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Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Løkke gik i tv for at redde sit store projekt

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 14:39


Danmark er ved at få en regering, der bygges bag tæt lukkede døre. Ingen af topforhandlerne siger noget, intet slipper ud. Indtil Lars Løkke Rasmussen pludselig sad på tv og bød sig selv og sine Moderater til som et støtteparti. Han behøvede ikke at komme i regering. Hvad skete der lige der, hvorfor vil magtmennesket nøjes med så lidt?Med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

RBLR Sports
RBLR Lightning: 999 & The Bottom Six

RBLR Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 60:03


There's so much to discuss this week! We beat STL/BUF but lost a playoff-style game to red-hot BOS. Does the bottom-6 need a shake-up? Cirelli's on the way back! We hold Stamkos accountable, Point was outstanding, Hagel racked up points, & Kuch leads! #gobolts Support The Pod! Buy A Shirt! Use Promo Code “BOLTS” for […]

The Dunker Spot
Southwest Stress

The Dunker Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 93:03


Nekias Duncan and Steve Jones Jr. bounce around the league with their observations from the week. 2:30 -- Kemba Walker signing 5:00 -- Teams that impressed (GSW, DET, PHI, MIA, BOS) 37:30 -- Teams that make us think (NO, DAL) 1:10:20 -- Players that impressed 1:17:49 -- Free Throws Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Mette vil midten, hvad gør fløjene så?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 15:46


Fire partier er sat uden for døren, mens statsminister Mette Frederiksen forsøger at skabe en bred regering. Ser Enhedslisten, Alternativet, Danmarksdemokraterne og Nye Borgerlige ind i fire år i glemsel, eller kan de vinde magt uden for det brede samarbejde?I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Permanencia Involuntaria
#514: Bosé, Gabinete de Curiosidades

Permanencia Involuntaria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 32:14


En este episodio platicamos sobre las series Bosé y.Gabinete de Curiosidades.

Claus y Faus
Episodio #80: Bosé, White Lotus, Black Adam

Claus y Faus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 67:14


En este episodio platicamos sobre Bosé, White Lotus, Black Adam y el Gabinete de curiosidades de Guillermo del Toro.

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina
How is Puberty Changing In Our Kids

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 44:56


In this episode of Real Talk, KJK Student Defense Attorneys Susan Stone and Kristina Supler are joined by Dr. Cara Natterson, a pediatrician, consultant, and New York Times bestselling author of puberty and parenting books. They discuss puberty. The conversation includes what changes in puberty professionals have seen over the years, the contributing factors that affect puberty in adolescents and the best methods for helping kids and their parents go through puberty successfully. Links: https://myoomla.com  Show Notes: Show Notes: (03:07)  What goal is the Puberty Podcast trying to achieve?  (05:15) How hormones affect children's behavior as they go through adolescence (06:41) Are kids mentally prepared for puberty once it hits?  (08:28) Why are kids nowadays experiencing puberty earlier than previous generations? (09:07) What are the possible factors that are speeding up the occurrence of puberty in adolescents? (10:36) Has the breast size of the young females of this generation increased compared to that of the former? (12:10) Is the spike of obesity in recent years the main reason behind bigger boobs in adolescent girls? (13:41) How a life-changing product and survival guide on how to get through puberty especially for kids was born (14:33) Should young ladies be wearing sports bras when they hit puberty? (15:05) What is the best type of bra for girls to start with? (16:05) Can underwear offer both comfort and health benefits? (16:30) How Dr. Cara is giving a voice to children going through puberty (18:25) Should the age at which kids go through puberty determine when we should treat them as adults? (19:00) Why are female early bloomers at a higher risk for sexual predation? (21:01) Is it scientifically proven that the pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of students? (22:33) What's the one piece of advice you would give to parents about their children and their mental health? (24:12) How has the adaptation of the body positivity movement impacted children's mental health when it comes to their weight? (24:31) Has the context of eating disorders and body image in boys and girls evolved throughout the years? (26:47) Should parents initiate, “the birds and the bees” talk with their kids even if they don't ask about sex? (28:51) How can parents help their children deal with weight and acne problems without hurting their feelings? (31:22) How have periods transformed over the years? (34:31) Has the rate of ADHD in boys surged recently? (36:58) What does sleep do to our bodies? (38:05) Are sleeping patterns of teenagers different from other age groups? (39:19) What can you do for your child when they can't sleep and begin to overthink? (39:47) Are sleeping aids such as melatonin supplements or gummies safe for teens who have trouble falling asleep? (41:13) How do you know when you should seek professional help for insomnia?  (42:25) What's one piece of advice you would give to kids who have low self-esteem? Transcript: Susan Stone: So today we're gonna talk about something that somehow has become a lost topic, and that is puberty.  Kristina Supler: Just saying that word is making me have these like awkward flashbacks, Susan Stone: but it shouldn't.  You know, I have to say I think of puberty very differently now that my oldest is 25 and I've seen them go through everything. And as a Jewish mama, I think of puberty kids at their bar and Bos mitzvah talking about, No, I am a man. A man. And you see this little guy going, Today, I am a man. And I'm like, No, you're a little pisser. Um, and for those out there, you get it. If you've been to a bar mitzvah and then something magical happens, Puberty. And then the voice drops and the boobs grow. And indeed they do look like little men and women. So  we're gonna talk about puberty today.  Kristina Supler: Well, and this is an issue that's particularly, uh, topical. I pertinent for the Supler household. My daughter would be mortified, but she is, um, in sixth grade. And so lots of conversations are starting to happen in our house. And indeed, A book that we're gonna talk about today has been purchased, so it's fortuitous to have our guests today. Today we are joined by Dr. Cara Natterson. Cara is a pediatrician, consultant, speaker, and New York Times best selling author of multiple books, including The Care and Keeping of You, the American Girl Library Series. And she has sold more than 6 million copies of that book. And indeed, I have purchased that book. Um, additionally, she's recently published Decoding Boys. And in 2020, Carra launched OOMLA, which is basically a a puberty positive company that we're gonna talk more about. Thank you for joining us, Kara.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here, and yours is not the only horrified child. My two children were just just deeply dismayed by what I did when they were going through puberty.  Susan Stone: That's amazing and we, we welcome you. I wanna start by talking about your podcast, The Puberty Podcast. So Kristina and I are sort of new to the podcasting world and apparently it is a world so newish ish. We're newish. It's been like a year, and we we're very proud of our Real Talk with Susan and Kristina podcast that you're on. Because we think that podcasting is just a wonderful way to reach audiences. So on your podcast, you talk about all things adolescence from body image and behavioral changes to sex and consent. Tell us, Cara, what is the real goal and what are you trying to accomplish with your podcast?  Dr. Cara Natterson: So we, we call it the Puberty podcast. But people think about puberty as being specific to the body changes that are happening, and that's the very narrow definition of puberty. It's the path through sexual maturity. The reason we call it the Puberty Podcast and talk about all these other adjacent topics as well, is that the same hormones that make your boobs grow and that make your shoulders broad and that make you hairy, and that make you smell all of those same hormones also impact your moods and your feelings, and therefore your friendships and therefore your family dynamics. And so there are all these downstream. Issues that used to be called adolescence, and those two buckets were really separate. Like there was puberty, which was your body, and there was adolescence, which was everything else. But what has become really clear is that those two things are actually quite synonymous. The Venn diagram overlap of those two topics is massive. And so we like to talk about all of it. Because it is the one stage of life that regardless of your gender, regardless of your background, regardless of where on the globe you are growing up, you will go through puberty. This is a universal rite of passage, and it's a much longer rite of passage than it used. Susan Stone: You know,  I don't know if you will agree with this statement, but when Kristina and I first became law Partners, her children were just, I think the preschool age and a little older. Kristina Supler: Yeah, that's about right. Susan Stone: And I remember saying to her, At that time, you are in your golden years. Mm-hmm. ? Mm-hmm. . I think post potty training and before puberty is just the sweetest time when a parent is with a child. Why do kids become little monsters once they hit puberty?  It's, And do you agree with me?  Dr. Cara Natterson: It's such a good question. I do agree with you that in that time between when they learn to walk and talk and when their, their sex hormones, estrogen and, and testosterone in particular, start to surge, the, the most common question out of their mouth is, you know, do you wanna know how much I love you? I mean, it's wrote, I can't beat it. Right. You really can't beat it. So, but what happens is, and it's by the way, it used to happen at 10 or 11, and now it's happening at eight on average for girls, and between nine and 10 on average for boys. Is that the, the sex hormones are starting to get ramped up in the body. The ovaries produce estrogen in the female body. The testicles produce testosterone in the male body, and those hormones don't just circulate below the neck. Those hormones circulate up in the brain and they impact the way kids feel. And we all know this. Every single person has felt this. We felt the highs and the lows of hormone surges. This is new to kids. They don't know how to manage it. Their brains are getting used to it, and that's what you are seeing and feeling when kids hit their tween and teen years. Susan Stone: I have a question.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Sure. Susan Stone: Now that it's puberty is happening so young a. Are they mentally ready for this ?  Dr. Cara Natterson: None of us are mentally ready for this. They are not. And this is a humongous piece of this puzzle. It really, um, it shouldn't matter when they enter puberty in so far as. It should just be a natural process in life. And it happens when it happens. And by the way, the range is very broad. So there are of course kids who start earlier and kids who start later, but it shouldn't matter. The problem is we live in a world in a context where it really does matter. So think about it this way. Um, the average age for cell phone ownership in this country is 10. It's 10. Okay? Now I've just told you more than half of all kids have either estrogen or testosterone coursing through their bodies by the time they're 10. So now you're gonna combine a brain that's pretty immature with these hormones that are pretty potent and devices, and no, the answer to your question is they're not ready. The brain is not going to be able to make consistently smart consequential decisions until it's close to 30. That's two more decades, so the puberty is happening earlier. It is not happening faster, and brain development is not happening faster. It just means we have to parent them a little bit differently.  Kristina Supler: So you've touched on something that Susan and I in preparation for today, Cara, what we were sort of wrestling with and talking through is that notion or question of, it seems like our children today are going through puberty earlier, at least than it in my tween years. And, and Susan indicated the same and, and you've acknowledged that. Why though? Why is that happening?  Dr. Cara Natterson: That's the question. The most common question I get, most common question I get. The really unfortunate answer is I don't know. I, I do know, and I work with a number of specialists. One of my favorite people, um, who is truly an expert on this subject is a woman named Louise Greenspan. She wrote a phenomenal book called The New Puberty. It came out in 2014, but it's just as relevant today as when it came out, and it answered that question. She is a researcher based in Northern California. She runs a lot of the studies that make headlines in the papers about when kids are going through puberty and why, and here's what she says. She says, it's everything we put into and onto our bodies. It's the food we eat. It's the liquids we drink. It's the cosmetics we're putting onto our bodies. It is the air we breathe and we just don't know the lowest common denominator. We don't know what we can take out of those things in order to fix the situation. Louise on. We did a podcast with her. Um, Recently, relatively recently, where she talked a little bit about antibiotics, and this is one, people talk about endocrine disrupting hormones all the time, but they don't talk about antibiotics. And Louise connected the dots and helped to explain why antibiotics that are given to poultry and to cows milk. Milk are directly impacting the way that these hormones work. And I can't do it justice here, but she has a really elegant description of it.  Susan Stone: So, I'm gonna ask you a question that's not so elegant. Hmm,  Dr. Cara Natterson: Go for it. Susan Stone: Can I ask you? Yeah. Okay. My readers are gonna be horrified and Kristina, feel free to kick me, but is it my imagination, but are boobs bigger? It's a really fair question, ,  Kristina Supler: and I wonder if there's a, a, a correlation to maybe childhood obesity as well. I, I don't know,  Susan Stone: Cara, So give us the answer.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Great question.  Susan Stone: I mean, of course it didn't help me out. I know. I'm sharing. I'm oversharing, guys. .  Dr. Cara Natterson: I could overshare here too. But you know, my daughter is so tired of me oversharing that I'm gonna, I'm gonna just answer the questions I could, but I won't. Exactly. Um, I have learned my lesson over time. Um, so the, the answer is anecdotally, I agree with you. Um, there is no data that shows it, but I definitely see what you see. Um, and there are probably a couple of contributing factors, and one is exactly what Kristina just pointed to, which is that, um, the average body weight in this country has gone up and up and up. Um, so about 20% of all tweens and teens are overweight or obese. Uh, we are looking at 33, 34% of all adults in this country who are obese. If you add overweight adults, we get to 74, 75% of the entire population. Breasts are made of water and fat tissue, and then duct systems. And so yes, when we accumulate extra body fat, that is one of the parts of the body where the body fat accumulates. But I actually think there's probably something else going on as well. And just go with me here. I'm gonna give you like 10 seconds of science. Sure.  Susan Stone: I thought it was a dumb question and I thought I was imagining it. Literally, my daughter goes to an all-girl school and look, my oldest is 25, so I'm talking about a change from a a couple years and I was looking and I went, What is going on here?  Dr. Cara Natterson: No, and, and here's one really interesting way of thinking about it. I don't know that this is scientifically what's going on, but the more fat cells we have in the body, the more ability the body has to convert hormones from one form into another. Because fat cells do what's called peripheral conversion. They actually change hormones from one form to another. So as body weights have gone up, hor, different levels of hormones have gone up in the body as a function of the fat cells being present. And I do think that's probably a contributor, although I don't know, and I'm not a researcher in this field, but I think it's very real. The other thing anecdotally that I've seen change, and again, no studies here, but in the world of pediatrics, definitely much more acne. Oh, I'm at too, right? And the acne is much more intense. Like it's not a few pimples, it's scarring. Full-face, full back, full chest. Same drivers here. Same drivers. Kristina Supler: Hormones. Powerful stuff. Yep. Uh, so I'd love to switch gears and talk about the business you launched OOMLA, which aims to make puberty comfortable, and you have all sorts of content for teens and tweens, and then also parents. Tell us about the mission of OOMLA and why you decided to launch that endeavor when it it seems like you have so much other stuff going on as well.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Yeah, I have the thing or two. So when I was writing the American girl books, I was traveling all over the country and it was a, an unbelievable opportunity to speak with parents and kids everywhere. And what became very clear to me was that there's lots of information about how to get through puberty aimed at adults only. Very little aimed at kids and there is no product solution.  So boobs. Perfect example. Everyone who has two X chromosomes and goes through a typical puberty will get breasts. But no one seemed to care that there was an on ramp of consumers who needed a bra that felt good and comfortable and fit them well.  Susan Stone: Don't they wear their sports bras? Dr. Cara Natterson: I have an issue with that because when they wear their sports bras, their sports bras bind them so tightly. And again, I don't have science to back this up. I just have scientific reasoning. Any tissue that's growing against resistance is going to grow differently. So breast tissue that's growing against sports bra resistance all day, every day. I think that is breast tissue that is more likely to get cystic or dense.  That I think is going to create a type out that's, Susan Stone: that's interesting. Dr. Cara Natterson: There's just no question. The other is the chafing, the irritation, and the smell of a sports bra. So what we did is I, I started a product. I said, I gotta fix the bra. That's the first thing we have to fix.  And so we created the OOMBra and the OOMbra is super soft, cotton reversible. So you can wear it on either side. And there's a cute print. Truly cute print, not ugly, cute print. I was gonna say two. You got it. And then so you can flip it and sign out. But there's a middle panel that does I'd call it like a half measure of a sports bra.  It doesn't bind you tight. It's almost like a piece of paper. It's got no stretch. So it hugs you but doesn't bind you, which to me feels safer. And why does it feel safer? Because when you take off your OOMbra at the end of the day, you don't exhale. You don't feel better. Which is the sign that you're not being bound too tight.  So that's the first thing we fix. Then we launch shorts that are the opposite of underpants. They have low crotch, wide legs, and they air you out because you're in sweaty underpants all day long. And that's where smells come from and that's where yeast growth comes from. And all this stuffs right. You got it. So we did that. Oh my gosh. The best is yet to come. We have socks coming this winter that do not smell.  Kristina Supler: Whoa. That's cool.  Dr. Cara Natterson: I, I know. It's amazing. So that's the product line. We love, love, love what we do on the product side. More important than that is the content side. So we do have a lot of content aimed at adults. But the content that I care the most about is called our puberty portal. And it is articles about puberty written by and for tweens and teens. That's amazing. It is awesome. It is a, a, an 18 year old is telling a 12 year old how it feels to go through a certain stage of life. And I'm reading everything. So it's all medically accurate. But it's through the lens of someone who just went through it. And it is to me that's, That's the gold. That's the gold.  Susan Stone: So Kristina and I represent students when they have issues being accused either in the criminal justice system or at their school with basically violations of a Title IX policy, sexual harassment, sexual assault. And typically our work with younger kids is to secure accommodations and better IEPs, individual education plans.  And I'm hearing you talk about puberty happening earlier and boobs getting bigger, hygiene issues and hygiene issues, but I, I, I wanna say just because your child is maturing physically more and going through puberty, Wouldn't you say that doesn't mean necessarily that they are advancing sexually? And that it's still okay to treat them in an age appropriate way that a 10 year old is still a 10 year old. So just because they may look like a 16 year old looked maybe when I went to high school, that they're still young. I, I just feel like we're trying to make them older too quickly.  Dr. Cara Natterson: I think that needs to be said in bold with highlighter and exclamation points. It is not just, It's just not just, okay. It's critical that we let kids be kids. Yes, we must treat them the age they are not the age they look. And by the way, this goes for kids who are late to puberty as well, who look young. And are treated younger than they actually are, um, because they have issues around that. But in the group that you're discussing, you know, these are kids who are at high risk. We know that girls who go through puberty early are at higher risk for sexual predation. We know that. Why? Because they present as older and they find themselves in situations that their brain cannot handle. The world has to treat them like kids. The world needs to protect them like kids. It makes me so, so sad when I see people treat kids as if they're mini adults and I know exactly what's going on in their brain. Their brain can't handle that kind of thinking at 25. Their brain can't handle that kind of thinking. I  Susan Stone: What's the rush? I know that there's a lot of talk. I, I've heard other parents talk, especially as you know, my children were in early high school about boyfriends. You know, I never had that talk with my children. I really worked very hard to make my kids stay as young for as long as possible while having conversations about sex education. You can do both at the same time.  Kristina Supler: Well, and I think, Susan, to your point though, even more, I think the, the sentiment you're expressing is even more important in today's time when our children at and adults, all of us are constantly bombarded by social media and advertising and all of this material that is really encouraging it's kids to grow up faster.  And you know, I think that students are now living through, um, The impact of Covid and the constant bombardment of social media. And it really presents a lot of challenges. I know, uh, last year the surgeon General issued an advisory on mental health. And I'm just wondering, Cara, as a pediatrician, have you noticed a direct correlation between the pandemic and mental health among students?  Dr. Cara Natterson: Everything that you've read about in the paper, everything that you've heard about in terms of the mental health emergency is true. And in some regard, this sometimes an understatement. The mental health impact of Covid was so massive. Um, I live in Los Angeles. Our schools were shut for 16 months. Imagine. Right that, And listen, I, as a physician, I understood, I understood how the decisions were being made to prioritize physical, biological safety, but the mental health implications are so massive. We're so massive.  Susan Stone: We're still suffering.  Dr. Cara Natterson: You bet. And they're massive everywhere. By the way, it doesn't matter if you were here where everything was shut, or if you were in places where school reopened six weeks, eight weeks into the pandemic. It really actually, it really didn't matter. The mental health crisis in this country is so phenomenally large. So much so that I think it's hard for a lot of parents to even begin to read about it and think about it. It's overwhelming. It's scary.  When we talk about kids who have suicidal ideation, it's terrifying. When we talk about kids who are cutting themselves or who are restricting their eating. This is heavy, big stuff.  And, um, I, this summer I wrote a book with my, um, partner at OOMLA. Um, we wrote a book that's called Modern Puberty, How it's Changed and How to Talk about It. Susan Stone: Is the book out yet? Dr. Cara Natterson: It comes out in 2023.   What chapter did we wait to write until last? Mental health. Because even though we work in this field, it's a lot for anyone to think through and to manage, but you have to, And so the one piece of advice I have for all parents is find your team of supporters. So that might be other parents, but it's a school official, an administrator or a counselor at school who can help your kid. A physician, whether it's a pediatrician, a family healthcare provider who can help your kid. A therapist or a counselor who can help your kid. A mentor, a coach, an inspiration who can help your kid. These are all people who have eyes on your kid and can tell you in different context how they're doing. This is your team and, and it's important to lean into the team.  Susan Stone: Speaking about mental health issues and I, Kristina, you brought up seeing, you know, the rise in body weight, part of me thinks that this is not a bad thing and I'm going to just express why. I recall when I went to college and still to this day, knowing a lot of people with very serious eating disorders, lots of anorexia. And I'm just wondering, I, I think I would rather see a little extra, you know, love on a child versus starvation or bulimia.  Would you agree that this change in po body positivity and even if it means that our kids are a little bit and they weigh more or more than their BMI should be, it's, it's in balance a good thing. Dr. Cara Natterson: So I'm gonna reframe it a little and I'm gonna say a couple of different things. The first is the body positivity movement is wonderful. I love it. And it is a, yeah, it's a very important piece to this puzzle. But when we talk about disordered eating, those of us who are raised in the eighties and early nineties, think about  Susan Stone: guilty ,  Dr. Cara Natterson: right? Think about weight loss and being too thin. And actually the eating disorder world encompasses people of all different weights and shapes and sizes. There are people who are restricting. There are people who are purging through exercise, or they're taking laxatives. Or they're vomiting. Those are people who are trying to lose weight. But especially among boys, they're totally missed because they're not trying to lose weight, they're trying to bulk up. They actually want more muscle. They don't wanna be the thin kid, and so often you get disordered behaviors on the other end of the spectrum. And this is an important piece to recognize, is that our old school, thinking of what disordered eating looks like is very narrow. And very limited. And there are people who need help and want help across the spectrum. So while I think Bos body positivity is wonderful, um, and while I also think that the, the broadening of female body ideals has been really positive, we're not there yet. But it's not just stick thin, that's the ideal anymore. Curvy is ideal. Strong and muscular is ideal. The the, the genetic male there's been no evolution for them in terms of body ideals. There's been no moving of the needle. The same body ideal that existed in the sixties and seventies exists today. The only difference is you're allowed to shave your head now, but the six pack abs and the broad shoulders and you know, you go kind of walk down all the features of a GI Joe doll, that's still the male body ideal. And so we have a long way to go in order to honor half of the population and recognize their struggles in any number of directions.  Kristina Supler: I'd like to sort of transition to a new topic, sex education. And in, in your book, Decoding Boys, you mention that, uh, waiting for your child to ask questions about sex ed is often a great way to gauge where the child is at mentally. But what happens if your child just, just never asks? Do you feel that parents should open the conversation up on their own, or what are your thoughts for parents who are facing that issue?  Dr. Cara Natterson: I hope it was clear in Decoding Boys, for sure in Modern Puberty, we have pages and pages and pages about when you need to talk about sex with your kids. It's sooner than you think. Um, most of your kids are not coming to you when they need the information. You do need to start opening those lines of communication before they prompt you with the question. So if, if an eight year old comes to you and asks you questions, Answer the questions that are being asked. But if a 10 or 11 year old has not come to you, well then let's contextualize it. The average age for first porn viewing in this country, if you are male, is between 11 and 13. So the adults in those kids' lives want to sex educate their kids before their kids are sex educated by strangers on a screen. So I usually use 10 or 11 as my cutoff for if they haven't come to you, you do need to start going to them and opening the lines of communication because of what's on their screens. If they're the youngest of five. You're gonna go to them sooner, right? If they're kids who have lots of older kid influences, you're gonna go to them sooner. The question is as much, how do you go to them as when do you go to them? And so, you know, there are some strategies that you can use. Um, and there's a lot of language that you can use around that. But opening up the conversation is critical. Susan Stone: I like what you're saying about opening up the conversation and I, I wanna circle back to, and I know we're flip flopping guys, but you're making us think. And sometimes the brain processes. Can we go back to the, when you see a child having a lot of acne or maybe being a little too heavy. You don't wanna shame them. But you do want them to keep their skin clean or eat healthy. What's the balance and what's the advice you would give parents?  Dr. Cara Natterson: So my partner, Vanessa and I talk about how often we mess this up on our podcast. Every week we talk about how parents and the adults who are helping to raise kids will screw up this conversation time and time and time again. And our advice is, however, you can bring something up in a non shaming, non-judgemental way, try it. But if it falls flat or if it lands poorly, Take the do-over. So a good example is with acne, um, I've messed this up 12 different times in my own house with my own kids. There are ways to show your kids how to wash their face. Ask them if they need new products. Suggest that they not pop pimples. Explain why. At the end of the day, some of it's gonna land and some of it's not. Sometimes you're gonna choose the wrong time or the wrong tone, and your child's gonna let you know. and they're gonna be very clear with you. They're either gonna tell you or they're gonna walk out of the room and shut the conversation down. So it's really appropriate to circle back with them, not immediately, but a little bit later and say, I think I really messed that one up. My goal is to just talk to you about hygiene and how to take care of your skin. I'm here to answer any questions and then you try again another day with another round of, would you like this cleanser or another round of, Are you, you know, in my house the other day it was, Hey, are you using a clean towel? When you wipe your face at the end of the day, you wash your face.  Kristina Supler: Oh, sure. Yes, yes, yes.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Right. That was my attempt in and it was not shut down entirely , but where it doesn't matter if you do this for a living or not, these are hard conversations. Just no shame, no judgment.  Kristina Supler: One other question about puberty and development, um, I'm wondering, With everything you've spoken a lot about, uh, hormones and bodies being impacted by what we eat and what we put on our skin and so on and so forth. I'm wondering also, kind of in line with Susan's question are, are our breasts getting bigger now among adolescents, females? What about periods are, are periods becoming more painful, uh, taking place for a longer period of time? What can you say about that? Heavier, heavier, heavier flow?  Dr. Cara Natterson: So, um, periods are, are one topic that we have a lot of data on. Um, one of the reasons we have a lot of data on is they're measurable. You can see them, people talk about them these days. Think about 20 years ago, no one ever talked about period. Now, I mean, teenagers just talk, talk, talk, talk, talk about their period to the point where it's almost astounding even to me. Um, but they're measurable. And also a lot of people are on these period apps, right? Where they're tracking their periods and the apps are collecting that we know about those apps, right. And those apps, I would imagine the two lawyers on the other end of the microphone have the same feelings that the doctor has, which is, they're great, but the privacy issues are huge on these apps. So they're pros and cons right to the, to the data collection there. And  Susan Stone: they're a poor form of birth control.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Oh, they are not, Yes, they are not in our approved list of birth control. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. Um, so, but, but, um, what do we know about periods? We know this is the most amazing fact about periods. We know that puberty is beginning on average two years earlier for a genetic female. But periods aren't happening any earlier at all. They have remained basically stable for the last 60 years. Um, maybe you can argue they've moved up by a month or two, but the gap in breast development has shifted by two years. So what does that tell you? That tells you? Kristina Supler: It's bizarre.  Dr. Cara Natterson: It's bizarre. And what it tells you is puberty is stretching like taffy. It is starting earlier, but it is happening slower, not faster. And this middle marker, people used to think of it as either the beginning of puberty or the end of puberty. It is neither. Getting your first period is a middle marker. This middle marker hasn't changed. As we get more and more data about length of period and heaviness of flow and all that, we can answer questions more about, um, how hormone shifts are impacting that. But right now, um, remember that the reporters who are telling us how heavy their periods are are 12 and 13 and 14, and they only have themselves to compare to mm-hmm. when it's, is this a heavy period, how do they know? Right. What are they measuring against? And so right now the data looks like the periods themselves have really not changed very much at all. Susan Stone: Can we talk about boys a little bit? Yeah. Yeah. So I, this is again, and, and right now I'm feeling pretty good about my observations, but I'm observing that almost every boy, Kristina, or young man or college age student has adhd. I mean, I don't think I've met anybody recently who does not have ADHD or some form of ADD. Is that just who we see in our, I mean, you wouldn't know in our office, but is there a rise in ADD or ADHD in boys, or is it just we're better at identifying it? Or is it the pandemic that's made it worse? What's going on with ADD in boys?  Dr. Cara Natterson: There's a very well-documented rise in medication for H ADHD in both genders over the past two or three decades. Some people believe it's accurate diagnosis and we're better at picking kids up. Some people believe it's over diagnosis, and it's an over call because if any of us was on a stimulant every single day, we would do better. We would focus more, we would, I mean, I'm on a stimulant every day. It's called caffeine. I do a cup of coffee and I lock in and feel like I can get my work done. That is, that, that is what caffeine does. It is a stimulant. So, um, there's a whole world of people who debate is. Is this rise and what you are seeing real or not real? I would have to guess that the community, the population you are dealing with are kids who are risk takers more impulsive. That's a big issue. Right, and And what is one of the diagnostic criteria of ADHD? Impulsivity. You don't have to be impulsive to have the diagnosis, but boy are you likely to have the diagnosis if you're highly impulsive. So I think probably in your population you have a skewed group. But that being said, I think we see much more impulsivity and hyperactivity and attentional issues now than we ever saw before. Kristina Supler: I'm wondering also if. The impact of sleep on teens and tweens and with phones and social media, and you name it. Let's face it, at least in my house, I mean, people are staying up much later than I'd like. And I know Susan, you've said that as well.  Susan Stone: Well, I have to chime in. I am a terrible, terrible sleeper. I always was. Post-menopause it's much worse. And. My kids are very bad sleepers. So the question is, are you seeing that everybody's getting worse sleep? And how is that different for those in puberty? And when you have a kid, and, and I know I'm hearing it from my youngest saying I can't sleep. Is it okay to give melatonin? Is it okay to maybe give NyQuil? I mean, or should you just say, tough it out? Because when I say tough it out, she wakes up and she's exhausted.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Mm. Yeah. Okay. We have a much deeper appreciation for the need for sleep today than we've ever had before. And we understand that sleep does a number of things to the body, but the top four that I always share with kids when I'm teaching in the classroom are that number one, sleep resets your mood. Okay? We all know that. Number two. It resets your metabolism because it impacts the way different metabolic hormones shift in your body. So it changes the way you feel hunger, and it changes the way you store your calories, either as fat or you burn through them. Number three, it files away memory. So if you cram for a test all night long, you're not gonna do as well as if you go to bed and get a good night's sleep because you need to sleep to store the memory. And the fourth, this is the big selling point for kids, is that you grow when you sleep. Not when you lay down, not at night when you sleep. You  Susan Stone: know, it's, That doesn't Interesting. You grow when you sleep. Yeah. That's why I remember my mother always saying to me, I would say My leg hurts. She'd say, Oh, it's growing pain,  Dr. Cara Natterson: growing pains. Yep. And so here's the thing about sleep, though, it doesn't come easily to everyone, um, especially teenagers whose melatonin level. So melatonin is a natural hormone that your brain produces to tell your body it's time for sleep. And most people have a melatonin surge that happens sometime between eight and 10:00 PM and then they get tired and then they fall asleep an hour or two later. The three. But teenagers, Yeah, I mean, well, teenage brains, right? They do not have melatonin surges at 8 pm. Let me, Sorry. They do not have melatonin searches at 8:00 PM They have melatonin searches closer to 11:00 PM or midnight and said to me, What?  That makes sense though, Why they wanna stay up?  I,  Kristina Supler: Yes. So I'm like dying to go to bed, but  Dr. Cara Natterson: me too. And so they may get into bed at 10 o'clock at night and want to do the right thing and get sleep and lay there and not be able to fall asleep. The worst. The other thing is there are some kids, and I have one of these kids who. They lay down in bed and what happens? They start processing the day. Mm-hmm. And they cannot turn their brain off. And you know, Susan, that may be you. You know, that may be one of the things that keeps you up. It is. Right?  Susan Stone: And what do we do?  Dr. Cara Natterson: Okay. Meditation. Learning how meditation does not turn your brain off. Meditation teaches you how to quiet certain parts of your brain so that you can accomplish things like sleep. I cannot tell you how many kids I know who have started listening to meditation apps and started to learn how to turn down the volume of their brain and it changes their sleep.  Kristina Supler: How do you feel though about melatonin supplements or gummies or any of that? Yeah.  Dr. Cara Natterson: You know, I mean, I think when used appropriately, they're fine. I think anyone can become dependent upon anything. The melatonin dependence issue is really more, um, psychological. Mm-hmm. , the physiological. Um, it's hard to give someone enough melatonin every single day that they become physically dependent upon it. What happens is if you take melatonin, you just replace what your brain normally makes and you're trying to game the system. So you're trying to shift the time so you fall asleep at the right time, but eventually your brain should take over and just start making it at that correct time. So, um, to me it's more like a, there's a more of a placebo effect than anything else where I'm gonna take my melatonin, okay, mentally, now I'm gonna start getting tired. And your body then goes down through this ritual of getting tired. Not to say that the melatonin isn't being absorbed and doesn't work, but there's a huge psychological component. So it would be really empowering to our kids and frankly to us to not be dependent upon taking something in order to fall asleep and instead use it when needed and then be able to transition off. Susan Stone: What do you say though about the 3:00 AM or the 2:30 AM wake up? That's not, I understand that's not to get to sleep, but what do you do when you wake up in the middle of the night? I'm at the point where, Tell my child is get up and walk around. Don't fight it. Yeah. Cause sometimes when you sit there and you get tense in your bed, I gotta fall asleep outta sleep. You're making it worse.  Dr. Cara Natterson: Just get a hundred percent. And I would say for anyone of any eight who wakes up in the middle of the night and cannot fall back asleep, that is a person who should absolutely consult with someone who works in the field of sleep to get some real strategies for how to handle it. Because there is nothing worse than the anxiety that hangs over you when you're laying awake thinking, Oh my God, tomorrow, right? I have a test, I have a this, I have a that, and, and you're just dooming yourself. So definitely some professional help.  Susan Stone: Cara, I just I'm so blown away. Not just that you are such an accomplished author, but you're an entrepreneur and you are a podcast, and you are a doctor, and for someone who works with kids of all ages, You are so accomplished. What's a piece of advice you would have for that kid who's in puberty with, as my kids call it, LSE, low self-esteem? What would you say so they could become a future doctor or entrepreneur or a podcaster like you?  Dr. Cara Natterson: Well, this is what we tell kids all the time, and thank you for those kind words. Um, we say to kids that it's completely unfair of us adults to expect you to feel great about everything that's happening to your life and to your body, and to your friend groups. When you have no idea what is gonna happen to your life or your body or your friend groups, and that we recognize as adults who have been through it that the path doesn't have a super clear endpoint, and that feels overwhelming, but we're here to help you out and to support you through it. I, I think if we tell kids to not feel perfect, but instead to just share how they feel. It works a lot better for us and for them. Because the expectations shouldn't be that a 10 year old who doesn't know how tall they're gonna be, has no idea how curvy they're gonna be. Has no idea how many zits they're gonna get, doesn't know what their bra size is gonna be, has no idea what their future holds for us to say everything's gonna be fine and gonna work out.  It's not helpful to them and it's not helpful to us. So for us to honor that in them and just say to them, Hey, we're here, and you just, It's effort in. It's effort in and communication out, that's what counts. I think those are the kids that really thrive.  Kristina Supler: That's great advice for kids and adults, frankly. So thank you. I, I really like ending on that note. Uh, Cara Natterson,, thank you so much for joining us today. Really, this was a treat. We covered a ton of topics, but I, I think that was so cool in that we've given our listeners so much food for thought on various different teen and tween issues. So thanks  Susan Stone: for bouncing with us,  Dr. Cara Natterson: the bouncers. I loved it. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate.  

RBLR Sports
RBLR Lightning: Milestones, W’s & Injuries

RBLR Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:48


This week we talk the Bolts winning in overtime, Stamkos' assist #500, showing some grit, shuffling around the power play unit, Paul-doing-it-all, but also dealing with refs, losing to BOS, shorthanded goals & injuries to Perbix/Koepke/Colton. #gobolts Support The Pod! Buy A Shirt! Use Promo Code “BOLTS” for 10% OFF! Spotify: RBLR Sports on SpotifyiHeart: […]

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Ellemann har bedt om skilsmisse - nu skal han på date

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 15:49


En stor tale fra Venstres formand har forandret dansk politik. Men hvorfor har Ellemann opgivet blå blok, og tør han kaste sig i armene på Mette Frederiksen? I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 26 - Bell Tower Brewing

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 94:57


This week I travel to Bell Tower Brewing in Kent, Ohio. My guest for this episode is Jennifer Hermann who is one of the co-owners as well as the head brewer for Bell Tower. In this interview we talk about the history of the brewery from it being in church in the mid 1800s to it becoming the home of a commercial laundry equipment company, and then later becoming Kent's 3rd brewery. Jennifer talks about her early fascination with beer that led to her home brewing and then later volunteering at Thirsty Dog and Hoppin Frog. Eventually she landed a brewing gig at Market Garden in Cleveland and the rest is history. During the interview we sampled the following beers Sci-uri-dae (Schwartzbier) - 4.4% 1858 (American Porter) – 6% Geist der Glocke (German Pilsner) – 5% Cinquième (Wet Hopped Saison) – 6.6% Greenhorn (Wet Hopped IPA) – 6.7% Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Bell Tower Brewing Company on FB and IG at @belltowerbrewing. You can also head over to their website at https://belltowerbrewing.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Brotherly Pod
Sisterly Pod #27 "Clothes For Cats"

Brotherly Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 68:30


Katie and Grace return to talk dressing up cats, live PHI vs BOS updates, Flyers through 15 games, Rise of TK, Frost's future, Fletcher and long term contracts, more!

The Dunker Spot
808s & Pump Fakes

The Dunker Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 110:09


Nekias Duncan and Steve Jones Jr. bounce around the league with observations from the week. 1:20 -- Jacque Vaughn thoughts 3:10 -- Teams that impressed (BKN, BOS, WAS, IND) 45:00 -- Teams that make us think (DAL, NO, MIA) 1:24:10 -- Players that impressed  1:31:10 -- Players that make us think  1:34:15 -- Free Throws Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Kan Ellemann og Olsen Dyhr spille på samme ministerhold?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 15:15


To uger efter valget står Danmark stadig uden regering. Mette Frederiksen vil bygge en bred regering, og lige nu holder alle øje med to partier: SF og Venstre. Tør de to partier gå med i en regering? Der er gode argumenter for og imod. Og træffer de den forkerte beslutning, kan det koste dem dyrt.I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3 - Episode 25: Bascule Brewing and Public House

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 86:44


This week I travel to Bascule Brewing and Public House in Lorain, Ohio. During my visit I talk to Chris Kambouris who is the owner and brewer. We talk about how he got his start at Ohio Brewing and then moving on to Brew Kettle in Strongsville and learning under the great brew master Jack Kephart. Chris talked about his passion for the city of Lorain and how much he appreciates that community. During the interview we sampled an American IPA, a sour IPA, a peanut butter porter, an imperial stout, and a beer made with sweet potatoes. We also discussed struggling through the pandemic, and how Bascule survived some dire times. Chris also discusses the latest venture that Bascule is undertaking and that is adding a kitchen to the taproom. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Bascule Brewery and Public House on FB at @basculebreweryandpublichouse and IG @basculebrewing. You can also head over to their website at https://basculebrewery.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Hvad i alverden laver de på Marienborg?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 15:13


En uge efter valget triller partiledernes biler ind og ud af gården foran statsministerens embedsbolig, Marienborg. Forhandlingerne om en ny regeringen skrider langsomt frem, Mette Frederiksen kører sin dronningerunde, mens Lars Løkke Rasmussen har sin egen, som man måske kan kalde kongemager-runden. Hvad foregår der?I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

8 Track
Los 40 años de Thriller de Michael Jackson - 05 Nov 22

8 Track

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 40:54


Estuvimos muy divertidos en el programa con Sury Sarai que nos trajo su primer sencillo 6am. La gran Pilar Santacruz, es parte de la cinta La Exorcista del director Adrián García. Hablamos del Gabinete de Guillermo del Toro y de la serie Bosé.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3 - Episode 24 Crooked Pecker Brewing Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 73:05


This week I travel to Chagrin Falls, Ohio and visit with my old friends at Crooked Pecker Brewing Company. I sat down with Erik and Bobby from Crooked Pecker, and it was tons of fun. We discussed their beer, and how they survived through the Pandemic. We learned about Erik's love of water parks and how that could play into a Crooked Pecker expansion. Basically, this episode was all over the place, but it was a load of fun and I highly suggest you listen. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Crooked Pecker Brewing on FB and IG @crookedpecker. You can also head over to their website at https://www.crookedpeckerbrewing.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Tør Ellemann gå over midten? Tør han lade være?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 14:44


Mette Frederiksen er i gang med at danne regering, og har flere gange inviteret Venstre ind i varmen. Det afviste partiformand Jakob Ellemann-Jensen, men nu bløder han op. Så tør Venstre vende ryggen til de blå og gåri en regering med Socialdemokraterne, eller satser Ellemann på en iskold oppositionspolitik?II dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Selfie-dronningen slår TikTok-desperadoer

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 20:35


Det er valgdag og tid til at finde vindere og tabere – også på sociale medier. Hvem spillede sikkert og vandt, hvem satsede på TikTok og tabte - og hvor er Løkke bedst? Så får vi en snak om walk-on-sange, og hvad skal politikerne spille, når de gør deres entre? Hvilken jakkesætsmand passer til LL Cool J, og hvem er en Twisted Sister?I dag med anmelder Felix Thorsen Katzenelson og musikredaktør Simon Lund. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 23 - Codex Brewing

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 87:12


This week I travel to Canton, Ohio and visit Codex Brewing. I sat down with Jason Gasper-Hulvat and we discussed his passion for craft beer and his love of history. Codex opened in November of 2020 as the world was in the midst of a Pandemic. Some may have thought it to be a risky idea considering the state the world was in, but Jason had a secret weapon built into his newly opened brewery. Jason had a drive thru and that drive thru came in quite handy. During our conversation we also enjoyed some of Codex fantastic beer which included a barrel aged Saison, Belgian Pale Ale, a wet hopped Hazy IPA, a Belgian Tripel, and a Butternut Squash beer. Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Codex Brewing on FB and IG @codexbrewing. You can also head over to their website at https://www.codexbrewing.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Det er snart slut med det DF, vi kender

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 16:16


På tirsdag er det alvor for Dansk Folkeparti. Kommer partiet ikke over spærregrænsen, kan det hele være slut. Kommer DF ind, skal de overlevende opfinde partiet en gang til. Og så har det vi spiser fået en særlig rolle i valgkampen – vi ser på politisk korrekt mad årgang 2022.I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane og madanmelder Joakim Grundahl. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Virker Mette F.'s slowmotion-valgkanin?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 17:10


I 2030 er det Pias tur til at få mere i løn. Måske. For Socialdemokratiet vil gerne give hende og de andre sosu'er mere i løn. Det er ikke enkelt, men løftet kan være nok til at vinde et valg. Og så har vores anmelder det tungt med country-politiske-lejlighedssange. I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard og musikredaktør Simon Lund. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

The Dunker Spot
Opening Week Takeaways

The Dunker Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 105:05


Nekias Duncan and Steve Jones Jr. react to the Los Angeles Sparks hiring Curt Miller away from the Connecticut Sun, then give their opening week takeaways for the 2022-23 NBA season. TIMESTAMPS 1:00 -- Curt Miller/Sparks 6:45 -- Teams that impressed (BOS, POR, PHX, MIL, SA, UTA) 43:45 -- Teams that made us think (MIA, PHI, MIN) 1:15:00 -- Players that impressed 1:20:50 -- Players that made us think 1:27:00 -- Free Throws Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Kan de røde få et flertal – og kan det bruges til noget?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 17:11


For syv uger gav en måling 90 mandater til blå blok. Nu ligner valget mest klumpspil på midten, men der er ikke langt til et rent rødt flertal. Det skal primært trækkes hjem af to kvinder. Lykkes de, kan det ændre virkeligheden efter valget. Og så har vi opsøgt de sociale mediers mørkeste afkroge og fundet to valgkamp-sange. Derfor kan du her høre den eneste politiske podcast i verden, der spiller både rap og jodlemusikI dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane og musikredaktør Simon Lund. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Møgsagen trak Pape ned, Vanopslagh surfer oven på den

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 16:33


Liberal Alliances målinger går op og op, selv om deres leder Alex Vanopslagh brød reglerne, da han fik en gratis lejlighed af Folketinget. Hvorfor slår den ikke igennem i målingerne, når Søren Papes personlige problemer trak ham ned? Og så forsøger vi at finde ud af, hvorfor Pernille Vermund har tilbragt en del af sin weekend oven på en gris.I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard og anmelder Felix Thorsen Katzenelson. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 22 - Terrestrial Brewing Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 82:03


This week I travel to Terrestrial Brewing company in Cleveland, Ohio and visit with Ralph Sgro who is the co-owner and head brew master. Ralph gives us a background how he got started in the brewing industry which includes being one of the original team members of Platform Brewing Company. He talks about formulating the idea of Terrestrial with his business partner Ryan Bennett which included crushing a lot of great craft beer in the Cleveland market. As we talked we also tasted some fantastic beers including a corn lager called Swill, a farmhouse Saison called Katie missed the plane!,  a wet hopped IPA called Wetlands,  and an American IPA called Star Party V4 which has an ingredient called phantasm thiol powder. This powder creates an extra boost of Sauvignon Blanc grape, citrus, guava, and passion fruit in the beer, and it absolutely shined through in Star Party. Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Terrestrial Brewing on IG @terrestrialbrewingcompany and FB @terrestrialbrewing. You can also head over to their website at https://terrestrialbrewing.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

El Siglo 21 es Hoy
La serie de Bosé en Paramount+

El Siglo 21 es Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 26:57


La serie "Bosé" se estrena en una temporada de seis episodios recreando pasajes desconocidos de la vida personal de Miguel Bosé. Cada episodio se centra en una canción que activa “flashbacks” de recuerdos del pasado.Miguel Bosé ha vendido 30 millones de discos, grabó 20 álbumes de estudio y actuó en 15 películas, como el film francés La reina Margot o Tacones lejanos, dirigida por Pedro Almodóvar. Fue presentador de televisión en programas como Séptimo de caballería, Operazione Trionfo, La Voz México. Es español, pero cuenta también con nacionalidad panameña, italiana y colombiana.En la serie participan 3 compañías productoras: 1 - Shine Iberia. Hace parte de Endemol Shine Iberia. Produce en España los concursos Gran Hermano, Masterchef, La Voz Portugal, así como series televisivas como, Isabel, además de formatos propios tales como Tu cara me suena, Operación Triunfo.2 - Elefantec: Productora fundada por un expresidente de Televisa, con sede en México, Los Angeles y Miami.3 - Legacy Rock Entertainment.El cuarto socio es la compañía que publicará la serie: ViacomCBS International Studios (VIS) con su nombre comercial Paramount+La serie es dirigida por Miguel Bardem, primo de Javier Bardem. Ha dirigido al menos 12 series de tv y películas, entre las que yo recomiendo Mortadelo y Filemón. Misión: salvar la Tierra; y por Fernando Trullols, que ha dirigido 7 producciones contando esta. La historia está basada en los dos libros que Miguel Bosé ha publicado con la editorial Espasa:1 - "Historia secreta de mis mejores canciones" (2022) 2 - "El hijo del capitán trueno" (2921) Paramount+ de momento no está disponible en España, así que es probable que las personas que en España quieran ver la serie tengan que usar un VPN, así que aquí hay algunos recomendados: - Hotspot Shield Free VPN [https://www.gethotspotshield.com/free-vpn/]- Windscribe [https://windscribe.com/]- ProtonVPN Free [https://protonvpn.com/]- VPN de Opera [https://www.opera.com/es-419/features/free-vpn]- Speedify [https://speedify.com/]- Hide.me [https://hide.me/]- TunnelBear [https://www.tunnelbear.com/]- HideMyAss! [https://www.hidemyass.com/es-ww/index]Es probable también que Paramount+ adelante su llegada a España y entre directamente con esta serie sobre Miguel Bosé.Sigue este pódcast en ElSiglo21esHoy.com

• El siglo 21 es hoy •
La serie de Bosé en Paramount+

• El siglo 21 es hoy •

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 26:57


La serie "Bosé" se estrena en una temporada de seis episodios recreando pasajes desconocidos de la vida personal de Miguel Bosé. Cada episodio se centra en una canción que activa “flashbacks” de recuerdos del pasado.Miguel Bosé ha vendido 30 millones de discos, grabó 20 álbumes de estudio y actuó en 15 películas, como el film francés La reina Margot o Tacones lejanos, dirigida por Pedro Almodóvar. Fue presentador de televisión en programas como Séptimo de caballería, Operazione Trionfo, La Voz México. Es español, pero cuenta también con nacionalidad panameña, italiana y colombiana.En la serie participan 3 compañías productoras: 1 - Shine Iberia. Hace parte de Endemol Shine Iberia. Produce en España los concursos Gran Hermano, Masterchef, La Voz Portugal, así como series televisivas como, Isabel, además de formatos propios tales como Tu cara me suena, Operación Triunfo.2 - Elefantec: Productora fundada por un expresidente de Televisa, con sede en México, Los Angeles y Miami.3 - Legacy Rock Entertainment.El cuarto socio es la compañía que publicará la serie: ViacomCBS International Studios (VIS) con su nombre comercial Paramount+La serie es dirigida por Miguel Bardem, primo de Javier Bardem. Ha dirigido al menos 12 series de tv y películas, entre las que yo recomiendo Mortadelo y Filemón. Misión: salvar la Tierra; y por Fernando Trullols, que ha dirigido 7 producciones contando esta. La historia está basada en los dos libros que Miguel Bosé ha publicado con la editorial Espasa:1 - "Historia secreta de mis mejores canciones" (2022) 2 - "El hijo del capitán trueno" (2921) Paramount+ de momento no está disponible en España, así que es probable que las personas que en España quieran ver la serie tengan que usar un VPN, así que aquí hay algunos recomendados: - Hotspot Shield Free VPN [https://www.gethotspotshield.com/free-vpn/]- Windscribe [https://windscribe.com/]- ProtonVPN Free [https://protonvpn.com/]- VPN de Opera [https://www.opera.com/es-419/features/free-vpn]- Speedify [https://speedify.com/]- Hide.me [https://hide.me/]- TunnelBear [https://www.tunnelbear.com/]- HideMyAss! [https://www.hidemyass.com/es-ww/index]Es probable también que Paramount+ adelante su llegada a España y entre directamente con esta serie sobre Miguel Bosé.Sigue este pódcast en ElSiglo21esHoy.com

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de Series del 18 de Octubre de 2022

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 9:29


C.J. Navas comenta las primeras series de ‘Bosé', la adaptación de la obra de teatro ‘Smiley' que ha encargado Netflix, el arranque de Serielizados Barcelona y muchas noticias más en su repaso diario al mundo de las series de televisiónPATROCINADOR:Realizando tus compras desde amazon.fueradeseries.com a ti te costará lo mismo y a nosotros nos estarás ayudando

AM Springfield Hour by Hour Podcast
October 14, 2022 - 6 a.m.

AM Springfield Hour by Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 60:17


October's Breakfast with BOS is live from the Wabash Avenue location of Bank of Springfield as executive vice president and board chairman Jason Knoedler kicks off the morning, followed by his assistant Julie Beveridge with details on Customer Appreciation Week and Shred Day next Saturday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AM Springfield Hour by Hour Podcast
October 14, 2022 - 8 a.m.

AM Springfield Hour by Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 60:17


Breakfast with BOS continues on Wabash Avenue with Bank of Springfield as vice president of insurance services Brad Leonard discusses cyber insurance, then University of Illinois Springfield track and cross country coach Emmons King and runner Wyatt McIntyre preview the annual UIS-BOS Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Truer Findsen-bogen statsministerens valgkamp?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 15:49


Den fyrede FE-chef har sluppet et spøgelse løs i valgkampen. Magtfuldkomne Mette genopstod, da Lars Findsen i en ny bog antydede, at regeringen sendte FE-cheferne hjem for at redde en truet minister.Og så besvarer vi spørgsmål fra Politikens lyttere og læsere – blandt andet: Hvem kan man stole på?I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Nu er der kun én chef i blå blok

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 14:50


Pludselig står det klart: Hvis vi får en borgerlig statsminister, hedder han nok Jakob Ellemann-Jensen. Vi undersøger, hvordan Venstres formand efter en vaklende start er endt i den rolle. Og så kan du høre, hvilken dansk partileder, der giver den i rollen som Batman.I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane og tv- og filmanmelder Joakim Grundahl. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.Shownotes:DF's valgvideo

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Hvis vi vælger Løkke, hvem vælger han så?

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 15:41


Kan man få et godt valg på at vende ryggen til sin gamle politik og nægte at sige, hvem man vil gøre til statsminister? Lars Løkke Rasmussen kan, og hvordan det fungerer, taler vi om i dag. Vi ser også på valgplakater, som faktisk kan være ret pæne, hvis man IKKE kigger lige ind i kameraet.I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard og kunstanmelder Mathias Kryger. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.Shownotes:Zenia Stampes valgplakatIda Aukens valgplakat

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: I baglandet undrer de sig over Mette Frederiksen

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 15:31


Mette Frederiksen vil lave en regering med ærkefjenderne i blå blok. Og har lovet skattelettelser. De nordjyske socialdemokrater er ikke vildt begejstrede over de ideer. Vi kigger også på, hvem den sjove mand i dansk politik er.I dag med politisk analytiker Elisabet Svane og kulturjournalist Felix Thorsen Katzenelson. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.Shownotes:Fest i Liberal Alliance? - Valgvideo 2022

Nosiči vody
Vrbův konec v Baníku jako příležitost. Poslouží inspirace Olomoucí

Nosiči vody

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 62:14


Trenér Pavel Vrba skončil na lavičce Baníku Ostrava po necelých pěti měsících. Remíza s oslabeným Libercem se mu nakonec stala osudnou. Co všechno stálo za špatnými výsledky Baníku a kterým směrem by se měl klub vydat?Chcete si z podcastu vybrat jen některá témata?2:00 Los na ME 2024 (a proč by měl Šilhavý dát trénovat)8:00 České týmy vyhořely v evropských pohárech27:00 Víkend v extralize - děravá Slavia a šťastná Sparta39:00 Bídná forma Baníku a kudy z ní ven?43:00 Německý šlágr Dortmund-Bayern49:00 Co se děje s Liverpoolem?57:00 Sázkařské okénkoNejnovější epizoda podcastu Nosiči vody byla nahrána ještě předtím, než Baník Ostrava oficiálně oznámil, že kouč Pavel Vrba v klubu končí. Jaromír Bosák a Karel Tvaroh ale i tak důsledně probrali současný stav slezského velkoklubu.Škoda tandemu Hapal-KováčOstravané o víkendu pouze remizovali 0:0 proti oslabenému Liberci, který hrál od 38. minuty bez Theodora Gebre Selassieho. Kdo čekal ve druhém dějství mohutný nápor baníkovců, ten se nestačil divit. Opak byl pravdou. Liberec by si zasloužil i výhru, jen kdyby neztroskotal na skvěle chytajícím Janu Laštůvkovi a vlastní střelecké nemohoucnosti.Ostravské vedení přišlo v pondělí dopoledne s relativně nečekaným řešením. Jak známo, majitel Baníku Václav Brabec si vysnil návrat Pavla Vrby do ostravského klubu. Jenomže z romantických letních líbánek se rychle vyklubala podzimní pouť hrůzy. Baník měl přitom zkraje sezony relativně příznivý los, roli potenciálního černého koně soutěže ovšem nedokázal potvrdit ani v nejmenším.„Je velká škoda, že v létě nedostal šanci tandem Radoslav Kováč a Pavel Hapal. Pravděpodobně během vyjednávání zazněla z jejich úst zmínka o jakési personální čistce v kádru. Zřejmě se to tehdy panu Brabcovi nezdálo, a tak v Baníku upřednostnili cestu s Pavlem Vrbou, vsadili tedy na zkušeného muže, řekněme s konzervativnějším přístupem,“ míní Karel Tvaroh, bývalý profesionální fotbalista.Inspirace v OlomouciTandem Nosičů vody se shoduje, že se Ostravě dlouhodobě nedaří zabudovat do seniorského kádru vícero odchovanců, na jejichž produkci přitom klub nebyl v posledních letech chudý. „Mládež v Baníku patřila mezi tu nejlepší u nás. Jenže nadějní ostravští talenti nedostávají mnoho šancí, ba naopak. Připadá mi to, že se to v klubu vede jako jakési nutné zlo, a to je škoda,“ všímá si moderátor podcastu Jaromír Bosák.Pochvaly se naopak dočkala olomoucká Sigma, která si v neděli smlsla na nedůsledné obraně Slavie a radovala se z výhry 2:0. „Sigma se narozdíl od Baníku vydala jinou cestou. Sází na mladší hráče, kteří jí to aktuálně splácí poctivým způsobem. Slavii sestřelil Jiří Sláma a Mojmír Chytil, hráči ročníku 1999. Možná právě tímto vzorem by se mohlo baníkovské vedení inspirovat,“ dodává Karel Tvaroh.Jak vnímali Nosiči defenzivní hrubky sešívaných a v čem jim Sigma imponuje? V podcastu uslyšíte také o sparťanském vítězství v Brně a mentální odolnosti Ladislava Krejčího mladšího.Šilhavý musí zůstatNosiči vody důkladně rozebrali i čerstvý los kvalifikace na Euro 2024, které pořádá sousední Německo. Proč by podle Jaromíra Bosáka měl i v tomto cyklu dostat důvěru trenér Jaroslav Šilhavý? A jaké vyhlídky mají Slováci? Nejen o tom uslyšíte v reprezentačním okénku.Nechybí ani rozbor plzeňské noci hrůzy na na stadionu Bayernu Mnichov, slávistická střelecká nemohoucnost a nešťastný zákrok brankáře Filipa Nguyena, který stál Slovácko cenné body v EKL. Pohárový úsek nabízí ohlédnutí za úvodní polovinou základní skupinové fáze. Co všechno z něho vyplývá pro české zástupce?V zahraniční části podcastu Nosiči vody hodnotí další střetnutí anglických gigantů mezi Arsenalem a Liverpoolem. Londýnští Gunners drží první místo i po 10 odehraných kolech, zato Liverpool se zmítá v dlouho nevídané krizi. Řeč přišla i na německý šlágr podzimu - souboj Borussie Dortmund s Bayernem, který opepřil strhující finiš plný emocí.Nosiči vody Fotbalový podcast Seznam Zpráv. Jaromír Bosák, Luděk Mádl a Karel Tvaroh každý týden o českém a světovém fotbalu. Příběhy, aféry, důležité postavy na hřišti i v zákulisí. Odebírejte na Podcasty.cz, Apple Podcasts nebo Spotify. Sledujte nás na Twitteru! Najdete nás tam jako @Nosicivody. Máte návrh, jak podcast vylepšit? Nebo nás chcete pochválit? Pište na audio@sz.cz.

Du lytter til Politiken
VALGET: Derfor punkterede Pape

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 16:00


Søren Pape kom tilbage fra sommerferien som statsministerkandidat. Siden er vælgerne flygtet, Ellemann er gået forbi, og Støjberg er også ved at overhale ham. Kan de konservative problemer koste de blå sejren? Og hvad var det, der skete, da TV2 i livedebat bad de tre statsministerkandidater vælge en vindersang?I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard og musikredaktør Simon Lund. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.

Du lytter til Politiken
Ny podcast om valgkampen: De radikale er ved at tabe det valg, de selv har udskrevet

Du lytter til Politiken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 15:12


Sofie Carsten Nielsen og de radikale er på vej mod et rædselsfuldt valg. Hvad kan hun gøre for at vende de dårlige meningsmålinger. Og hvad er det for en kampagne-video, Socialdemokraterne har lavet. Er den – lidt – grim med vilje?I dag med politisk redaktør Anders Bæksgaard og film- og tv-redaktør Kristoffer Hegnsvad. Vært er Bo Søndergaard.Shownotes:Socialdemokratiets valgvideo

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 21- Brewery 33

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 81:03


This week I travel to Logan, Ohio and visit with Dave Kornmiller at Brewery 33. Opened since 2017, Brewery 33 is in the Hocking Hills area of Southeastern Ohio. The brewery operates a 5-barrel system with 10 5-barrel fermenters. Dave used to help his dad brew beer as a kid and that is what sparked his interest. Dave began his journey to opening a brewery in 2015, and by 2017 Brewery 33 was born. During the episode we try Dave's Festbeer, Hibiscus and Blood Orange Saison, a pale ale, and a mango Gose. Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Brewery 33 on IG @br3w3ryhockinghills and on Facebook @br3w3ry. You can also head over to their website at https://brewery33.com/ and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3 Episode 20 - Talking Ohio Craft Beer with Rick Armon

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 107:58


This week on the show I am joined by Rick Armon who is a vast book of craft beer knowledge. More specifically, Rick knows the craft beer scene in Ohio better than anyone else. He has been writing about craft beer since 1999. In that time, he has written two books about Ohio craft beer including “Ohio Breweries” and “Fifty Must-Try Craft Beers of Ohio”. During the interview we cover the craft beer boom that Ohio continues to experience, and we address the question of when the bubble burst will. We also talk about topics such as brewery expansions, fad beers, and whether Ohio will see growth in the sub-categories of beer such as maltsters and hop farms. At the end we compare our list of our five must visit breweries, as well as what five beers would be on our all-star flight board. You can buy Rick's books on Amazon by following the links. Ohio Breweries (Kindle) – https://amzn.to/3xCnTUY Fifty Must-Try Craft Beers of Ohio - https://amzn.to/3S3ITMG Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PINTTALKING at https://www.manscaped.com Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. You can follow Rick on IG at @rick_armon and on Facebook @rick.armon.3 Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Join the American Homebrewers Association and get access to hundreds of award-winning recipes as well as countless informative articles. Follow this link and use the code PintTalking for $5 off your membership. https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/support-the-aha/?promo=the-Brewer-of-Seville. Blue Cooler - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

The Business Of Strength Podcast
EP 112: Grow Your Training Business by 100% in 12 Weeks

The Business Of Strength Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 14:08


On this Episode Dan Goodman breaks down a case study of BOS client that grew their business by 100% in 12 weeks! He reviews the 3 processes that helped skyrocket this business in a hurry! Streamlining the offer understanding the 3 pillars of marketing operational organization These 3 items added serious fuel to this business and they can do the same for yours. Give it a listen and if you enjoy please leave us a 5 Star review! Register for our Upcoming Events: BOS Netherlands: https://buy.stripe.com/bIY17O3ht5Rs5O04gk BOS At Varsity House: https://varsityhoopstraining.teachable.com/p/business-of-strength-2-day-event Dan Goodman

I Survived Theatre School
Cullen Douglas

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:37


Intro: Even our lungs need a sense of purpose. Let Me Run This By You: Boz is buying a house!Interview: We talk to actor and documentary filmmaker Cullen Douglas about AMDA, Florida School of the Arts, Southeastern Theatre Conference, Tyne Daly, character actors, Jason Priestly, Patricia Crotty, Our Town, Lenny Bruce, Dick Van Dyke, investigative journalism, reusing caskets, David Carr,  Deadwood, playing Bilbo Baggins, being pen pals with Andrea McCardle, singing If I Were A Rich Man,  The Pirates of Penzance, Bye Bye Birdie, Robert Sean Leonard,  Billy Flanigan: The Happiest Man on Earth, Shonda Rhimes, Twin Peaks,  Grey's Anatomy ,  Barry, Bill Hader,  documentary filmmaking, The Humanitas Prize,  Private Practice.FULL TRANSCRIPT (Unedited): 1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ruez.2 (10s):And I'm Gina Paci.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.2 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of1 (20s):It all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?3 (33s):TikTok and I started looking at the videos and I was like, Ooh, I don't know about this. I think I need to start wearing wake up. So thank you. You1 (43s):Look gorgeous. How are3 (43s):You doing?1 (44s):Yeah, hi. I'm finally, Many things are happening. Many things are happening. So I finally, even though I'm coughing still little, I finally feel like I am, I like kicked the pneumonia bronchitis situation and little mostly thank you. I, yeah, I, we went away and then to Ventura and I slash Ojai and I really rested and I really, there was one day I worked, but I really mostly rested and I just really was like, okay, I need actual ass downtime. And yeah.1 (1m 25s):And then I started to heal and I was also on praise God for antibiotics. And then the thing that really helped me really kick it was I hadn't exercised my lungs in a really long time at all because I was so sick that I just was like, Who wants to like walk or, and, and it was 107 degrees, so it's like, who wants to exercise in that? So my cousin, my sister came in town, I, that's like a big eyebrow raise for, to drop my niece off to college. And we went on a hike to Griffith, but like a sloping hike, not a crazy hike. And I was like, I don't think I'm gonna be able to do it.1 (2m 5s):And it actually helped my lungs to like feel like they were contributing to fucking something and me like Forgot I3 (2m 16s):Like a sense of purpose. Right,1 (2m 17s):Right. And also like to, yeah, to have a job. And they were like, like to be exercised and I was like, Oh, I forgot that. Like the lungs. And, and it's interesting in this whole covid situation, like the lungs need to work too. And I never understood in hospitals, cuz I spent quite a long time in them, why they have those breathing like tube things that you blow the ball and the ball floats up. You have to, I thought that was so dumb until I had bronchitis and pneumonia and I was like, Oh, they have to work. Like they have to be expanded. If you don't use them and work them, they get, it's not good when,3 (2m 58s):When my dad, you know, my dad had this really bad car accident when I was like nine years old and yeah, he rolled 40 times and he wasn't wearing a seatbelt, which saved his life because he was in a convertible. But of course the reason he got into the accident was because he was drinking anyway. He broke everything. Like he broke six ribs and he had one of, he had to spend one year lying on an egg crate mattress on the floor one year. And for the rest of his life, every time he sneezed or coughed it hurt his ribs. But he,1 (3m 34s):Oh, and he3 (3m 36s):Had one of of those things like you're talking about. And as a child I could not get it to the height that I was supposed to go. I shuder to think what it would be like right now. Yes. So you're, that was a good reminder to exercise our lungs. I make sure my breathing capacity is good1 (3m 54s):And, and, and even wait and, and it's like, I always literally thought, oh, you exercise to be skinny. That is the only, only reason no other, like, if you had asked me, I'd say, Oh, there's no other reason. What are you talking about? But now I'm like, oh, these parts of us need actual exercising. Literally lie. I just, it blew my mind.3 (4m 19s):I was lies1 (4m 21s):The lies.3 (4m 22s):It's endless. Yes.1 (4m 27s):Hey, let me run this by you. Oh, I think we're buying a house. What? This is the craziest Oh my not in, Yeah. Okay. This is what went down. So this is so crazy. Miles' job stuff has evened out in terms of like, there's just so much going on that I can't talk about, but which is makes for terrible radio, but podcasting. But anyway, the point is we're we're a little stable, so we went to Ventura and I was like, I fucking love this town. I love Ventura. It's an hour away. It's a weird like, think lost boys, right? Like Lost Boys. The movie is, is really Santa Cruzi, but like, that's what this town reminded of.1 (5m 9s):It's not, so it's Adventurer county, so it's like an hour northwest. It's on the beach. And I was like, I love this town. I I I love it here. There's so many brown folk. It's heavily, heavily you Latina. And it's like, so anyway, I was like, I love it, but I bet I can't afford it like anywhere in California. Well it turns out that Ventura is about 500,000 less on a house than la. So I was like, wait, what? So we saw this darling house that was, that is was small but like beautiful craftsman and you know, I'll just say I'll be totally transparent with $729,000, which is still a shit ton of money.1 (5m 49s):But I looked at the same exact property almost in, in, in Pasadena for 1.3 million for two bedroom, one bath. Yeah. Two bedroom, one bath got preapproved. I've never been preapproved for anything in my goddamn light. We got preapproved for a mortgage. I couldn't, Gina, I couldn't. But when we got the preapproval letter, like I literally, speaking of lies, I was like, okay, well just expect him to come back and say we can't do anything for you.3 (6m 17s):Yeah, right.1 (6m 19s):Just really know it's not gonna work. And he wrote back and was like, Here's what we can do on this house the mortgage wise and it's comparable. It's in the ballpark of what we're paying in rent. And I was like, I don't wanna be going into my middle aged and later years in no space.3 (6m 39s):It really takes a toll. It really takes a toll on your psyche in a way that you can't really account for until you go from no space to having space. And then you go, oh my gosh, there's these three specific muscles in my shoulders that have been tense for the entire time I've been living in a city, you know, decades in some1 (6m 56s):Cases. So it's a whole different, I could build a little studio, like all the things. So yeah. So I'm grateful. Never would occur to me, never would have occurred to me. Never.3 (7m 6s):Do you care to say anything about your sister's visit?1 (7m 10s):Well, you know what is yes. And what is so comforting to me again, you know, if you listen to this podcast you're like, Oh my god, Jen, shut up. But about the truth. Okay. The truth is the fucking truth of, and even, even if it changes from person to person, that person's truth is the truth. And my truth is, I feel, So she came and she stayed not with me because I just, that what we were outta town. And then she stayed in my house while we were gone, which was fine with her, with my niece for one night. And then I saw her one day and that was, that was fine. And then she stayed with my cousin and it was, let's just say it was very, the, for me, my experience was, oh, someone else besides me sees the challenges.1 (7m 60s):And that's what I will say about that. There is something about being witnessed and having someone else go. I see, I feel what you're talking about.3 (8m 11s):Yes. Oh, I, I relate very deeply to that because people who are good at1 (8m 19s):Image image management,3 (8m 22s):At image management, a term I like is apparent competent.1 (8m 26s):Oh yes. Oh yes. I love that. I've never heard that. Apparent, competent. That is it.3 (8m 30s):Yes. Many, many people in life are apparently competent because all of their energy and effort goes into projecting very much just that idea and to be at home with them is a completely different thing. And I'm not saying like, Oh, you should always be competent in all areas of life or that I'm competent in all areas of life. I'm just saying like, yeah, there, there are some, some forms of personality disorders and just like, not even that, but just interpersonal problems are so kind of covert. And they're so, because I feel like people say, I feel like people are always trying to look for like the most broad, you know, big actions to determine whether somebody is1 (9m 13s):Whatever, nurse, whatever. They haven't been hospitalized, they've never been in rehab, they still have a house. You're like,3 (9m 20s):What? It's the same kind of mentality that says if you're not like in the gutter with a, with a mad dog in a paper bag that you're not an alcoholic, you know, it completely ignores probably what 85% of alcoholic for, which is highly functioning Correct. People who don't miss work and Correct. You know, maybe even people in their lives would never, ever know that they had a drinking problem. So yeah. So that is validating. I'm happy that for you, that you had that experience and sometimes it takes like 20, 30 years to get that validation. But the truth always, I mean, you know, it's true. That's the thing. It comes to the surface eventually.1 (9m 56s):Well, and the other thing is, I now as where I used to be so afraid of the truth and I still am, look, I I don't like getting, we know this about me, my feedback is hard for me. I'm scared of all the things, but I used to run from the truth like nobody's business in my own ways. Now I sort of clinging to it as, wait a second, wait a second, what is the truth of the matter? Like what are the facts here? Because I feel like that is the only way for me to not get kaka go, go crazy. And it is comforting. I am comforted in knowing that. Like, it was interesting. So I also am taking a solo show, writing class, I'm writing a new solo show, my third one.1 (10m 41s):And I'm just started and I thought, let me take a class with the woman who I taught. I did the first one in oh four in LA with, anyway, but I was saying on Facebook, like I, I, I'm taking this class with Terry and she's magic and I'm so glad I'm doing it and da da da. And she was like, Hey, I have a question for you. Can I quote you? And I was like, Yes. Because in her, in her like, for a and I said, of course it's all true. Like I didn't have to worry that my quote was somehow dirty or misleading or like, not really what I felt like I've done that so much in my life in the past where I've been like, oh shit, I told them I loved them or I loved their stuff, or I loved and I feel inside totally incongruent with that kind of thing.1 (11m 30s):No, I was like, no, these are what, these are my words now. I try to, it doesn't always work, but I try to just be like, okay, like what is the truth? And if someone had to quote me, would I be okay? And I, and I am a lot of the time I was like, of course you can. It's what I, I'm thanking for asking, but also it's what I feel in my bones about that, that you, that you have a magic when it comes to solo show teaching. That's it, it that is the truth. That my,3 (11m 55s):That is so cool. It's cool that you're doing that and I'll, that it, that gave me a reminder I had wanted to say on this podcast because you know, we had Jeremy Owens on the podcast. Yes. And he recently put on his social that he, he was doing it kind of as a joke, but I think he's actually doing it now, which is doing another solo show. And I had messaged him to say, you know, I meant what I said when I told you that you should do this and that I would help you and that goes for anybody cuz I said, I've said that to a lot of people on this podcast. Like, if you need help, you know, if this conversation has reinspired in you, a desire to go and do this other creative thing, please, I'm not saying like, I'm gonna co-write it with you.3 (12m 37s):I'm saying like, let me know if there's something I can do, if I can read it or, or, or bounce it off of you so that that stands for any of our previous guests. But tell us more about what, what's it gonna be about, what are you gonna be talking about? Well,1 (12m 51s):I don't entirely know, but where I'm leading is, it was interesting in this, See the thing I forgot means is that I like writing exercises. I never do them on my own. I never do. So this, she does writing exercises and a meditation before and I really longed and craved that because I spend so much of my hustle these days. How can I bring in income? How can I advance my career in Hollywood? And that is really shuts down the play aspect of all things. And I'm not saying, you know, I'm not saying that you, that I I'm not saying it's bad. All I'm saying is it totally eliminates for me the create like the really raw fun play creativity.1 (13m 37s):Okay? So in this, in this class, I just took it like, I just took the class. I was like, I'll do it. It's a masterclass in solo work, I'll do it. I like her. She called me, I was on the freeway and I was like, I'll do it. So right now the working title is, and also a solo show more or less. And I don't know if that's gonna change, but it is. Like I, and, and then in the exercise we did, we had our first class Sunday, it was all about, I realized that this solo show needs to be for me more of a call to action that that we, the, and it really comes from something you said, which is, I'm paraphrasing, but it's like we are our only hope, which is the good news and the bad news.1 (14m 25s):So like you said, we are the problem, I am the problem. Which is great. And also the, you know, terrible. So that is sort of this solo show is more gonna be about, it's like more activism based, but in a like creative arts activism way and, and not just a funny antidotes about my wacky family. And I mean, I would argue we could argue that like that my last solo show did have that underneath. But I think there needs to be a more like call to action for artists and people like us to start doing the things in the arts world that are gonna like help save the planet. And I don't know what that means yet, but she was like, oh this is like more of an activism piece based on what you're like it has that component to it.1 (15m 11s):And I was like, yeah. And then she said, if there was a banner, we did these cool exercise, she said, there's a banner all over town, whatever town you're in advertising your show, what would it say? And what came to mind in the meditation was it would be a red banner and it would just say, and it would say hope. And then in parentheses it would say sort of, So what I realized is I'm obsessed with the parentheses, like that's where I live. So I live in the world of I love my life parentheses, it's a fucking nightmare. So I love that kind of thing in my writing. And so I was like, okay, I'm really gonna embrace that. So it's like, it's like that, that stuff, I don't know where it's gonna go. I don't know what it's gonna happen.3 (15m 52s):Well two things. One is you have actually thrown out quite a few excellent titles for show, for solo shows. You'll periodically be like, that's the title of my new book or that's the title of my next, my next solo show. Yeah. So you might have to give a little re-listen to some episodes. I wish I could tell you which1 (16m 11s):I will.3 (16m 12s):Okay. The other thing is something that just came up for me when you said about the parenthesis, which I know exactly what you're talking about. I was saying like, oh yeah, she wants to show the good, the bad and the ugly. Oh. And something that occurred to me was like this concept of underbelly. Like you're showing yes, your soft underbelly. We are, I mean when I think when a person is maturing into themselves, that's what, that's the goal is to get to first accepting your own soft underbelly and then also contending with it and then representing it to the world. Because the thing that I've been on recently is like I have done myself and nobody else any favors for the amount of time I've spent misrepresenting myself because my misrepresenting myself has all been based on the lie that I thought there is a person that you are supposed to be, and your job is to be that person and you know, instead of like figure out the person that you are.3 (17m 10s):So, you know, coming into your own power is, is is a lot what we spend, what I spent my thirties about, like coming into your own power and not say that I arrived at it, but that No,1 (17m 23s):But3 (17m 24s):You about that. And then I think my forties are more about coming into my own vulnerability and that both of those things are really two sides of the same coin. Your power and your vulnerability, right? Because you can't have any power unless you're being honest about, you know, what the situation is. Today we are talking to Colin Douglas. Colin Douglas is an actor, writer, director, and documentary filmmaker who has been on absolutely everything. Most recently you've seen him on Barry and I love that for you.3 (18m 4s):But he's been, I joke in the, in our interview that he's been an absolutely every television show ever made. And that's only a slight exaggeration. He's been on Grey's Anatomy and Private Practice and the 2017 revival of Twin Peaks Agents of Shield, Pure genius. He's just been on everything Deadwood. So he's very experienced, he's very wise and he's very warm. So I hope you enjoy our conversation with Colin Douglas.0 (18m 34s):Great.3 (18m 36s):So congratulations Colin Douglas, you survived theater school. You survived4 (18m 42s):Two3 (18m 42s):Theater schools as a matter of fact.4 (18m 45s):I did. I was a glut for punishment actually. Yes. I I couldn't get enough of it.3 (18m 50s):So it was a BFA and MFA both in acting?4 (18m 54s):No, you know what, it was a zero degree. I, I am still just kind of riding by the seat of my pants. I actually, when I attended amda, it was not a degree program yet. Now it is. But back in the day it was basically they just kind of said, okay, go audition. And then when I went to Florida School, the arts, it only had an AA degree and I literally am still to this day two credit shy of my degree because I had booked a job out of Sctc and it was gonna be starting and I was like, I'm not sitting around and getting my degree just so that I can go get a job.4 (19m 42s):So I went, I took the job and I never looked back.1 (19m 45s):I mean that is, here's, I was just talking to someone who went to the theater school last night, my friend Lindsay. And we were talking about how conservatory I wish, I wish that I had done things differently, but it is what it is. But what you are reminding me of just go and audition is like the most valuable piece of advice anyone could have given us, which we never got. Which was now you, the piece of paper that says you have a BFA is not for not, but it's also not, it doesn't directly correlate to getting jobs. Like, it just doesn't. So you, you got a job while you were in school and said, I'm going, you didn't even think about staying or how did that work in your brain?4 (20m 30s):Well it was, it was because I was literally just the two credit shy kind of thing. And actually the class was, it was sort of a lab where I, you know, I had to help strike sets, but I was so busy with doing shows that I never had time to go help out with strike. So it was one of those things, oh okay, I'll, I'll require, I'll get that when I can get it when I have the time. And I never did. And then the tour was starting before the fall session started and I was like, you know what? My only regret honestly was the fact that I felt like, and, and again, it's not, you know, if somebody were to ask me today, you know, should you go to theater school?4 (21m 16s):I would say yes, if that's what really where you wanna hone your craft if you wanna, you know, build your community, but don't, if you're gonna do something like that, go to a program that has an established alumni because that's where your connections are being made when you get out of school is that support network that you have at amda at the time, there really wasn't, you know, when I was there, the biggest sort of claim to fame at the time was Time Daily. She was a graduate of, of Amda. And so it was, it wasn't as if I could reach out to Time Daily all of a sudden.4 (21m 59s):And then Florida School, the arts was, and still is such a small arts school that there really wasn't anybody for me to reach out to. Had I gone to Northwestern, had I gone to Juilliard or Yale or, or or Tish, that I would've had a built-in network of working professionals on the outside. So that was my only regret in that, that if I had perhaps gone to a different theater school, maybe I would've had those connections. But I certainly got the education I felt I needed.3 (22m 34s):Well and also you got the connections while getting paid instead of having to pay, which is was just definitely preferable. And by and speak about, you know, work experience and getting connections. You have been on every television show that has ever existed and tons of films too. So was your experience that as soon as you started working, you were just off to the races? I mean, I'm not suggesting that it's easy because no life of an actor is easy, but have, has it been pretty consistent for you would you say for your career?4 (23m 10s):It's been consistently inconsistent in that,1 (23m 16s):Wait, I just have to say that has to be the name of your book. Okay. I, we were talking about earlier before you got on about titles of shows and books, your book could be consistently inconsistent. The Culin Douglas story, I'm just, I'm just putting it out there. Thank you. Please send me 10% check to my office.4 (23m 32s):Yeah, thanks. No, it really, it was one of those things that I, I had a very dear professor at Florida School of the the Arts, Patricia Kadi, she was the acting instructor there and I was doing all of the plays, I was in all of the productions there and I had kind of become the top dog in the school, so to speak. And she pulled me aside one day and she said, you know, the one thing you're gonna have to realize is you're probably not gonna start working professionally until you're in your thirties.4 (24m 13s):And I, and I didn't really understand what she was saying there. What she was basically commenting on was that I was a young character actor and I didn't look like Jason Priestly, I didn't look and yet I hadn't grown into my framer look either. So I was gonna be in this really sort of, where do we cast him? He's talented but we don't know where to put him. And so I did a lot of theater for a lot of years and then in my thirties is when I was able to transfer into television and film. So what, cause I finally had kind of caught up to my look.1 (24m 45s):Yeah. So what I appreciative aid about that is it sounds like she said it so she said it in a way that wasn't like being a jerk, right? Like my experience was feeling that way except having it told like there is something deficient in you so that you cannot be an ingenue cuz you're too fat, you're too this. So instead of, hey, go do some theater, do all the things and then you'll grow into your look, do not fret. This is like part of the technical side of the business of how a camera sees you and not about your talent. It would've been so much different. Instead it comes down to, I think a lot of people we've talked to from the DePauls, from the Northwestern say, nobody told me that in a way which was, I could make a plan about it.1 (25m 35s):It was always just, well you're never gonna be cast. So by, and instead of hey maybe you could do theater, maybe you could write, maybe you could do something else until Hollywood catches up to the character of you.4 (25m 50s):Exactly.1 (25m 51s):It good, Patricia. Good. Is Patricia still around?4 (25m 54s):She is. And she literally just announced today that she's retiring from teaching. Well1 (25m 60s):Patricia, you did good work and you she did fantastic. You made it so call in part of it sounds like she encouraged you cuz you started with that story of her encouraged you to know that maybe later it would be your time to be on every single television show ever written. But for the twenties and the, you know, you were gonna do some theater and, and get your training right man, and,4 (26m 23s):And I honestly, I didn't completely understand everything she was saying in that little sound bite because, you know, I was, I was sort of standing there saying, Patty, look at all these job offers. I just got out of CTCs, you know, I'm gonna be working like crazy. And she said, No, no, no, don't get me wrong that the work is going to be there. But as far as what you're seeing in your mind's eye of, you know, Helen Douglas tonight on The Tonight Show, that's not gonna happen until you can kind of get into that other stream as it were. How3 (27m 0s):So did that match up? I mean, was that a surprise to you or did that match up with what you already thought about yourself? I don't think any 17 year old, 18 year old necessarily thinks of themselves as a character actor. Although it may just be because it never gets put to you that that's an option when you're a teenager. You know, the option is like, as Bos mentioned, Ingenu or not Ingenu, but they never really say like, Well, but you, you know, you're gonna fit into this different mold. So how did that butt up against what you already thought about yourself?4 (27m 32s):It actually kind of lined up okay with me in, in a weird way because at Florida School, the arts in particular, they were so gracious in the fact that when they picked their seasons, they picked shows that it made sense for me to be the lead in, in that I, I'm giving you an example, we did a production of Our Town and I was the stage manager and, you know, as opposed to being cast as the one of the young, you know, lead ingenue kind of a things. And then we did Bye by Birdie and I was cast in the Dick Van Dyke role.4 (28m 12s):And so they did it in such a way that, you know, or when we did Barefoot in the Park, I was Victor Velasco the old man who lived upstairs. So I was already sort of being primed that I was this character actor and would be gonna be doing that kind of stuff. And then quite honestly, as that look started to emerge, I mean in college I had sort of a flock of seagulls kind of hairdo thing going on, you know, and then it quickly all went away. And I had been playing about 20 years older in film and television and in theater than I've actually always been, you know, I was playing guys in my, when I was in my, you know, thirties, I was playing guys in my fifties.4 (28m 59s):Now I'm in my fifties and I'm playing guys in my in1 (29m 1s):In seventies. And I think that calling, the thing that I'm noticing too is like maybe for men it's a little different too, right? Like there's something about being, like, there's just, and it's a societal thing where like women who are play, like, it's, it's a insult for women when they're like, Oh, we're sending you in for a 50 year old and you're 30. But, and I think maybe if you have a certain kind of ego for a man as well, and we all have egos, I mean, it says, but, and I, I love the fact that you didn't, it doesn't sound like anyway, and you can tell me if I'm wrong, you took it as an insult that they were, that you were going out for roles that were for like the Victor Velasco of the world. You were able to embrace it as you were working.1 (29m 43s):Like that's, so I say this all to say, because I remember in our last class with Jim Ooff, who people call hostile prof and he said to me, You know who you are. And I was like, dying to hear you are Michelle Pfeiffer. That was never gonna happen. But I was dying to hear, he was like, That's who you, he's like, you are the next. And I'm waiting and, and I'm waiting. He goes, Lenny Bruce. And I was like, what the actual fuck is going on? What are you telling me?3 (30m 13s):No idea. What a great compliment that was.1 (30m 15s):I was devastated, devastated. I wanted to quit. I was suicide. Like it was just, But anyway, so what I'm saying is you didn't take that and run with it in a way that was like, I am not Jason Priestly and therefore my life is over. You were able to work and, and embrace the roles. It sounds like4 (30m 34s):I was able to embrace the roles and, and I was getting, okay, you are a young dick fan dyke, you're a young, this kind of a guy. So I was able to kind of make that connection. I honestly were being completely honest here. I think, how do I put this, that it does not sound completely like an asshole. It1 (30m 54s):Doesn't matter. We always sound like assholes here. Go ahead.4 (30m 57s):But at Florida school, the arts, I was one of, I was one of the only straight men at school and therefore undated a lot. So I was not, the fact that I wasn't looking like the young hot stud,1 (31m 22s):You were still getting it4 (31m 23s):Right? I was still getting it. So that didn't it, had it not been like that situation, I think I probably would've started to hyperventilate thinking, well hold it, I'm in my twenties, why are they making me play these old men? And this is affecting, you know, cus group. But that wasn't the case. And so I, I had sort of a, a false sense of ego I guess a little bit. But it was supporting the work that I was doing.3 (31m 50s):Yeah, absolutely. So did you grow up always knowing that you wanted to be an actor? Did you think, did you try any other paths first? Or were you, were you dead set on this?4 (32m 2s):I was dead set when the story goes, that when I was four I asked Santa for a tuxedo to wear to the Emmys and Santa delivered gave me a, a white dinner jacket and spats and stuff like that. So I was, I was ready to go.1 (32m 18s):Oh my god, do you have that picture? Can you please send us that?4 (32m 22s):Oh no, we have moved so many times. When I was growing up, my dad, when I was growing up was an undercover investigative reporter. And so wherever he was basically undercover was where we were living. Wait1 (32m 36s):A minute, wait a minute. Wait a minute, wait. Okay. This is fantastic because I do a lot of crime writing and so does Gina writes and undercover crime reporter father now, right there is sort of burying the lead. What in the hell? He was an undercover, What does that even mean? An undercover, He's not a police officer, but he's an undercover reporter.4 (32m 57s):He was an undercover investigative reporter. Well, what that for a period of time, So I'll give you an ex, there was a senator at one time back in the early seventies who was receiving kickbacks from his employees or hiring people on the books. And those people weren't actually having jobs. And so they would then send him the money. He was getting all of the money.1 (33m 24s):Sure. Like Chicago was like living in Chicago all time.4 (33m 28s):So the, somebody tipped my father off that this was happening. And so he went undercover and, and worked as sort of like an aid and things like that. Or there was a time where he, he worked at a meat packing place or he worked at a funeral parlor that was selling caskets with fake bottoms. And so people would buy these incredibly expensive things and then they would drop them and then they'd open up the hatch and the body would just drop into a pine box and then they would reuse the, the casket.1 (34m 8s):So this is the single greatest thing I've ever heard in my life, and I'm gonna write a pilot about it immediately called Fake Bottom. And it's4 (34m 14s):Gonna see, I've already wrote that was, I actually wrote a spec pilot. That's how I landed my lid agent. Oh, it was because what ended up happening is my dad, much to my mom's chagrin, used me in two of his undercover stings when I was a kid. One time, there was a situation where firemen had been hired and they weren't actually properly trained. It was another one of those kind of kickback situations. So it was a training session and they, I was supposedly, it was a staged event where they were gonna try to test the skills of the firemen or whatever.4 (34m 55s):And so I was gonna, I I practiced with a real fireman being fireman carried up and down a ladder from a second story kind of a thing. But once the word was out that it was an internal sting, they put me into one of those crane baskets. And so I was sort of floating over midtown in, in the basket kind of a thing. And then another time actually, there was a talent agent who was running a kitty porn ring. And so I was sort of used to expose, so to speak, this this person that was actually trying to take advantage of, of kids and parents.3 (35m 38s):Oh my God. Well, two things occur to me about that. One is your family was already full of drama before you came along. I mean, anybody who wants to, right, who wants to do this investigative journalism, Like that's, that's a dramatic person. I love David Carr. I love that kind of personality of per, you know, the person who wants to like really get in there, investigate and just as an aside, like, I'm sorry for the families who paid for those coffins, but at the same time, you know, good, good on them because it's such a waste. So much, many people spent putting mahogany boxes into the ground to to, to, to decompose over time. Okay. So did your parents like that you wanted to be an actor or did they have a different idea for plan for you?4 (36m 19s):Oh, they, they were 100% supportive. The very, very much so from day one, I think, because it was my mom who really sort of stepped in and said, Hey, let's figure out how we can get this new kid who's always the new kid to find his people. And so she took me when I was 11 years old to a local community theater, children's community theater. And they were doing a production, a musical version of The Hobbit. And you know, the intention was that I was just gonna audition and be, you know, number 40 in the background kind of a thing.4 (37m 0s):Third,3 (37m 1s):Third habit from the left,4 (37m 3s):Third habit from the, And so they auditioned and I remember you had to sing a song and God, I have not told this story, you had to sing a song. And I decided to sing tomorrow from Annie because I was me madly, deeply in love with Andrea Ricardo. And we were actually pen pals. And so I went in there and I sang tomorrow and jump cut to that weekend. And my mom came in Saturday morning smiling as I was watching cartoons and she said, You've been cast in the lead as Bill Bos. And that was sort of like, okay, I I I found my people.3 (37m 47s):That's amazing. Please tell us more about your penal with,4 (37m 54s):So I, I just, I, you know, I I had gotten the album when it came out and I listened to it and I memorized it. And even then I was casting myself as either Rooster or Daddy Warbuck, you know. And so somehow I found her address and sent her, you know, a, a letter as we used to write, you know, before texting. And she wrote back and then I wrote back, and then the thing that was really exciting was 20,3 (38m 28s):Wait a minute, are you married to Annie?4 (38m 31s):No, I am not married to Annie. Okay. But 20 some odd years later I was doing a national tour and staying in a hotel in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Andrea was on tour doing a national tour and was staying in the same hotel, kind of bumped into one another and was like, you know, you don't know who I am, but this. And it ended up, it was wonderful because I went to see her show on my dark night and she and her family came to see me on, on the other night. So.1 (39m 7s):Beautiful. Okay, so here we go. Your family's on board and why didn't you just go and strike it out either in New York or anywhere? Why did you end up going to school? Were you like, I wanna learn more, or how did that transition into schooling go?4 (39m 24s):It did, I did wanna learn more. It, it really was because up at that point, the only influences as far as acting I was going was from, you know, the, either the community theater directors or the high school drama teacher who had, you know, aspirations for theater, but was really just doing it because he didn't wanna coach the football team. So I felt like I needed a stronger foundation for myself. And, but always it was sort of like I was going to the theater school because I didn't feel like, Oh, I don't wanna go to a school where I'm gonna have to learn all of these other things that I'm not gonna ever use.4 (40m 7s):Now I look back and go, you know, I wish I had done some of that other stuff because I did not create any kind of a fallback plan for me. It would, this is either gonna work or it's not gonna work and you're gonna be screwed. I1 (40m 21s):Mean, here's the thing, here's the thing. I don't know what you, you two think, but like, there is this two schools of, well there's probably a bajillion schools of thought, but one of them is like, if you have a fallback plan, you will fall back. The other one is not everyone is gonna be a Colin Douglas or a John C. Riley that's gonna work, work, work, work, work, work, work. So a fallback plan for some of us might have been like another avenue to get into the industry, right? But a fallback plan can also literally have people go and not live their dreams and become, you know, actuary scientists because they're afraid. So it's like, it's so individual, which is why I think theater school training is so tricky is because you're taking young individuals who don't know shit and some know what they wanna do, some don't, some are good, some are talented, but not, it's so individual.1 (41m 10s):So it's like when people ask me, should I go to theater school? I'm like, I fucking don't know who, I'm like, who are you and what do you wanna do on the planet? But nobody ever asked me that as a 17 year old. So here we are. Gina, you were gonna say something? Oh,3 (41m 23s):I was just going, if you remember your audition,4 (41m 30s):My audition into theater school. Okay. So I do, I remember my audition into anda a, and again, I already recognizing I was a character actor. I sang if I were a rich man from Fiddler on the Roof, you know, you know, a skinny ass, you know, kid from, you know, suburbia singing that song. And then I did a monologue from a play that I had done in high school. And which1 (42m 9s):One do you remember? Or No,4 (42m 10s):It's okay. It was it, yes. No, actually it was weird because I look back on it now kind of thinking how the soul sometimes prepares. I think sometimes it was a, from a show called Juvie, and I played a young gentleman who was mentally challenged and I got a lot of incredible feedback from, from the role because I had researched, I had, I had gone to the library and this is, there was a thing called Microfish when you would go to the library and you'd have to look up stories on kind of like a big machine. And I did all of these kind of things and research the roles, and I saw images of babies and young people with different kind of cognitive delays.4 (42m 60s):And so I did that. I got into Amda, whatever, again, sort of jumping forward in life. In 1996, my oldest son was born and he happened to be born with Down syndrome. And when I met him for the first time at the bassinet, I immediately went back to that Microfish machine in high school and remembered seeing babies and images of people with Down syndrome. And so I made that kind of connection. So it was sort of like, all right, this is where life was going as far as Florida School, the arts went, I actually didn't audition for that.4 (43m 43s):What had happened is I was at, and I broke my foot during one of the dance classes. They would bring in dance captains from various Broadway shows and teachers routines. And we were doing a routine from cats and I jumped off of a piling and I came down flat for,1 (44m 5s):Let me tell you something. This is what, this is just one of the many reasons I don't care for that musical is that also what are you having people jumping around for that? Aren't I just, anyway, I'm glad they brought, I'm sure it was a great experience in some ways, but like, I just don't care for, that was my first musical I saw. And I even as a kid, I was like, I don't buy this at all. I don't know what's going on here, but I don't like it. But anyway, so you busted your foot. Oh, and can I just say about microfiche? I'm sorry to be an asshole, but like, I could never figure out how to slow the fucking shit down and I never could see a goddamn story, so I gave up on the microphone, so you made it further than me. I was like, why is it going too fast? That was my, that's like, like, that's like so indicative of my life. But anyway, so okay, so you, you broke your foot and so what happened?1 (44m 49s):You had to, why did you4 (44m 50s):So I, I, I broke my foot, I went home to my parents' place who were now living in Florida and kind of rehabbed for a while. I then auditioned for a play for Pirates of Penza, excuse me, that was up, up performances up near St. Augustine, Florida. And I went up there and I was playing Samuel the the second pirate. And the gentleman who was playing the modern major general in the show was actually the dean and artistic director of Florida School of the Arts. And he said to me, If you'd like to come to school, we'll offer you a full scholarship and you can start at the, as soon as the show closes.4 (45m 38s):And so that's what I did. It was like, I just went straight to Flos Bureau Arts and I did not go back up to Amda after my footed here. Helen,1 (45m 45s):It's really interesting, like, and I was talking about, this was someone else yesterday about how one, obviously one thing leads to the next, Oh it was a showrunner actually, that was that I was listening to a lecture and she just said that what I've done is I have walked through doors that have opened to me without a lot of second guessing. I followed my heart in terms of who took interest in me and who opened doors for me. I walked through them. I didn't say no, but, or no, I just did it. And so it sounds like that's what you did. You were like, Oh, full ride, I'm in Florida now. You could have been like, No, no, no, I'm gonna go back to Amda because whatever.1 (46m 26s):But you were like, I'm gonna do this. And it sounds like it worked in your favor, but what was your experience like at Florida? Did you, I mean obviously we know you left early, but did you get stuff out of it? Did you love it? What was the deal?4 (46m 41s):I did love it in the sense that because it was such a small school and because where the school is located, it's in Plac of Florida, which is sort of geographically in the middle of sort of Jacksonville and Gainesville. And so on a Friday night there really wasn't any partying going on. It was all of us getting together and doing monologues for one another, you know, because there wasn't any place to really go. And then as far as the classes went, because it was such a small institution, so many of my classes were literally just myself and professor in their office.4 (47m 26s):And we would do, you know, that's how I learned dialects was literally just, you know, we were working on the Italian dialect or whatever and I would go in and the professor would speak to me in that Italian dialect and then I would have to answer him and that would be the entire class. And then the next week we would do the brooklynese. And so I had all of that and they were very, very gracious to me because when I came in as quote a freshman, I was taking all of the freshman courses, but then they also had me taking all of the second year acting courses as well, sort of accelerating me through the program and then allowing that by doing that I was able to be cast in all of their different productions.3 (48m 15s):So when you did school and enter the workforce, what surprised about sort of the business that maybe you weren't expecting or hadn't been prepared for? For in terms of your training or, you know, and it could have been a happy surprise or, or, or not such a happy surprise, but like what was some I always just feel like there's, people have their list of things. Oh, I never thought the one that people always bring up as coverage, I never thought, when I watched TV shows that they had to do the same thing 50 times.4 (48m 58s):I, I think for, for me, the biggest sort of, even though Patty Crotty, Patricia Crotty had said, you know, Hey, it's gonna be a while before you're gonna start to work. You know, although I did work immediately when I got outta school, it was, it was one of those things where I quickly realized that they really didn't care that I had played Albert and by by Birdie they didn't care that I was in all of the productions. It was basically, no, you've earned the right to stand in the back of a line and you're gonna have to, you know, get up at an ungodly hour, go to equity, sign in at 6:00 AM and then come back at two in the afternoon for your audition.4 (49m 47s):But by the time you come back, if you pick up backstage, you're gonna read that Robert Strong Leonard has already been offered the role that you're auditioning for at two o'clock. So those were sort of some of the realities of, oh, okay, this is not necessarily gonna be the projecting thing that's gonna get me into the room. It's just, it's gonna be more for me that, okay, I feel like I deserve to be here and I'm competent enough in my abilities. But I, I think that was as far as just working in general. But Gina, to answer the question as far as like the thing that I was most surprised by within the industry, I'm, I'm trying to think if there was anything that I really was sort of taken aback by,1 (50m 31s):Well I guess I can ask like, did you, what was your like, like in terms of getting an agent and all that, did anything there go like, Oh my gosh, I didn't understand that I would have to, How did your representation come about? Was that a surprise or did you just get an agent? Cause a lot of our listeners, some of them we talk, you know, we talk about like a showcase or, but you left early and just started working, so what was that transition like in terms of getting representation and going on, on auditions for film and TV or theater? And if you think of anything that surprises you along the way, just let us know. But sure,4 (51m 4s):I didn't have theatrical, I didn't have legit theater representation for a lot of years. I was literally very lucky in that, you know, just using relationships, you know, to help propel me into the next situation that one show would be closing and I would hear about the fact that they were looking for something else. Or I would go to the Southeastern Theater conference and audition and be able to pick up my next year or year and a half worth of work. And I was able to kind of keep it at that point. I finally did get an agent who was gonna cover me theatrically as well as, you know, commercially.4 (51m 46s):And I remember her telling me, she was basically saying the same thing that Patty Crotty had said is that, you know, you know, you're a good actor, I'll put you out there, but it's, it's probably gonna be a while before you're gonna book a commercial or any kind of television cuz you're just really hard to place. She was good to her words. She put me out there and a week later I booked a Budweiser commercial. So I was like, Oh, okay, I think I got this. I, I think the hardest lesson that I had to learn was that because it sometimes came easy, it felt like, like, oh, okay, this is what it was, is I would get say to that chunk of change.4 (52m 29s):And I, it took me a while to figure out that I had to make that chunk of change, stretch as far as I possibly could because I didn't know exactly when the next job was coming from and, and that it was hard when I met and fell in love with my wife who was coming. She had been a model, but she had also worked in the corporate world. And so she was very accustomed to, well no, you make this amount of money every month and this is what you can expect with your expenses. It was hard when we started to realize, oh no, CU just got a great windfall of money, but if you break it down and spread it out over a year, he's not making minimum wage.4 (53m 10s):So, you know, it was a really, that was a hard kind of thing to adjust with.3 (53m 15s):Yes. I mean that's, yes, that's a common story and that's something that they don't teach you about in theater school. They don't teach you money management and how you have to withhold taxes and all kinda stuff. Yeah. So that, that's that, that's, that's a whole education in and of itself. But you were also a writer and director. When did the writing and directing and producing come into your career?4 (53m 40s):The writing actually started in college in that we would have to have monologues for class and I had an affinity to writing the monologues and so I started writing monologues for my classmates for beer money or they would need an audition piece for something in particular. And so I would tailor it to sort of echo whatever play that they were auditioning for kind of a thing. And so it really just sort of came easy for me. And then whenever I was auditioning, my biggest thing was I don't wanna go in there with something that they have seen 3000 times.4 (54m 23s):And so I was like, Okay, you know what? I'm just gonna write my own thing. And it worked, it worked to a degree. And so that's where I sort of started to do it. And then personally after my oldest son Gabe was born, I had a lot of demons to be dealing with. I didn't understand why I had been chosen or whatever, or, or given a child with a disability and, and it took me kind of having to get outta my own way to realize that was the least interesting thing about him. And, but in doing so, I, I started to write in journals and then I ended up writing a one man play that I in turn tour the country with for a handful of years.4 (55m 11s):And it was that play that I then attracted some other attention and then got hired on to do some other writing in script doctoring or whatever. And then as I shared earlier, I wrote a spec script about that time of my life when we were kind of moving into hotels and things like that. And then that kind of just started to snowball. And then I was very fortunate back in 2010, I had the Humanitas Organization, Humanitas Prize. They tapped me as the first recipient of their New Voices fellowship program, which pairs you with showrunners to sort of mentor you in creating a television series.4 (56m 0s):And so I was shared with, paired with Shonda rhymes over at Shondaland and was able to develop a show, which was actually an adaptation of my one man play, about a family, you know, coming to terms and dealing with a child with a disability. But I had already actually had a relationship with Shawnda prior to that because I had gotten cast in an episode of Grey's Anatomy and she and her producing partner, Betsy Beers, put me up for an Emmy for that role. And then when I didn't get the nomination, Shawnda turned around and created a role for me over on private practice.1 (56m 46s):Okay. So you know, all these people, and I guess I'm mindful of time and I wanna know what the hell are you, are you doing now you have this documentary, What is your jam right this second? Colin Douglas. And if you could do anything, what would it be? And tell us about this documentary, because what I don't wanna happen is it's like 10 minutes go by and we haven't heard about the documentary and we haven't heard about like, what is your jam and your juice right this second.4 (57m 13s):Okay. So I, I made the documentary, I started working on it when we got locked out, you know, the world was hurting, the industry was shut down. I couldn't stand in front of a camera, I couldn't direct a bunch of actors in a narrative, but I knew I could still tell stories. And so I, at one point in my career, I detoured and I was an associate show director and a performer at Walt Disney World. I was there for about three years. And the level of talent in those theme parks is just incredible. You know, there are a lot of people who come outta theater schools and they get their job, you know, at Dollywood or at Bush Gardens or at Disney World or Disneyland, and they spend the summer there and then they go off and do whatever else with their life.4 (58m 5s):There are other individuals like the subject of my film, Billy Flanigan, who, he started right after theater school. He went to Boston Conservatory. He then opened up Epcot in 1982 as a kid at the Kingdom and has been working for 40 years straight as a performer out at Disney. When the Disney Park shut down because of the pandemic, Billy was without a stage for the first time in his 40 year career. So what he did is he took it upon himself to start doing singing and dancing telegrams for other performers who were out of work. And then he started to literally take it on the road because he's a cyclist and he started crisscrossing the entire country, delivering these sing in dancing telegrams called Planograms.4 (58m 55s):And my Facebook page was blowing up with, I got Planogrammed, I got Planogrammed and I, so I reached out to some old friends from Disney and I said, I've heard about this name Billy Flanigan for years. He's a, he's a legend. He was a legend 20 years ago when I was working, You know, can you put me in touch with him? And so I spoke with Billy. I reached out to my producing partner and I said, There's a documentary here, because Billy has just been so incredibly selfless. He's always a pay it forward kind of a guy. He's a performers performer, you know, even though he jokes about the fact that he'll get a nosebleed if he's not on center.4 (59m 36s):But it's one of those things where he just really is about making the other people on stage look good. So he's been the face of Disney. But then what ended up happening is he was so busy working and raising an entire family that a handful of years ago, Billy finally slowed down and realized that he had been living a different life than he perhaps should have been. And he came out and it really destroyed his family and, and brought things down. And so you had this guy who day in and day out was still having to give that Disney, you know, RAAs, but behind the scenes, as we all know, his performers, the show's gotta go on.4 (1h 0m 20s):And so his heart was breaking. And so I said to Billy, Look, if we tell your story, we're gonna have to tell all of it, because I feel like you sharing your humanity and your pain is gonna help other people out there within the L G B T community who are feeling bullied or feeling like they don't have their place. So if we can do this, this is, this is sort of our mandate. And he said yes. And his family said yes. And, and thankfully not as a direct link to the film, but I shared the final cut with Billy and his family, because obviously I had to have their final approval. And Billy called me and said, This film is helping heal my family now, because it had given them that creative distance that it was no longer them, it was these other people up on a screen talking about a period of their life.4 (1h 1m 13s):So right now, the film, it premieres digitally on October 7th, and then is available on D V D November 15th. And then after the first of the year, it'll be looking like landing on one of the major streamers.3 (1h 1m 29s):Oh, that's fantastic. I'm so excited to see it because I watched the trailer and that thing that you were describing about, you know, he's, he's, he's gotta always have a stage that comes through from the first frame. You see him, you think, Wow, this guy is like a consummate performer in a way that I could never imagine. I mean, yes, I, I love to be on stage. It's fantastic, but I, I don't have this thing where like, you know, I've gotta be performing every second. And that was really clear. And I didn't know, I didn't glean from the trailer that he was doing that for fun for other performers. I thought he was just starting his business with the singing telegram. So that is even more interesting. Okay, that's really cool.3 (1h 2m 9s):So after the first of the year, it'll come out on a streamer. And actually when you know which one it is, you'll let us know and we'll, we'll promote it on our socials. And I4 (1h 2m 17s):Wanted, but you can preorder now the DVD and the digital.1 (1h 2m 22s):Yeah. I didn't mean to like cut us off from Shonda land, but I really wanted to make sure that we talk about this documentary because I think that it is taking your career and your life in, it's like it's made it bigger and about other things other than, I mean, it's like there's a service component to documentary work that like, I think is not always there in other kinds of media. That documentary work is like at once, for me anyway, really personal, but also universal and also has a great capacity for healing. And so, or at least the truth, right? Like what is the truth?1 (1h 3m 2s):So that's why I wanted to make sure we covered that. But if there's other things you wanna say about your career and like what you're doing now and where you wanna go or anything else, I wanna give you the opportunity, but I wanted to make sure, So I didn't mean to cut off your Shonda land story because I know people are probably like, Oh my God, tell more about Sean Rhymes. But I wanted to talk about the, the Billy documentary.4 (1h 3m 24s):I appreciate that so much. No, I, I, you know, just to sort of bookend the, the documentary, I never felt like it was one of those things that I knew I could tell stories, but I didn't feel like I had any business telling the documentary. I don't necessarily even gravitate towards documentaries, but I just felt like, hold it. This truly is a story that that needs to be told and can maybe bring about a little bit of healing. And that's what I think good films and television do that you, we, we see ourselves mirrored back in many ways and we feel less alone.4 (1h 4m 5s):And so I felt like if I could do that with a narrative, maybe I can do it with a, a documentary. That's not to say that I wanna become a documentarian, because it's not that I wouldn't if the opportunity ever presented itself, but it's the same way in which, you know, writing a narrative feature, it's like, well, I've gotta be compelled to wanna tell this story kind of a thing. And this just happened to be the medium in which to tell it as opposed to making a, you know, a, a film about a guy named Billy who wants to start out being a performer.1 (1h 4m 40s):And I think that you've said a really good word that we talk about sometimes in other ways on this show and in my life I talk about is being compelled. So when someone is compelled to do something, I know that the art created from that feeling of being compelled is usually authentic, true necessary, and, and, and, and, and sometimes healing. So I love the word what doing projects that were compelled. So anything else that you're compelled to do right now?4 (1h 5m 14s):Work great, really, you know, I I, I really, I I still even after, you know, making this, this film, I, I am still very much an actor at heart and I love being on camera. I love the collaborative experience working with other actors. You know, I was very, very fortunate this past season to to work on Barry with Bill Hater and Bill, I guess if I, it was like, what's next? What's my next jam? I would love to be able to emulate what Bill is doing. You know, Bill is the lead. He's also writing, he's also directing all of the episodes.4 (1h 5m 58s):You know, I joked with him that he also ran craft services because it was literally doing all those things and just watching him effortlessly move from being Barry back to Bill, giving me a note and then giving a note to the DP and then stepping back into Barry was just a really wonderful thing. And it's like, you know what, if I can do that, and I have other friends and, and mentors like Tom Verica, Tom actually directed me in that first episode of Grey's Anatomy. And he and I have since become dear friends. He's now the executive producer and resident director on Bridger.4 (1h 6m 39s):He also was the resident director and producer on inventing Anna. And he and I have developed a narrative film that we're looking to produce as well. And, and, and so again, and yet, you know, Tom as sort of an aspiration or an inspiration for me. And he started out as an actor himself. And then, you know, he directed a lot of Grey's Anatomy and then the next thing you know, he's playing Vila, Viola Davis' husband on how to Get Away with Murder. And then he was also the lead producer on Scandal. So it's like, you know, not being defined by what this industry wants to put you in.4 (1h 7m 20s):I feel like I'm finally at the point in my career where Colin can direct a documentary and he could write something for somebody else and he could act. And, and again, you know, from day one when I, when I left Flow Arts early to go out and do the job, it's just because I wanna keep working. Yeah.3 (1h 7m 38s):And that's, that's, everybody says that. Everybody says, I just wish I could be working constantly. Cuz it's where it's where all the fun of, of the work is, you know, not auditioning and getting head shots and whatever. It's, it's, it's doing the work. By the way, Barry is how I came to ask you to be on this podcast, because I didn't watch it when it first came out. I, I kind of came to it late and of course binge the whole thing and it's fantastic. And, and I immediately went and looked up every single actor to see who went to theater school because I, I would love to have them all. What a fantastic show and what an interesting kind of nice little parallel somehow with your documentary and, and also your own story.3 (1h 8m 18s):There's a lot about actors like figuring out what they're doing on screen and, and kind of reconciling that with their offscreen life or, or even just with their career. Do I wanna be this type of actor? Do I wanna be this type of person? You know, Ha and Bill Hater has seamlessly gone, I mean, once upon a time you would not have really thought of a Saturday Night Live person making quite this kind of crossover. And the humor in that show about actors is so perfect. I've ne I've seen things that have come close to that, but I've never seen something that you're just dying laughing if you know anything about the acting profession, Right?3 (1h 8m 58s):Yeah. Or were you gonna say that?1 (1h 8m 59s):I was gonna say that. And also that like, his account, So I have suffered, you know, from panic attacks and anxiety disorder and his journey through that and with that has given me so much hope as a artist because he was one of the first people I knew, especially from snl, especially from comedy, to say, I was struggling with this and this is how I dealt with it. So it didn't totally destroy my life. And he could have chosen to be like, I'm having panic attacks on set at Saturday Live. I'm done, I'm done. But he worked through it and now is doing all of this. So it gives me a lot of hope. So if you talk to him, tell him there's a late, an anxious lady that really feels like I can, I can really reclaim myself as an artist and even maybe thrive through the anxiety.4 (1h 9m 50s):No, I, I, I so appreciate that, Jen. I really do. You know, I have dealt with panic attacks over the years, you know, again, being that new kid, I was kind of predisposed to, Oh my gosh, you know, and luckily I've never had it within my art. It's always been on the other side. But the way in which Bill has navigated all of that is really truly just, you know, motivating and inspiring on so many different levels. And I think the thing that I also recognize is the fact that Bill never had aspirations to be on snl. He wanted to be a filmmaker, you know, he was editing, he was doing all these types of things and he sort of fell in backwards to groundings and, and all that kind of stuff.4 (1h 10m 38s):And somebody saw him and said, Hey, let's do it. It's sort of like he had to kind of take that detour to be able to get back to doing the kind of things that he really wanted to be doing, you know, Which is great for me because I look at like, my time at Disney, okay? I never would've imagined that that brief time at Disney would've been able to fuel me in that it brought back into my life to allow me to direct a film about one of their performers 20 years later.1 (1h 11m 6s):It's a, your story. I'm so glad you came on because your story is a story about the, the consistent inconsistencies and the detours that aren't really detours. And for me, like just being like, I'm just knowing now going into into meetings, being a former therapist for felons. Like that is the thing that people are really interested in. And I

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 19 - ESP Brewing Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 67:27


This week on the show I travel to Amherst, Ohio and visit with Larry Esper from ESP Brewing. During the show we get into Larry's background of microbiology and how he applies it to producing his delicious craft beer. During the show we discussed the build out process of ESP and the struggles of keeping production up with demand. We tasted some fantastic beer including an imperial blonde ale, pale ale, fest beer, and a smoked maple porter. The porter was presented two different ways, one with a sugar syrup rim and one without. It was actually quite amazing how the rim muted a lot of the smokiness. Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and you'll get early access to the show. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow ESP Brewing on IG @ESPbrewing and on Facebook @ESPbrewingcompany. You can also head over to their website at https://espbrewingco.com and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Blue Cooler  - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Otherworldly Oracle Official
Enchanted AUTUMN Entrees (Kitchen Witch Series)

Otherworldly Oracle Official

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 27:45


In this enticing Kitchen Witch episode, Kitty walks us through two of her favorite Autumn dinners including an herb roasted chicken with colcannon and a savory pumpkin soup with rosemary garlic bread. What's awesome about this episode isn't necessarily the recipes, but the education on each ingredient's magical properties and folklore and how each is important for the Autumn - Mabon and Samhain season. If you'd like to get your paws on the recipes described in this episode, you'll have to head over to our https://www.patreon.com/burninghallows (Patreon) to download the supplemental BOS pages complete with each ingredient's magical information. Here's the recipe for https://tasty.co/recipe/roasted-rosemary-garlic-loaf (Rosemary Garlic Loaf) from Tasty to go along with Kitty's savory pumpkin soup. Don't forget you can find Kitty's writing at https://otherworldlyoracle.com/ (otherworldlyoracle.com) and Allorah's Tarot, numerology, and soul origin readings at https://www.allorahrayne.com/ (allorahrayne.com).

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 18 - Ignite Brewing Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 105:07


This week on the show I travel to Barberton, Ohio and talk with the team from Ignite Brewing. Michael, Jason, and Megan discussed all the exciting new things going on at the tap room including the acquisition of a new canning line and larger volume fermenters, the opening of a new kitchen, expanding the reach of their beer distribution, as well as all the exciting events taking place at Ignite. In late September the brewery will celebrate its 4th anniversary with a week of events including a beer and food pairing dinner at LaLa's on the lakes in Akron, special beer releases both in the can and on tap, as well as live music. Get 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. That's 20% off + free shipping with the code PIINTTALKING at manscaped.com. Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and once every month you will be invited to a one-hour Q&A session on Facebook in which you can ask them anything you want about craft beer and the industry. In the very near future patrons will gain access to exclusive content that no one else is going to hear. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Ignite Brewing Company on IG and on Facebook @ignitebrewingcompany. You can also head over to their website at http://ignite.beer and see what's going on. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Check out our other sponsors: Blue Cooler  - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 17 - Wolf's Ridge Brewing Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 95:44


Support the show by doing your Amazon shopping through our affiliate link. Just click the link here or on my website and do your shopping as you would normally. With every purchase you make using the link the podcast gets a little commission kick back. https://www.amazon.com?&linkCode=ll2&tag=thebrewerof0f-20&linkId=508b80c5f61935cee690c0e883386653&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl This week on the show I travel to Columbus, Ohio and sit down with Chris Davison who is the head brewer at Wolf's Ridge Brewing company. I am also joined by Shawn White from Nostalgia Brewing who is taking the co-host role for the week. During the news and views segment we discuss Alternative energy sources and how that can have an impact on breweries. During the interview with Chris we get to learn about all of the cool things that Wolf's Ridge is doing and of course we get to enjoy some of the most delicious beers that Columbus has to offer. Please consider becoming a member of the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are four tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and once every month you will be invited to a one-hour Q&A session on Facebook in which you can ask them anything you want about craft beer and the industry. In the very near future patrons will gain access to exclusive content that no one else is going to hear. Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the newly renovated BOS swag store. I have added several new colors and styles of Tees and Hoodies. Make sure to follow Wolf's Ridge Brewing Company on IG IG at @wolfridgesbrewing and on Facebook @wolfsridgebrew. You can also head over to their website at http://wolfsridgebrewing.com Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks Also check out our friends at Nostalgia Brewing Company on IG and FB at @nostalgiabrewing and check them out on the web at https://www.nostalgiabrewing.com/ Check out our other sponsors: Blue Cooler  - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.

Garza Podcast
43: Kyle Anderson | BRAND OF SACRIFICE

Garza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 73:17


Kyle Anderson is the singer for deathcore band Brand of Sacrifice. We talk about getting ther Summer Slaughter tour. Anime, manga influence on BOS and much more! SPONSORS: distrokid.com/vip/garza 30% OFF! emgpickups.com Promo Code: Heavy 15% OFF! 00:00 - Intro 00:55 - Summer Slaughter tour w Cattle Decapitation, Carnifex & The Faceless 04:17 - Forming Brand of Sacrifice 07:40 - Going viral on Facebook & memes w Eclipse 10:55 - Job for a Cowboy 15:00 - Deathcore going electronic & classic 21:00 - On new BOS & listening to In flames & The Acacia Strain 23:30 - Flying to practice 24:30 - Writing & recording process at home 31:45 - Lifeblood 34:20 - Anime, Manga, Berserk and Japanese influence on BOS 44:10 - Deathcore going worldwide & addiction to cat videos on Instagram 52:20 - Smoking weed & conspiracies 56:00 - Grinding while being lazy 59:35 - Writers block w deadlinesm 01:07:00 - Fly in shows & hearing loss

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast
ITP 18 - Late Summer Closer Changes

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 68:30


Jake and Rick break down the latest closer news and all the changes to the closer depth charts.   Timestamps: (2:00): 3 Up- Félix Bautista, Tanner Scott, Kyle Finnegan (9:20): 3 Down (not "down", but out)- Josh Hader, Craig Kimbrel, Rowan Wick (18:30): News/Closer Changes- SD, PHI, HOU, LAD, NYY, CHC, OAK, TB, CIN, BOS, TEX (1:00:00): W2W4Get PL+ and join our Discord: https://pitcherlist.com/plus