Podcast appearances and mentions of brian dean

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Best podcasts about brian dean

Latest podcast episodes about brian dean

The James Altucher Show
740 - Finding the next Exploding Topics with Brian Dean

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 41:19


I have been obsessed with newsletters, generally, they're accessible, and nowadays, they're tens of thousands of different newsletters with different topics out there. However, this particular newsletter, Exploding Topics, caught my eyes, and I have been reading it every time it hit my inbox! In this episode, I have the writer and co-founder of Exploding Topics, Brian Dean, comes on to talk about the popular and the next trend in the world. We also talked about how to build new businesses and even start a new side hustle with the new trends!   I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Klik Proces - SEO, CRO, YouTube en Voice
NIEUW: Brian Dean's GEHEIME Linkbuilding Strategie [Werkt in Elke Niche in 2021]

Klik Proces - SEO, CRO, YouTube en Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 16:46


Brian Dean's (Backlinko.com) Heeft een Nieuwe Linkbuilding Strategie Die Nog Niet Openbaar is en Niemand Anders Gebruikt. Ik Ontdekte Hem Toevallig en in Deze Video Leg Ik Hem Stap-Voor-Stap Uit.

Dragon Digital Marketing Podcast
How To Blog Effectively For Your Small Business with Andy Cabasso (Ep.#52)

Dragon Digital Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 39:58


Episode shownotes: https://dragon-digital-marketing.com/podcast/episode-52/how-to-blog-effectively-ep-52.html Get Free Small Business Marketing Resources: https://dragon-digital-marketing.comYes, you do need a blog for your small business on which you consistently publish fresh content. Content is king. Blog posts help potential buyers to learn more about what you do, find the right solution for them, and make a buying decision. They also help more people to discover you and find your website through search engines like Google. To get SEO benefits from your blog articles, acquire organic search traffic, earn shares, comments and other forms of engagement, and also attract backlinks to your content, your blog must be better than just average.But how can you find popular content ideas to write about, that are top searched, top shared and top linked? How do you make your articles get traction and lots of traffic, visits and conversions? How can you create better pieces of content than what's already out there? And how do you promote your content to the right people and let them know it exists?The answer:The skyscraper technique!It's a blogging strategy by Brian Dean that - when followed correctly - makes your blog posts trump the rest, just like a skyscraper. Listen and watch until the end to learn how to leverage it for your small business blog and make you blog more effectively.All episodes: https://dragon-digital-marketing.com/podcast/podcast.html Support the show (https://paypal.me/DragonDigitalM1)

Marketers Morgen podcast
Eksempler på gode outreach e-mails – 3 specifikke metoder

Marketers Morgen podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 13:19


En af de vigtigste ting, når man arbejder med outreach, er, at modtageren både læser og ønsker at svare tilbage på din henvendelse. I dagens episode taler Anders og Mikael om tre specifikke cases, som Brian Dean har modtaget, og om hvorfor hver af de 3 e-mails har fungeret så godt. Efter denne episode er du måske motiveret til selv at prøve et par teknikker af.

The Marketing Secrets Show
The Roundtable of World Changers (Part 2 of 4)

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 50:47


The roundtable interview with Matt and Caleb Maddix and a small group of people who are trying to change the world. Enjoy part two of this special 4 part episode series. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Seekers Podcast. So I have got to ask you, what did you think about episode number one of the World Changers Roundtable? Hopefully, you loved it. There were so many things covered in that 42 minutes. Anyway, we are moving on to the next part of this interview. As you know, this is going to be broken down into four parts because they kept me there, handcuffed to a table, until 3:00 AM. I'm just joking. They didn't really. But, the question was so intriguing, we were having so much fun, we just kept going and going until finally I was like, "I have to fly out in three hours. I need to get back to my hotel." But now we're going to go dive into the second part. This next episode is probably another 30 to 40, 45 minutes or so as well. So these are some things we'll be covering in this one, which is really fun. We talk about, number one, why my business partner, Todd Dickerson, is so amazing, and hopefully give you ideas about if you're pursuing opportunities and trying to land your dream job or partnership or whatever. Number two, we talked about personality profiling, how we actually are hiring here at ClickFunnels. We talked about where my love for learning came from. We talked about transition for me, going from an athlete to a business person and a marketer. We talked about some of the lessons I learned from Lindsey Stirling, things I was not expecting to hear from her that totally changed everything for me. We talked about people who intrigue me, my interest in health and bio hacking. We talked about is there anything that happens inside of this business that gets me as excited as what I felt in wrestling. We talked about what thing is close, but nothing actually has ever hit it. We talked about the first Two Comma Club Awards. We talked about how to upgrade your identity as you grow. We talked about the fact that you have to cycle and fail and rebuild in your businesses. We talked about the launch of ClickFunnels and how it wasn't just the fact that I was a genius, because I wasn't. There are so many things. Talking about the grace of God and how it tied into the launch of ClickFunnels. We talked about some of my early products, like Zip Brander and Forum Fortunes. We talked about my Christmas Grinch sale, which was the very first big sale, big launch I ever did, to my little tiny list that made enough money to cover Christmas for my wife and I when we were first getting started. We talked about becoming worthy. We talked about list building, how it's better than buying ads, and a whole bunch of other things. It's amazing, this could be 40 courses all wrapped into one super podcast episode. So if you liked the last episode, I think you're going to love this one as well. And I've got two more after this, coming back, going deeper into this conversation with the Roundtable of World Changers. So, that said, we're going to cue the theme song. When we come back, we'll dive right into the second section here of the interview. Matt Maddix: Dave and Todd, I mean, just wow. Those dudes are like... But what about those guys? Russell: So here's Todd's story. So the real long story short, I bought some software, it was coding Ruby on Rails, didn't know that. Bought this company with the last... I didn't have the money. So I borrowed money, bought this company, coded on some platform we didn't know, and I was like, "Screw it," right? And I tried to hire people to fix it, nobody could fix this platform until finally I was leaving the office one day. I literally emailed the people saying, "Turn off the servers." We lost all of our money to this company. They shut it down. And I'm walking out of the office and I had this impression of like, "There could be someone on your email list who knows Ruby on Rails." I was like, "That's weird. I had a bunch of internet marketing nerds. There's no one that's like, 'Ruby on Rails...'" Anyway. It was starting with the impression from God, I stopped, turned back around, set the computer to open back up, sent an email to my list. "If you know Ruby on Rails, I'm looking for a partner. I bought a software company and it's not working. Please send me a message." Send. Matt: And that's all you said? Russell: Yeah. And lo and behold, three years earlier, Todd bought some random thing from me, happened to be on my email list. He built the website three or four years earlier that was making six figures a year on autopilot. Hadn't worked in four years. Just hanging out relaxing with his wife and his daughter. And an email comes in and it says, "If you know Ruby on Rails, I'm looking for a partner." He's like, "I know Ruby on Rails. I can be Russell's partner." Emails me back. And at first I see him and his beautiful wife and I'm like, "There's no way he's a programmer. There's no way." That was literally my thought. But he was the only person that responded back so I was like, "Okay, well, here's the login to the site. Fix it. I don't know what to do. I'm not a coder." I went to bed, woke up the next morning. He's like, "Cool, I fixed the site. Plus I found this, this, and this. And I changed this. And I moved these things,", and all of this stuff. He's like, "It's working now. Do you have anything else you want to do together?" I'm like, "Huh." And so I give him another project, another project. And for an entire year Todd and I worked together, and never once did he ever ask me for money, ever. Matt: Wow. Russell: Not a penny. And I remember he started finding Boise to work on a project together ... Matt: You're telling me he worked for you for an entire year? Russell: For free. More than a year. Caleb Maddix: Why was that? Russell: I don't know. I found out later. He'd gone to Robert Kiyosaki at this event and he said, "Find someone who's doing what you want to do and work for them for free." So he told me that years later. I didn't know that. Matt: Todd, if you're watching dude. I love you man. You're legit. Russell: And so he kept coming and he started coming to Boise and we started becoming friends. The smartest developer I've ever met. Literally the smartest person I've ever met. I'll go that far. Just genius. And he'd come out to Boise and we'd work on projects and ideas. We tried to launch a couple of things. None of them really worked. And we were just trying stuff. He was just always there, always serving, always doing stuff. And one day were in Boise and I was looking over his shoulder cause we're looking at stuff and I saw his email. And there's all these emails from some recruiting site or something. I was like, "What's that?" He's like, "Oh, it's people recruiting me for a Ruby job." And I was like, "Do you get a lot of those?" And he's like, "I get three or for a day." I'm like, "Really? Are they good offers?" He's like, "I don't know. Let's check it out." He opened it up and the first one was like $400,000 a year starting salary. I'm like, "What?" The next one is $350,000. The next was 5 ... Insane things. I'm like, "Why don't you do that?" He's like, "I don't want to work for them. I want to be your partner man." I'm like, "What?" And then I all of a sudden had this realization that I hadn't paid him in a year. We didn't have much money at the time, we're still at the backside of a business failure when we met. I'm like, "I can pay you maybe $50,000 a year. Can I pay you that?" He's like, "Whatever." So I told our little bookkeeper, "Pay Todd $50,000 a year." And they're like, "Okay." So he did that and next year we're paying $50,000 a year. We're doing stuff and we have more things. Started to get a little success here and there. Making more money. Back in Boise again. And I'm like, "Can I pay you some more?" And he's like, "Whatever." Matt: So he wasn't ever just asking? Russell: Never in his life has he asked me for money. Ever. So we bumped it up to $100,000 a year because that's what we got, the year before that, after a year or two working together. And then, it was crazy, the day Leadpages got the first round of funding for $5,000,000, the same day Todd was flying to Boise. And he gets the email. It's east coast so he's two hours ahead. He's awake and on the plane, he sees the email, forwards it to me, and then jumps in the plane. He's flying for four hours. I wake up. I see the email and I was like, "Leadpages? Got 5 ..." I was like, we built landing page software in the past. I was perplexed and angry. And then Todd lands. And Todd, he's a little guy, he comes into the office all angry. He's like, "Leadpages got 5 million!" He's like, "I can build Leadpages tonight. Do you want to build lead pages?" I'm like, "Yeah. Let's compete with Leadpages." He's like, "All right." Matt: No way. Dude. I love this. Russell: This is like angry Todd. I love angry Todd. I like all Todds, but angry Todd is the best Todd. Matt: Is it? Okay. Russell: He's just pissed because he's like, "I can build this tonight. Everything thing they got we can have done tonight." So we're getting all ready. What should we call it and everything. And then he's like, "Wait, we're building this. You want to add anything else to it?" And I was like, "Oh. Yeah. What if it did this? And what if it did this?" And we spent a week in front of a white board saying, "What if it did?", and we mapped out ClickFunnels. Matt: So you're talking about a week where you guys just locked in and you were just having fun. Just doodling and whatever. Russell: Yeah. He's like, "Oh, I can do that. We can do that." We're brainstorming all sorts of stuff so we map the whole thing out. Matt: Did you know at that moment you were onto something big? At that moment right there, when you guys were like ... Or was it just still like ... Russell: All lot of people have tried something like that. I tried before other people tried. No one had done it. So I was kind of skeptical but Todd's like, "I can do this. This is easy." I'm like, "Okay because I tried it ..." He's like, "No dude, I can do it. This is easy." So I was, excuse me, optimistically hopeful because he's a genius but I was also nervous. But anyways, we map it out and then we bought Clickpros.com. I wanted to call it ClickFusion because I own ClickFusion, but we'd had three failed businesses called ClickFusion. All of them failed and Todd was like, "No. It's bad karma. We can't." I'm like, "But the logo is so cool dude." Matt: I love it. You love the logo. Russell: And he's like, "No, we can't." He's like, "It's got a jinx on it or something. We can't do that. You have to come up with a different name." I was like, "But ClickFusion is the coolest name ever." So we're trying things. Click everything and then ClickFunnels. We're like, "Ah." That was the thing. We're so excited Matt: Who first said it? Do you remember? The words ClickFunnels. Caleb: It's almost like God saying, "Let there be light." Russell: I would assume it was me but I'm not positive. I'll have to ask Todd on that one. Caleb: Well, when you said it, was it instant? Like fire? Russell: It was insane, it was available. Matt: Oh, you know that feeling, right? Checking domains. You're like… chills. Russell: How has no one thought of this before? And so we got it and I remember I was driving him to the airport at the end of the week to take him back home. And we got to the airport. Boise airport, It's a small airport. So we pull up to the thing to get out and you can tell he's probably nervous waiting. And before we get out of the car he's like, "I really want to do this man. I'm excited." I'm like, "Me too. Me too." He's like, "I don't want to do this like your employee though. I want to do it as your partner." And in that moment, I was just like all the fear of ... I'd tried partners in the past. It hadn't worked. All this stuff and all the everything. And it was just this weird thing of just all the emotions were hitting me as he sat in the car, about to get out the car. I have 15, 20 seconds before he's going to to go. I was just thinking about him. I was like, he's never asked me for money. He's never done anything. He's served. He's given everything. I was just looking at him. I was like, "All right let's do it." He's like, "Cool." And he got out of the car and he's gone. Matt: Wait a minute. So at that moment? Is was that quick? Russell: That was it. Matt: It was a gut feeling that you just knew. That he was ... Russell: It was him. Yeah. And I was literally... I said this on stage at Funnel hacking live, outside of marrying my wife, it was the greatest decision I ever made. Matt: Yeah. I remember you saying that with tears. Russell: Yeah. Matt: Why though? I'm curious because it's not just ClickFunnels. Russell: He's amazing. If you look at our personality profiles, it's fascinating. We have the same personality profiles. The Myers-Briggs. Except for one letter's different. Where I'm a feeler he's a thinker. And it's been magical as a partnership because we both have so much respect for each other that we don't try to fight each other. And it's very much like if I wanted to do something, I'm like, "This is what I want to do. This what I'm feeling. What do you think?" And he'll come back and be like, "Well, I think this." And so I come up from feeling instead of thinking and it's really cool. So sometimes his thinking will trump my feeling. And I'm like, "You're actually right. Let's not do that." Or vice versa. Where he's like, "I'm thinking this." And I'm like, "I don't know why but I feel this." And he'll be like, "Okay." He respects that. We just have such mutual respect that we've never been in a fight. We've never argued. We've never had problems. It's been amazing. Matt: Wow. Russell: And he's similar to like we talk about with Dan. He went back home after us white boarding that, sat in his basement for five or six months and built ClickFunnels by himself. Caleb: Really just by himself? Russell: 100% by himself. Caleb: No other team. No other dev? Russell: It was just him. And the right before we launched, we brought in another partner, Dylan, who built the front-end editor and did a lot of the UI. And so then it was those two as we got closer and closer to the launch. And then for the next year it was just those two that did everything. And then after a year, we started bringing in other developers. But it was 100% Todd. Matt: Wow. Russell: He's amazing. In all aspects. You know you have friends you think they know everything about everything. That's like Todd except he actually knows everything about everything. You ask him anything and he's just like ... I don't know how he does it. And I'll always fact check him, like, "Oh my gosh. He's right again." He's brilliant. It's amazing. Matt: So for those of us who have partners or are maybe going into partnership, what's your best advice? And what do you feel like he does right that other partners don't do? Russell: I think the hardest thing with partners is typically we want to partner with someone who is just like us. We did a podcast most recently. Dean, Tony and I, right? We've done two partnerships. Both partnerships made it through the launch and they stopped. Made it through the launch and stopped. The podcast was like, "Why?" I love Dean. I love Tony. They're amazing. The problem is that me and Dean had the exact same skill set. Matt: Oh. Russell: And so the problem is that both of us are right. We both understand it right, but we do it differently. And so it's like You have two people, and so typically you want to partner with those people who are like you. You're like, "Oh, we think the same. We should be partners." But that's not necessarily the right thing because then you've got two alphas with the same skillset, and someone has to win and someone has to lose. And it's hard. Whereas me and Todd, we have different skill sets. There is never a winner or a loser. We can both win because different skill sets, both the same mission. It's really easy. So I think the biggest thing is you're trying to find the yin yang. You're not trying to find someone who thinks like you or acts like you. In fact, this is true in most hiring processes as well. I used to have people like, "Send me a video if you want this job." Right? So I get these videos, and the people that I wanted to hire were the people like me. I'm like, "This person's awesome. They think like me. They're a genius. They're amazing." You'll hire them, and within a week I'm like, "I hate this person." It's horrible. So we started shifting the way we do our hiring based on personality profiling instead. DISC profile drives most of my own personal hiring so I know that I'm a high D, high I, high S. No C at all. Right? And so the people I need to hire around me are high S, high C. The problem is the people I who I watched their videos and I'm pumped, they're high D, high I. So I'm like, "Yeah. These people are awesome. They're charismatic. I'm going to love them. They're drivers, they're awesome. Worst employees ever. Matt: Right. Russell: Right? So when people send us this profile, first I find the right profile and then from there I do interviews. Because if I interview ahead of time I get sold by the people who sell and then they're horrible employees. And so I make sure they're high S high C, because I know that if I talk to high S high C, I'm going to be kind of bummed out. Like, "Oh, I don't know if this is the kind of person that I'm going to jive with." But they're the best people to surround myself with because I'm such a high D high S. I'm a creator. I'm throwing things up in the air and I need people who are S and C, who are faithful finishers, who are going to take the things, capture them, and make sure that it's amazing. Matt: Do you feel like businesses and entrepreneurs are making a mistake by not having their employees and their team take these tests? Russell: 100%. I have a new company we're launching all about personality profiling because I'm such a big believer in it. Matt: Really? Tell me why. Top three reasons. Russell: It's in all things in life. If you're going to be a partner. If you're going to date someone. Understanding who they are is such a big part of it. Right? Because we think everyone sees the world the same way we see it and it is not true at all. The way you see it, the way we all see is so different and so if we don't understand that at a deep level, then I get upset by what you do and at what everyone's doing because it's like, "Don't you see what I see?" And the reality is no they don't. So if you start understanding people better ... In fact, the software can be called Understand About Me. It's a place you go and you take all the personality profiling and it gives you a page that can show somebody this is me. So in five seconds I can understand you perfectly they're like, "Oh, now I know how to work with you." Because I understand what you are, what your beliefs are, what your values, all the things I need to know about you, I can find it really quickly. Where normally you're going to go years with somebody before you understand them. I can look at a thing and get pretty dang close in a minute. Matt: Wow. Russell: Now I know hot interact with you and spend time with you and work with you. Things like that. Caleb: Question. Where does your love to learn come from? Because one of the things I noticed from being around you, it's always like yeah, so I had this moment where I geeked on this and I geeked out on this. It was health and suppliments, and marketing and personality types. There's all these different things you geek out on. Have you always been that way? Is it like you geek out on marketing, you saw the rewards from it, and you're like, "Wow, what if this goes into other areas?" Where does that come from? Russell: Yeah, I didn't always have my life. In fact, I had a fascinating conversation with Tom Bilyeu about this, because when I was growing up in high school I always thought I was a dumb kid. I thought I was an athlete, so I focused there. I thought I was an athlete, so I was a wrestler, that was my identity, that was where I focused at. I thought I was dumb. Because of that, straight C student high school and college, my cumulative GPA graduating from college was 2.3. Straight C's and one B maybe somewhere in there, right? Because I was a dumb kid. When I got done I ended my wrestling career, so I stopped being an athlete, and I was like, "Oh crap." I started to learn this business stuff and I don't like to read. I'm a dumb kid. What do I do? It was fascinating. Tom told me, because I had this epiphany, I'm not actually dumb. He's like, "Actually, the reality is you probably really were dumb. But then you changed, right?" So for me it was like I shifted. It was fascinating. Do you remember the Funnel Hacking Live where we had Lindsay Stirling perform? One of my favorite parts of that, she did a whole performance. If you guys don't know, Lindsay does violin dancing stuff, and afterwards I had a Q and A with her afterwards. I had this question I was so pumped to ask. I was waiting for her just to like, the question is, she was on America's Got Talent, and I think she took 7th place. When she got kicked off, Pierce Bronson or whatever said, "You've got no talent. You're no good." Whatever, right? So I was like, do you remember that time when he said that? What I thought she was going to say was, "Yeah, I proved him wrong. Yeah." I was like, "What did you feel after that?" She's like, "Yeah, I got home and I realized he was right. I wasn't very good. So I went back and I started practicing and I started working harder and eventually I became good enough." It was like, oh my gosh. I got chills when I was saying it again. Matt: Yeah. Russell: I remember when Tom said it to me, he was like, "You probably were dumb." I was like, "I was." Because I wasn't reading things. So with marketing that was the first thing for some reason that caught my attention, that got me excited, right? And then if you look at my DISC profile, ROI is my highest value. I have to see ROI in something or I don't want to do it. So when I saw an ROI on this reading, I was like, "Oh my gosh. I read a book, I got one little sentence, changed a color, made more money. Oh my gosh." That is where it started, 100%. I started learning that and I started getting obsessed with those things. As this business grew for me I started being more, I always joke that crazy people got attracted to me, right? The best health people, the best fitness people, the best in every market kind of came into our world somehow. So I started getting to meet all these people. When you're around someone who's the best in the world at the thing, and they start talking about the thing, you can't help but be like, "Oh my gosh, this is amazing." Right? You zone in on that. So whenever I meet someone that's amazing and I have a chance to talk to them like this I just geek out. Like when I met your dad the first time with you guys. That's when I bought your parenting course and everything. I was just like, I saw you and I saw him and I was like, "I want that." So I started going down that rabbit hole, right? I met Anthony DiClementi, I was like, "I love this guy. I have respect for him, I love him." Every time he talks about anything, he fascinates me, when he talks about something it fascinates me. I have to look down those things, right? When people fascinate me, the things that fascinate them start fascinating me and that's when I kind of go down those rabbit holes. This person is so intriguing and fascinating. What makes them that way? What are they doing. It's interesting. I'm not a good question asker. You guys are so good at question askers. I've never been good at asking questions, but I'm really good at watching what people do and then seeing it and trying to go down the rabbit hole. What are they doing, why are they doing it, that kind of thing. Caleb: He's a true master in it. You can just tell. What are some things you want to take the time to geek out on? I'm sure you see something and you're like I want to get on that but it's not a priority, I've got to do this. What are some things, if I had a week or two? Russell: Just free time with nothing else involved? Caleb: What's the next thing you're going to geek out on? Russell: Oh. I would say every probably three years I get re-excited about SEO, for some reason. I start going down that path again, because I love it. There's times in my business when that was the focused. It's not now at all, but I went through a couple ... Brian Dean's a real cool SEO guy, couple guys… I started dabbing my toe in again and I'm like, I just want to get back into it so bad. Right now SEO is actually our number 11 lead source as of today in ClickFunnels, which is amazing. So we handed SEO the first four or five years, now we're focused on it again. It's doing really well for us. I want to go deep there because I like that. Anyway, I haven't had a chance to do that. Any of the health stuff really, really fascinates me. Matt: Why? I'm curious. Why are you drawn to that so much? The health stuff. Russell: Because I've seen with myself ... My history is I got in wrestling, at the PAC 10 tournament was my last actual wrestling match. My wife was giving herself fertility shots in the stomach during PAC 10 so the next month se was pregnant. So I got done wrestling, got done competing, got done running, got done lifting. All my athletic career ended, and then my wife got pregnant. She's eating for three kids, and I'm pumped because I don't have to work out right now, she's hungry, I'm hungry, we're eating. We just kept eating and eating. So over the next seven to eight months my wife gained like 60 pounds, I gained like 60 pounds. We were doing it together so who cared, it was amazing. Then one day she has two babies and she loses like 45 pounds and I'm like, oh crap. I'm stuck here. Where did you go? This for me? Matt: Yeah. Russell: Thank you. Then at that time the business was starting and I was stressed out trying to figure it out and I didn't get healthy again. I just was in that state of being 65 pounds heavier for years. But I didn't know the difference, I didn't know that I felt differently, because I'd never been in a spot where I spent eight hours sitting behind a computer, so I didn't know what good felt like or bad felt like. I knew if I tried to wrestle I'd puke, so I was like I don't feel like I'm an athlete. I just felt normal, I thought. Eight years in I was like, I don't know, I looked at myself in the mirror and I was like, "Oh, what happened to you?" You know what I mean? I'm sure hopefully everybody's had a chance. I was like, huh. It was hard because in my head I knew how to work out, I knew how to train, I knew these things. Finally I was like, "I need to get a trainer." So I got a trainer for the first time. I'd never really done that before. Started going, and got me from I don't even know, 27, 28% body fat down to 12% in a matter of seven or eight months. I looked better, I felt better, but what's crazy is I could work twice as hard and twice as long. I wasn't tired. I was like, "I can keep going. My brain's on fire. This is amazing." Matt: Wow. Just from the ... Russell: I had no idea until I lost all the weight. All of a sudden it was just like, I can do so much more. I think, when I first met Anthony DiClementi the first time I was like, this is my problem right now. I am at work all day slaying dragons, doing all these things, I have this energy. I get home at night and my two little twin boys are there, and my little daughter, and I'm spent and I have no energy. How do I still be a present dad and how do I have these things? The next tier was the bio hacking stuff. How do you do these things? How do you increase energy? There's so many ways to do that, from light therapy to supplements to sleeping to sound to breath, all these crazy things that seem stupid. The first time Anthony's like, "We're going to do breath work." I'm like, "We're going to breathe? That's your bio hack? We're going to breathe together?" He's like, "Yeah, it's going to be amazing." I'm like super annoyed. What's the ROI on this, I've got to get back to work. So he sat me down in our gym. You've been in our wrestling room. He sat me down and he's like, "You have to sit because if you're standing you'll hit your head and you'll die." I'm like, what are you talking about? He sits me down and we do these breathing exercises where he's yelling at us and screaming. All this stuff is happening. If anyone's ever done deep breath work it's nuts. We're doing this thing where we're supposed to do this heavy, heavy breath work until he's like, what's going to happen is the world is going to ... Has anybody done jiu-jitsu here? Been tapped out before? Matt: Yeah. Russell: So you get choked out. What will happen, the carotid artery gets choked and the world starts shrinking like this. If you take pressure off it, it comes back to life. If you don't, it goes darker and darker until it disappears and you're gone, right? If you've never been choked out, that's what happens. It's a really fun experience. But you have the minute when you see it shrinking around you and then it's gone, right? He told me that's what's going to happen. You're going to breathe so much that the world around you is going to start shrinking. If you don't stop you're going to pass out. So we go all the way to where it starts shrinking, stops, and then when you hit that point you let me know and then you hold your breath for as long as you can. He's like, "How long can you hold your breath for?" I'm like, "Maybe a minute." He's like, "You'll do it for at least five." I was like, there's no way. So he says sit down, we're doing this breath thing, we're going like crazy and sure enough the walls start doing weird stuff. I feel like I'm on drugs. I'm sweating like crazy. We keep doing it. He's yelling at me. All of a sudden the world starts closing around me, I'm like, "What is happening?" And then he stops and is like, "Hold your breath." He starts the clock. I'm sitting here holding my breath forever, looking around. We had three or four of us guys all doing it at the same time. I'm freaking out. And then it starts getting quieter, things are slowing down, we're sitting there and then he's like let some of the pressure out but don't breathe in. Let pressure out, pressure out, pressure out, keep doing that, and it gets done and the stop clock is over five minutes. I'm just like, I just held my breath for five minutes. Matt: And you didn't even know it. Russell: Insane. And then the rest of the day we were on fire. It was just like, whoa. Right? We brought a cryo-sauna at our house and we go freeze in the cryo-sauna and the rest of the day you just feel ... That's the thing I love now, these little weird things. Light therapy, breathing, weird things that just seem stupid. You do it and you can go longer, you can think better, you can do stuff. All those things just get me so excited. Anthony's fun because he randomly will just ship me weird stuff in the mail. Just the weirdest things. It makes my wife so mad. It just shows up. There's a big old box. She's like, what's this from? I'm like, I'm hoping it's from Anthony, it's going to be amazing. Just weird things. Tons of stuff. I love that kind of stuff because the ROI on it is crazy. They're always these weird things. I have this headband someone sent me. You put this headband on, you put an app on and you start working and it just makes you not tired, makes you focused. These weird things. How does this work? I don't know. And they're like oh, it works because the waves over here sync your brain and change your brain waves and the creative state and all these things. I mean, I don't know how it works but I just wrote two chapters. Caleb: Do you do breath work every day? Russell: No, because it's so intense. If I had a coach who could walk me through it. I have a recording of Anthony doing it and I almost dread it because I know how hard it is. By the time you're done you're sweating. Caleb: I've got to get that recording. Russell: I'll get it to you. By the time you're sweating, you're like what just happened? I just breathed for five minutes. It's weird. Anyway, I would love to understand it on a deeper level but I don't understand a lot of the things now. Some of them I've gone deep on, but a lot of them I do without knowing why. I hate it because my wife will be like, "What's this do?" And I'm like, I don't know. Matt: Just love it. Russell: One of my buddies, Preston Eli, he wrote this blog post, he called it the Warriornaire Workout. In there he explains part of his morning workout. He's like, why do I do it? He's like, because Tony Robins does, and I obey all giants who fly helicopters and have stage presence. That quote goes to my head all the time. People ask me, why do you do that? I'm like, because I obey all giants who fly helicopters and have stage presence, that's it. I'm like, I don't know the reason why, Tony says so, therefore I will do it. I would like to understand it at a deeper level so I have a better response than I obey all giants with helicopters and stage presence. But that's a pretty good reason. Anyway. Matt: Real quick, does anybody else want to throw in a question for Russell? Anybody else here live with us? Caleb: Let me ask one more real fast. Because I want to. I want to ask this. We were just having sushi, I was asking you, what are some of the favorite periods of your life? One of them you said was wrestling, which I found funny because by far one of my favorite periods is baseball, which people wouldn't expect because obviously I've been on stage and all this other stuff and that should take the cake. But those moments when you're just on the field, you're in the zone, there's nothing better. Where, with what you get to do now, whether it's being live on a webinar or being on stage or whatever it is, where do you get the same feeling of wrestling? Do you know what I mean? You know, the feeling in your chest? Russell: Today while we were in line at the grocery store I talked to your dad about this. I said that the best feelings I ever had in my life were from wrestling. The feeling of winning a hard match that I wasn't supposed to win and getting your hand raised, I never felt something like that, that felt as good as that, ever. I've been searching in business to find that, and I've never found it. Speaker 3: Do you feel like sports is like business in any sense? Matt: Good question. Russell: For sure, yeah. There's a lot, for sure. What I was going to say is the closest I've ever gotten to feeling that is when you serve at an event and you see a table rush and you see not only people where they get the a-ha, but enough of an a-ha where it gets them to get up and to move. That's the closest I've ever felt to that. It's not as good, but it's the closest I've ever felt to that. Which is why I love doing the big things. I get a glimpse of that. Caleb: How close? Scale of one to 10. Wrestling's a 10. Where does that rank? Russell: If wrestling's a 10, I'd say it's about an eight. In fact it's interesting because when I first started in business I was racing for that, trying to find it, trying to find it, trying to find it. It took me years before I was like ... Matt: Is it disappointing? Russell: For sure, yeah. We launch today and make a million dollars and it's like, huh. That sucked. What else have we got. Give me something else. Matt: Exactly. Russell: The money goal is always what I thought was going to be the thing, and those always were just like, huh. In fact, literally one of the main reasons I did the Two Comma Club Awards, for me I need, maybe it's just from a decade of my life someone grabbing my hand and raising it. I was like, entrepreneurs need that. No one raises our hands. Two Comma Club Awards, for me, is me lifting their hands like you did it. I needed that, they need that. That's one of the main reasons I did that, because that's the equivalent of that. Anyway. Matt: How many millionaires have you created? Russell: This year we passed 1,000 people that won the two comma club award. We're over 120. Matt: How does it feel to say that? To say it? You know how sometimes it's like so many people that have passion or goals or huge dreams and visions, rarely do they really celebrate what's happening on the journey. Do you find yourself ever getting where your vision is so big and your passion is so deep that even saying things like there's 1,000 millionaires. Dude, that's huge. Man, 1,000 people that are millionaires because of you. Russell: I think the first time I really got that, probably the most impactful time, was the very first Funnel Hacking live that we gave away Two Comma Club Awards. It was the third Funnel Hacking live. It was a couple of months before that we had the idea of a Two Comma Club and an award, talking about that. I legitimately didn't know. I wonder if anyone in ClickFunnels has actually made a million dollars. I don't even know. So Dave went back and the database guys went through everything and I remember he came back and was like, there's 79 people right now that made a million dollars. I was just like, are you serious? Matt: Was it a boost of confidence? What did it do for you? Russell: It was one of those things, looking back on me doing these events where two people showed up and nobody showed up, hardly anybody, where I was so excited about this? I was like, how come nobody cares? To now it was like, this is actually, I've talked about this long enough people are believing it and now they're doing it. You start seeing it, and there's the fruits of it. In my mind I was like a million bucks, even then, ClickFunnel was new, I was like a million dollars is hard. Most of my friends I knew were like made somewhere near a million dollars. There were people who have been in this business for a long time. A million bucks is a big deal. That was most people's goal still. The fact that 79 people had done it, that was just weird to me. I think that was the biggest one, the realization that just like, oh my gosh. It's not just a theory and I think it works, it's working. It's working at a scale that was unfathomable to me at the time. 79 people. To go to 200 and then 500 and then 1,000 is crazy. Matt: What was your question, buddy? Speaker 4: You're talking about how at each level of success you hit, some of your mentors hit that ceiling, right? Because of the posturing, right? So ultimately I feel like when you get to a new level of success it requires you to upgrade your identity, your self image. What have you found is the number one routine, what's your process for upgrading the identity, upgrading your self image? Because I think that's so important because it can either hold you back and have you self sabotage and not take action and go after what you want, or it's going to be the thing that keeps you at that level and continues to propel you forward. What's kept you ... Russell: That's good. It's weaved through everything, right? The one that's the most obvious external, especially in our world, because you see marketers, most people when they first start selling whatever it is they're selling they're bragging about themselves. Here's my ad, here's my name. It's all about them, that's the first tier of it. And then the second tier, when they start having the realization, I feel like is when they stop talking about themselves and start talking about the people they've helped. Speaker 4: Mm. Russell: You see externally. You don't hear me talking about how much money I make. I'm not like, oh, check out what I got. I talk about all the other people. It's like, that's next year, is that. And then for me the third tier now, which has been really cool, is talking about Lady Boss, right? The success story isn't Kailin, it's Kailin's customers, right? So it's like that next tier. What you're talking about is like the external version of that. There's a lot of internal things that you've got to deal with, but you'll notice it shifting in people when you look at just their messaging and what they're saying. From the way they podcast, they video, they market, their ads and everything, it's the shift of it's not about me, it's about them. It's not even about them, that's the external version of it. Internally I think it's really, it's what we talked about, I can't remember why, but we brought up yesterday or today I had this really successful guy I met one time who the first time we met he was like tell me your story. So I was telling him the wrestle posturing story about how great I was. He was like, no. Tell me about the time you failed. So I was like, well, I'm in the middle of one right now. So I told him let me tell you. I told this whole thing. I remember afterwards I was so embarrassed. He's going to think I'm an idiot. You know, that fear? He was like, good, you cycled. I was like, what? He was like, I will not work with entrepreneurs who haven't cycled at least once. Because if they haven't then they still believe their own bio, right? I think that's the biggest thing, the internal version is that. The first time around, before you cycle, you think it's all you. I know for me it was. I remember doing this the first time, I'm like, I am a genius. I'm the smartest guy in the world. And then when it collapsed I was like, oh, there's a lot of things outside my control. This is not me. There is a team, there's God, there's all these other things that are making this possible. There's a scripture, I can't remember where it's at, it's the Bible, Book of Mormon, but it says you can either be humble or God will humble ... Ah, I'm misquoting it by far. But it's like God will humble people. You can be humble or he will humble you. So it's like, looking at that, I'm like round two I'm going to be a humble person because I don't want to be humbled again, right? Matt: I still feel it. Russell: This is not me. I understand, I look around now and it's 100% like there's no way I would be where I am right now if Dan Usher didn't make videos the way he does. There's no way I'd be here right now if Todd Dickerson could not code software the way he does. There's no way, all these things are so many people. Matt: You're so right. Russell: Then there's so many success stories that inside of it there's just so many people. And then there's the grace of God. I just look at the timeline of when ClickFunnels came into the market. I've now got funnels for a decade, nobody cared. Then all these things were happening, we started having the idea for ClickFunnels, started building it, we're creating it, and then literally we go to traffic and conversion, Todd's halfway done building ClickFunnels, and Ryan Deiss stands on stage in the biggest event at the time and he spends the entire four days talking about funnels. Talking about how funnels are the greatest thing. Everybody's like, what's a funnel? They're all taking notes. Me and Todd are like, does he know we're building? He's talking about funnels. He's talking about funnels like crazy. And then the next day everyone gets home from traffic and conversion and everybody that day, the next day 8,000 funnel consultants pop up. Everybody's a funnel consultant. Everyone is on Facebook talking about funnel consultants and teaching funnels and all this stuff. We're like, oh my gosh. Todd, get this software done, everybody's talking about funnels right now. So he's coding like crazy, all this stuff is coming around, all of a sudden everyone's like, millions of funnel consultants, everyone's doing it, and all of a sudden we're like, hey, we created this thing called ClickFunnels, here it is. All of a sudden all of the consultants and all the people and everyone came and we were the only platform. I look at that, as smart as I think I am, there is so much grace and timing. If I'd launched a year earlier, a year later, it would not have hit the way it did. 100% it was the timing of all these things that have to happen. If it wasn't for that ... I can act like I'm smart, I'm a genius, but man, there's so much divinity that came into all the things. There's no way it could happen without that. Anyway, just understanding those things. Matt: What did you learn when you were cycling? Russell: So many lessons. Russell, you are not that good looking. Or cool. Or anything. Matt: It's basically not about you, right? Yeah, I feel that. So what was hardest? What were the tough lessons? Caleb: How many times did you cycle? Russell: Two big ones for sure. Matt: Really? Do you mind sharing? Russell: Yeah, the first time was after I was trying to figure this thing out. I remember one of my buddies was like, you're making money online? I'm like, yeah. He's like, that's cool. I'm like, do you want a job? He's like, what? I'm like, you're the first person I know who's interested. I'll pay you to come hang out with me. He's like, all right. So I hired my friend. He's like, I have some friends too. I'm like, okay. So I start hiring all these people because I want someone to talk to. Anyway, it was really bad. I ended up having a whole bunch of employees nobody knew how to do anything. I didn't know how to train anybody. I was hiding in the room trying to make money to pay payroll while they're standing outside like, do you want us to do anything? I'm like, don't talk to me, I've got to make money to pay your payroll. They're like, we can help. I'm like, I don't have time to explain anything to you. It was horrible. I built it up to the point where it was just like, I was launching a new thing as fast as we could just to pay payroll. As an entrepreneur, you kill something you get to eat, right? It's like the greatest thing in the world. Employees, they want to get paid every two weeks whether they killed anything or not. I did not realize that until they were like we need money and I'm like, but we haven't made any money. They're like you have to pay me. I'm like, what? I'm so confused. Like, okay. Anyway, it had grown and we didn't have a model, sustainable. Speaker 3: You just launched stuff to see if it works? Russell: Yeah. When I was by myself it was like, I had an idea today, let's try it. You launch it, it makes some money, sweet. And then it was like, I made 20, 30 grand. It was my wife and I, so it was like, that lasts nine months. You know? Caleb: What did you sell? Obviously I know the potato gun backstory. You said I talked about funnels for like a decade before that. What were you selling during that decade leading up to ClickFunnels? I know it's an inordinate amount of stuff. Is there anything not even close to funnels, like something ... Russell: Yeah. The very first, pre-potato guns, my very first big idea was ... Back then what everyone was doing, you know who Yanik Silver is. Yanik would write a book and then he would sell the resale rights to the books. Someone else would buy it and they could sell it. I remember I got online, I saw these books, I bought a book from Yanik and I'm like, I can sell this. I bought a book from somebody else. I was buying all these eBooks I could sell. But then inside the books they would have links back to all their sites. I'd sell the book and I was like, I made 10 bucks selling the book. And then inside the book Yanik is selling his thousand dollar course and seminars and things. They make all this money. I'm like, I got 10 bucks. He made like $1,000 off of me selling his book. I remember being mad. I was like I wish there was a way I could brand this ebook so that before somebody opens it and sees his ad they'd see my ad. That was the first idea I ever had, ever. So my first product was called Zip Brander, it was this little thing that would take an ebook and it would brand it. You open it up and it popped up an ad. You see the ad and you click a button and it would take you inside the ebook. It was my first thing. We launched that and I sold 20 or 30 copies of it. But that was the first money I ever made, it was amazing. I had a customer list, I was like this is amazing. And then the way I was selling those, I was going to forums. This is pre-Facebook, so all you little kids, before Facebook, before MySpace, before Friendster, we used to go to these things called forums. They were these things where people would talk all day. So we'd go to these forums. One of the rules in the forums is you could comment all you wanted but you could have a signature file. At the end you could have like, Russel Brunson, check out my new software Zip Brander. I'd go to these forums and I would just spend eight hours a day answering questions and asking questions and everything. People see my ad on every little thing. My footer was on everything. That's how I was selling Zip Brander initially. I was in 50 forums posting like crazy but I couldn't keep up with it. I was like, man, if I could create a software that would manage this whole thing, that would be amazing. So my second product is called Forum Fortunes. It was this little software that would manage your posting on every single forum. You post and you could see if someone responded back on Forum 49 it would pop up and you're like, oh, you can go find it and go back and comment and keep the discussion. I made it for myself and then we started selling that. We sold more of those because I now had a little customer base here and went bigger. After that it was the next. It was always what's the next thing. That's kind of how it started back in the days, little tools and things like that. Speaker 3: How do you know when you're shooting all these bullets, how do you know when you shoot a cannonball? Matt: Good question. Russell: The thing about it initially, I had been married, I was making zero dollars a year as a wrestler, so for me to make $600 in a month, that was a cannonball. That was insane. I thought I was the coolest kid in the world. $600 was insane. So I did four or five little things. I remember it was Christmastime and I remember my wife wanted to buy a couch and it was a $2,000 couch. I was just like, oh, I can't afford that. I don't have a job. I'm getting sick to my stomach. I had this idea, what if I do a sell and just sell a whole bunch of crap that we had. I had a bunch of eBooks I bought rights to, a couple of things I had created, so we made this Grinch sale. I remember I wrote the copy, it was like, it was the Grinch Before Christmas or something. It had a picture of the Grinch and his heart growing three sizes, I don't know. I wrote this copy. My wife and I had been married a year, she really wants a couch, I can't afford a couch, so if you guys buy this, if I sell 32 of these things, I can buy her a couch and put it under the Christmas tree. It will be amazing. Caleb: You said that in the copy? Russell: In the copy, yeah. It was the reason why. I still have the page, I can show it to you. I know exactly where it's at, I can show it to you. So I had the whole page and then only an email list of like a couple hundred people at the time. I still had an affiliate program, so at the top it had an affiliate link. So I sent an email to my list and went to bed that night. Someone on my list was a guy named Carl Galletti, I haven't heard about Carl in a long time. He was a big famous copy writer at the time. Carl went and saw the thing, bought it, and started affiliating. So he joined the affiliate program, he was like this is awesome. He took that email, sent it to his entire list of this huge thing. So I go to bed. I wake up the next morning, we're at $10,000 in sales. Matt: How much before you went to bed? Russell: Oh, like $30, $40 or something. I was like, what just happened. Did I rob someone? I didn't know what happened. I looked at my email and there's all these people who were like, hey, I bought two of them, I hope you can get your wife that couch. Oh, I sent it to my friend. All these people. Because Carl promoted it, all these other people who follow Carl saw it. Carl is like it's converting like crazy. Tons of people are buying it. I'm freaking out. I'm going to wrestling practice trying to answer customer support. I'm late for practice, I ran into wrestling practice, I get back out I'm like, "Oh my gosh, I made like $600 in sales." I'm freaking out. Anyway, the whole thing goes through and over that, I think it was a seven day sale or something like that, we made $35,000. Which is more money than I'd seen in all my lifetime combined times 100, right? I paid probably 10 grand in affiliates. We made, I don't know, $25,000 that we got to keep. I was like, "Oh my gosh." I told Colette, and Colette's like, my wife. I love her. She doesn't understand the business part of things at all. I was like, "We made $25,000." She was like, "Is it illegal?" First thing. "Are you going to go to jail? Is it illegal?" I'm like, "No, I don't think so. I'm pretty sure." The first thing I did is I went and bought the couch for her, for Christmas. We got it back, I got a picture of her, sent it out to the list saying thank you so much, you got the Christmas gift, the couch. They all celebrated together, all the people. I was like oh my gosh, this is the greatest game of all time. This is so much fun. I was like, what's the next idea, what's the next thing. It was like that, these little things. After that one was done now I had way more customers, all these people that had bought my product knew who I was now so the next thing was easier so it incrementally kept growing and getting bigger. Somewhere along the line I launched the potato gun thing. Upsales of things. We didn't call them funnels back then. We called them sales flows or sales processes. Talk about your sales flow, what's your sales flow. Caleb: Sales flow. Russell: I remember Dylan Jones was our partner at ClickFunnels. Before Todd we tried to build something like ClickFunnels, we called it Click.com.com, which is a horrible name. But Dylan's, I still have all the UI images, and in there we had a whole section for sales flows and all these things. It's like, this was the first ClickFunnels. Because Dylan was on the UI eventually on ClickFunnels anyway, but we literally designed something like this five or six years earlier. Just crazy. Matt: Do you think that all those little failures and all the trying and that kind of energy is what brought you here today? Russell: For sure. It's the key. I wish I could grab everybody because everybody's like, okay, I'm waiting for my ClickFunnels, or I'm waiting for my thing. They're waiting and they're waiting and they're waiting. I was like, the reason why I got this thing was because I didn't wait. If someone were to give me ClickFunnels initially it would have been bankrupt in 15 minutes, right? You have to become worthy of the thing eventually. You don't become worthy by waiting, you become worthy by trying. And trying and trying and trying. Eventually, if you keep doing that, over time, then God's like, all right, he's going to do it. He's built 150 funnels, now I'll give him the idea. Matt: Wow, that's powerful. Speaker 3: How much more did you feel that all your other friends are in the same game? Matt: I hope you guys take there's more that's caught than Todd. That's some gold in what he just shared right there, what you were just sharing. But go ahead. What was the question? Speaker 3: I was just saying how much more would you fail if all your other friends were playing the same game? Russell: All my friends were like why are you launching more stuff? Why do you keep doing things? They do like one product launch a year. They got so annoyed. They were like, dude, stop doing stuff. I'm like, why would I stop doing this? This is so much fun. It was just confusing to me. Why don't you guys do more? Everyone, they make money they'd just be done. Caleb: Why would you keep doing more? Was it genuinely like one funnel away? Like this next funnel's the one. Were you just like you sold yourself on it, this is it, so you keep going? Or did you just really enjoy it? Russell: Well each one I thought was. Each one, every time I was so surprised, like this is amazing. That was the one. The next one's bigger. Oh my gosh, that was even better, who knew? And then I just kept going from there, you know what I mean? So I wasn't waiting for ClickFunnels or anything like that. I was just enjoying the journey every time. It was so exciting. Eventually it was like, oh crap, who knew that that was going to do what it did. Caleb: Was it all emails? Was there any ads or was there anything to scale the traffic? Russell: First 10 years was 100% emails, partnerships. There wasn't ads back then. I mean, there was Google ads, but the first initial Google slap happened about the time I was getting started. Prior to that a lot of guys I knew built their email list off of Google ads and then the slap happened. A lot of them had lists. I started getting to know those guys, going to events, meeting them, so that's how it started initially was tons of that. And then there was this big gap for years where paid ads weren't a thing. Some people did banner ads, but it wasn't consistent. It wasn't like it is nowadays. It was harder. You worked harder and all the stuff wasn't there. Mostly we focused on ... If you didn't have an email list, you weren't playing the game. It's like, who's got lists, how can you build lists, what can you do? Matt: You still think that's true to a degree? Russell: 100%. That's why the traffic seekers book was so important for me to write, I feel like, because most of the people in the game today have been blessed with Zuckerberg's simple Facebook ads that make the game easy. Matt: Wow. Russell: They've never focused on building lists. I was like, you guys, just so you know, Zuckerberg is going to screw us all. It's going to happen. Matt: Yeah. Caleb: It will happen. Russell: It's like, if you don't have a list you're all screwed. I've been through this for 18 years now, I've been through five or six cycles. I've seen people who made millions of dollars who now are not online. The people who have waded the storm the whole time are all the list builders. They're the ones who survived. Everyone else who's good at ads, they come and they go and they come and they go.

HDcourse 網上課程: 銷售、數碼營銷、商業策略及創新思維
Brian Dean 分析了大約20萬頁的內容去了解Core Web Vital by ivan so

HDcourse 網上課程: 銷售、數碼營銷、商業策略及創新思維

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 5:28


今天跟大家分享SEO的core web vitals。Core web vital我以前也講過的,但這次有些不同,因為這個研究是Brian Dean做的,他是全世界幾位最頂尖的SEO專家其中一個,我有很多内容都會參考他的。https://www.hdcourse.com/seo/brian-dean-core-web-vital/

Breakthru Entrepreneur
SEO For Small Business Owners | Top 5 SEO Tips For Small Business | SEO For Beginners | Quick Tips

Breakthru Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 6:29


I go over why you need SEO for your small business and the top 5 SEO tips I recommend you need to cover first. Once you know the basics you can do it yourself or hire someone to do it. Go to: https://VinceTrujillo.com for more free tools for entrepreneurs and small business owners. Thank you for watching! FREE Books!

The Success Harbor Podcast: Entrepreneurship | Business | Starting Business | Success | Lifestyle

Can you succeed as an entrepreneur without having a basic understanding about SEO? Brian Dean shares his journey from feeling stupid to making $10,000 a month with one niche website. Brian shares his wisdom about SEO as it should be. The ability to drive traffic to a website is where most businesses fall [...] The post What Every Entrepreneur Should Know About SEO appeared first on Small Business Advice Help For Startups and Entrepreneurs.

How to Build an App
Creating Content That Brings Customers Straight to You With Brian Dean (Backlinko & Exploding Topics)

How to Build an App

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 42:10


Content is king, but what do you do if you run out of content ideas?Our guest today is Brian Dean. Brian is the founder of Backlinko and Exploding Topics.Brian Dean has been called an "SEO genius" by Entrepreneur.com and a "brilliant entrepreneur" by Inc Magazine. Brian's award-winning blog, Backlinko.com, has been listed by Forbes as a top "blog to follow".Success Magazine has referred to Brian as "the world’s foremost expert on search engine optimization" due to the influence of his blog, which reaches over 3.5 million people every year.This episode is full of so much valuable information. Brian talks about why you shouldn’t spend too much time or money on App Store Optimization, how to drive traffic to your site like crazy, and how to think about your marketing plan. We start off talking about what Brian is most known for… SEO. ---Learn more about Backlinko here:https://backlinko.com/Watch Brian’s YouTube videos here:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx7J37QuXsGL7QG6SMIpqKgFind topics to write about here:https://explodingtopics.com/---This show is produced by Strides Development, a full-service app development agency. We specialize in taking your ideas and turning them into a finished app in only a few months. If you have an app you’re building, we would love to talk to you. You can schedule your free strategy call by clicking here.Make sure you’re following Strides:Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/strides.dev/Linkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/betzeraustin/

Ask Amanda About Marketing
How to Scale Your Content Marketing Efforts

Ask Amanda About Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 31:45


Scaling your content marketing is an important step, but it's important to know both how and when to do it effectively. Brian Dean, founder of Backlinko and co-founder of Exploding Topics, explains how to scale content the right way, imparts the importance of a content calendar, and much, much more. 

SIFT Podcast
EP 177 : The Skyscraper Technique by Brian Dean | Content Marketing

SIFT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 11:47


Marketing a great piece of content is as important as writing one ! Good content is better when people can find it, however, with thousands of Blogs coming out every single day it's extremely competitive to rank high on Search Engines like Google or bing. Brian Dean from Backlinko , famously known for being one of the best bloggers and consistently ranking on SERP # 1 , crafted a content marketing technique known as The Skyscraper Technique that essentially makes it easy for new websites to rank much faster.The Skyscraper Technique focuses a lot on making content much better than it is, as explained in this episode, and that is something that Google likes to see. Connect with me !Clubhouse @augustinekiamaJoin TMP exclusive on www.tmp.supercast.techSubscribe to the TMP newsletter and learn more about Marketing on www.themarketingpodcast.liveYou can find me on social media @kiamaugustineRate, Review & Subscribe to support the Podcast.Thank you for tuning in !Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

SIFT Podcast
EP 173 : Google Webmaster Guideline & The Skyscraper Technique | SEO

SIFT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 9:55


Google has detailed information published on what falls under their webmaster guidelines. Essentially, these are a set of instructions and Guidelines on what Google considers to be part of White Hat SEO and anything apart from that is simply going against their Guidelines ( Black Hat SEO ) and might lead to website penalization or poor ranking results on SERP.In this episode I explain also the Skyscraper technique which was created by Brian Dean from Backlinko on how to create content that naturally attracts high quality backlinks and improve overall ranking.Connect with me !Clubhouse @augustinekiamaJoin TMP exclusive on www.tmp.supercast.techSubscribe to the TMP newsletter and learn more about Marketing on www.themarketingpodcast.liveYou can find me on social media @kiamaugustineRate, Review & Subscribe to support the Podcast.Thank you for tuning in !Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? #1673

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 5:44


Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? In episode #1673, we discuss whether the Skyscraper Technique still works in 2021. We have spoken often about this great method for creating content and links, developed by our good friend Brian Dean, but we thought it was about time to reevaluate its use in the new year. Tune in to hear about how it can still be effective, misunderstandings to avoid, and a whole lot more! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today's topic: Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? [00:28] A refresher on the Skyscraper Technique and the brains behind it, Brian Dean. [01:14] Ways in which the technique is still working and how it is being misunderstood too. [02:37] Word count is not the most important thing, it's about value. [03:54] The example of Wikipedia and why this proves the importance of updating content. [04:37] Usability, links and more to improve you traffic! [04:56] That is it for today! [04:59] Go to marketingschool.io/pro for 14 days free in our marketing community!   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Backlinko Ahrefs Ubersuggest  Wayback Machine   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? #1673

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 5:44


Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? In episode #1673, we discuss whether the Skyscraper Technique still works in 2021. We have spoken often about this great method for creating content and links, developed by our good friend Brian Dean, but we thought it was about time to reevaluate its use in the new year. Tune in to hear about how it can still be effective, misunderstandings to avoid, and a whole lot more! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today’s topic: Does the Skyscraper Technique Work in 2021? [00:28] A refresher on the Skyscraper Technique and the brains behind it, Brian Dean. [01:14] Ways in which the technique is still working and how it is being misunderstood too. [02:37] Word count is not the most important thing, it's about value. [03:54] The example of Wikipedia and why this proves the importance of updating content. [04:37] Usability, links and more to improve you traffic! [04:56] That is it for today! [04:59] Go to marketingschool.io/pro for 14 days free in our marketing community!   Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:   Backlinko Ahrefs Ubersuggest  Wayback Machine   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

B2B Lead Gen Podcast with Eric Schwartzman
How Brian Dean of Backlinko Grew His Traffic in the Ultra Competitive World of SEO Blogs

B2B Lead Gen Podcast with Eric Schwartzman

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2021 31:04


Brian Dean is founder of Backlinko, a website that offers next-level SEO training and link building strategies, sharing free tips through a website, YouTube channel, and email marketing that are designed to make a market for online courses he sells.  He started his company in 2013, but it took three before his traffic started to… The post How Brian Dean of Backlinko Grew His Traffic in the Ultra Competitive World of SEO Blogs appeared first on Eric Schwartzman.

Cryptonized!
How to Build a Repeatable Word of Mouth Marketing Program

Cryptonized!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 21:05


How do you create a repeatable, sustainable word of mouth marketing program? It's not as hard as you think. Join Monique Idemudia and I as we discuss how companies can roll out a program that generates testimonials, reviews and of course word of mouth marketing.     FINAL QUESTIONS: 1. Hottest digital marketing technology that you recommend My top 3: ActiveCampaign for marketing automation, Hootsuite for social media marketing, Trello for project management   FINAL QUESTION 2. Who is the most influential person in marketing today? Hard to pick only one... Gary Vaynerchuck, Neil Patel, Brian Dean, Ann Handley, Seth Godin Monique's BIO I am the founder of Dragon Digital Marketing, a digital marketing agency for small businesses based in St. Petersburg, Florida and passionate about inspiring small business owners to build an online presence and grow their business with the power of great digital marketing. I am an execution-driven consultant and can provide value on topics like small business marketing and entrepreneurship.   Host Mark Fidelman @markfidelman www.fanaticsmedia.com 

Immediatism
236 Antiwork: A Radical Shift in How We View Jobs, by Brian Dean

Immediatism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2020


This text is from the book Abolish Work: An Exposition of Philosophical Ergophobia, edited by Nick Ford, published by LBC Books, and available from LittleBlackCart.com. Abolish Work at LittleBlackCart.com Immediatiatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Therapy Session - The Tools We Use For Affiliate Marketing

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 76:30


One of the things we get asked a lot is what are the tools we use for various things in our business. So since we are affiliate marketers, today’s show is all about all the affiliate marketing tools that we use in our business when it comes to software, but more importantly how we use them and how they connect with each other.  You’ll hear all about the best tools we recommend for email automation, webinars, creating videos, membership, link shorteners, and a whole host of other stuff that we either use now or have used in the past. We also include some cool ways you can put these tools to use as well as how some of our previous guests have insights on these tools as well. After you have listened, be sure to check out some of the episodes we mentioned including our show with Brian Dean where we chat all about SEO and our show with Rob & Kennedy and their tactics with email marketing.  “If you can create this perfect journey for your customer, there are tools and if you string up the process, you can make it the most enjoyable journey for someone and they will have so much trust with you, and that’s why they will buy more stuff.” - Joe Fier “I almost see tech as a creative pursuit in the sense that I love trying to tie technical tools together in ways that people haven’t tied them. To me, there’s a creative art form about the tech that we do.” - Matt Wolfe Some Topics We Discussed Include: Why learning and using technology is actually a creative art form  How we are working more strategically so we end up working less time Why using a deadline funnel is the hot sauce to your marketing (put it on everything!) How to optimize articles you already have on your site to boost them up to page one Why we haven’t used Photoshop in over a year, and the easy tool we use instead Tools we have used to double in our opt-in rate How and why you want to create the ultimate customer journey so they will buy from you over and over again And much, much more! References and Links Mentioned: Active Campaign AWeber  Drip Convert Kit  Infusion Soft Convert Box Optin Monster Thrive Architect Groove Pages ClickFunnels Members Pro Snappa Deposit Photos Ahrefs Topic Deadline Funnel Pretty Links Loom Thrivecart Unicorn Equity Designrr Episodes with George Bryant and Rob & Kennedy for email tactics How Convert Box Doubled Our Opt-In Rate 12 Ways To Use Convertbox To Get More Opt-ins And Sales From Your Website Episdoes with Stephan Spencer, Brian Dean, Nate Broughton, David Sinik, and Matthew Woodward for SEO tactics Brian Dean’s Skyscraper Strategy Charley Valher of Valher Media who’s helping us grow our podcast Joe Kerns and Mike Alvarez from Majik Marketing, who are assisting us on the email automation side.  Are you ready to be EPIC with us?! Then grab our EGP Letter here! Did you know we have an awesome YouTube Channel?  Join the Facebook Community - be sure to hop in our Facebook group to chat with us, our other amazing guests that we’ve had on the show, and fellow entrepreneurs! This episode is sponsored by our go-to SEO research tool, Ahrefs.com, and by  Easy Webinar - be sure to check out these special deals for our listeners. Email Marketing Tactics From A Mind Reader And A Hypnotist - Rob & Kennedy Google And YouTube SEO Strategies For 2019 - Brian Dean

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
SPECIAL EPISODE: How to Promote Your Content Using Tactics That Work Today with Brian Dean

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 18:34


Today we have a special bonus episode with special guest Brian Dean from Backlinko! This is a highlight from Brian's talk at our Growth Accelerator Mastermind. To get full access to our exclusive content and more, go to http://www.marketingschool.io/pro   Leave Some Feedback:   What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.   Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Here's How You Can Build a Widely-Known Brand in Your Niche (Without Spending a Fortune) | Ep. #1448

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2020 5:52


In episode #1448, we talk about how you can build a well-known brand in your niche without spending a fortune. Larry Kim, Dave Perell, and Logan Paul are only a few of the many people who have built successful brands doing what they are passionate about. Tune in to hear why consistency and repeatedly exposing people to your brand are the two top strategies in the brand-building game! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today’s topic: Here’s How You Can Build A Widely-Known Brand in Your Niche (Without Spending a Fortune). [00:33] Brian Dean from Backlinko went for the SEO niche despite it being highly competitive.  [00:41] He built his brand from consistently writing good long-form, data-driven content.  [01:10] Larry Kim built a great brand for pay-per-click advertising.   [01:31] You can be known for whatever you are trying to do if you are consistent.  [01:47] The importance of leveraging the rule of seven. [01:58] Chatbots and other ways you can repeatedly expose people to your brand.  [02:26] Dave Perell built a successful brand on Twitter where he educates people about writing.  [02:51] Start with one channel first—don’t try to do everything at once.  [03:26] A brand is one of the most defensible things you can have.  [03:45] Experiment with different channels to see which ones you like.  [05:00] That’s it for today! [05:01] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information or text us on 310-349-3785!   Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:   Backlinko Brian Dean  Larry Kim MobileMonkey ManyChat David Perell on Twitter Naval on Twitter Jason Lemkin on Twitter Quora  Logan Paul on YouTube   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast
260: Ecommerce SEO in 2020: What Actually Moves The Needle

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2020 50:53


With Facebook boycotts, changing advertising policies, and channel unpredictability, it’s more important now than ever to invest in what you can control The approach to search engine optimization (SEO) has changed over the last several years, but it still remains an incredibly important component of your marketing strategy. This week’s guest is SEO consultant and expert Dan Shure. Dan’s been working in SEO for more than 12 years, and he joins us to talk about what’s changed over time when it comes to SEO strategy, the two different types of core content to focus on, what’s working in ecommerce SEO in 2020 and the tools you should be using to be successful. This episode has some great actionable tips you can start using today, and I hope you enjoy! Episode Highlights 5:16 How Dan fell into SEO while working as a professional musician 7:50 What is SEO really? Is it a channel, a traffic source, links, or something else? 13:30 The #1 thing business owners need to think about when it comes to ecommerce SEO in 2020 15:49 Informational intent vs. purchase intent content and how you should be using each in your SEO strategy 18:53 Letting the keywords be your guide as you’re thinking about creating content with informational or purchase intent content 22:40 Breaking down seed keywords and how to identify them for your brand 26:04 Why Dan shifted from an agency business model to a consulting and training model 31:35 The technical pieces of SEO you need to watch out for in ecommerce 33:55 Should you have a developer on your team to help you with technical SEO? 35:34 Shopify blog or Wordpress blog: which is better for SEO? 37:20 What’s working right now with content: remember the keywords are king. 42:56 Backlinks: do you need them and how to build them proactively 46:30 Must-have tools for ecommerce SEO in 2020 Links and Resources: Evolving SEO Experts On The Wire Podcast Evolving SEO on Youtube Evolving SEO Interview with PR Expert Dmitry Dragilev Dan's Seven Beliefs About SEO @Dan_Shure on Twitter @EvolvingDan on Linkedin Strengths Finder Google’s Guidelines on SEO Google’s Developer guidelines Brian Dean’s Skyscraper Technique Backlinko.com JournoRequest HARO Dan’s SEO Toolkit Keyword Keg Keywordtool.io Screaming Frog SEO spider SEM Rush Keywords Everywhere plugin SEO Minion Ask.com Google Natural Language 5 Ways To Use Google's Natural Language Tool for SEO (Dan's YouTube Walkthrough) Tf-idf @a_brawn on Twitter @andrewfoxwell on Twitter Brand Growth Experts Foxwell Digital Review or subscribe on iTunes

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
If We Had to Start Over in SEO, Here’s What We Would Do First | Ep. #1421

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 5:15


In episode #1421, we tell you what we would do first if we were to start all over again! We imagine how we would play the SEO game if we had no resources but all our knowledge, and stress things like learning from the playbook of your competitors, going after easy keywords in a large total addressable market, and diversifying once you build some traction. Listen along so you can apply what we learned the hard way! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today’s topic: If We Had to Start Over, Here’s What We Would Do First. [00:30] Setting the criteria: starting SEO with no resources and just our knowledge. [00:50] Learning from the playbook of successful competitors. [01:45] Brian Dean’s strategy: long-form content with lots of data. [02:24] Partner with people, take their data, analyze, and add your unique spin. [02:32] Publishing one thing a month; taking it one step at a time. [02:51] The riches are not in the niches: create a site after a big TAM. [03:16] It’s easier to get a small fraction of a big pie than the other way round. [03:31] Focus on the easy keywords in the big markets and build traction from there. [03:42] Diversifying once traction is built; newsletters are a good idea at this point. [04:20] Don’t bet everything on SEO! [04:33] That’s it for today! [04:34] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information.   Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:   Brian Dean Backlinko Sam Parr The Hustle   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Growth Mindset University
How Brian Dean Built an Online Brand from Nothing to Hundreds of Thousands of Subscribers, Followers, and Dollars

Growth Mindset University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 30:10


I've been following Brian Dean since my freshman year of college when I created my first website and needed help gaining some visibility. Brian (@Backlinko) has been called an "SEO genius" by Entrepreneur.com and a "brilliant entrepreneur" by Inc Magazine. Brian's award-winning blog, Backlinko.com, was listed by Forbes as a top "blog to follow" in 2017.Success Magazine has referred to Brian as "the world’s foremost expert on search engine optimization" due to the influence of his blog, which reaches over 2.5 million people every year. Connect with Brian on LinkedIn, Twitter, and his blog Backlinko.com.

Reply All
#161 Brian vs. Brian

Reply All

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2020 46:57


Just for fun, a guy and his friends record a Christmas song in his Living room. More than three years later, he walks into a grocery store and hears that song playing. Alex investigates.  Listen to Brian Dean's version of We Wish You a Merry Christmas

Unemployable: Advice for Freelancers and Entrepreneurs
What’s Working Right Now in SEO

Unemployable: Advice for Freelancers and Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2020 63:06


A smart and sustainable SEO strategy remains one of the best ways to drive targeted traffic and build an engaged audience.There is no one better to discuss what really work in SEO that this week's guest, Brian Dean, the founder of Backlinko. Brian shares with us some of the biggest takeaways from his epic article The Definitive Guide To SEO In 2020.He begins by giving us a few of the most important high-level things that everyone needs to realize about SEO — including the enduring power of keyword optimization and some smart tips for how to discover search intent.Then we cover a wide range of topics after that, including how AI will impact SEO moving forward, how to think about SEO when you're focusing on a curated email newsletter, tactical advice on how to structure content in WordPress, and much more.Now there’s just one catch with this episode: we didn’t record it specifically for the podcast. What you’re about to hear is actually the audio from a webinar that we did inside of the Unemployable Initiative, our private, paid community for freelancers and solopreneurs. And as you’ll hear, the questions Brian answers are directly from community members.With the doors to the community now open for ongoing registration, Brian Clark and I wanted to give you a little taste of the content you’ll find when you join. To find out everything that is included in your membership, go to unemployable.com/community.Note: the original presentation was on video, and Brian does share his screen a few times. If you want to see the video replay, visit the lesson page: https://unemployable.com/podcast/seo

The Digital Marketing Podcast
Discover Ubersuggest with Neil Patel

The Digital Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2020 20:02


Ciaran speaks to Digital Marketer and New York Times bestselling author, Neil Patel about , a free SEO tool Neil has been developing since 2017. Neil and his team have been hard at work, developing the toolset's functionality from a simple keyword tool to a full-blown SEO app. If you haven't looked at it recently, we think you should look again. The free version is featured-packed, but the new paid-for version gives you a whole host of new and powerful functionality. In this interview recorded in early March, Neil walks us through some practical, no-nonsense ways anyone can use Ubersuggest to build their marketing traffic and business using the tool's SEO feature-rich toolset. If you are looking for ways to drive more organic traffic to your site, this tool can really help to prioritise the steps you need to take to improve performance.  We explore Neil's business strategy around developing Ubersuggest, including some of the running costs behind offering a globally available free tool like this. We also learn about the tool's new paid-for options that greatly open up the toolset’s power and functionality for a fraction of the cost of rival SEO tool suites.   Since we recorded this interview,  Neil has opened up even more functionality to the free version Ubersuggest to help support businesses through difficult times. See for more details. Useful Links NP Digital Ubersuggest Tool SEO tools comparison Top Tips- A Complete Guide to using Ubersuggest Neil's Running costs for Ubersuggest blog article Brian Dean's Skyscraper Technique

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast
Brian Dean's Shopify SEO Strategy

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 42:45


As we look for more ways to generate quality organic traffic to our stores, SEO will come to mind.In this episode, you'll will hear how to get more search engine traffic to your store.We're joined by an SEO Expert who has been called an "SEO genius" by Entrepreneur.com and a "brilliant entrepreneur" by Inc Magazine.If you've read the Backlinko blog or watched their YouTube channel, you'll recognize today's guest, Brian Dean.Brian's going to tell us:How to create awesome ecommerce contentHow to use Authority Sculpting to boost rankings to product and category pagesHow to rank above Amazon (yes, its possible!)

Internet Marketing: Insider Tips and Advice for Online Marketing
#543 How to Grow Your YouTube Subscribers: Interview with Brian Dean

Internet Marketing: Insider Tips and Advice for Online Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 17:06


On this weeks episode of the Internet Marketing Podcast, Andy is joined by Brian Dean, Founder at Backlinko to discuss different ways in which you can grow your YouTube subscribers. On the show you'll learn: Why your branding and positioning on YouTube can help you to stand outBrian's tips for making the most out of your video introsHow you can optimise your YouTube videos for SEOWhy it's important to look for keywords with low competition and try to optimise for those How you can get more subscribers to your channelPlus, Brian provides his top tip for the audience when it comes to growing your YouTube channel and increasing your subscribers. Brian's YouTube channel with a whole load of useful digital marketing training and tutorial videos can be found here.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Marketing Geniuses to Pay Attention to in 2020 | Ep. #1318

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2020 9:01


In episode #1318, we are going to talk about the top marketing geniuses to watch in the 2020. In marketing it is key to surround yourself with those are thinking outside the box, trying out novel ideas, and taking on the most creative approaches to the everyday marketing tasks. Stay tuned to hear our list of who we are following and why they are worth your time. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today’s topic: The Marketing Geniuses That You Need to Pay Attention to in 2020. [00:33] Eric Siu: avid reader with a lot of information to offer. [01:09] Neil Patel: always tries new, unconventional things - choose non-consensus and right. [02:13] Ryan Bonnici: strategies on where marketing is going, the long-term view. [02:59] Syed Balkhi: entrenched in the WordPress ecosystem. [03:50] Brian Dean: tactical approach, testing new ways to grow without producing a lot of concent. [04:21] Yaniv Masjedi: building a good marketing team, and treating them like family. [05:02] Grant Cardone and Gary Vanerhuck: keeping a pulse on the social web. [05:35] Matthew Barby & Kevin Indig: understanding SEO and newsletters. [06:16] Russell Brunson & Ryan Deiss: implementing sales funnels and monetizing email lists. [06:56] Patrick Campbell: creative approach to content creation and customer response. [07:52] Erik Rivera: thinks outside the box with novel ideas. [08:16] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information. Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode: Ryan Bonnici G2 Syed Balkhi WPBeginner OptinMonster Brian Dean Backlinko Yaniv Masjedi Grant Cardone Gary Vaynerchuck Matthew Barby Traffic Think Tank HubSpot Kevin Indig Russell Brunson Ryan Deiss Patrick Campbell ProfitWell Erik Rivera Honest Paws Leave Some Feedback:   What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.   Connect with Us:  Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Time for Marketing
#30 - Alexandra Tachalova - Smart Link Building how to stop following best practices and start getting links

Time for Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2020 21:25


Alexandra Tachalova (Linkedin or Twitter) is the organizer of the Digital Olympus conference and she does one thing in life. Generates backlinks. So if you want more backlinks, you should listen to what she has to say. This is her presentation from the DMSS 2019 in Bali, check out her presentation below. Smart link building how to stop following best practices and start getting links from Alexandra Tachalova   Podcast transcript Alexandra Tachalova: So when I was the very first time doing link building, I spent the first three or four months painting those features and well, I believe I did notice one or two links. Peter: This is Time4Marketing, the marketing podcast that will tell you everything you've missed when you didn't attend the marketing conference. Hello, and welcome to the Time4Marketing marketing podcast, the podcast that invites the best marketing conference speakers to come and sum up their presentations in five minutes. It's 2020 Happy New Year to everyone. My name is still Peter and I'll still be your host for this podcast episode. If you would like to know more what is going on on the podcast, you could visit the time4marketing.com website when you have forum where you could subscribe to our email newsletter or just subscribe to this podcast. If you want to talk to me, you can find me on my web page, seos.si. Enough about me. I hope you're having a wonderful new year. With me today is Alexandra Tachalova. Alex, hello and welcome. Alexandra: Hello, Peter. Thanks for having me. Such a pleasure and honor being here today. Peter: Alex, I'm very glad that you are here with us. Where are you located? Alexandra: I'm based in Saint Petersburg, which is not in Florida, but in Russia. Well, we are based on the same continent with you, not really far away from you. Peter: True, true. But Russia sounds very cold. Is it unbelievably cold right now? Alexandra: No, it's not unbelievably cold. We are going to have a Christmas and New Year without snow. Right now it’s +3 +4 five. Yes, just rainy. Peter: Alex, you are the founder of the Digital Olympus Conference. Tell us a bit more about the conference and tell us a bit more what you do in your everyday job life. Alexandra: Well, first of all, let's chat a little bit about the Digital Olympus Conference. That's going to happen on the sixth of April in Kraków, which is based in Poland. We have very, I think inspiring lineup. We have Aleyda Solis, Michal speakers, Lukasz Zelezny, Fernando Angulo, Leonardo Saroni from Booking, Judith 'deCabbit' and many, many other quite well-known experts. We are a very affordable conference because the cost, our POS is less than 100 that. That's more or less about this Olympus Conference and hope to see you guys maybe-- by the way, you don't even need to go to our conference. You could also join us online because we do a free live stream. Even if you can't come personally, then you have an option to join us just online. When talking about what I do besides Digital Olympus, I do link building. I have a quite small agency and it's just under the same brand, under Digital Olympus. Well, actually we built links mostly for B2B clients. That's what I think I know very well and that's my areas of expertise. That's the reason why I'm talking about link building quite a lot and write about link building covers intellectually. Did write a post for the MOZ Blog about the economics of link building. I highly recommend checking it out. Get tons of positive feedback. People were writing to me across different channels and they really love this stuff because not a lot of experts sharing it, the real cost of link building and why like different options cost different- costs differently. Yes, that's a good one, I think. Let me add one more thing about my personal life. If you go to any of my social media channels, you'll find me and my horse. I'm really into horse-riding, in particular dressage. That may be my second fashion after digital marketing. Peter: To go to your presentation, you spoke-- Well, you speak at a lot of different events. But I contacted you because you spoke at the DMSS in Bali in 2019 with-- Alexandra: That was my excuse to go to Bali. [laughter] Peter: That is a lot of people's excuse to go to Bali. It’s business. I can write it off on business expenses. Your presentation title was How to Stop Following the Best Practices and Start Getting Links. Alex, here are your five minutes for your presentation. Alexandra: I was talking about how exactly we built links here at Digital Olympus, what we do. First of all, we don’t follow any best practices. If you go to, just you know, to Google on quite well-known digital marketing blog, you'll find tons of- they're sharing how to do link building like 66 best link building strategy that you need to do today or tomorrow. Don't do that because they are quite useless being honest. The reason behind it that they're overused. Also, well, I have something more to share here besides like, they are useless because we've already tried them and they don't work but besides me there are some data. For instance, some time ago, Brian Dean teamed up with Pitchbox, which is an outreach tool and they analyzed thousands of email outreach pitches. Well, they found out that their average response rate is quite low, in fact, below 9%. That's the reason why I think doing link building by following those strategies is not the right way to go because, let's imagine if you sent 100 emails, you might get only one or two links because the response rates while any link builder know that response rate doesn't equal to getting a link. What I suggest doing-- First of all, what we don't do, definitely we don't send mass emails because they have a quite poor response rate. Instead of these, I would recommend going to people that are already aware about your brands, so with whom you've already established a relationship. The reason behind it that they're much more responsive and eager to communicate with you, so your emails won’t be ignored. Plus they know you, they trust you so you could try to get a link from them. But for sure it's not just because you are so good and your content is so good, you need to give them something back or visit it because people understand the value of links. My recommendations will be, well, if you want to work with though then do it like really do link building. That's actually the most beneficial way of doing it because if you partner up with a company that doing link building on a scale, so they’re also investing in this process, then you could build much more links because they know more people, they write to more blogs. But you need to return them links back. That's where we are coming to an indirect link exchange. You need to contribute to other blogs but not to build links because it's very expensive. Well, for sure you could do this, but it's much more like, it makes much more sense to do it, to return things back to people that could also generate links, so you are doing indirect links exchange. Well, for sure not only links can be cured as something available for people, someone or connection the rest of others with hype or like, for instance, your clients. If you are checking your circles. What you do, you check your clients, your social media followers, your partners as well. Anyone who basically knows your brand and their whereabouts, your existence. Well, if you talk about liners, they might want to, something like your specs, they might want to, so you send them your secs and get a link. Well, for sure don't do like the majority of people do like sending here is what like-- send an email, how does it look like? For instance, I deliver this awesome blog post and I've been following you for ages and then the reason why you need to give me a link back, well, quite stupid. They don't owe you a thing so don't do that. Instead of these, what I would recommend doing, first of all, connect with them and do something valuable for them. For instance, like link back to them, sending soundtracks. Only after these, ask whether there is any chance to link back to your awesome, insightful blog posts. That's very much it. The last tip will be, if you want to find people that write across various blogs within your niche, most probably they're doing link building because that's the reason why they write to different blogs. On a regular basis go to BuzzSumo experts, the list of contributors because at BuzzSumo allows you on the most popular blogs and then search via those author names inside BuzzSumo. Going back to BuzzSumo and see whether they write across different blogs or only write on this one article. Your goal is to find those that write across a quite big number of blogs like me. For instance, I write on different blogs like Moz, Search Engine Journal, co-marketing [unintelligible 00:10:50] excel, and et cetera. That's very much it. Peter: Okay, excellent. Alex, how important do you feel are links still in SEO and even more, are they getting more important or less in the last years? Alexandra: I think they're like, there should be one more guy here that-- there will be a very interesting conversation because I'm sure, yes, for sure I say links, the main reason why sites are ranking at the top of Google results and then we need an opponent here, someone who is really- truly believe that technical SEO on-site is so then the reason why sites are ranking. The thing here that I know how to build links and I see that when we build links to our clients' websites, the clients pager they grow. I see how it works. Then the reason why I believe that links are really important. However, I don't really do technical SEO so I don't see any correlations between technical SEO. I'm not observing them because I don't do that. Each time I just meet people that do technical SEO they are like sharing, "No, you don't need links, you only need to just to nail your calls or whatever it is." There are one more very important thing that everyone should remember. If you have a small website, I mean it's not a big e-commerce brand, you don't have tons of pages. I don't think nailing your technical off-site SEO would help you like really change your situation, especially if we are talking about highly competitive niches like IT, well, digital marketing or something like that. You could do whatever you want with your website. Make it very fast, make it very, very beautiful in terms of your course but unless you have links, it's not going to work. Peter: Especially business to business websites are usually in such a way that it's small content. Alexandra: Yes, just because your competitors are doing this. The problem with all those things that related to links, if people around you within your niche heavily invest in link building, then Google sees it and reacts on those additional forces that are impacting the SERPs. Then the problem is, well, imagine no one would be doing link building and then I could imagine that links won't be so important because Google will be looking at other factors. Since we have links and links are the core of Google [unintelligible 00:13:56] still because they are recommendations. We are recommending something like in real life. When I recommend something and I'm a trustworthy source because, for instance, I recommend something because I really know I think the digital marketing, I am a trustworthy-- people believe me. That's the same with links. When you are a trustworthy website and do you say like, "Okay, I linked to this website," you basically say that the website that you're linking to is also trustworthy and that's how Google overlays things. Peter: Probably links are going to be important for always. Another question-- Alexandra: I think so. yes. Peter: If I'm a company and now what is the distinction, when should I decide to find someone from the outside to help me with my link building and when should I do it by myself inhouse? Is the size of the website, the criteria or-- When should I look for someone to help me with my link building? Alexandra: When it comes to digital marketing, well, I'm a big believer that you need to try it on own. When I have a potential client that tell me, "Look we might hire you or might not because we are right now considering doing it on our own." I say like, "Look do it on your own because you see how it's hard, first of all then if you see how it's hard, then you might see a value in my services." You just try it, you see that it's very hard because it's very hard, you barely-- Even if you do guest blogging, it's very expensive so you would just spend the very few months just trying to pitch something to someone and receive a lot of no most probably. The thing with link building or when I think you need to outsource these types of things, well first of all, when you want to do it faster. You hire an agency. Because the main reason why people hire an agency like us or agencies like another like other guys because they've already established those relationships so they want it just to capitalize on what we've already done. Starting from the very first month, we could build up to 30 links per client. We've already know people so we just simply sent emails and they said, "Okay, we'll do this." They need to do everything from scratch. When I was the very first time during link building, I spend the first three or four-month painting those features. I believe I do notice one or two links so if you linked that was all I was very frustrated and I was like why? Because you need to spend around two, three years establishing those relationships and then everything is easy. The second situation when you need an agency when you need very specific links. You've already a well-known company-- well, you don't need average links, you need very specific links to very specific pages. For instance, category or it might be even commercial pages. Then you could try to go to a link building agency and ask them whether they could help you. Because you have such clients from an enterprise sector, They are very well known company but they want to run better by some of their category pages because that's their commercial pages, that's where all the revenue stream is coming. Yes, in some cases, you could do this. The best thing about email, personalized email outreach is that you could even build links to those pages as well. Not for each and every company but if you are talking about well-known and if you know, people, you could do this. Actually, we have a few clients for whom we are building links to commercial pages. Peter: Excellent. All right, I think that's it. Alex, if people would like to contact you or talk to you more about link building, where can people find you? Alexandra: That might be LinkedIn but please, if you want to connect with me on LinkedIn, write down a short message. I have already 200 connections that are pending. I just want to be sure that I'm not going to skip your connection request. Just write down something like, "I heard you on podcast something like this and then the reason I'd love to connect, I just greatly appreciate it." Or you can just go straight to Twitter which allows you to connect with me directly by following me and asking me question there without sending any super tracklist to connect. [chuckles] Peter: All right. Thank you for being on the podcast. I'll add all of the links about the stuff that- Alexandra: Thank you, Peter: -talked about in the show. I will also add your presentation into the show notes so if people want to go deeper into the content, they can- Alexandra: Awesome. Peter: -do that. One more thing, do you have future conferences lined up? Where can people find you if they want to see you speaking live? Alex: I think the biggest one that I have in my calendar is BrightonSEO in April, so if you'll be around- If you plan to come to BrightonSEO hope to see you there and for sure I'll be speaking about link building, which is a quite hot topic right now. It's on the rise. If you are based closer to me in Eastern Europe then SEO zraz in Bratislava, right? I think so in Bratislava, will be in February and so well, our own conference. I won't be speaking there, but I'll be there and so well, I'll be just taking care of technical things at Digital Olympus and if you're based somewhere in Poland, hope to see you at our own event. Peter: All right. There's a lot of opportunities. Okay. Alex, thank you very much for being on the podcast. It was great talking to you and hope to see you around. Alex: Hope to see you, Peter. Thank you very much for having me. And have a lovely Christmas.  

Search Talk Live Search Engine Marketing & SEO Podcast
Best of Search Talk Live with Brian Dean of Backlinko

Search Talk Live Search Engine Marketing & SEO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2019 58:26


Brian Dean of Backlinko goes over his skyscraper methodology. Search Talk Lives best of shows.

Search Talk Live Search Engine Marketing & SEO Podcast
Best of Search Talk Live with Brian Dean of Backlinko

Search Talk Live Search Engine Marketing & SEO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2019 58:26


Brian Dean of Backlinko goes over his skyscraper methodology. Search Talk Lives best of shows.

SEO Podcast Unknown Secrets of Internet Marketing
21 Actionable SEO Techniques That Work GREAT in 2019 by Brian Dean Part 3 #467

SEO Podcast Unknown Secrets of Internet Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2019 34:33


Having 1st aired in 2009, with over 3.6 million downloads in 100+ counties, “SEO Podcast, Unknown Secrets of Internet Marketing” has become one of the longest running and most authoritative podcasts for staying ahead of the perpetually changing digital marketing landscape. For those new to the podcast, choose a past topic among the vast library of almost 500 episodes of all topics related to internet marketing: SEO, PPC, Email Automation, social media marketing and more.. Great for marketers, business owners and agencies from the novice to experienced in using the internet to market and grow a brand! www.bestseopodcast.com

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Karl Steinmeyer - How We're Scaling Homebrew Academy

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 78:10


Today we have an interesting chat with Karl Steinmeyer, as we deep dive into SEO. Karl is a partner of our Homebrew Academy website and we’ll get into some of the details he’s doing there for us and how he’s helped us to improve the site. We’ve brought Karl on board to help us run this business since he’s an SEO ninja who has some amazing content strategies and is awesome at building content marketing plans.  In this show he talks about all the little tips, tricks, and strategies he uses to really crank up the SEO, using Ahrefs among other things and some cool ways you can use this tool we love. Karl actually did an audit on our website and dives into the health score as well as other things we can be doing to improve. We also talk about Pinterest and best practices on how to drive traffic to your brand using this site.  After listening, go check out our conversations with David Sinik and Brian Dean for more SEO strategies and ranking factors.  “If anyone wants to level up the monetization on their website that’s monetized heavily with Amazon links they can look into creating their own products or private labeling a product and that’s one of the different avenues to go down if you’re looking for different ways to monetize those types of websites.”  - Karl Steinmeyer Some Topics We Discussed Include: On-page and off-page SEO strategies you need to know Content strategies and what types of content to have on your site How to find low hanging fruit keywords How to use Pinterest to grow your brand How to perform an SEO audit Ways to leverage the most out of our website What the heck is helium beer And much, much more! Contact Karl Steinmeyer: Facebook LinkedIn References and Links Mentioned: Are you ready to be EPIC with us?! Then grab our EGP Letter here where you’ll get not only all of the notes for everything episode we’ve done and will do in the mail, a private forum community, plus new training videos all the time with us and our guests. This is a super sponsored episode by our go-to SEO research tool, Ahrefs.com which we delve into quite a lot in this show. We use this amazing tool pretty much daily, and if you listen back to some of our most recent episodes, we breakdown some of the tactics we use in our intros, such as website audits, looking at our competitors’ websites, and finding low hanging fruit keywords for easy Google rankings. It’s like having cheat codes for business. As of this episode, they have a 7 day $7 trial, so be sure to check it out. Google developer tools Homebrew Academy Media Vine  AdThrive Ready.mobi Yoast

The Rotunda with Trimmel Gomes
Episode 167: Resiliency

The Rotunda with Trimmel Gomes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2019 24:27


On Trimmel Gomes’ latest episode of The Rotunda, Melba Pearson with the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida (ACLU of Florida) explains their fight to get a judge to block Florida’s law requiring fees be paid before ex-felons can vote. Plus, educators like Brian Dean of Instruction Partners tells Gomes why he’s urging state officials to improve, instead of eliminating Florida’s Common Core educational standards. Gomes also talks with Doug Wheeler, president and CEO of the Florida Ports Council about their new study, which shows Florida’s 15 seaports are leading the nation in resiliency for sea level rise and natural disasters. Follow on @RotundaPodcast on Twitter and visit www.rotundapodcast.com for daily updates.

PressNomics Podcast
Ep 6: Brian Dean. SEO legend explains the basics and how he went from zero to $10k MRR in four months

PressNomics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2019 61:17


For transcript, links, video, show notes and more visit: https://pagely.com/podcast/episodes/ep-6-brian-dean/ Brian Dean is one of the foremost experts on Search Engine Optimization. His site Backlinko.com gets over 200k monthly unique visitors and he's been dubbed by Entreprneur.com as "an SEO genius." In today's episode Brian shares his process for analyzing a site, what he knows about the Google Rankbrain algorithm, featured snippets, FAQ schema, content pruning, his advanced "ghost post" technique and a boatload of tools for dialing in your SEO. Visit the link above if you have a question for Brian.

Buddhist Recovery Network Podcast
Sangha Safety ft Jean Tuller, Brian Dean Williams, Sue Neufeld-Ellis & Alex Holt

Buddhist Recovery Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2019 69:06


From the International Buddhist Recovery Summit 2019: Safe Sangha - Creating Safer Spaces. Dana/Donation https://www.buddhistrecovery.org/donateBuddhist Recovery Network https://www.BuddhistRecovery.org/Buddhist Recovery Network FacebookFind out more at https://brn-podcast.pinecast.co

BoostSauce
SEO Tools Mastery - Growth Insights From 3 Experts (Ep002)

BoostSauce

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2019 70:53


Join Johnathan & Sean as they interview Dan Shure from Evolving SEO, Brian Dean from Backlinko, and Rob Bucci from Moz. Do you have questions for our guests or hosts or want to see a topic featured? Email us at BoostSauce@klientboost.com! Don't have time to listen? Read the full transcript here: https://klientboost.com/boost-sauce/episode-002-seo-tools/

Duct Tape Marketing
Creating a Winning SEO Strategy

Duct Tape Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2019 32:26


John speaks with Brian Dean, SEO expert and founder of Backlinko. Dean shares the latest SEO tips, discusses the SEO approaches that work best for B2B and local businesses, and debunks some common SEO myths.

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Stephan Spencer — The SEO Mistakes That Everyone Is Making

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2019 81:04


Back in 1995, Stephan Spencer decided to drop out of college and start his own website agency. Four years later he had the “crazy” idea he could live anywhere he wanted, so he moved to the beaches of New Zealand. There he built his first SEO company when Google was just becoming a household name. Stephan is a top SEO consultant and best selling author who is known as a cutting edge strategist for some of the world’s most recognized brands. He keeps seeing businesses make the same mistakes and he’s here to share his expertise so entrepreneurs can stop wasting dollars and start getting profitable results. Whether you have an established website or about to launch a new one, listen in as Stephan shows Matt and Joe how to build for SEO and keep it optimized, the criteria Google currently uses for rankings, and which SEO tools everyone should be using. This episode is stuffed with SEO expertise, but if you’re craving more go check out our conversations with Brian Dean and Christopher Gimmer. “Don't try and outsmart or trick Google. You're not going to win at that game. Everything you do has to be underpinned by value creation.” -Stephan Spencer Some Topics We Discussed Include: A simple tactic to set a domino effect in motion Why you must always aim for the big fish How to quickly double-hit every win The right way to go off brand and increase traffic What you can do to “outsmart” A.I. (your brain isn’t enough!) How Google keeps its rap sheets on businesses Why your high-quality content is landing dead in the water EAT and YMYL - they’re more important than ever The ins and outs of YouTube’s unique SEO structure A method to gain traffic as soon as you buy a new domain How to make sure your website stays optimized One fix that can lift a site all the way to page #1 The SEO tools everyone should be using Contact Stephan Spencer: Marketing Speak/hustle - special link! Get Yourself Optimized StephanSpencer.com Connect on Instagram And on Facebook or Twitter References and Links Mentioned: The EGP Letter – Get our print newsletter The Perpetual Audience Growth Course – Learn how to drive consistent, high-quality traffic day in and day out Abundance 360 MarketMuse Google Cloud - Natural Language Google Search Quality Evaluator Guidelines There’s no shortcut to authority: Why you need to take E-A-T seriously Google Keyword Planner's Dirty Secrets The Strategies and Techniques Behind Viral Videos with Jamie Salvatori Link Research Tools ahrefs SEMrush Majestic MOZ Link Explorer MOZ Keyword Explorer Rank Ranger Google Trends Answer The Public Ubersuggest Searchmetrics Brian Dean: Google And YouTube SEO Strategies For 2019 Christopher Gimmer: The Founder Of Snappa Shares His SEO Secrets

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Stephen Esketzis — Affiliate Marketing Using Epic Content

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2019 60:52


Right out of high school Stephen Esketzis created his first app to get people into night clubs. He worked with a friend to sell his app and got hooked on designing the perfect funnel to bring in customers. That’s when he stopped developing and went full throttle into marketing. Now Stephen is a leading sales funnel expert who specializes in content marketing using purely SEO strategies. He used to be the head of content marketing at Clickfunnels before building multiple media brands of his own. And he is sharing his knowledge with thousands of entrepreneurs through his website, podcast, and the events he organizes in his home city of Melbourne. Get ready to update your system as Stephen shows Matt and Joe how to create epic content, start a media brand from scratch, and planning the exact right time to make your exit. When you’re done, go get even more content strategies from our conversations with Brian Dean and David Sinick. “I wanted to build an asset rather than just a funnel because a funnel should be a part of the brand, it shouldn't just be a standalone thing.” -Stephen Esketzis Some Topics We Discussed Include: Why media ecosystems net more profit than funnels The 1 thing your SEO strategy needs (you can forget the rest!) How to find writers for your niche What top ranking content looks like today 2 options for starting a media property Skyscraper Campaigns to generate backlinks Overcoming mental blocks to send 40 emails a day The Silo Structure that makes epic content Marketing tools to keep it lean and sharp Where affiliate marketing should fit into a business How to plan the sale of your media properties A webinar ad that is super cheaper and effective [adrotate group="3"] Contact Stephen Esketzis: stephen@stephenesketzis.com StephenEsketzis.com Lazy Contact App Free Funnel Builder Digital Marketers Australia Connect on Facebook And on Instagram References and Links Mentioned: Free Evergreen Traffic Playbook The Perpetual Audience Growth Course – Learn how to drive consistent, high-quality traffic day in and day out GenM (Sponsor) – Find marketing apprentices for $50/mo Trello Jira Software notion Clickfunnels Dashlane Time Management: Smart Hacks Audiobook by David Tracy & Brian Allen Google And YouTube SEO Strategies For 2019 – Brian Dean The Ultimate SEO and Content Marketing Playbook – David Sinick

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Nate Broughton — How To Get Millions Of Visitors With SEO

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2019 57:17


The entrepreneur bug bit Nate Broughton while he was just a freshman in college. In his off time, he helped build an 8 figure online business when search engines were still in their infancy. The first thing he did after graduating? Start building a 9 figure company of his own. Nate has been in the SEO game for 17 years and counting. He specializes in lead generation using organic strategies he’s perfected after having built and sold numerous companies across multiple markets. And now he shares his knowledge with other entrepreneurs as co-host of Opt Out Life. Get ready to update your online content as the guys learn what effective SEO looks like today, the tactics that are no longer working, and the latest checklist for onpage optimization. When you’re done, check our conversations with Brian Dean and Christopher Gimmer for more organic traffic strategies. “You can write pretty bland when you write for Google. Worry about finding a voice later when you have a bunch of traffic!” -Nate Broughton Some Topics We Discussed Include: SEO rules for building any website from scratch Organic traffic strategies for 2019 How to make high-ranking content today (it’s not about link building anymore!) An essential checklist for onpage optimization Tips for finding copywriters that speak to your niche What your HTML code should look like for SEO The latest tools for content and keyword planning A content structure that is outranking the competition Offsite SEO strategies that actually work A method to improve your organic ranking using ads How to get quick, amazing results from an established site Some tactics to drive traffic to your podcast [adrotate group="3"] Contact Nate Broughton: Opt Out Life Opt Out Podcast Nate’s MarketMuse Webinar Connect on Twitter Or on Instagram References and Links Mentioned: Free Evergreen Traffic Playbook The Perpetual Audience Growth Course – Learn how to drive consistent, high-quality traffic day in and day out GenM (Sponsor) – Find marketing apprentices for $50/mo MarketMuse Ahrefs SelfHacked When I Stop Talking, You'll Know I'm Dead by Jerry Weintraub Billion Dollar Whale by Tom Wright & Bradley Hope Google And YouTube SEO Strategies For 2019 – Brian Dean Christopher Gimmer: The Founder Of Snappa Shares His SEO Secrets

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons
GE Ep 61 [2014]: How Backlinko’s Brian Dean Built His Traffic to 90,000 Visits per Month

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2019 49:20


In today’s interview, we’re talking to Brian Dean of Backlinko. In regards to SEO and list building, Brian’s got some really action-packed advice that helps him collect over 200 emails a day, and has an internet marketing blog that’s close to breaking 100,000 visits per month. Click here for show notes. Leave some feedback: What should I talk about next? Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, leave a short review here. Subscribe to Growth Everywhere on iTunes. Get the non-iTunes RSS feed Connect with Eric Siu: Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @ericosiu

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Should You Coin Your Own Terms For Marketing? | Ep. #933

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2019 5:54


In episode #933, we discuss whether you should coin your own marketing terms. Tune in to hear if you should create new terms in order to promote your business. We have committed to throwing a FREE Marketing School Live Event in Los Angeles, once Marketing School reaches 1M downloads in a 30 day period. Take action: Rate, review, subscribe, and SHARE. Check the progress here! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:27] Today’s Topic: Should You Coin Your Own Terms For Marketing? [00:36] We have talked about this in the past. Our mutual friend, Brian Dean came up with the skyscraper technique. [01:12] Most people are coining hundreds of terms, but only a handful are taking off. [01:35] Neil would rather ride the coattails of a term, rather than inventing one. [02:04] Let someone else build the demand, while you go in and fill it. [03:11] It’s ok not to be the first-mover. [03:25] Drift invented the term “conversational marketing”, but Hubspot came up with the more popular “inbound marketing”. [04:12] Eric prefers Neil’s method to inventing his own terms. [04:21] That’s it for today! [04:25] We hit our goal of 1 Million downloads! So, we will be throwing a free event in Los Angeles. Check out our website and continue listening to our podcast for further details. Leave some feedback: What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review. Connect with us: NeilPatel.com Quick Sprout Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel Twitter @ericosiu

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast
Brian Dean — Google And YouTube SEO Strategies For 2019

Hustle And Flowchart - Tactical Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2018 65:08


In 2012, when Brian Dean founded Backlinko, SEO was a vague science. There was very little real advice out there, which is why he decided to share the strategies he had developed learning the hard way. Just a few months in business and Brian knew he was onto something. Now marketers from Apple, Disney, IBM, and more are loyal readers of his weekly newsletter. And his blog is one of the first places people turn to when they need practical, actionable advice for their online business. Get ready as Matt and Joe get the latest advice from Brian Dean about how to optimize your videos on YouTube, make super shareable blog posts, and what is going to change for SEO in 2019. When you’re done listening, go check out our talks with David Sinick for more SEO strategies and Brian G. Johnson to jumpstart your YouTube channel. “There probably are a couple things that are unique to you… so double down on what works and cut out what doesn’t.”- Brian Dean Some Topics We Discussed Include: What sites that struggle with SEO are forgetting to do The 2 factors you must optimize, even if you mess everything else up! 80% of YouTube views come from this (and it isn’t search) A trick to nudge your viewers into the rabbit hole The ideal video length for a top ranking video What to do in the first 15 seconds of any video The PPP formula to improve view time and rank your channel Pattern Interrupts: what every successful channel is an expert at Why “telling stories” isn’t working and what to focus on instead How to use text to improve screen attention Why YouTube is going to be even more competitive next year The new ranking factor that is going to be foundational to any SEO strategy The Skyscraper Technique: how to blog once a month and outperform daily bloggers Contact Brian Dean: Backlinko The Skyscraper Technique Link Building Strategies: The Complete List Content Marketing for SEO Tutorial Connect on Twitter And on YouTube References and Links Mentioned: The Perpetual Audience Growth Course – (Limited Discount!) Learn how to drive consistent, high-quality traffic day in and day out GenM (Sponsor) – Find marketing apprentices for $50/mo SEMrush Ahrefs Yoast Under the Black Flag by David Cordingly New Rules for the New Economy by Kevin Kelly The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss Passive Income Hacks & The Legalities Of Running An Online Business – Dana Robinson The Ultimate SEO and Content Marketing Playbook – David Sinick How To Start A Profitable YouTube Channel From Scratch – Brian G. Johnson

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Do You Really Need to Write 1890 Word Blog Posts to Rank on Page 1? | Ep. #836

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2018 5:42


In episode #836, we discuss the appropriate length for blog posts. Tune in to hear how long your posts should be. We have committed to throwing a FREE Marketing School Live Event in Los Angeles, once Marketing School reaches 1M downloads in a 30 day period. Take action: Rate, review, subscribe, and SHARE. Check the progress here! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:27] Today’s Topic: Do You Really Need to Write 1890 Word Blog Posts to Rank on Page 1? [00:45] Brian Dean is the one who came up with this theory. [01:08] Google looks at each industry separately. [02:05] You don’t need long form content to succeed. [02:40] There a lot of things you can do to rank. [02:52] In the B2B industry, longer is better. [03:03] B2C, length isn’t as important. [03:54] Use SEMRush or Ahrefs to look at the top ten results in your industry. [04:11] See what the trend is for length. [04:32] That’s it for today! [04:40] Go here to see how many downloads the show is getting. Also rate and review to help us meet our goal of 1 Million downloads per month. Hopefully, we’ll see you at the live event in L.A.! Leave some feedback: What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review. Connect with us: NeilPatel.com Quick Sprout Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel Twitter @ericosiu

The Marketing Secrets Show
The Dream 100 (Part 3 of 3)

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2018 36:38


On today’s episode we get to hear the final portion of Russell’s presentation at Dream 100 Con. Here are some of the awesome things in this final piece: Hear as Russell goes into detail on how to dream 100 several different platform choices. Find out why you need to pick just one platform to obsess over at first, instead of trying to do all of them. And Find out how Brian Dean at Backlinko.com does SEO using the dream 100 as well, even though that’s not what he calls it. So listen here to have everything you need to know about dream 100 from the final episode dedicated to Russell’s presentation at Dana Derricks Dream 100 Con. ---Transcript--- Hey everyone, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome to the third and final part of my presentation at Dream 100 Con. I hope you’ve been enjoying so far. If you’re just jumping in right now, go back and listen to episode one and two, this is all part of 90 minute presentation I gave at Dana Derricks Dream 100 Con where I was going into the Dream 100 and how it works inside of your business. It is the foundation for all traffic. It’s the foundation for how we grow and how we scale companies. It’s the foundation for everything. And it also happens to be the first two chapters of the new Traffic Secrets book. I hope you guys are getting some anticipation and excitement for the book that will be coming out next year. It’s going to go deep into this stuff, but this is a really good foundation to help you guys understand how the Dream 100 works, and how it fits in context with the other platforms and ad networks, and everything like that. Without any further ado, I’m going to jump into the third part of this presentation from Dana Derricks’ Dream 100 Con. I hope you enjoy it, and I’ll see you guys after the intro. Alright, so now that you kind of have that context, I want to talk about, I want to go into these channels here and talk about growing these different channels. Each channel, when you start going through these you have to understand each channel is a little bit different, the way that they all work. So the first one is Facebook, we’ll talk about that. So Facebook for me is closest to like a talk show. It’s interesting, when you look at when new movies come out…in fact, it’s going to be fun, as we go through all these I want you guys thinking about this. All of us see these things every single day, but if you start seeing what’s happening in the real world and see how it correlates with what we’re doing today, it should get you really, really excited. So when the Expert Secrets book was coming out we’re trying to figure out, how do we launch this thing? How do we get it out there to the whole world? And one night I was watching late night TV, I can’t remember what show it was or whatever, I can’t remember what actor. But basically there was a movie coming out and the actor was on the show, let’s say it’s Ben Affleck. So Ben Affleck was on Jimmy Kimmel talking about the movie, they show a little clip of it, and then boom. Then Ben Affleck went to the Today Show and then Good Morning America, and this does this circuit and hits all the different talk shows talking about the movie and then that Friday the film goes live and they sell a ton of tickets. So what does Hollywood do? They do the same thing. They go and find a distribution channel, they get this person in front of all of it, and they do two things, number one, they work their way in. They get Ben Affleck, or whoever the celebrity is in the movie, to get on the show and actually talk about the show, so they work their way in. But they also go and buy their way in, okay. During the break there’s all sorts of commercials for the show as well. So they’re buying their way in, they’re working their way in, in front of core audiences. They know we’re going to buy the movie to get all the hype and buzz. And then they go and people show up to the movie and hopefully it’s a big blockbuster. So I’m watching this and I see this whole thing happen, I watch the movie blow up in sales. And I’m like, gosh, I wish I could get on all these shows. I would love to be on the Today Show and Good Morning America and all these things, but unfortunately traditional media thinks I’m a big internet nerd and that I’m just trying to sell stuff and they don’t like people like me. At least that’s the story in my head, it’s probably not true. But that’s my belief right. So I’m like, I can’t get on these shows, that’s frustrating. Then I was like, wait a minute. Facebook is similar to talk shows. People have built these huge distribution channels, what if I went and just did what Ben Affleck just did, but I do it on everyone’s Facebook channels. So the first step we did, me and Dave sat down freaking out, Steven was there at the time too. We sat down and said, “Let’s build a Dream 100 of everyone on Facebook who’s got big huge Facebook following.” We sat down and built a huge dream 100 just….actually not true. This is a mistake I made that I want to teach you guys through too. We built our initial dream 100 and the first time it was like everybody and then the goal was to go do talk shows on all these people’s Facebook channels. What was interesting is that, we had some people who had huge email lists, and we did Facebook lives on their Facebook platform, and they got like 4 people to show up and it was a huge waste of time. One thing I want you to understand, this is like a really simple, but really powerful concept, people who listen to podcasts, they listen to podcasts. People who read emails, read emails. People who read blogs, read blogs. People who watch things on Facebook, watch things on Facebook. People kind of pick their platforms. I’m curious, just in this room alone, how many of you guys get the majority of your media through YouTube? How many of you guys get the majority of your media reading blogs or through like medium.com? How many get the majority of your media through podcasts, that’s what you like to consume? How many get the majority of your media through Facebook Lives? It’s really fascinating. So what we found, I was trying to this dream 100 strategy with someone with a big email list, but they had no people on Facebook, it was a huge waste of my time. So for you, if you come back down, it’s really figuring that out. Like, “I’m just going to do the Dream 100 on this platform because this is the platform where these people live. If I’m going to get people on Facebook to follow me on Facebook, that’s where they’re all going to be at. So again, we came back here with Facebook, we did our own Dream 100, built out a huge Dream 100 of everyone who had a big Facebook following and started calling them up and said, “Hey can Russell come on your Facebook page and do an interview with you?” It was like a virtual book tour. We had a ton of people say yes, which was really cool. So I was on all these different people’s channels doing Facebook Lives, “Hey this is Russell.” And I got interviewed by Tony Robbins, by Grant Cardone, by a bunch of you guys here in this room, we did a ton of them. I remember we were doing like 10 a day for like two weeks, it was really exhausting. But we did the whole circuit of that. So I worked my way into all of these different shows. The second thing we did, and this was kind of a cool, unique strategy. We got agreements from all the people doing Facebook Lives, for me to actually go into their ads account and buy ads. So then I started buying my way in. So Tony Robbins gave us access to their ad account, where I could plug in, and John on my team could actually take our interview and boost it. That’s how we got 3.2 million people to see the interview with Tony, because we were buying ads and growing it up. So I both worked my way in, and I bought my way in to grow that thing. I did the same thing with Grant Cardone, and every single person’s audience. And if you look at that effect from that whole thing, we sold tens of thousands of copies of the book, then my Facebook channel, because I’m being interviewed by Tony, by all these people, so in the thing you see my head and his head, my channel grew by over a hundred thousand subscribers during that time. So my channel started growing, my channel started getting bigger. So for each of these, I’m going to kind of go through some of the strategy behind each of these, but I want you guys to understand, most of you aren’t going to go and build a channel on all of these. I would pick just one right now. If you’re trying to do podcasting and Facebook lives and blogging and insta….all these things, it’s going to be like super diluted and this is going to be really hard for you guys to do it.  So pick like, and I would recommend whatever platform you’re the most obsessed with is the one you should plug into. If you love listening to podcasts all day, you should be a podcaster, because you’re going to understand that medium so much better. If you love Facebook Lives, you should be doing Facebook lives. Initially at least, pick the one medium that you like the best and start focusing on that. As you start growing you can pick the second one or the third one, but if you triple down on one, it’s going to be way better for you, I promise you that. So I’m going to go through the core ones here and then I want you guys to kind of think through it for yourself what you want to do. Okay, now each, in fact let me come back to the first image. For each of these different platforms, my goal again is the same thing from right here. I’m building my own podcast show, I’m building my own FAcebook following, I’m building my own instagram. Pick the platform you want to focus on, but just pick one right now. Then the question, the thought is, how do I buy my way in, how do I earn my way into that one. So if it’s Facebook Live, I build my Dream 100, okay can I get these people to interview me on their page? That’s going to build my platform, if not can I buy ads to their people, that’s going to build my platform? Can I buy my way in? Can I work my way in? Or can I do both? If I’m doing a podcast, same thing. In fact, how many of you guys have ever listened to the Art of the Charm podcast? The Art of the Charm Podcast. It was one of the top podcasts in all of iTunes and the dude who started it, his name was Jordan Harvenger, it’s interesting because for some reason him and his business partners got in a fight or something and he left that podcast and then he started his new podcast called the Jordan Harvenger show, and I’d never listened to that other podcast, but all the sudden I started hearing him. All my favorite podcasts I was listening to, he was popping up on the first one, and the second one and the third one. And everybody is interviewing this guy. I’m like, “I’m so confused.’ And on every one of them they’re like, “how did you build the biggest podcast out there, number one or two on all of iTunes?” and he said, “Well, we launched a show and then I went to every other podcaster and I did interviews with them, and then my call to action was if you like me, go listen to the Jordan Harvenger show. And what’s interesting is people who listen podcasts listen to podcasts. So I leveraged all the podcasts in my dream 100 listeners to go and fuel and build up my podcasts.” If you go listen, that’s all he’s doing. Interview after interview, after interview, just building these things up. You could do the same thing now, find out all the other big podcasts and buy ads to build a platform, but all he’s doing is try to build his platform for round two. So look at somebody who built one of the biggest podcasts in the world, how he builds his second one is the same thing we talked about. Build your platform and come back and earn your way in, work your way in, or buy your way in, or both. So whatever platform you’re picking, that’s kind of the process. So let me come back to here. So that’s the talk show. So again, if you’re going to do Facebook, you’re like, “Number one, I’m going to focus and double, triple down and build a huge Facebook following, that’s my goal.” Cool, so you build your page, come back and say okay, “I’m going to work my way in, I’m going to buy my way in. I’m going to Dream 100 all my people, who from these people can I work my way in? Who can IJ buy my way in?” and that’s how you start growing up the channel. Alright, number two direct mail and email. So old school, if you think of the old school method of this, and you can learn a lot looking at the old school as you’re looking at what’s new. So many of you guys obsessively study direct mail? Me and Dana probably, a couple of people. So I don’t know, I still love the old guys the best. When Dana was joking about me and him getting in bidding wars on EBay, that’s actually a true thing. Every Sunday night I sit on my bed in EBay and I have like 12 searches that are always preloaded, one’s Dan Kennedy, one’s Gary Halbert, all the old school people, I’m searching for the new thing to pop up and I buy everything. It’s really fun because I love the old stuff. It’s my favorite because there’s so much you can learn that relates back to what we’re doing today in our world. So direct mail is just like talk shows, if you look how Hollywood does the talk show circuits, it gives us the model of what we should be doing. The same thing is true with direct mail. So you look at direct mail back in the day, this is how the whole thing worked. Initially with direct mail, what you would do, this is you and direct mail is similar to the dream 100, there are lists out there. If you look at the history of direct mail, initially what people would do is they would go and just try to mail everybody right. They would try to get the phone book out, and just get a whole bunch of names and send them out stuff. How many think that is efficient or effective or anything? It’s really bad.  In fact, it’s funny when I was first learning about direct mail when I was 12 I remember them talking about this whole concept and it was similar to email where basically they’re like, “I get a list of 100 thousand people, you mail them out a letter and 3% of people respond, this is how the money works, and you make a bunch of money.” So as a 12 year old kid I got all excited. So I wrote a sales letter on blue paper because that’s all we had in the printer, my parents printer. For my birthday I asked for stamps, I’m such a nerd, so my parents gave me 36 stamps because that was the equivalent of what they were willing to spend on my birthday present. I took my 36 stamps, I wrote out a one page sales letter on the blue paper, because that’s all we had, then I folded it in half because I couldn’t afford envelopes, I put a sticker on it and I hand wrote out 36 addresses. And I didn’t know where to get a list, so I literally got my phone book and I opened it up and I was like, “That guys getting a letter.” And I wrote his name in, I flipped it over, “That guys getting a letter.” And I found 36 people randomly from the phone book in Salt Lake City, Utah and I took those letters and I mailed them. And I was just like, “Oh my gosh, this is going to be huge. If 1% buy…” I’d do the math and I was so excited. My sample size was 36 and I mailed these letters out and nothing happened. Not a single person responded, and it was really heartbreaking. But it was really hard to read, black ink on blue is really hard to read. And I was like, “I wish my parents had white paper.” But for some reason they didn’t. Who knows? So that was traditional, when direct mail first started, people just tried to mail the phone book. And there’s only one campaign in the history of the world that ever actually worked with the phone book, and it was a campaign that Gary Halbert did called the Coat of Arms Letter. Who has ever heard this story before? Ah, the old school stories are the best. So I actually had a chance to meet Gary Halbert, I interviewed him once before he passed away. But he is one of the most amazing people in our industry ever. In fact, if you go to the garyhalberletter.com you can still see all of his old newsletters that he’s published for the last decade before he passed away. They’re all there and you can read them. And just reading them, you’ll learn more about marketing than you will almost any other way. So the Gary Halbert letter, anyway, as I’m studying Gary’s stuff he tells this story about the Coat of Arms, it was actually an interview with him and my first mentor, Mark Joyner and he’s telling this story. So what he did is he tried a whole bunch of different things and he found this family crest, like a coat of arms thing, and it cost him like 30 cents to like photo copy it and like put it out to people. What he did is like, “This has got people’s names on it, I could actually use the phone book.” So he took all the Johnson’s in the phone book and mailed out this one page sales letter, have you read the letter? It’s so good. Anyway, it’s like a super personal like, “Hey, this is Gary or whatever, I have the same last name as you and I found the family coat of arms, it’s really cool. Check it out. I actually got a whole bunch of them printed for myself and my family and stuff. I saw that you have the same last name, you’re also Johnson, I’m Johnson. If you want I could send it to you for like $5. Just send me cash in the envelope and I’ll send you out your own coat of arms.” And what’s interesting, I won’t go too deep in this, but he found with the bigger names like Johnson or Smith it didn’t work, but with the smaller names like Brunson or Derricks, where it’s a more unique name, it killed it. And he was literally getting the phone book, ripping them out, a dude’s typing in all this stuff, and mail those out. They’d write the letter for the Derricks family, or the Brunson family. What’s funny, this is the coolest part of the story. I wish he was here to tell it. His dad at the time was kind of like most of our parents. I remember when I first got started in this business I was making like a quarter of a million bucks a year and my mom was like, because I was still in school at the time, and she’s like, “Well Russell, when you get done with school what’s your job going to be?” I’m like, “Mom, this is my job.” And she’s like, “No, no, no when you’re done with that, what are you going to do when you want to grow up.” I’m like, “Mom, this is a legit thing, this is real.” And it’s funny, if any of you guys know David Frye, David Frye is my second uncle or something like that, he’s also in our industry. I found out years later that he was doing the same thing I was doing. So I called my mom like, “uncle David, he’s doing what I’m doing.” And she’s like, “Oh, well he does really well. Okay, you can do that.” And that legitimized what we do because somebody else she knew was doing it. But Gary had the same thing with his dad where his dad was like, “When are you going to get a real job? When are you going to do this thing?” So Gary, what he told his dad, he’s like, “Dad, I want you to put on a nice shirt and tie and I’m going to pick you up tomorrow because I want to show you something.” And his dad is like, “Why?” he’s like, “Just please dress up nice, I’m going to take you out.” So he goes and picks up his dad the next morning, and he drives over to the bank, and they walk into the bank and there’s like the bank tellers there and stuff, and then there’s this stairway. He’s like, “Come here dad.” His dad is like, “What are you doing?” and he’s like, “Come over here.” He’s like, “We can’t go up there, that’s just for employees.” And he’s like, “No, come here dad.” So he takes this thing, and they walk up the stairs and go on the second level of the bank, and they walk around the bank and there’s like 60 full time people there, 60 people who are opening up envelopes and are pulling out 5 one dollar bills, putting them in a bank bag and cashing them. Boom, 60 full time people. And he tells his dad, “this is the people of the bank who work to put our cash into the bank full time.” And he’s like, “Those are the sales for the month?” “These are the sales for today.” That letter at its peak was getting like 10,000+ responses a day of people sending in $5 a time. And they had full time people just doing that, counting the cash. And his dad was like, “Okay, you can keep doing this.” It legitimized it for his father. So that’s kind of what direct mail is. For most people, the phone book concept does not work. Having a phone book doesn’t work, but for that one….there’s a picture of a phone book, I don’t know. Okay, that doesn’t work, but if you look at the progression, what happened then, people started here, they were testing all sorts of stuff. And what happened is people started getting buyers, and they started building buyer lists. So this person over here, this dude would be like, “Hey, I don’t have a phone book but I’ve got this list right here. These are a whole bunch of people on my list, let’s say there’s 30,000 people that have bought something from me, so you can mail the phone book of like a billion people and cross your fingers and hope or if you’re selling something similar, I sold 30,000 people garden hoses, if you have something that someone who bought the garden hoses would want, you can rent this list.” So people come and they rent this list and they would mail it out. And then somebody else over here would  have a list that was based on a business opportunity. And this guy would have a list based on health and weight loss. And soon people would build up huge directories, like here’s all the different lists that are out there. Have you ever heard of the SRDS, it’s this huge directory of every list known to man that people actually rent it. And in every market you can find here are a hundred or a thousand people that have buyer lists of people. So the first phase was like the phone book list, the second phase became buyer lists, then the third phase, people kept saying buyer lists are good, sometimes they’re better and sometimes they’re worse, and these buyer list people would be like, “well, here’s all my buyer lists in the last 10 years.” And in there you’ve got tons of people who have moved and all sorts of stuff. So they came up with this algorithm that figured out how to get the best possible people on the list. So the algorithm is this, RFM, any direct response nerds know what RFM stands for? I know Dave knows, anybody else? Recency, how recent have they bought something? Somebody who bought something yesterday is more valuable than somebody who bought something three years ago. So recency. The second one is frequency. How often did they buy? How many of you guys are hyper active buyers? How many of you guys have bought more than one thing from me about funnels? Guess what, you’re more likely to keep buying from me. “But Russell, I already bought everything on funnels.” No, it doesn’t matter. You’re obsessed. You’re obsessive compulsive like me, you buy the thing and then the next thing and next thing and you can’t stop. That’s better. I want people who buy frequently, that’s a better buyer. So if they bought recently they’re a better buyer, if they bought frequently they’re a better buyer, and what’s the M stand for? Monetary value. How much they spent? The dude who gave me $30,000 is worth more than the guy who gave me free plus shipping. So you start doing that, say, “I want to rent your list of 30,000 people, but I only want people who have bought in the last 30 days and bought at least 2 things from you and spent over $1000.” And now you get the cream of the crop, the gold and that’s who you would go out and you would mail from the list. So that’s kind of how the old school worked. Other cool things we learned from the old school as well, if you would go and let’s say I read this dude’s list, I get these people and if I would just send a letter to them randomly it would do good, but what would do better is the invention of this thing called the lift letter. So the lift letter is a one page paper from the person they know. They know, let’s say this is Lady Boss and they know Kaelin, so there would be a one page letter from Kaelin and it’d be like, “Hey, I just met Russell, he’s got this really cool weight loss program that works really, really good for dads. So you are one of my Lady Boss women and you want your husband to be a little skinnier, you should get Russell’s program, it’s amazing…..” a one page lift letter that would be on top of it, and then underneath the lift letter would be my entire sales letter selling my program. So we learned this, having lift letters is better. So how does that correlate to us today? Well it correlates today, understanding that if I’m going after someone with email, I want to find people who have email lists that are good. People that have, that are growing lists, recency, frequency, monetary value. I tell you what, if I can do a JV partnership with somebody who their potential buyers, all their customers have spent $1000 with them or $5000 with them, I’m going to spend more time on that dream 100 person because I know that their list is worth way more. If I know, man, this guy just did a product launch, he’s got $5000 new buyers, oh my gosh, that buyer list is hot. When we used to be in the product launch game, we’d launch a product and we’d sell 10,000 copies of it and for the next like 60 days our list was hot. Anything we promoted they would buy, because they were recent. So it’s like, you’re finding partnerships, looking for people who actually have lists that are these things. A lot of people who like, when we launched the Expert Secrets book, they had done really good on the Dotcom Secrets book launch, I was all excited for them to promote and sell and guess what? These people hadn’t added anyone to their list in like 3 years, and they didn’t email them very often, and they did horrible on the launch, the second one because they weren’t always doing these things. So when I’m looking for JV partners I’m looking for people who have recency, frequency, and monetary value inside their list. That’s a much more valuable partner for me than someone who isn’t. I also look at this, the lift letter right. The reason why JV’s do so good, if you get the Dream 100 and be like, “Dude, Dana wrote this book, it’s insane. It’s 400 bucks, it doesn’t make any sense, but this book is amazing. If you come on this webinar with me, he’s going to explain the whole thing, it’s going to be awesome.” That’s going to be way better than me running a cold Facebook ad to Dana’s audience. So if I can get him to do the lift letter, him to endorse it, promote it before  they come on, everything goes up. That’s why Dana when he did his Facebook ads made zero dollars in sales on his webinar. Did the same thing with the JV partner who did a lift letter and warmed him, $260,000 in sales. That’s the difference. So we learned so many good things from direct mail. Email is the same thing. The second phase in this for you guys, you need to go and sit down and be like, “who are the emailers in my business?” Because people who read emails, people who open and click on emails are people who open and click on emails. I’m going to find the emailers, I’m going to build a dream 100 list and then I’m going to do one or two things. I’m going to work my way in or I’m going to buy my way in. If I work my way in it means I’m going to try to dream 100 them, get them to promote my stuff as an affiliate, and they say no or whatever, I can see if I can buy my way in. I’m going to go and see if I can buy an ad in their newsletter, if I can pay them up front. This weekend in my secret illuminati meeting, I was hanging out with the guy that owns Tapping Point Solution, do any of you guys know….I probably shouldn’t tell the members of the illuminati I might get killed. Alex, Nick…do you guys know them at all? So they have a company called Tapping Point Solution which is like this really cool thing, but what they do when they do dream 100 stuff is they have, their entire business is based on affiliates promoting their stuff, but they don’t pay affiliates commissions at all. What they do is they pay affiliates $1.50 for every single click that they get, no matter what. So they’re able to go to the affiliates, and they’re not necessarily working their way in, “Hey, let’s split the money 50/50.” It’s like, “Okay, how many clicks can you send? I’ll give you this much per click. You guys in?” and they’re like, “sure.’ And that’s how they do it. They’re buying their way into every single one of their dream 100 list. So there’s different ways to structure this as you start learning about this. The reason why I’m kind of showing you guys this in detail on each platform is because one of the biggest things I want you to understand is I want you understand the concepts are the same for all of these. It’s picking the platform, building my channel, doing the dream 100, working my way in, buying my way to grow my platform. And it’s going to be similar on every one of these, and if you understand that, this is what makes your business bulletproof. Because someday Facebook is going to get squashed, or email might get banned. I had a bunch of friends who made a ton of money back when fax blasts were real, you could rent a fax list and you could queue it up and you’d have your sales letter printing on like 35,000 people’s stuff that night. And then the FTC came in and made Fax Blasting illegal and that dried up. So email could be illegal tomorrow, we have no idea. Blogs could like, who knows, things could be shut down, but if you understand these concepts it doesn’t matter. As new platforms come out, if you understand, “Hey I wanna go big in Twitter, or Twitch, or Pinterest, or whatever it is.” The same process, the same concepts are the same. So you build your channel, find the dream 100, work my way in, buy my way in, boom that’s it, direct mail. Number three radio podcasts, same thing I talked about. If you want to build a podcast channel, that’s it. Build the channel, build the platform, then you go dream 100, go to the iTunes directory, go to Stitcher, go to all the big directories, search your phrases, figure out who your people are, and go start dream 100ing them. Or go back in time, maybe if I come here to my customer journey, my best ones if I go sales funnel radio, everyone on Steven’s podcast probably wants sales funnels. So that’s an easy one to do. But if I can go backwards in time in the podcast directory and be like, “Okay well, there’s only like 3 funnel podcast, who else do I go?” I gotta go backward s in the customer journey. Who’s got a podcast on business growth? Who’s got a podcast to chiropractors? Who’s got a podcast on anyone else who may potentially be a customer going backwards. So don’t just do the obvious of, “Russell’s there’s only three people who have a funnel podcast.” Okay, that’s right here, now go backwards in the timeline. Who else needs a podcast. Go warmer to the traffic, then go to the colder traffic and go back and forth. But you should be able to get at least a hundred people from any podcast directory for what you’re in. So don’t tell me, “There’ sonly 3 people.” It’s because you’re being lazy. You gotta go backwards in time and think, hot traffic, warm traffic, all the way to cold. So that’s podcasting, the same thing. YouTube is like a sitcom. How many of you guys watch TV? Dave and I were talking about this last night. So YouTube is a little different beast right. It’s not like…I can buy my way in really easy, I can find here’s all of Tony Robbins videos and I can buy ads. I can go and find infusion Soft, they can be my Dream 100. How many of you guys have ever watched an Infusion Soft Tutorial on YouTube? What happens right before that? Right before the Infusion Soft Tutorial pops up is me being like, “Are you trying to figure out how to use Infusion Soft? It is confusing software, but guess what there’s this really cool tool called Clickfunnels, so before you watch this tutorial I’m going to show you something that’s way simpler than the crap you’re trying to figure out, click down below.” It’s really fun. Same thing with Lead Pages and Hubspot and Unbounce and all my competitors. So they’re my dream 100 in YouTube because I want to pop in front of everyone in their tutorial videos and explain to them why the software they’re using is the devil and why I am their savior. So it’s really, really fun. So I dream 100 my competitors there, but how do I work my way in on a YouTube channel? How do people do it through sitcoms? How do they do it through different TV shows? Well think about it, how many of you guys have ever seen a show, they call them a crossover show, where two different casts of different shows will be on a show together? Why do they do that? Hmmm, why would they do that? Maybe this show’s got a big following and this show’s got a big following, they’re all a bunch of attractive characters. People over here on ER love the ER staff, and over here they’re like the Simpsons and like the Simpson’s staff, whatever it is, they do a crossover show where somehow the characters connect. Then the people of this show see this, people love the show and all the sudden they cross pollinate, and now both channels get bigger. Dave was pulling this morning a bunch of different shows that did that. The Flash and Super Girl did a crossover show so that both audiences find out about the other shows. Fresh Prince and The Jefferson’s did it. Simpsons and 24, Law and Order and Homicide. Dozens and dozens of shows. This is how they cross pollinate TV shows. So for you, how do you do that? You dream 100 the crap out of YouTube and find out who are all the people you eventually would love to have their audiences, and then you do crossover shows. You do some kind of video together and you do the crossover. Now again, initially obviously I would love to find someone with a billion person YouTube following and do a crossover show, they’re probably not going to do it. So the only way a crossover show is going to work where you’ve got similar platforms. So if you’ve got 10,000 people on your YouTube, I’m going to Dream 100 everyone in my market that’s got 10,000 people , we’re going to do a crossover show, I’m going to get a bunch of their people, they’ll get a bunch of my people and now my show grows to 15,000. Then I’m going to go and say, “Who’s my next thing?” and do a crossover show over there and boom, keep doing that. And keep ascending myself up the dream 100 until eventually you got a hundred thousand, and then a million and you can keep growing from there. So doing videos together is how you do the crossover show. Same thing comes true with Instagram. Instagram happens, I dream 100 it. I can go buy swipe ups on the people that are on my dream 100. I can buy ads from the people on my dream 100, then I can also do partnerships with them. Like yesterday I was in, or two days ago I was in Jackson hole in a helicopter, and how many of you guys know who Dave Hollis is? Dave and his wife are amazing, and she’s got like a billion followers, he’s got less but growing fast. And he was in the helicopter and he was like, “Hey I’m in the helicopter back here with Russell Brunson!” And then he tagged me @Russellbrunson and I got a whole slew of thousand plus people from his following that then followed me. Just like that. Right now when Steven Larsen said, {inaudible}, I was filming him and I tagged Steven Larsen and gets what’s going to happen? He’s going to get a whole crap-ton of my people who are going to come over to his thing. I’m doing little mini crossover shows on Instagram. I did a whole bunch with Dana, like 3 or 4 with Dana. So invite people to go do cool things with you, then they’ll tag you and all the sudden I guarantee you will wake up with a whole bunch of new instagram followers if you even know how to log in to Instagram. Yeah, you don’t even know. I bet they’re there. It happened to Todd at Funnel Hacking Live. Guess what? I tagged Todd in something, he had like 3 followers, he woke up the next morning with like 700 followers and he’s like, “I should probably do some instagram now.” So you’re finding cool people and hanging out with them, that are already doing that, and then very quickly people will start sucking, and you’re doing that same kind of thing. So I’m working my way in and I’m buying my way in. In fact, all you guys should Instagram me right now and tag me, you have my permission. You need me to dance or something? Whatever you want to do, tag the crap out of me, because I want all your people to follow me as well. So I’m working my way in, I’m buying my way in and I’m working my channel. Same thing happens with blogs. In fact, how many of you guys want to know how SEO works? In like 2 minutes? SEO. How many of you are like, “I wish I could be number one in Google for my term.” Dream 100 is actually how you do SEO as well, which is fascinating. No one ever believes me until I tell them this, then I show them and they’re like, “What?” Boom, mind blown. The dude who I think is the best SEO coach right now, a guy named Brian Dean at Backlinko.com And if you look at Brian’s strategy it is literally dream 100. So this is what he does, he goes into the Google, and he figures out, “Man, it would be awesome to be ranked for….” He types in a phrase, “sales funnels.” And he clicks search, boom, and it’s like, “Dude number one, lady number two, person number three.” And here’s the top ten right. He’s like, “That would be my dream spot. I want to be number one.” And he’s like, “Who is the dude that is number one.” So he clicks on this thing and goes over to this page, and it’s like, “here’s the dude who’s number one for Sales Funnels.” And he’s like, “There’s an article, that would be awesome if that was mine instead.’ So there’s a couple of things you could do. There’s a couple levels of dream 100 here. One level is like, “I want to be right here. Let me contact this person and see if I can buy an ad on his page.’ So what I do is I build a dream 100 of every single person who is in the top ten in Google for the keywords I’m dreaming about, and I can buy my way in where I just go and buy an ad directly on their page. In the past, back when we were doing more Biz Op stuff, I found the top three people here, and literally paid them to throw a pop on their page that people opt in to my newsletter. And I was not, I didn’t work for this, but I was paying per opt in to get all the people who came to Google, searched for the thing, came for the thing, and they opt in. It was like the best leads ever. Let me step back, that’s one way to use Dream 100. But if you look at what Brian teaches at backlinko, which is super cool. He takes this page, and he’s like, “Why is this page ranked number one? Why does Google actually like it? There’s got to be a reason.” So he does some stuff, he’s like, “Okay, this page has got, let’s say it’s got a 3000 word article, in the article he said the world sales funnels like 6 times, used these keywords, and here’s some other keywords…” He kind of diagrams, what was that? Then what he does, he takes this and there’s different sites you can do to run a background thing, and he runs it through it and says, “How many people are linking to this site.” And it says, “This site has 682 links coming back to it. Here’s all the links coming back and pointing to this page.” So we know that Google’s algorithm is based on two things, what’s on the page, and then who are all the people pointing back to you. So what Brian does, what he teaches all his students, he says, “This is your dream 100.” He doesn’t say that, but that’s what it is. He then takes this list of dream 100 and he then emails every single person. He’s like, “Hey dude, your email or blog is amazing. I saw you’re linking to my buddy over here. I wrote an article as well. His is only 3000 words, mine is 6. If you’d like, I’d love for you to link over to mine as well.” And then he gets this dude now to link to his article, it’s even better, then this dude, and this lady, and this person, and this person. And soon all the people who are making this thing pop to number one start linking here. And within the week he’s number 10, and then 7, and then 3, and then 2 and then he’s just getting more links. That’s SEO, all dream 100. Does that make sense? This process you guys, it’s the same over and over and over and over again. And then the last one on here I just put other, because this is true with every platform. If you guys learn to Twitter, what do you do? Do the Dream 100 list. How do I work my way in, how do I buy my way in? That’s the game. I want to be big on twitch, I want to be big on Pinterest. Whatever platform you want to be in, whatever next new platform is coming out, this is the game. Building your own channel, figuring out how to work my way in, how to buy my way in, and growing your own platform. So that is it. What I recommend for all you guys, like I said 30 minutes ago, don’t do all of these right now. It will suffocate you and it will be really hard. Pick one, which platform do you want to be the best at. Do you want the biggest email list, do you want the biggest Facebook following, biggest YouTube…pick one, I don’t care which one it is, but pick one, the one you like the most, the one you want to geek out, the one you want to go deep on the most and start building there and that’s going to start building your own platform. Then as you start growing, then you move to the last phase. This is like where in our company we’re at, but we didn’t get here until 2 years ago, so don’t think you have to do this today, but long term the goal is to get what we call Conversation Domination. How do I do this on all the platforms? Start building your team out like, here’s our Facebook Dream 100, here’s our email dream 100, here’ sour podcast, here’s our YouTube, here’s our Instagram, here’s our blog. That’s what we’re doing out of our office. We got people in charge of all these things. Going deep, building dream 100 and then realizing we want to grow our Facebook following, people on Facebook like being on Facebook so let’s build our Facebook dream 100. How do we work our way in, how do we buy our way in, and let’s get them to come to our platform. Let’s say I want to build my podcast following. We know people who listen to podcasts, listen to podcasts, so let’s build our dream 100 in the podcast, let’s work our way in, let’s buy our way in and build our platform there. If you want to be big on email, on YouTube, it’s the same process over and over and over again. And it’s not that difficult. It’s pretty simple and a lot of fun. And I believe that is the last phase of it. So if we kind of scroll here, I’m going to go back to the beginning real quick and walk you guys through the 7 of these. So the foundation for this whole thing is this, it’s really understanding this. There’s three types of traffic. Traffic you control, traffic you earn, and traffic that you own. That’s the foundation. So after you figure that out, then come back and be like, “Who is my dream customer?” Then you become obsessed with them so I can figure out where they’re actually at, because I can’t go and buy that traffic or work my way in unless I can figure out exactly where they’re at in their life and how to communicate with them at that point. So we have our dream 100 customer journey. So now we have an idea, we love our customer, know exactly who they are, we’re obsessed with them, who’s got them already? Let’s go find those people and let’s go build a dream 100, and start building our well before we’re thirsty. Let’s build our ecosystem out there, then we’re going to start focusing on all these people. Where’s the traffic I control, traffic I don’t control, put it in those pages and then mush it back into traffic that we own, and from there it’s understanding the distribution channels, understanding the platforms, each of the channels. It’s going to be similar, with little tweaks, little differences, but do that to build it out. Then as we grow we move to full on conversation domination as we start growing across all the platforms. And that you guys is how we do the dream 100 in our company. Alright everyone that is it for the third and final part of my presentation for Dream  100 Con. I hope you guys enjoyed this presentation. I thank Dana for putting on the event and allowing me to come and speak at it. I’m glad that I was able to share with you guys because hopefully it gets you excited for the traffic secrets book. Now I have one favor, if you’ve enjoyed the last three episodes, I would love for you to take a screen shot on your phone and then go and post it on Facebook or Instagram, or any of the other networks you use. If you’re tweeting or pinning or whatever else, feel free to post it there. Be sure to tag me so I can see that you’re listening, that’s how I know you’re cool. And then after you’ve tagged me, then also use hashtag Marketing Secrets, and let other people know about this episode if you got value from it. Thanks so much you guys, appreciate you all, and we will talk to you all again soon. Bye everybody.

Hack the Entrepreneur with Jon Nastor
445: Step-By-Step SEO: An Interview with Brian Dean

Hack the Entrepreneur with Jon Nastor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2018 72:21


Today's sponsor is LinkedIn Marketing Solutions. To redeem a FREE $100 LinkedIn Ad Credit, go to https://linkedin.com/hack Today's guest is an internationally recognized SEO expert who's worked with companies like Disney, Apple, and IBM. His name is Brian Dean, and he is the founder of Backlinko, an SEO blog launched in late 2012. Brian has grown Backlinko from 0 to over 180,000 visitors a month. In short, this guys knows how to get stuff ranked in Google. Here's the story behind the episode... Back in July, after studying Brian and his articles for months, I began implementing what he teaches. During the past three months, I've published just three articles, and traffic has gone up a staggering 181% as of this recording. I want you to have access to this process too. In this episode, we are going to hear Brian walkthrough his exact process for publishing content and getting it to rank number one in Google. Seriously, from Brian's process for getting topic ideas, straight through to publishing and beyond. In addition to this episode, head over to the blog and check out the complementary article called How to Get on the First Page of Google. You can find it at https://HacktheEntrepreneur.com/google All right, now let's get into the interview with Brian Dean of Backlinko.

The Speaker Lab
206. How SEO Can Grow Your Speaking Business with Brian Dean

The Speaker Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2018 36:06


Do you know what SEO stands for or how SEO can grow your speaking business? You're in luck because today's guest will answer those questions, and more. Brian Dean of Backlinko joins us for episode 206 of The Speaker Lab. Brian's company is Backlinko, an SEO training company that teaches people how to rank in Google and YouTube. Most people know Backlinko as a blog, it gets 3 million visitors every year and is one of the top SEO blogs in the world. If you're wondering what SEO is the term stands for search engine optimization, which means getting your site to rank higher on Google. The purpose of SEO is driving more traffic to your site from search engines, like Google and YouTube. On this episode, we'll talk about why SEO (including blogging and YouTube) should be a part of your marketing strategy. Brian will also share techniques you can use, including where to begin, and much more on today's edition of The Speaker Lab. THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:    What does EAT stand for and why does it matter in your Google rankings? What is the barbell strategy? How do you know which keywords you should use? How many keywords should you be targeting to be most effective? What are the two ways Google reviews your site to rank it? Why has he put so much effort into YouTube? What is the 2nd biggest search engine in the world? How long should your videos be on YouTube? And so much more! EPISODE RESOURCES Backlinko web site Backlinko blog Backlinko on Twitter Seed Keywords Engine Database of speaking events  The Speaker Lab Facebook group Free Speaker Workshop Booked and Paid to Speak Got questions? Send them in here Email me! Subscribe on iTunes, and leave us a rating or review  

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
This Is Going to Disrupt the SEO Industry | Ep. #788

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2018 5:24


In episode #788, Eric and Neil talk about the one thing that is going to disrupt the SEO industry. Tune in to hear what their predictions are for the future of SEO. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:27] Today’s Topic: This Is Going to Disrupt the SEO Industry [00:42] Voice search is going to disrupt the SEO industry. [01:28] We can’t predict when it will take over, but it is becoming more popular. [01:38] Right now, it is used for quick information, not for in-depth purchasing research. [02:50] Eric thinks it is still business as usual, until he sees the scales tipping. [03:10] Brian Dean wrote an article on Backlinko about voice search. [03:27] In general, a strategy for voice search isn’t needed yet. [03:50] Try to keep your rankings up. [04:10] Just be aware of the trend. [04:20] That’s all for today! [04:24] Go here to see how many downloads the show is getting. Also rate and review to help Eric and Neil meet their goal of 1 Million downloads per month. They will throw a live event once they reach their goal. Leave some feedback: What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review. Connect with us: NeilPatel.com Quick Sprout Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel Twitter @ericosiu