. mushi mushi → it's muggy / very humid. [01:34] It's really muggy in summer in Japan. I will get sweaty! [01:43] Now, make a sentence using the hints. For example,It rained really heavily yesterday, didn't it? [hint] indeed, za- za- → Indeed, it was pouring. Ready? [02:01] 1. It's hot today again, isn't it?[hint] indeed, mushimushi → Indeed, it's muggy. 2. Spring has come. What a pleasant weather.[hint] indeed, pokapoka → Indeed. It's warm and feel nice. 3. It was so windy yesterday. [hint] byu-byu- → It was wuthering, wasn't it? 4. Is it raining there? [hint] yes, za-za- → Yes, it's pouring. 5. Is it raining there? [hint] yes, but, para para → Yes, but it's just drizzling.[03:51] It's just drizzling at the moment, so let's go home before it turns into heavy rain. [04:02] Now, how would you answer?[04:05] 1. It's hot today again, isn't it? [your answer] 2. It's nice spring weather. Ist not hot, itäs not cold, itäs just right. [your answer] 3. It was so windy yesterday. [your answer] 4. Hello, it's nice weather here. How is the weather there? [your answer] ****** 「ムシムシあついですね」[00:07] みなさん、こんにちは。おげんきですか。きょうは、オノマトペ*を れんしゅうします。JS 90 もやってみてください。[00:18] まずてんきです。どんなてんきですか。♫オノマトペをきいて、それから、ぶんをリピートしてください。 Repeat after me [00:27]1. ザーザー あめが ザーザー ふっています。 2. パラパラ あめが パラパラふっています。 3. ビュービュー かぜが ビュービュー ふいています。 4. ぽかぽか ぽかぽかしてきもちいいです。 5. ムシムシ きょうも あついですね。ムシムシしますね。 [01:34] にほんのなつは ムシムシするんです。あせでびっしょりです! [01:43] では、ヒントを つかって ぶんを つくってください。 たとえば、 きのうの あめは すごかったですね。[hint] そうですね、ザーザー → そうですね。ザーザーでしたね。 いいですか。 [02:01] 1. きょうも あついですね。[hint]そうですね、ムシムシ → そうですね。ムシムシしますね。 2. はるですね。いいてんきですね。 [hint] そうですね、ポカポカ → そうですね。ポカポカですね。 3. きのうの かぜは すごかったですね。 [hint] ビュービュー → ビュービューでしたね。 4. そちらは、あめが ふっていますか? [hint]はい、ザーザー → はい、ザーザーふっています。 5. そちらは、あめが ふっていますか? [hint] はい、でも、パラパラ → はい、でも パラパラです。 [03:51] いま、あめは パラパラなので、ザーザーになるまえに うちにかえりましょう。 [04:02] では、みなさんは どうこたえますか?[04:05] 1. きょうもあついですね。 [your answer] 2. はるのいいてんきですね。あつくなくて、さむくなくて、ちょうどいいですね。[your answer] 3. きのうのかぜは すごかったですよね。[your answer] 4. もしもし、こっちは いいてんきですが、 そちらは どうですか。 [your answer]=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=Become a patron: More episodes with full translation and Japanese transcripts. You'll get access to the members-only podcast feed that you can subscribe to in your smartphone app. Japanese Swotter on PatreonNote: English translations might sound occasionally unnatural as English, as I try to preserve the structure and essence of the original Japanese. I hope it also helps you to capture the pattern of the sentence structure.Support the show

Develop Yourself
#44 - Vanilla JavaScript and Entrepreneurship with Chris Ferdinandi of Go Make Things

Develop Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 81:10


In this episode, we speak with Chris Ferdinandi. Chris helps people learn vanilla JavaScript at gomakethings.com, and believes there's a simpler, more resilient way to make things for the web. His developer tips newsletter is read by thousands of developers each weekday.  Chris and I talked about his journey, how to make a career transition to web development, how Chris found his niche in vanilla JS and ended up working for himself, and much more. Enjoy!LinksGo Make ThingsResources from this episode SPAs were a mistakeChris' TwitterShameless PlugsJunior to Senior (use code DVY100 to access the course for free)Parsitydev30.xyzPeter's YouTube channel

The Business of Authority
Clients For Life?

The Business of Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 43:43


How the retainer execution model rewards a clients for life strategy, but can keep you on the gilded hamster wheel.The required mindset shift as you move away from strictly execution to higher value consulting.How to think about dandelion projects where you stay in touch with client team members as they scatter to new companies (and which business models can easily leverage this).The altitude shift from “hands” consulting to advisory work and why that tends to down-shift client longevity.Quotables“Think of a retainer as charging a periodic amount…for a given set of deliverables. An advisory retainer is not that. An advisory retainer is where you are not executing—you are giving strategic advice.”—RM“The thing about this sort of ‘hands-on' retainer…it's like a job. It's predictable and safe and probably can be a lot longer term than an advisory retainer.”—JS“When you start that transition (to advisory)…it feels like ‘wait a minute, I'm not doing enough for this money. I need to be busier.' You have to make a mindset shift.”—RM“Think about a dandelion project—where a buyer brings you in, and you do good work for them…and then that team from that company disperses, and they go to five other companies.”—JS“It's different working with the CEO than it is with the director level of a function. Your impact is bigger. Your potential influence is larger. And the price of failure is higher. That's why you don't come out of school and go coach the CEO.”—RM“The easiest sale is new stuff to old clients because you already have trust. They already know you're legit. They already know that you deliver results.”—JS“Growing your altitude…allows you to operate at a much higher level. And by the way, that level is exceedingly lucrative.”—RM “I've got some students who've done internal systems for gigantic brand names—like names you'd recognize—and they've just oozed from department to department.”—JS

Field & Garden
#172: Bug Talk: Native Bees with Dr. Barb Abraham

Field & Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 33:38 Very Popular


For this edition of "Bug Talk" Lisa and Rhonda are joined by special guest Dr. Barb Abraham, an ecology professor, bee researcher and Chair of the Bee City USA - Hampton steering committee. Today they're talking about native bees. Did you know that you can have an average of 100 different bee species in your yard? And that native bees typically are not aggressive and do not sting? You may have seen some that look like gnats, flies or wasps and not even realized they were actually bees! Learn how you can support your native bee populations by avoiding pesticides, offering a consistent water source, a providing nesting habitat. Recommended Bee Books: All of these are profusely illustrated with stunning photographs... Holm, Heather. 2017. Bees. An identification and native plant forage guide. Pollination Press, LLC. Minnesota. Holm, Heather. 2014. Pollinators of native plants. Pollination Press, LLC. Minnesota Embry, Paige. 2018. Our native bees. Timber Press. Portland, OR. Frey, Kate and Gretchen LeBuhn. 2016. The bee-friendly garden. Ten Speed Press. Berkeley. Wilson, JS and OM Carrill. 2016. The bees in your backyard. Princeton University Press. Princeton and Oxford. Xerces Society. 2016.100 plants to feed the bees. Storey Publishing. North Adams, MA. Xerces Society.2011. Attracting native pollinators. Storey Publishing. North Adams, MA. This one is heavy reading for the avid apiphile, few colored illustrations... Danforth, BN, Minckley, RL, and JL Neff. The solitary bees. Biology, evolution, conservation. Princeton University Press. Princeton and Oxford. Other Links & Mentions Bee City USA - Hampton, VA: Website Facebook The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation Sign up to receive our weekly Farm News! The Field and Garden Podcast is produced by Lisa Mason Ziegler, award-winning author of Vegetables Love Flowers and Cool Flowers, owner of The Gardener's Workshop, Flower Farming School Online, and the publisher of Farmer-Florist School Online and Florist School Online. Watch Lisa's Story and connect with Lisa on social!

Hack Music Theory
Red Hot Chili Peppers HACK for Better Bass Lines

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    How to Write a Bass Line like Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue"   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,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) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

Hack Music Theory
Make Music like Red Hot Chili Peppers

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    How to Write a Bass Line like Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue"   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,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) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

Hack Music Theory
Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue" Music Theory Secret

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue" Music Theory Secret   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,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) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

Bethel Church Temple TX Podcast (Sermons)

SESSION ONE / / SEALED OR MARKED "13 When you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in Him, you were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, 14 who is the guarantee of our inheritance." Ep 1:13-14 ESV Sealed by the Holy Spirit: Blessings & Benefits  ___________ alliance Ep 1:13-14  ___________________ & plan Re 7:3-4 Ze 12:10; Ro 11:25-27; Ze 13:8-9; Re 14:1,3-5, 20:4  ___________________ 2Co 1:21-22, 5:5  Eternal ____________________— Re 22:3-4 New Heavens and New Earth "He required everyone—small and great, rich and poor, free and slave—to be given a mark on the right hand or on the forehead." Re 13:16 Marked by the Beast: Damnation & Destination  ___________ alliance Re 13:15-18  Required to _________ or sell Re 13:17  __________ & Deception Re 16:2,19:20  Eternal ____________________—hell Re 14:9-11 The Choice: Who will you worship?  __________ Christ and live with Him forever  __________ Christ, accept the mark & be eternally damned "Choose this day whom you will serve!" Js 24:15; Mt 6:24

Hack Music Theory
Red Hot Chili Peppers SECRET for Better Bass Lines

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    Red Hot Chili Peppers SECRET for Better Bass Lines   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,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) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

Hack Music Theory
Make Bass Lines like Red Hot Chili Peppers

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    Make Bass Lines like Red Hot Chili Peppers   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQADAIABAMzMzP///yH/C1hNUCBEYXRhWE1QPD94cGFja2V0IGJlZ2luPSLvu78iIGlkPSJXNU0wTXBDZWhpSHpyZVN6TlRjemtjOWQiPz4gPHg6eG1wbWV0YSB4bWxuczp4PSJhZG9iZTpuczptZXRhLyIgeDp4bXB0az0iQWRvYmUgWE1QIENvcmUgNS41LWMwMTQgNzkuMTUxNDgxLCAyMDEzLzAzLzEzLTEyOjA5OjE1ICAgICAgICAiPiA8cmRmOlJERiB4bWxuczpyZGY9Imh0dHA6Ly93d3cudzMub3JnLzE5OTkvMDIvMjItcmRmLXN5bnRheC1ucyMiPiA8cmRmOkRlc2NyaXB0aW9uIHJkZjphYm91dD0iIiB4bWxuczp4bXA9Imh0dHA6Ly9ucy5hZG9iZS5jb20veGFwLzEuMC8iIHhtbG5zOnhtcE1NPSJodHRwOi8vbnMuYWRvYmUuY29tL3hhcC8xLjAvbW0vIiB4bWxuczpzdFJlZj0iaHR0cDovL25zLmFkb2JlLmNvbS94YXAvMS4wL3NUeXBlL1Jlc291cmNlUmVmIyIgeG1wOkNyZWF0b3JUb29sPSJBZG9iZSBQaG90b3Nob3AgQ0MgKE1hY2ludG9zaCkiIHhtcE1NOkluc3RhbmNlSUQ9InhtcC5paWQ6MUQ5NjM5RjgxQUVEMTFFNEJBQTdGNTQwMjc5MTZDOTciIHhtcE1NOkRvY3VtZW50SUQ9InhtcC5kaWQ6MUQ5NjM5RjkxQUVEMTFFNEJBQTdGNTQwMjc5MTZDOTciPiA8eG1wTU06RGVyaXZlZEZyb20gc3RSZWY6aW5zdGFuY2VJRD0ieG1wLmlpZDoxRDk2MzlGNjFBRUQxMUU0QkFBN0Y1NDAyNzkxNkM5NyIgc3RSZWY6ZG9jdW1lbnRJRD0ieG1wLmRpZDoxRDk2MzlGNzFBRUQxMUU0QkFBN0Y1NDAyNzkxNkM5NyIvPiA8L3JkZjpEZXNjcmlwdGlvbj4gPC9yZGY6UkRGPiA8L3g6eG1wbWV0YT4gPD94cGFja2V0IGVuZD0iciI/PgH//v38+/r5+Pf29fTz8vHw7+7t7Ovq6ejn5uXk4+Lh4N/e3dzb2tnY19bV1NPS0dDPzs3My8rJyMfGxcTDwsHAv769vLu6ubi3trW0s7KxsK+urayrqqmop6alpKOioaCfnp2cm5qZmJeWlZSTkpGQj46NjIuKiYiHhoWEg4KBgH9+fXx7enl4d3Z1dHNycXBvbm1sa2ppaGdmZWRjYmFgX15dXFtaWVhXVlVUU1JRUE9OTUxLSklIR0ZFRENCQUA/Pj08Ozo5ODc2NTQzMjEwLy4tLCsqKSgnJiUkIyIhIB8eHRwbGhkYFxYVFBMSERAPDg0MCwoJCAcGBQQDAgEAACH5BAEAAAEALAAAAAABAAMAAAICRFIAOw==) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

Hack Music Theory
How to Write Bass Lines like Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue"

Hack Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:57


    How to Write Bass Lines like Red Hot Chili Peppers "Tippa My Tongue"   In the new Red Hot Chili Peppers single “Tippa My Tongue”, there's a ridiculously funky variation of the blues scale, which we're calling the RHCP scale. And that's what you're about to learn, as well as how to write a bass line or guitar riff using it. But first... Tea!   INTRO Hello revolutionary music makers, we are Kate and Ray Harmony (AKA Revolution Harmony), and welcome to Hack Music Theory, the fast, easy and fun way to make music. If you're new to theory, or if you just want a refresher, then read our free book "12 Music Theory Hacks to Learn Scales & Chords". It'll give you a super solid music theory foundation in just 30 minutes. The free download is below. Enjoy!   SCALE Okay so first things first, what's the blues scale? Well, the blues scale is actually a variation of the minor pentatonic scale. Okay, so what's the minor pentatonic scale? Well, it's the natural minor scale without its 2nd and 6th notes. So from the root of C, the minor pentatonic scale is: C, E♭, F, G, B♭. And its spelling is: 1, ♭3, 4, 5, ♭7. Now, to turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale, all you have to do is add the ♭5, which in this example is G♭. Alright, this is where it gets juicy! So the Chili Peppers use the blues scale in the chorus of this song, but to make it extra funky, they add two non-diatonic notes (i.e. notes that are not in the scale). The two extra notes they play are the major 3rd and the major 7th. And to be clear, they're using these notes to spice up the blues scale, they're not technically part of the scale. But, when you do make them part of it, you end up with a super funky 8-note scale, so why not add them in?!  So from the root of C, our RHCP scale is:  C, E♭, E, F, G♭, G, B♭, B  And the spelling of the RHCP scale is:  1, ♭3, 3, 4, ♭5, 5, ♭7, 7  And just a quick FYI for the more advanced producers. As you know, theoretically a scale can't have both the minor 3rd and major 3rd, so we have to spell the 3 (E) with its enharmonic equivalent, which is the ♭4 (F♭). Same note, different name. By the way, if that was confusing, then read our free book, as it's all explained in there!   BASS Okay, now that we've got the scale down, let's use it to write a bass line! So, set your tempo to 88 BPM, then create two bars of 4|4. The first thing you need to do is play the root note (C) on beat 1 in both bars. This was James Brown's funk rule. His band could do whatever they wanted for the rest of the bar, but they all had to lock in by playing beat 1 together. And the most solid note to play on beat 1 is obviously the root, so that's your starting point. What you do for the rest of the bass line is up to you, but here's a few guidelines. Be sure to use all 8 notes of the scale in your bass line, otherwise you won't get the full flavour. Also, use lots of rests. Funky music actually has a lot of space in it.  And related to that, you definitely wanna use a lot of syncopation, which is when you accent an off-beat. It ain't funky without syncopation, so go crazy with that, as the root note on beat 1 in every bar will lock it all together. Lastly, use a variety of different note values, like 1/16 notes, 1/8 notes, and dotted 1/8 notes. So to conclude, what we're calling the RHCP scale is simply the blues scale plus the major 3rd and the major 7th.   NEXT If there's a song that you want us to hack in a future lesson, drop us a comment on our YouTube channel. Also, if you wanna learn our essential hacks for making great melodies, chord progressions, bass lines, drum beats (and more), then watch the 12 step-by-step videos in our Songwriting & Producing course. If you're feeling frustrated because your music isn't as good as you want it to be, then this is for you!   Free Book     Wooohooo!!! You're a mere 30 minutes away from being even smarter than you already are. Just head on over to your inbox now for your free download. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again.   “The most brilliant, fast, easy & fun music theory book I've ever seen!” DEREK SIVERS, CD Baby founder We use this field to detect spam bots. If you fill this in, you will be marked as a spammer. DOWNLOAD FREE BOOK /* Layout */ .ck_form { /* divider image */ background: #EAE9EA url(data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQADAIABAMzMzP///yH/C1hNUCBEYXRhWE1QPD94cGFja2V0IGJlZ2luPSLvu78iIGlkPSJXNU0wTXBDZWhpSHpyZVN6TlRjemtjOWQiPz4gPHg6eG1wbWV0YSB4bWxuczp4PSJhZG9iZTpuczptZXRhLyIgeDp4bXB0az0iQWRvYmUgWE1QIENvcmUgNS41LWMwMTQgNzkuMTUxNDgxLCAyMDEzLzAzLzEzLTEyOjA5OjE1ICAgICAgICAiPiA8cmRmOlJERiB4bWxuczpyZGY9Imh0dHA6Ly93d3cudzMub3JnLzE5OTkvMDIvMjItcmRmLXN5bnRheC1ucyMiPiA8cmRmOkRlc2NyaXB0aW9uIHJkZjphYm91dD0iIiB4bWxuczp4bXA9Imh0dHA6Ly9ucy5hZG9iZS5jb20veGFwLzEuMC8iIHhtbG5zOnhtcE1NPSJodHRwOi8vbnMuYWRvYmUuY29tL3hhcC8xLjAvbW0vIiB4bWxuczpzdFJlZj0iaHR0cDovL25zLmFkb2JlLmNvbS94YXAvMS4wL3NUeXBlL1Jlc291cmNlUmVmIyIgeG1wOkNyZWF0b3JUb29sPSJBZG9iZSBQaG90b3Nob3AgQ0MgKE1hY2ludG9zaCkiIHhtcE1NOkluc3RhbmNlSUQ9InhtcC5paWQ6MUQ5NjM5RjgxQUVEMTFFNEJBQTdGNTQwMjc5MTZDOTciIHhtcE1NOkRvY3VtZW50SUQ9InhtcC5kaWQ6MUQ5NjM5RjkxQUVEMTFFNEJBQTdGNTQwMjc5MTZDOTciPiA8eG1wTU06RGVyaXZlZEZyb20gc3RSZWY6aW5zdGFuY2VJRD0ieG1wLmlpZDoxRDk2MzlGNjFBRUQxMUU0QkFBN0Y1NDAyNzkxNkM5NyIgc3RSZWY6ZG9jdW1lbnRJRD0ieG1wLmRpZDoxRDk2MzlGNzFBRUQxMUU0QkFBN0Y1NDAyNzkxNkM5NyIvPiA8L3JkZjpEZXNjcmlwdGlvbj4gPC9yZGY6UkRGPiA8L3g6eG1wbWV0YT4gPD94cGFja2V0IGVuZD0iciI/PgH//v38+/r5+Pf29fTz8vHw7+7t7Ovq6ejn5uXk4+Lh4N/e3dzb2tnY19bV1NPS0dDPzs3My8rJyMfGxcTDwsHAv769vLu6ubi3trW0s7KxsK+urayrqqmop6alpKOioaCfnp2cm5qZmJeWlZSTkpGQj46NjIuKiYiHhoWEg4KBgH9+fXx7enl4d3Z1dHNycXBvbm1sa2ppaGdmZWRjYmFgX15dXFtaWVhXVlVUU1JRUE9OTUxLSklIR0ZFRENCQUA/Pj08Ozo5ODc2NTQzMjEwLy4tLCsqKSgnJiUkIyIhIB8eHRwbGhkYFxYVFBMSERAPDg0MCwoJCAcGBQQDAgEAACH5BAEAAAEALAAAAAABAAMAAAICRFIAOw==) repeat-y center top; font-family: 'Montserrat'; line-height: 1.5em; overflow: hidden; color: #000000; font-size: 16px; border-top: none; border-top-color: #666666; border-bottom: none; border-bottom-color: #3d3d3d; -webkit-box-shadow: none; -moz-box-shadow: none; box-shadow: none; clear: both; margin: 0px 0px; } .ck_form, .ck_form * { -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; } #ck_subscribe_form { clear: both; } /* Element Queries — uses JS */ .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { width: 50%; float: left; padding: 5%; } .ck_form.ck_horizontal { } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: none; } .ck_form.ck_vertical { background: #fff; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content, .ck_vertical .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_vertical .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; overflow: hidden; } /* Trigger the vertical layout with media queries as well */ @media all and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form { background: #fff; } .ck_form_content, .ck_form_fields { padding: 10%; width: 100%; float: none; } .ck_form_content { border-bottom: 1px dotted #aaa; } } /* Content */ .ck_form_content h3 { margin: 0px 0px 0px; font-size: 0px; padding: 0px; } .ck_form_content p { font-size: 14px; } .ck_image { float: left; margin-right: 5px; } /* Form fields */ .ck_errorArea { display: none; } #ck_success_msg { padding: 10px 10px 0px; border: solid 1px #ddd; background: #eee; } .ck_label { font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; } .ck_form input[type="text"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 0px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="email"] { font-size: 16px; text-align: center; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 8px 8px; width: 100%; border: 1px solid #d6d6d6; /* stroke */ -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ background-color: #fff; /* layer fill content */ height: auto; } .ck_form input[type="text"]:focus, .ck_form input[type="email"]:focus { outline: none; border-color: #aaa; } .ck_checkbox { padding: 10px 0px 10px 20px; display: block; clear: both; } .ck_checkbox input.optIn { margin-left: -20px; margin-top: 0; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt { margin-left: 4px; } .ck_form .ck_opt_in_prompt p { display: inline; } .ck_form .ck_subscribe_button { width: 100%; color: #fff; margin: 0px 0px 0px; padding: 8px 8px; font-size: 18px; background: #c83232; -moz-border-radius: 4px; -webkit-border-radius: 4px; border-radius: 30px; /* border radius */ cursor: pointer; border: none; text-shadow: none; } .ck_form .ck_guarantee { color: #626262; font-size: 12px; text-align: center; padding: 5px 0px; display: block; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by { display: block; color: #aaa; } .ck_form .ck_powered_by:hover { display: block; color: #444; } .ck_converted_content { display: none; padding: 5%; background: #fff; } /* v6 */ .ck_form_v6 #ck_success_msg { padding: 0px 10px; } @media all and (max-width: 403px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 30px; } } @media all and (min-width: 404px) and (max-width: 499px) { .ck_form_v6.ck_modal .ck_close_link { top: 57px; } }    Podcast Listen below, or on any podcast app.

The Gardenangelists
Garden Thoughts as We Bid Adieu to August

The Gardenangelists

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 46:25 Very Popular


Carol and Dee talk about flowers that bloom in the fall, enriching your soil with cover crops,  a book on color in the garden, composting, and more in this week's episode.Link to our Substack newsletter with more information about this week's episode. Be sure and subscribe to get the newsletter directly in your email inbox!Links:   Acres Abloom on Instagram and their websiteDee's going to make elderberry syrup.Carol's Green Bean Story on her blogDee's blog post about fall bulbs Barnardia japonica (Japanese Jacinth) for sale from Hayefield [15 Seeds]   The Elizabeth Lawrence Houses and Garden in Charlotte, NCCarol's Persian Violet  Instagram.   Blackhawks Big Bluestem Grass, Andropogon | American MeadowsBotanical Interests has a nice article on cover crops (affiliate link)On the Bookshelf:  The Gardener's Palette by RHS and Jo Thompson (Amazon link)And we still love The Chef's Garden by Farmer Lee Jones (Amazon link) Dirt:  Gardeners' World's Monty Don blasts show's ‘gardening mafia' Links for Dee's Rabbit Hole on the JS bioreactor for composting Link to a manual on how to build one, an article about it.  Also, Bioreactor - Regeneration InternationalGert Schley, was the charming German gardener on Gardener's World, Episode 23 who wowed us with his Somerset gardening smock.  Carol discovered his connection to Haddon Wood.Affiliate link to Botanical Interest Seeds. (If you buy something from them after using this link, we earn a small commission at no cost to you. This helps us continue to bring this podcast to you ad-free!)  Book links are also affiliate links.Email us at TheGardenangelists@gmail.com  For more info on Carol and her books, visit her website.  Visit her blog May Dreams Gardens.For more info on Dee and her book, visit her website.  Visit her blog Red Dirt Ramblings.Don't forget to sign up for our newsletters, via our websites!

The Joe and Smith Podcast: Read the Book of Mormon with us

Don't adjust your podcasting devices, you're hearing correctly. Smith picks up reading before talking or anything else?!!? Joe tells Smith about why they're not funny, or maybe they're only funny to each other. Is it learned or learn-ed? JS is not a fan of smart people. The learn-ed person is kind of the natural enemy of the con artist. Joe makes an ableist joke that seminary teachers would like. Can a person get reverse-circumcised? Smith looked into it before. Joe's summary of how the contents of the BOM can be categorized into 3 or 4 categories comes from Jahndalyn's interview with Grant Palmer. Is JS LARP-ing as a 19th Century Protestant preacher in this chapter? Was Captain Kidd the same as Indiana Jones? Was the dog's name Captain? Joe reminds us of the idea where he reads a chapter. Smith prefers the Ron Howard series of The Office. Joe tries to give a pass to Arrested Development for being of its time. Smith teaches Joe about SMILE and Joe is not a fan. The guys go over new changes they would like to see in the endowment ceremony. Joe thinks the movie should be history of the entire world, i guess, and Smith wants it to get sexier.  Smith refers the listener back to an episode of Nathan for You. JS gets a little bold about truth claims in this chapter, as per use. Joe starts to make a point about his faithful friend, Dwayne, but then he forgets. Joe refuses to cut ambient noise in this ep (he didn't follow through). He gets upset about the idea that the BOM is going to teach us about the ‘consequences of sin'. Then he issues a challenge to make a tbm-friendly ep that is sincere. The guys try another take on the condescension of god. Maybe they'll get it next time.  Joe recaps some of his convo with a tbm friend which ended in the question- would the world have more sexual abuse if the church didn't exist? The guys talk about some of the methods the church uses to address the elephant in the room. Does the org structure of the church facilitate SA? Smith has heard some pretty inflammatory SA second-hand accounts. The guys are too afraid to tell their actual families about the podcast, so….spread the word? Don't forget to keep your relationships professional. Your family relationships, keep it professional. One of Joe's naughty mission companions taught him a song about smoking joints. The guys don't really have a patreon.    Mormon Stories Podcast 030-033: AN INSIDER'S VIEW OF MORMON ORIGINS — AN INTERVIEW WITH GRANT PALMER history of the entire world, i guess Nathan For You - Claw of Shame - The Event The Toyes - Smoke Two Joints Music Provided by Eric VanAusdal with permission from the artist. The Book of Mormon is publicly available at churchofjesuschrist.org  Remember who you are and what you stand for

JavaScript Jabber
Even More JavaScript Features You Should Avoid - JSJ 547

JavaScript Jabber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 75:41


Today's episode is a continuation of the previous JavaScript Jabber Episode 543, where we discuss JS language features to avoid.  Do you agree with the list?  Today we talk about: for in forEach else null object.create A named function using the arrow operator  switch labels  Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Picks Charles- Orbis Charles- Diablo Immortal Charles- Richard Paul Evans Charles- JavaScript Remote Conference 2022 Charles- - Top End Devs Dan- John Carmack: Doom, Quake, VR, AGI, Programming, Video Games, and Rockets Dan - BuilderIO framework benchmark mitosis Dan - War in Ukraine Steve- James Webb Space Telescope Shows Big Bang Didn't Happen? Wait... Steve - Dad Jokes

NTH Podcasts
Between The Js: Episode 20: Dr. Josh Boyd

NTH Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 35:59


In this episode of “Between the Js,” Dr. Josh Boyd, band director at Newnan High School, joins Jacqui and Joy to talk about the band program and the role the community played in helping ensure the program would carry on after the devastating tornado of 2021 upended the band room and the student's instruments. The Coweta County Board of Education recently recognized Dr. Boyd for being selected 2022 Music Educator of the Year at the Georgia Music Educators Association annual conference. Dr. Boyd was honored as an exemplary music educator with significant career accomplishments, as well as a leader in his school, community and state.

Tech Won't Save Us
Who's Winning in China's Fight Against 996? w/ JS Tan

Tech Won't Save Us

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 49:17 Very Popular


Paris Marx is joined by JS Tan to discuss how Chinese tech workers fought against “996” work practices and whether the its phaseout is being driven by that movement or by the changing needs of the government and tech companies.JS Tan is a graduate student at MIT, a former tech worker, and a member of Collective Action in Tech, a project to advance the tech worker movement. Follow JS on Twitter at @organizejs.Tech Won't Save Us offers a critical perspective on tech, its worldview, and wider society with the goal of inspiring people to demand better tech and a better world. Follow the podcast (@techwontsaveus) and host Paris Marx (@parismarx) on Twitter, support the show on Patreon, and sign up for the weekly newsletter.The podcast is produced by Eric Wickham and part of the Harbinger Media Network.Also mentioned in this episode:JS wrote about why China's 996 work schedules are changing and the factors driving it.Rest of World also had recent reporting on changes to 996 practices.Collective Action in Tech has an embedded organizer program that is open for applications.The Verge wrote about Justin Sun, a controversial figure in crypto.In 2020, Ant Group's US IPO was canceled.China has launched a number of policies to crack down on its tech industry in recent years.Support the show

Jason & John
Kevin Durant is all in for Nets, Pujols/Cardinals love from JS, & John wants to meet the Rock

Jason & John

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 45:49


Kevin Durant is all in for Nets, Pujols/Cardinals love from JS, & John wants to meet the Rock

Screaming in the Cloud
How to Leverage AWS for Web Developers with Adam Elmore

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 34:24


About AdamAdam is an independent cloud consultant that helps startups build products on AWS. He's also the host of AWS FM, a podcast with guests from around the AWS community, and an AWS DevTools Hero.Adam is passionate about open source and has made a handful of contributions to the AWS CDK over the years. In 2020 he created Ness, an open source CLI tool for deploying web sites and apps to AWS.Previously, Adam co-founded StatMuse—a Disney backed startup building technology that answers sports questions—and served as CTO for five years. He lives in Nixa, Missouri, with his wife and two children.Links Referenced: 17 Ways to Run Containers On AWS: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/the-17-ways-to-run-containers-on-aws/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/aeduhm Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/adamelmore TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, I encounter someone in the wild that… well, I'll just be direct, makes me feel a little bit uneasy, almost like someone's walking over my grave. And I think I've finally figured out elements of what that is. It feels sometimes like I run into people—ideally not while driving—who are trying to occupy sort of the same space in the universe, and I never quite know how to react to that.Today's guest is just one such person. Adam Elmore is an independent AWS consultant, has been all over the Twitters for a while, recently started live streaming basically his every waking moment because he is just that interesting. Adam, thank you for suffering my slings and arrows—Adam: [laugh].Corey: —and agreeing to chat with me today.Adam: I would say first of all, you don't need to be worried about anyone walking over your grave. [laugh]. That was very flattering.Corey: No, honestly, I have big enterprise companies looking to put me in my grave, but that's a separate threat model. We're good on that, for now.Adam: [laugh]. I got to set myself up here to—I'm just going to laugh a lot, and your editor or somebody's going to have to deal with that. And maybe the audience will see—[laugh].Corey: Hey, I prefer that as opposed to talking to people who have absolutely no sense of humor of which they are aware. Awesome, I have a list of companies that they should apply for immediately. So, when I say that we're trying to occupy elements of the same space in the universe, let me talk a little bit about what I mean by that. You are independent as a consultant, which is how I started this whole nonsense, and then I started gathering a company around me almost accidentally. You are an AWS Dev Tools Hero, whereas I am an AWS community villain, which is kind of a polar opposite slash anti-hero approach, and it's self-granted in my case. How did you stumble into the universe of AWS? You just realized one day you were too happy and what can you do to make yourself miserable, and this was the answer, or what?Adam: Yeah, I guess. So. I mean, I've been a software developer for 15 years, like, my whole career, that's kind of what I've done. And at some point, I started a startup called StatMuse. And I was able, as sort of a co-founder there, with venture backing, like, I was able to just kind of play with the cloud.And we deployed everything on AWS, so that was—like, I was there five years; it was sort of five years of running this, I would call it like a Digital Media Studio. Like, we built technology, but we did lots of experiments, so it felt like playing on AWS. Because we built kind of weird one-offs, these digital experiences for various organizations. The Hall of Fame was one of them. We did, like, a, like, a 3-D Talking bust of John Madden, so it was like all kinds of weird technology involved.But that was sort of five years of, I guess, spending venture money [laugh] to play on AWS. And some of that was Google money; I guess I never thought about that, but Google was an investor in StatMuse. [laugh]. Yeah, so we sort of like—I ran that for five years and was able to learn just a lot of AWS stuff that really excited me. I guess, coming from normal web development stuff, it was exciting just how much leverage you have with AWS, so I sort of dove in pretty hard. And then yeah, when I left StatMuse in 2019 I've just been, I guess, going even harder into that direction. I just really enjoy it.Corey: My first real exposure to AWS was at a company where the CTO was a, I guess we'll call him an extraordinarily early cloud evangelist. I was there as a contractor, and he was super excited and would tweet nonsensical things like, “I'm never going to rack a server ever again.” And I was a grumpy sysadmin type; I came from the ops world where anything that is new shouldn't be treated with disdain and suspicion because once you've been a sysadmin for 20 minutes, you've been there long enough to see today's shiny new shit become tomorrow's legacy garbage that you're stuck supporting. So, “Oh, great. What now?”I was very down on Cloud in those days and I encountered it with increasing frequency as I stumbled my way through my career. And at the end of 2016, I wound up deciding to go out independent and fix… well, what problems am I good at fixing that I can articulate in a sentence, and well, I'd gotten surprised by AWS bills from time to time—fortunately with someone else's money; the best kind of mistake to make—and well I know a few things. Let's get really into it. In time, I came to learn that cost and architecture the same thing in cloud, and now I don't know how the hell to describe myself. Other people love to describe me, usually with varying forms of profanity, but here we are. It really turns into the idea of forging something of your own path. And you've absolutely been doing that for at least the last three years as you become someone who's increasingly well known and simultaneously harder to describe.Adam: Yeah, I would say if you figure it out, if you know how to describe me, I would love to know because just coming up with the title—for this episode you needed, like, my title, I don't know what my title is. I'm also—like, we talked about independent, so nobody sort of gives me a title. I would love to just receive one if you think of one, [laugh] if anyone listening thinks of one… it's increasingly hard to, sort of like, even decide what I care most about. I know I need to, like, probably niche down, I feel like you've kind of niched into the billing stuff. I can't just be like, “I'm an AWS guy,” because AWS is so big. But yeah, I have no idea.Corey: Anyone who claims, “Oh, I'm an expert in AWS,” is lying or trying to sell something.Adam: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: I love that. It's, “Really? I have some questions to establish that for you.” As far as naming what it is, you do, first piece of advice, never ever, ever, ever listen to someone who works at AWS; those people are awful at naming things, as evidenced by basically every service they've ever launched. But you are actually fairly close to being an AWS expert. You did a six-week speed-run through every certification that they offer and that is nothing short of astonishing. How'd it come about?Adam: It's a unique intersection of skills that I think I have. And I'm not very self-aware, I don't know all my strengths and weaknesses and I struggle to sort of nail those down, but I think one of my strengths is just ability to, like, consume information, I guess at a high volume. So, I'm like an auditory learner; I can listen to content really fast and sort of retain enough. And then I think the other skill I have is just I'm good at tests. I've always said that, like, going back to school, like, high school, I always felt like I was really good at multiple-choice tests. I don't know if that's a skill or some kind of innate talent.But I think those two things combined, and then, like, eight years of building on AWS, and that sort of frames how I was able to take all that on. And I don't know that I really set out thinking I will do it in six weeks. I took the first few and then did them pretty fast and thought, “I wonder how quickly I could do all of them.” And I just kind of at that point, it became this sort of goal. I have to take on certain challenges occasionally that just sound fun for no reason other than they sound fun and that was kind of the thing for those six weeks. [laugh].Corey: I have two certifications: Cloud Practitioner and the SysOps Administrator Associate. Those were interesting.Adam: You took the new one, right? The new SysOps with the labs and stuff I'd love to hear about that.Corey: I did, back when it was in beta. That was a really interesting experience and I'll definitely get to that, but I wound up, for example, getting a question wrong in the Cloud Practitioner exam four years ago or so, when it was, “How long does it take to restore an RDS instance from backup?” And I gave the honest answer instead of the by-the-book, correct answer. That's part of the problem is that I've been doing this stuff too long and I know how these things break and what the real world looks like. Certifications are also very much a snapshot at a point in time.Because I write the Last Week in AWS newsletter, I'm generally up-to-the-minute on what has changed, and things that were not possible yesterday, suddenly are possible today, so I need to know when was this certification launched. Oh, it was in early 2021. Yeah, I needed to be a lot more specific; which week? And then people look at me very strangely and here we are.The Systems Administrator Certification was interesting because this is the first one, to my knowledge, where they started doing a live lab as a—Adam: Yeah.Corey: Component of this. And I don't think it's a breach of the NDA to point out that one of the exams was, “Great. Configure CloudWatch out of the box to do this thing that it's supposed to do out of the box.” And I've got to say that making the service do what it's supposed to do with no caveats is probably the sickest shade I've ever seen anyone throw at AWS, like, configuring the service is so bad that it is going to be our test to prove you know what you're doing. That is amazing.Adam: [laugh]. Yeah, I don't have any shade through I'm not as good with the, like, ability to come off, like, witty and kind while still criticizing things. So, I generally just try not to because I'm bad at it. [laugh].Corey: It's why I generally advise people don't try, in seriousness. It's not that people can't be clever; it's that the failure mode of clever is ‘asshole' and I'm not a big fan of making people feel worse based upon the things that I say and do. It's occasionally I wind up getting yelled at by Amazonians saying that the people who built a service didn't feel great about something I said, and my instinctive immediate reaction is, “Oh, shit, that wasn't my intention. How did I screw this up?” Given a bit of time, I realized that well hang on a minute because I'm not—they're not my target audience. I'm trying to explain this to other customers.And, on some level, if you're going to charge tens of millions of dollars a month for a service or more, maybe make a better one, not for nothing. So, I see both sides of it. I'm not intentionally trying to cause pain, but I'm also not out here insulting people individually. Like, sometimes people make bad decisions, sometimes individually, sometimes in a group. And then we have a service name we have to live with, and all right, I guess I'm going to make fun of that forever. It's fun that keeps it engaging for me because otherwise, it's boring.Adam: No, I hear you. No, and somebody's got to do it. I'm glad you do it and do it so well because, I mean, you got to keep them honest. Like, that's the thing. Keep AWS in check.Corey: Something that I went through somewhat recently was a bit of an awakening. I have no problem revisiting old opinions and discovering that huh, I no longer agree with it; it's time to evolve that opinion. The CDK specifically was one of those where I looked at it and thought this thing looks a little hokey. So, I started using it in Python and sure enough, the experience was garbage. So cool, the CDK is a piece of crap. There we go. My job is easy.I was convinced to take a second look at it via TypeScript, a language I do not know and did not have any previous real experience with. So, I spent a few days just powering through it, and now I'm a convert. I think it's amazing. It is my default go-to for building AWS infrastructure. And all it took was a little bit of poking and prodding to get me to change my mind on that. You've taken it to another level and you started actively contributing to the AWS CDK. What was your journey with that, honestly, remarkable piece of software?Adam: Yeah, so I started contributing to CDK when I was actually doing a lot of Python development. So, I worked with a company that was doing—there was a Python shop. So actually, the first thing I contributed was a Python function construct, which is sort of the equivalent of the Node.js function construct, which like, you can just basically point at a TypeScript file and it transpiles it, bundles it, and does all that, right? So, it makes it easy to deploy TypeScript as a Lambda function.Well, I mean, it ends up being a JavaScript Lambda function, but anyway, that was the Python function construct. And then I sort of got really into it. So, I got pretty hooked on using the CDK in every place that I could. I'm a huge fan, and I do primarily write in TypeScript these days. I love being able to write TypeScript front-end and back, so built a lot of, like, Next.JS front-ends, and then I'm building back-ends with CDK TypeScript.Yeah, I've had, like, a lot of conversations about CDK. I think there's definitely a group that's sort of, against the CDK, if you're thinking in terms of, like, beginners. And I do see where, for people who aren't as familiar with AWS, or maybe this is their entry point into cloud development, it does a lot of things that maybe you're not aware of that, you know, you're now kind of responsible for. So, it's deploying—like, it makes it really easy to write, like, three lines of TypeScript that stand up an entire VPC with all this configuration and Managed NAT Gateways and [laugh] everything else. And you may not be aware of all the things you just stood up.So, CloudFormation maybe is a little more—sort of gives you that better visibility into what you're creating. So, I've definitely seen that pushback. But I think for people who really, like, have built a lot of applications on AWS, I think the CDK is just such a time-saver. I mean, I spend so much less time building the same things in the CDK versus CloudFormation. I'm a big fan.Corey: For me, I've learned enough about JavaScript to be dangerous and it seems like TypeScript is more or less trying to automate a bunch of people's jobs away, which is basically, from I can tell, their job is to go on the internet and complain about someone's JavaScript. So great, that that's really all it does is it complains, “Oh, this ambiguous. You should be more specific about it.” And great. Awesome. I still haven't gotten into scenarios where I've been caught out by typing issues, and very often I find that it just feels like sheer bloodymindedness, but I smile, nod, bend the knee and life goes on.Adam: [laugh]. When you've got a project that's, like, I don't know, a few months old—or better, a few years old—and you need to do, like, major refactoring, that's when TypeScript really saves you just a ton of time. Like, when you can make a change in a type or in actual implementation stuff and then see the ripple effects and then sort of go around the codebase and fix those things, it's just a lot easier than doing it in JavaScript and discovering stuff at runtime. So, I'm a big TypeScript fan. I don't know where it's all headed. I know there's people that are not fans of, like, transpiling your Lambda functions, for instance. Like, why not just ship good JavaScript? And I get that case, too. Yeah, but I've definitely—I felt the productivity boost, I guess—if that's the thing—from TypeScript.Corey: For me, I'm still at a point where I'm learning the edges of where things start and where they stop. But one of the big changes I made was that I finally, after 15 years, gave up my beloved Vim as my editor for this and started using VS Code. Because the reasons that I originally went with Vi were understandable when you realize what I was. I'm always going to be remoting into network gear or random—on maintained Unix boxes. Vi is going to be everywhere on everything and that's fine.Yeah, I don't do that anymore, and increasingly, I find that everything I'm writing is local. It is not something that is tied to a remote thing that I need to login and edit by hand. At that point, we are in disaster area. And suddenly it's nice. I mean things like tab completion, where it just winds up completing the rest of the variable name or, once you enable Copilot and absolutely not CodeWhisperer yet, it winds up you tab complete your entire application. Why not? It's just outsourcing it to Stack Overflow without that pesky copy and paste step.Adam: Yeah, I don't know how in the weeds you want to get on your p—I don't know, in terms of technical stuff, but Copilot both blows me away—there are days where it autocompletes something that I just, I can't fathom how—it pulled in not just, like, the patterns that it found, obviously, in training, but, like, the context in the file I'm working and sort of figured out what I was trying to do. Sometimes it blows me away. A lot of times, though, it frustrates me because of TypeScript. Like, I'm used to Typescript and types saving me from typing a lot. Like, I can tab-complete stuff because I have good types defined, right, or it's just inferred from the libraries I'm using.It's tough though when GitHub is fighting with TypeScript and VS Code. But it's funny that you came from Vim and you now live in VS Code. I really am trying to move from VS Code to, like, the Vim world, mostly because of Twitch streamers that blow my mind with what they can do in Vim [laugh] and how fast they can move. I do—every time I move my hand, like, over to the arrow keys, I feel a little sad and I wish I just did Vim.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Lambda Cloud. They offer GPU instances with pricing that's not only scads better than other cloud providers, but is also accessible and transparent. Also, check this out, they get a lot more granular in terms of what's available. AWS offers NVIDIA A100 GPUs on instances that only come in one size and cost $32/hour. Lambda offers instances that offer those GPUs as single card instances for $1.10/hour. That's 73% less per GPU. That doesn't require any long term commitments or predicting what your usage is gonna look like years down the road. So if you need GPUs, check out Lambda. In beta, they're offering 10TB of free storage and, this is key, data ingress and egress are both free. Check them out at lambdalabs.com/cloud. That's l-a-m-b-d-a-l-a-b-s.com/cloud.Corey: There are people who have just made it into an entire lifestyle, on some level. And I'm fair to middling; I've known people who are dark wizards at it. In practice, I found that my productivity was never constrained by how quickly I can type. It's one of those things where it's, I actually want to stop and have my brain catch up sometimes, believe it or not, for those who follow me on Twitter. It's the idea of wanting to make sure that I am able to intelligently and rationally wrap my head around what it is I'm doing.And okay, just type out a whole bunch of boilerplate is, like, the least valuable use of anything and that is where I find things like Copilot working super well, where I, if I'm doing CloudFormation, for example, the fact that it tab-completes all the necessary attributes and can go back and change them or whatnot, that's an enormous time saver. Same story with the CDK, although with some constructs, it doesn't quite understand which ones get certain values to it. And I really liked the idea behind it. I think this is in some ways, the future of IDEs, to a point.Adam: Oh, for sure. I think, like, the case, you call that with CloudFormation, you don't have really typeahead in VS Code, at least I'm not using anything. Maybe there are extensions that give you that in VS Code. But to have Copilot fill in required prompts on a CloudFormation template, that's a lifesaver. Because I just, every time I write CloudFormation, I've just got the docs up and I'm copying stuff I've done before or whatever; like, to save that time it's huge. But CodeWhisperer, not so much? Is it not, I guess, up to snuff? I haven't seen it or played with it at all.Corey: It's still very early days and it hasn't had exposure outside of Amazonian codebases to my understanding, so it's, like, “Learn to code like an Amazonian.” And you can fill in your own joke here on that one. I imagine it's like—isn't that—aren't they primarily a Java shop, for one? And all right. It turns out most of my code doesn't need to operate the way that there's does.Adam: I didn't know that they were training it just internally. Like, I'm assuming Copilot is trained on, like, Stack Overflow or something, right? Or just all of GitHub, I guess.Corey: And GitHub and a bunch of other things, and people are yelling at them for it, and I haven't been tracking that. But honestly, the CodeWhisperer announcement taught me things about Copilot, which is weird, which tells me that none of these companies are great at explaining this. Like I can just write a comment in this of, “Add an S3 bucket,” and then Copilot will tab-complete the entirety of adding an S3 bucket, usually even secure, which is awesome. They also fix the early Copilot teething problems of tab-completing people's AWS API credentials. You know, the—yeah, they've fixed a lot of that, thankfully.Adam: Yeah.Corey: But it's still one of those neat things that you can just basically start—it gets a little bit closer to describe what you want the application to do and then it'll automatically write it for you on the back-end. Sure, sometimes it makes naive decisions that do not bear out, but again, it's still early days. I'm optimistic.Adam: Yeah, that reminds me of, like, the, I mean, the serverless cloud, so serverless framework folks, like, what they're doing where they're sort of inferring your infrastructure based on you just write an app and it sort of creates the infrastructure as code for you, or just sort of infers it all from your code. So, if you start using a bucket, it'll create a bucket for that. That definitely seems to be a movement as well, where just do less as a developer [laugh] seems to be the theme.Corey: Yeah, just move up the stack. We see this time and time again. I mean, look at the—I use this analogy from time to time from the sysadmin world, but in the late-90s, if you wanted to build a web server, you needed a spare week and an intimate knowledge of GCC compiler flags. In time, it became oh, great, now it's rpm install, then yum install, then ensure present with something like Puppet, and then Docker has it, and now it's just a checkbox on the S3 page, and you're running a static site. Things don't get harder with time, and I don't think that as a developer, your time is best spent writing by hand the proper syntax for a for loop or whatnot.It's not the differentiated value. Talk to me instead about what you want that thing to do. That was my big problem with Lambda when it first came out and I spent two weeks writing my first Lambda function—because I'm bad at programming—where I had to learn the exact format of expected for input and output, and now any Lambda function I write takes me a couple of minutes to write because I'm also bad at programming and don't know what tests are.Adam: [laugh]. Tests are overrated, I don't spend a lot of time writing t—I mean, I do a lot of stuff alone and I do a lot of stuff for myself, so in those contexts, I'm not writing tests if I'm being honest. I stream now and everyone on the stream is constantly asking, “Where are the tests?” Like, there are no tests. I'm sorry. [laugh]. Was someone else's stream.Corey: Oh yeah, it used to be though, that you had to be a little sneakier to have other people do work for you. Copilot makes it easier and presumably CodeWhisperer will, too. Used to be that if AWS launched new service and I didn't know how to configure it, all I would do is restrict a role down to only being able to work with that service, attach that to a user and then just drop the credentials on Twitter or GitHub. And I waited 20 minutes and I came back and sure enough, someone configured it and was already up and mining Bitcoin. So, turn that off, take what they built, and off the production with it. Problem solved. Oh, and rotate those credentials, unless you enjoy pain. Problem solved. The end. And I don't know if it's a best practice, but it sure was effective.Adam: Yeah, that would do it. Well, they're just like scanners now, right, like they're just scanning GitHub public repos for any credentials that are leaked like that, and they're available within seconds. You can literally, like, push a public repo with credentials and it is being [laugh] used within minutes. It's nuts.Corey: GitHub has some automatic back channel thing—I believe; I haven't done an experiment lately, but I believe that AWS will intentionally shoot down the credential as soon as it gets reported, which is kind of amazing. I really should do some more experiments with it just to see how disastrous this can get.Adam: Yeah. No, I'd be curious. Please let me know. I guess you'll tweet about it so I'll see it.Corey: Can I borrow your account for a few minutes?Adam: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, it's fun. Now, the secret to my 17 Ways to Run Containers On AWS is in almost every case, those containers can be crypto miners, so it's not just about having too many services do the same thing; it's the attack surface continues to grow and expand in the fullness of time. I'm not saying this is right or wrong; it is what it is, but it's also something that I think people have an understated appreciation for.Let's change topic a little bit. Something you've been doing lately and talking about is the idea of building a course on AWS. You're clearly capable of doing the engineering work. That's not in question. You've been a successful consultant for years, which tells me you also know how to deliver software that meets customer requirements, as opposed to, “Well, the spec was shitty, but I wrote it anyway,” because you don't last long as a consultant if you enjoy being able to afford to eat if that's the direction you go in. Now, you're drifting toward becoming a teacher. Tell me about that. First, what makes you think that's something you're good at?Adam: So, I don't know. I don't know that I'm good at it and I guess I'll find out. I've been streaming, like, on Twitch just my work days, and that's been early signs that I think I'm okay at it, at least. I think it's very different, obviously, like, a self-paced course are going to be very different from streaming for hours, so there's a lot more editing and thoughtfulness involved, but I do think, like, I've always wanted to teach. So, even before I got into technology—I was pretty late into technology; it was after high school. Like back in high school, I always thought I wanted to be a professor.I just enjoyed, I guess the idea of presenting ideas in ways that people understood. And I live in an area—so I live in the Ozarks, it's not a very tech literate area. It became, like, this thing where I felt like I could really explain technology to people who are non-technical. And that's not necessarily what my course—what I'm aiming to do. I'm trying to teach web developers how to leverage AWS, and then sort of get out of the maybe front-end only or maybe traditional web frameworks—like, they've only worked with stuff that they deploy to Heroku or whatever—trying to teach that crowd, how to leverage AWS and all these wonderful primitives that we have.So, that's not exactly the same thing, but that's sort of like, I feel like I do have the ability to translate technology to non-technical folks. And then I guess, like, for me, at this stage of my career, you know, I've done a lot of work for a company, for startups, for individual clients, and it feels very, like—I just always feel like I'm going in a hole. Like, I feel like, I'm doing this little thing and I'm serving this one customer, but the idea of being able to, I guess, serve more people and sort of spread my reach, the idea of creating something that I can share with a lot of developers who would maybe benefit from it, it just feels better, I guess. [laugh]. I don't know exactly all the reasons why that feels better, but like, at the end of the day, my consulting kind of feels like this thing I do because I just need money.And now that I need money less and less, I just feel like I'd rather do stuff that I actually am excited about. I'm actually really excited about the outcomes for creating a course where, you know, I think I can maybe—my style of teaching or something could resonate with some group of people. Yeah, so that's it. It's AWS for web devs. The thought is that I'm going to create courses after this. Like, I hope to move into more education, less consulting. That's where I'm at.Corey: I would say you're probably selling yourself fairly short. I've seen a lot of the content you've put out over the years and I learned a lot from it every time. I think that there are some folks who put courses out where, one, they don't have the baseline knowledge around what it is that they're teaching, it just feels like a grift, and another failure mode is that people know how to do the thing, but they have no idea how to teach it to someone who isn't them. And there's nothing inherently wrong with not knowing how to teach; it is its own distinct skill. The problem is when you don't recognize that about yourself and in turn, wind up having some somewhat significant challenges.Adam: Yeah. No, I know that one of the struggles is, I work with pretty obscure technologies on AWS. Not obscure, but like, I have a very specific way I build APIs on AWS and I don't know that's generally, if you're taking a bunch of web developers and trying to move them into AWS is probably not the stack that I use. So, that is part of it, but that's also kind of to my benefit, I guess. It works for me a little bit in that I'm less familiar with maybe the more beginner-friendly way to enter into AWS.It's been years, so I think I can kind of come at it a little fresh and that'll help me produce a course that maybe meets them where they're at better. Yeah, the grifting thing, I'm definitely sensitive to just this idea of putting out a course. It was hard for me to really go out there and say I was making a course, even on Twitter, because I just feel like there's, like, some stereotype—I don't know, there's an association with that, for me at least, for my perception of course creation. But I know that there are people who've done it right and do it for the right reasons. And I think to the extent that I could hit that, you know, both those things, do it right and do it for the right reasons, then it's exciting to me. And if I can't, and it turned out not good at teaching, then I'll move on and do more consulting, I guess, [laugh] or streaming on Twitch.Corey: You are very clearly self-aware enough that if you put something out and it isn't effective, I have zero doubt that you won't just stop selling it, you'll take it down and reach out to people. Because you, more so than most, seem very cognizant of the fact that a poor experience learning something does not in most people's cases, translate to, “Oh, my teacher is shitty.” Instead, it's, “Oh, I'm bad at this and I'm not smart enough to figure it out.” That's still the problem I run into with bad developer experience on a bunch of things that get launched. If I have a bad time, I assume it's, “Oh, I'm stupid. I wish someone had told me.”And first, they did, secondly, it's the sense that no, it's just not being very clearly explained and the folks who wrote the documentation or talking about it are too close to what they've built to understand what it's like to look at this thing from fresh eyes. They're doing a poor job of setting the stage to explain the value it brings and in what scenario, you should be using this.Adam: It's a long process. I want to launch the course in the fall, but in the process of building out the course, I'm really going to be doing workshops and individual—like, I just have a lot of friends that are web developers and I'm going to be kind of getting on with them and teaching them this material and just trying to see what resonates. I'm going to a lot of trouble, I guess, to make sure I'm not just putting out a thing just to say I made a course. Like, I don't actually want to say I made a course, so if I'm going to do it, it's like most things I do I really kind of throw myself into. And I know if I spend enough energy and effort, I think I can make something that at least helps some people. I guess we'll see.Corey: I look forward to it. Any idea as far as rough timeline goes?Adam: Yeah, I hope to launch in the fall. But if it takes longer, I don't know. I've heard people say, to do a course right, you should spend a year on it. And maybe that's what I do.Corey: No, I love that answer. It's great. You're just saying I want to launch in the fall, which is sufficiently vague, and if that winds up not being vague enough, you could always qualify with, “Well, I didn't say what year.”Adam: [laugh].Corey: So, great you know, it's always going to be the fall somewhere.Adam: [laugh]. I just know, like, when someone says you should spend a year I just do things very hard. Like I really, like, throw a lot of time and obsess, like, I'm very obsessive. And when I do something, it's hard for me imagine doing any one thing for a year because I burn myself out. Like, I obsess very hard for usually, like, three months, it's usually, like, a quarter, and then I fall off the face of the earth for three months and I basically mope around the house and I'm just too tired to do anything else. So, I think right now I'm streaming and that's kind of been my obsession. I'm three weeks in so we got a few more months and then we'll see, [laugh] we'll see how I maintain it.Corey: Well, I look forward to seeing how it comes out. You'll have to come back and let us know when it's ready for launch.Adam: Yeah, that sounds great.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time and taking me through what you're up to. If people want to learn more, what's the best place for them to find you?Adam: Yeah, I think Twitter. I mean, I mostly hang out on Twitter, and these days Twitch. So, Twitter my handle—I guess you'll put it, like, in the thing description or something. It's like the phonetic—Corey: Oh, we will absolutely toss it into the show notes, where useful content goes to linger.Adam: [laugh]. It's like A-E-D-U-H-M. It's like a—it's the phonetic way of saying Adam, I guess. And then on Twitch, I'm adamelmore. So, those are the two places I spend most my time.Corey: And off to the show notes it goes. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I really appreciate it, Adam.Adam: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. I really appreciate it.Corey: Adam Elmore, independent AWS consultant. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment that attempts to teach us exactly what we got wrong, but fails utterly because you're terrible at teaching things.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

PLAYING GAMES with Strangers
70: If This Doesn’t Work…

PLAYING GAMES with Strangers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 58:31 Transcription Available


Playing Games with Strangers Theme (Towerfall Remix) by Steve Arthur & JS Earls Music by Tabletop Audio & JS Earls Episode engineer(s): JS "The Jester" Earls and Katherine "Bonecrusher" Czerwinski Thanks to Julie Earls, Aaron Peckham, Amanda Clements, Branson Boykin, Matthew Cosby, and Debbie Roth - our Blade-level patrons! Become a patron for as little as $1 for uncut sessions, exclusive content, and more! Maybe even the chance to play in a Patreon-exclusive miniseries with some of the cast! Ways to support the podcast Get new click-clacks for your own sessions from Sage's Portal!Rep some PGwS merchEnergize yourself and be better with Dubby, a clean energy drink that is made to give you focus with no crash, jitters, or angst like other energy drinks.

Frontend First
Playing with Server Components in Vercel's Edge Runtime

Frontend First

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 51:28


Ryan tells Sam about some experiments he's been running using Server Components in Vercel's new edge runtime. He talks about how components that suspend in the node runtime cause the static build of your Next.js app to wait until they unsuspend, while components that suspend in the edge runtime stream back fallback responses as data is being fetched. Ryan also tells Sam about a blocking JS trick he learned to alter the initial render of your clientside app based on client-specific data, like whether their theme preference is dark or light mode.Topics include:0:00 - Intro1:00 - Running synchronous JS before React's initial render of build-time generated HTML17:03 - Using getServerSideProps on the edge in Next.js for run-time generated HTML32:15 - Behavior of Server Components that suspend in edge runtime vs. node runtimeLinks:Josh Comeau's post on dark modeNext.js discussion on switchable runtime

BrosEmprenden-Vender en Amazon, Ecommerce y Negocios en Línea Podcast
43 Temo Valle | Crear una Marca es el Activo Más Valioso que Puedes Crear Hoy | BrosEmprenden

BrosEmprenden-Vender en Amazon, Ecommerce y Negocios en Línea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 67:08


Temo Valle Nos nos platica su historia y como inició en ecommerce.Además de consejos de emprendimiento y motivación para nuestros colegas godines. No extrañamos las cofías, jeje que se usan en la industria de los alimentos.No esperes para comenzar a vender en Amazon, la primera opción es comenzar en un marketplace y después lanzarte con toda la carne al asador a tu tienda propía.La información de Temo la puedes encontrar aquí https://activosdevalor.com/Una herramienta muy poderosa para vender en Amazon - Helium 10 (50% de descuento en tu primer mes https://bit.ly/2RdhZrf) aunque el Padrino use JS.Vente para Telegram para compartirnos tus logros y tus aprendizajes, obvio también preguntas con la banda de BrosEmprenden - https://t.me/aprendeavenderenamzPodcast: BrosEmprenden.com BrosEmprenden: Facebook  Instagram Support the show

Bien Comer
#193 Efectos postcovid - Bien Comer

Bien Comer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 27:00


En esta entrega me honra con su visita la Dra. JS para platicar sobre los efectos a largo y mediano plazo del covid. Cómo debemos alimentarnos, suplementarnos, qué estudios clínicos debemos realizar, en fin… creo que es un tema que a todos nos compete pues creo que a la mayoría de la población ya nos alcanzó el bicho. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv
How to Get Your Rails Models and Routes into Your Front End Framework - RUBY 559

All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 73:01


Today on the show, Máximo Mussini shares how your front-end framework can benefit from integrating rails models and routes concurrently.  Topics they discuss today include everything from complex structures with serializers to generating JS from rails routes. In this episode… Advantages of serializers  Contact serializers Parse float and typescripts Complex structures with serializers Path helpers in JS Generating JS from rails routes Typed interface files configurations Types and Ruby Sponsors Avo Raygun | Click here to get started on your free 14-day trial Top End Devs Links Generating TypeScript interfaces from Ruby serializers 2 Generating JS functions to make request from Rails routes 2 GitHub: ElMassimo Twitter: @MaximoMussini Picks Charles- Orbis Charles – Top End Devs Meetups Charles – Rails Remote Conference John- Simple Task Management Software for Businesses of All Sizes John- VALORANT: Riot Games' competitive 5v5 character-based tactical shooter Luke- Introduction Luke- Decameron | work by Boccaccio Máximo- Recording Your Terminal to SVG | platformOS Docs Máximo- Inertia.js - The Modern Monolith Valentino- Co-ops: On Sparking Innovation at Doximity Valentino- Ruby Evolution Valentino- why the lucky stiff - Wikipedia

Thinking Elixir Podcast
112: Putting LiveView in a Chrome Extension

Thinking Elixir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 54:34 Very Popular


Google Chrome extension that displays a LiveView and integrates with a web page like Gmail? Steve Bussey shares how he did just that! We learn how it worked, why he did it, the benefits he sees, and how this differs from the conventional approach. He explains the small JS shim used, recommends a library to help when integrating with Gmail and he explains how the user experience is great, particularly when rolling out new versions! Steve goes further to talk about Chrome's new v3 extension API and targeting multiple browsers. Show Notes online - http://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/112 (http://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/112) Elixir Community News - https://github.com/WhatsApp/eqwalizer/blob/main/FAQ.md (https://github.com/WhatsApp/eqwalizer/blob/main/FAQ.md) – WhatsApp static type checker eqWAlizer added a FAQ. - https://twitter.com/robertoaloi/status/1555470447671754753 (https://twitter.com/robertoaloi/status/1555470447671754753) – Experimental support in erlang_ls has also been built for eqWAlizer - https://github.com/erlang-ls/erlang_ls/pull/1356 (https://github.com/erlang-ls/erlang_ls/pull/1356) – Erlang LS eqWAlizer support - https://twitter.com/michalmuskala/status/1554813818475319296 (https://twitter.com/michalmuskala/status/1554813818475319296) – Erlang/OTP's Dialyzer can now be run incrementally, which works out ~7x faster on average - https://github.com/erlang/otp/pull/5997 (https://github.com/erlang/otp/pull/5997) – Dialyzer PR with more details - https://twitter.com/chris_mccord/status/1554478915477028864 (https://twitter.com/chris_mccord/status/1554478915477028864) – Initial verified routes announcement from Chris McCord for Phoenix 1.7 - https://twitter.com/josevalim/status/1554512359485542400 (https://twitter.com/josevalim/status/1554512359485542400) – José Valim gave more clarification on what verified routes means. - https://twitter.com/hugobarauna/status/1554547730302832641 (https://twitter.com/hugobarauna/status/1554547730302832641) – Hugo Baraúna created a 5 minute Youtube video showing how to integrate Livebook with Google BigQuery. - https://twitter.com/akoutmos/status/1556046188784324616 (https://twitter.com/akoutmos/status/1556046188784324616) – Alex Koutmos teased that he's adding Benchee support to Livebook. - https://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/94 (https://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/94) – Benchee discussion with Tobias Pfeiffer in episode 94. - https://erlangforums.com/t/pgmp-postgresql-client-with-logical-replication-to-ets/1707 (https://erlangforums.com/t/pgmp-postgresql-client-with-logical-replication-to-ets/1707) – Interesting Erlang library launched called pgmp - https://github.com/shortishly/pgmp (https://github.com/shortishly/pgmp) – pgmp is a PostgreSQL client with support for simple and extended query, and logical replication to ETS. Do you have some Elixir news to share? Tell us at @ThinkingElixir (https://twitter.com/ThinkingElixir) or email at show@thinkingelixir.com (mailto:show@thinkingelixir.com) Discussion Resources - https://twitter.com/yoooodaaaa/status/1544434779327811585 (https://twitter.com/yoooodaaaa/status/1544434779327811585) – Tweet about creating a chrome extension - https://pragprog.com/titles/sbsockets/real-time-phoenix/ (https://pragprog.com/titles/sbsockets/real-time-phoenix/) – Author of "Real-Time Phoenix" book - https://salesloft.com/ (https://salesloft.com/) - https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/honey-automatic-coupons-r/bmnlcjabgnpnenekpadlanbbkooimhnj?hl=en-GB (https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/honey-automatic-coupons-r/bmnlcjabgnpnenekpadlanbbkooimhnj?hl=en-GB) - https://www.streak.com/post/announcing-inboxsdk (https://www.streak.com/post/announcing-inboxsdk) - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/iframe (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/iframe) Guest Information - https://twitter.com/YOOOODAAAA (https://twitter.com/YOOOODAAAA) – on Twitter - https://github.com/sb8244/ (https://github.com/sb8244/) – on Github - https://stephenbussey.com (https://stephenbussey.com) – Blog - https://pragprog.com/titles/sbsockets/real-time-phoenix/ (https://pragprog.com/titles/sbsockets/real-time-phoenix/) – Real-Time Phoenix book Find us online - Message the show - @ThinkingElixir (https://twitter.com/ThinkingElixir) - Email the show - show@thinkingelixir.com (mailto:show@thinkingelixir.com) - Mark Ericksen - @brainlid (https://twitter.com/brainlid) - David Bernheisel - @bernheisel (https://twitter.com/bernheisel) - Cade Ward - @cadebward (https://twitter.com/cadebward)