Podcast appearances and mentions of David Attenborough

British broadcaster and naturalist

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Best podcasts about David Attenborough

Latest podcast episodes about David Attenborough

Building Great Sales Teams
Ravi Rajani: Ditch Feature Telling for Story Selling

Building Great Sales Teams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 53:41


Does storytelling work in sales? If not, why? If yes how do you use it effectively? Our guest today is Ravi Rajani, Founder at Ravi Rajani Consulting & Host of The Influential Communicator Podcast. Ravi's exportise is in generating sales through the use of storytelling.Ravi is a sales and communication expert who helps B2B sales teams ditch the pitch and become better communicators so they can get their solution in the hands of those who need it the most. His journey to this career began in 1997, when his family took a trip to Tanzania and he first picked up a camcorder and began narrating their safari in his best David Attenborough voice. From that moment on, he was hooked on performing and feeling invincible on stage. Despite not having the grades for a career in medicine or law, Ravi excelled in the world of theatre as a teenager.After business school in London, Ravi had a successful career on the trading floor, but eventually felt drained and out of alignment. In August 2016, he decided to press eject and went on a journey to remove his mask and reclaim his story. Through a variety of experiences, including TV, speaking, coaching, and building sales teams in the world of early stage startups, Ravi realized that success and failure in sales is dependent on one's ability to communicate their value, story, and solution in a memorable way.Ravi now helps others capture their customer's attention, build trust, and sell more with story. He currently lives just outside of London with his wife Sophie, daughter Zara, and dog Nellie.We regularly talk about selling the way people want to buy.  In that training we highlight 4 distinctly different buyer profiles. However, Ravi takes that information and breaks down how he would approach those people and still get to the story that people are more likely to base their buying motives off of.Sit back and enjoy this unvarnished heart-to-heart with two passionate people who just want to bring value to the people that they serve.Connect with Ravi 

Have You Herd About Animals?
Have You Herd About Puffer Fish?

Have You Herd About Animals?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 32:37


Hey there, Herders can you believe it's been one year already?! Crazy to think we started this on a whim and hoped people would listen. Thanks for being our fans. We absolutely cherish it.

The BreakPoint Podcast
Our Universe and My Father's World: When Nature Documentaries Want to Thank Someone

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 5:09


May we have the listening ears and the thankful hearts to acknowledge the Creator to which documentaries like Our Universe point, whether they admit it or not. 

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 313: Sonam Lama, Conservation Manager w/Red Panda Network

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 54:04


We are excited to kick off 2023 covering the Red Panda and the people out there fighting to save them. Sonam Lama is an absolute conservation hero! He is a recent Whitley Award Winner in 2022 in recognition for his hard work in conserving the Red Panda. The Whitley Fund for Nature is one of the world's leading organizations in helping and recognizing those out in the field doing the hard work to save some of our most endangered animals. Sonam is no exception! He was with the Red Panda Network from its inception. While he lives in Nepal, he has traveled the world to study and help these animals. An incredible interview to kick off the year! You can learn more about Sonam Lama by viewing his David Attenborough narrated vide HERE or by visiting HERE You can learn more about the Red Panda Network by visiting HERE You can learn more about the Whitley Fund for Nature by visiting HERE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Be Ye Lifted
1-1-2023 Frogs, Fugitives and Fulfillment

Be Ye Lifted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 19:01


What is the meaning of our hosannas to the newborn Jesus if we, at the same time, stand silent before the Herods of our day?Transcript:Part of the reason I wrote the Juniper Bog is that frogs get a bad rap in the bible. Frogs are mentioned in the bible a total of 15 times; 14 of those times they are literally, a plague. The 15th occurrence is in the Revelation 16:13 where unclean spirits are described as looking like frogs. And trust me, it's ugly. But during the pandemic, we watched Life in Color on Netflix. Narrated by David Attenborough, it is a documentary about the many ways animals use color in their lives, and frogs were the headlining act. And that got me thinking about how much we miss when we don't look beyond our initial impression of an animal or a person. Take fugitives for example. What's the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word, fugitive? Maybe it's Harrison Ford running from a literal trainwreck or hiding in a St. Patrick's Day parade. But chances are, the word fugitive, all by itself, has a negative connotation. We have laws that forbid concealing people from arrest, concealing an escaped prisoner, fleeing to avoid giving testimony or avoiding prosecution, and they are all detailed in the U.S. Code under the heading: Fugitives from Justice.But according to Webster, a fugitive is merely “running away or intending flight” and the first example given is, “a fugitive slave.” Which gives me pause. If someone is being harshly treated, abused, held against their will, and they escape, and run, ought we label them as a “fugitive?”Today's Gospel is often referred to as the Holy Family's flight to Egypt. Flight. They have fled Bethlehem as recommended by an angel, in a dream, to Joseph. They are fleeing because Herod has issued an edict that all baby boys under the age of two should be killed; his strategy? If Jesus was a baby boy, and all the baby boys were killed, surely Jesus, who threatened Herod, even as an infant, would be killed as well. To protect Jesus, Joseph takes Mary and Jesus and flees to Egypt. They were, by definition, fugitives. We tend to focus on the joyful reaction of angels and shepherds and magi to the birth of Jesus, but the truth is that Jesus birth so frightened grown men in power, that the plot to kill him began while he was still an infant. And this makes sense because when the Good News of Jesus Christ , including his birth, is proclaimed in the world, it brings fear and loathing to those whose lives are focused on the accumulation and maintenance of power.  And that brings me to fulfillment. Matthew views Jesus' escape to and return from Egypt as a fulfillment of Hosea 11:1, “Out of Egypt I called my son” (2:15). It also hearkens back to the first exodus, with Israel being identified as God's son. In verse 18 Matthew cites Jeremiah 31:15 to express the horror of Herod's slaughter of the innocents. We dare not imagine the blood-curdling screams and inconsolable sobbing throughout the region as little boys were mercilessly killed. Yet the use of this text signals a glimpse of hope. In Jeremiah's day, as the Israelites were taken into captivity, on leaving Jerusalem they would have passed by Ramah, a town six miles to the north, on the way to Babylon. Rachel, the beloved wife of Jacob and mother of Israel, wept over this national tragedy. If we continue on in Jeremiah 31, however, we will hear God's words of comfort, his new covenant with Israel, and his commitment to his people's salvation.  The third citation, “He will be called a Nazorean” (2:23), claims that Joseph's decision to settle his family in Nazareth was also prophetically anticipated. Oddly, these exact words cannot be found in the Hebrew Scriptures. Could this be why Matthew uses “through the prophets” in thSupport the show

The Hammerbarn Project
Happy New Near! (Whale Watching)

The Hammerbarn Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 41:29


Merry Merry NuNear listeners! It's a new year and you're STILL listening to us? What a cause for celebration – but not TOO much celebration. Cause thar be whale watching in the morning to do! To ring in the new year we re-open our InBarks to respond to you lovely people who took the time. In our nautical journey, we make a few discoveries: Greg is a ratbag, Natalie Portman is one Brenny's speed dial, and Pirates are somehow related to David Attenborough.  Is this the roughest we've ever seen Bandit and Chilli? Parent guilt is a real thing! Naomi's picks is back and we close it all out with a memorable outro – best one of 2023 so far!

Finding Annie
Changes Revisited: Caitlin Moran and Orla Doherty

Finding Annie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 24:22


Oceans and Porn - this boxing day we have a unique and intriguing offering for you courtesy of highlights from Orla Doherty and Caitlin Moran. Orla Doherty is a TV producer and environmentalist making change through deep sea filming. Orla produced ‘the Deep' episode and the finale of Blue Planet II with David Attenborough. We revisit her Changes episode as she describes in precise detail the magic of diving and filming in the deep ocean. It's as if you are there. A perfect escape. Caitlin Moran is a gear change but that's what we're here for after all. A journalist, author and broadcaster, one of the nation's favourites, Caitlin is known for not holding back. This highlight is no exception, prepare for porn chat and maybe one day, porn to change the world. Full episodes here: Orla Dohertyhttps://podfollow.com/changeswithanniemacmanus/episode/73154a0e981aaeea323f5c71eae4aa5e5387c47d/view Caitlin Moranhttps://podfollow.com/changeswithanniemacmanus/episode/3e730ec6830f51a1daabd7e9cb1cf21e4b5a6715/view Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Review It Yourself
Elusive: Bigfoot Abroad (2020) with Sarah from 'Weird Horizon'

Review It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 65:51


Merry Christmas Eve Eve! Sarah from Weird Horizon returns to listen to Sean choke on a bacon sandwich. Elusive: Britain's Cryptids-Available on YouTube under the title 'Elusive Bigfoot Abroad' (2020). This documentary explores Bigfoot sightings in Britain. Discussion Points: -Being from England, Sean and Sarah obviously start their catch-up by talking about the weather. -Sarah and Sean both fell asleep whilst watching this documentary-but this is not an indictment of the film, but the weather. -This has already happened in history two species of hominids have co-existed. -The seeming-balanced viewpoint of the film with regards to whether these creatures could actually exist. -Most people don't go off the beaten track. -How we are taught not to explore forests. -Trunk or treat. -The human needs for answers. Raised Questions: -What are Cryptids? -Did the myth of the Kraken come from real-life giant squids? -What's the word for the big animal family tree? -Can you be biased when someone speaks with your accent? -Have you ever seen a wild deer? -Have you ever got lost in a forest like Sarah? -Is Sean a hussy for American podcasters? -Has conspiracy become a bit of a dirty word? Quote of the episode: "We're basically living on the crust of a big sponge"- Sarah rivals David Attenborough. Guest Info: Sarah has "Discussions on the spooky and the esoteric, the counter-cultural and the just plain weird."-Her words. Her voice is so calming, I'm trying to talk her into doing a 'Help you to sleep' podcast. LISTEN HERE: Weird Horizon • A podcast on Anchor Review It Yourself now has a Patreon! Show your support for the show! Choose from TWO memberships: -MCU It Yourself: The Marvel Series will continue as a Patron Exclusive Series! Sean has to watch every Marvel film until the bitter end... + other benefits. -Visit It Yourself Behind the Scenes: +All the benefits of the 'MCU It Yourself' tier PLUS An even-more exclusive series, where Sean takes you behind the scenes of the Visit It Yourself Series! The Campaign for the North. The Visit It Yourself Video episodes will go out to everyone, but only Patrons will get the extended Behind the scenes podcast, filmed on location. Find Out More Here: Review It Yourself is creating Podcast | Patreon TWITTER: Review It Yourself

The Radio Times Podcast
Smart TV Episode 38 - Christmas Crackers

The Radio Times Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 34:30


Kelly-Anne Taylor and David Butcher gather around the Christmas tree to discuss their TV highlights for the holidays. They run through some classy dramas, heart-warming comedies and a festive helping of David Attenborough. Plus, as always, they pick one show you can safely avoid.For more, pick up a copy of our Radio Times Christmas double-issue. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Why Did Peter Sink?
The Gate of God (part 11)

Why Did Peter Sink?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 29:53


The reason I found it impossible to understand anything in the Bible when I was fallen away is because of one simple fact: I did not really believe in God. Once I had re-admitted that God was real, I still did not really believe in spirits. This blocks all understanding of what Jesus is up to, in nearly every interaction that he has. It's not surprising people get nothing out of the Bible today, since our Present Bias considers spirits to be the mere superstitions of uneducated fools. Our long march through the Enlightenment left our souls behind, and now we have to turn the bus around to go back and retrieve the other half of our selves. Notice that whenever Jesus heals someone, he cures by removing something and/or making something whole. He often drives out a spirit. And spirits are everywhere in the Gospel. They seem to not only rule the nations, but they overtake people. A general observation of mental health in today's world suggests that little has changed since the time of Jesus. These healings happen without full explanation, but there is clearly something spiritual at work, something supernatural. Let's run down the list:Jesus drives out a spirit in Capernaum, he drives spirits into a herd of pigs, he heals a demon-possessed child, he heals a boy with an “unclean” spirit. That's just for starters. He re-infuses the spirit into dead people, re-animating them. He does this to Lazarus, Jairus' daughter, and a widow's son; garden-variety miracles of resurrection for Jesus, not the Resurrection that Jesus does to himself that conquers death. Next, consider the numerous healings of blindness and deafness. There are seven of these alone. Plus, he heals deformities, skin diseases, and even paralysis. Then there are the mystery illnesses that, like Peter's mother-in-law who has a fever, the chronically ill woman in the crowd, the many healings at Gennesaret, the dropsy cure on the Sabbath, and the healing of the official's son in Galilee. None of these medical cures require a scalpel or a prescription. He even re-attaches an ear in a split second without any plastic surgeon in sight (or proof of insurance). Without understanding that Jesus came to a spirit-filled world, how can you possibly understand or relate to anything in the Bible? I don't think you can, because the awareness of God, spirits, angels, and demons is fundamental. In our disenchanted scientific model, we don't live in the best of all possible worlds, we live in the boringest of all possible worlds. No wonder every libertine becomes so dull as they age and end up looking botoxically ridiculous in their luxury cars. Our scientific obsession has sliced our ability to understand scripture by shifting our thoughts into a pancake-flat rationalism, into “nature” alone, ripped clean away from the spiritual life. We've lost a whole dimension of understanding by cancelling our souls and God. The funny thing is that cancel culture cannot cancel what is true, and God and souls are real. We can hear them knocking on the culture now, quite loudly, while we put our fingers in our ears and try to talk over it. Oddly, in our collective transition from beings with body and soul into just a body and mind, we have become less and less connected to nature. This may be the greatest irony of all: in our obsession with nature as the answer to all things, we have moved further and further from the woods. We believe nature is the only thing that is real, but in our actual lives we mostly experience nature on TV, not outdoors. And if we do finally get outdoors, we make sure to bring plenty of hand sanitizer in order to quickly makes ourselves clean again. You can't make this stuff up. I think the ancient Israelite cleanliness rituals have nothing on today's materialist germophobes. Covid protocols doubled the fear for those already afflicted. The bright side of Covid is that people started to realize that nature must be experienced, not merely narrated by David Attenborough. The exodus from cities and throngs of people cramming into National Parks attest to the fact that a change in mood about those “flyover states” and rural living is happening. There is a transition happening as the candle of the Enlightenment has begun to flare out, particularly as its pursuit of “truth” through pure materialism and liberalism has led us directly into postmodernism, the poster-child of relativism and antithesis of truth. Let's briefly revisit the pre-Enlightenment era, known as the the Dark Ages. First, you need an Enlightenment propaganda decoder ring. It's pretty simple: Christendom = Dark = Evil.Modernity = Light = Good. The name alone, Enlightenment, broadcasts the propaganda as much as “woke” implies that the pre-woke world was “sleep.” We have the same game being played out again and again. Marx tried to do a takedown of the bourgeoisie, with his villain as Christianity and the class system. In the Enlightenment, the enemy was the same: Christendom. In the latest manifestation of Marxism, guess who is the enemy? Christianity. The long-term Nazi plan was to stamp out Christianity. Is anyone yawning yet? We can keep going if needed, all the way back to Julian the Apostate to Marcus Aurelius to Nero. The common enemy of worldly power is Christianity, always. And guess who remains after all of these ideologies flame out? Jesus. I've heard people say, “We are finally getting out from Christianity and the patriarchy.” Today men, and white men in particular, are the enemy. It's hard to tell these true believers that, no, you are not, because Jesus is the ruler of this world. The misapplication of the doctrine of original sin happens ad nauseam, as the underdog and the oppressor fable plays out. This is why we cannot get to the Kingdom of God, because the whispers of the evil one keeps this loop of pride happening. If we consider the era of the Enlightenment, which is now being replaced, we can track the language of “Dark Ages” rather easily, all the way back to Petrarch in the 1300s, but the label really took off with the French Revolution. See, people were not free until they rejected God. Here's another clue for your decoder ring. Freedom = Rejection of God. That's how the story goes. Ignorance and error only comes with obedience to God, or so we're told, and given that we want to taste all the flowers of life, we are easily sold. But that story is always a lie. It's the wrong kind of freedom. People find this out in their own falls and redemption just as nations do. Repeatedly. Israel itself found this out the hard way, repeatedly, until it finally was kicked out of the promised land entirely for 1900 years. Choosing the freedom of the self versus the freedom of obedience to God takes you down very different paths. This is the story of the decline of Christian values in the west. Taking the easier path is the lesson of Lot going to live in Sodom instead of taking the less arable land that Abraham chose. In our current state, we constantly choose the easier path, and have done so with massive encouragement from writers and media, from the Renaissance era right up to the iPhone today. The perceived gains in efficiency and leisure come with a cost. It's been long observed by writers like Neil Postman that we are Amusing Ourselves to Death. But not only does entertainment take our eye off the road of life, it breaks our connection to nature entirely, to the point that people become disconnected from even the sources of food that we eat. During the “Dark Ages,” we lived in far greater connection with nature. When we had no radios or phones, when we shivered near wood stoves, when we lived near animals, near the woods, near pastures, we had a far better idea of “spirits” than we do today. I suspect it was far easier to talk about spirits when you could hear the blizzard whipping at night outside the hut, or even the castle, than it is today where we watch TV in our Snuggie in front of the gas fireplace amid the humming white noise of forced air furnace heat and walled within airtight spray-in insulation and drywall. No, they did not have hot tubs or cold beer or vibrators, but they had something much greater, and that was a spiritual sense of life. The many advances that came through engineering and science proclaimed that unending progress in technology would bring freedom. Now, I don't want to experience a Minnesota winter without a forced-air furnace if I don't have to, but a furnace does not bring salvation, and faced with the choice of losing God or losing my furnace, I would choose to remain with God, and ideally, I pray, avoid living in the eternal furnace. My point is that people were far more in touch with nature and its awesome power, and likewise were more connected to the world of ghosts. We don't experience either now, as we lean over Chromebooks and live out the myth of Narcissus, staring into the mirror of a screen. Unless the storm breaks into our lives somehow, we don't get to recognize our weakness and need for something greater than ourselves. And God still does find a way to invade our lives, it just takes longer than it did in the “Dark Ages.” God still has a way of breaking in to our world, even with all of our engineered comfort. A storm can strike even while you lay on the couch and the sun is shining outside. Jesus climbs into our boat, invading us with Grace. How you react to it will be the climactic moment of your life. Never coercive, God lets us choose, and we do. One way or another, we say yes or no to God, whether we think we have or not. Many people today say, “Nature is my church,” and I know why. Those who spend time in the woods sense something out there, something awesome. You don't need a sequoia tree to appreciate the awesomeness of nature. A sapling will do. An acorn or a pine cone will do. You can spend time in amazement looking at a blade of grass if you hold it close enough. My point is that we do not experience nature reading papers in the journal Nature. Knowing how nature works is not an experience of nature. We experience the awe of nature by participating in nature, being out in nature. Being able to summon from memory the Latin names of plants is not experiencing nature, it is bottling nature for our consumption. A child jumping in a pile of leaves understands nature far better than a naturalist collecting beetles in jars. There is more nature experienced in slapping a single mosquito around a campfire than reading an entire book on microbiology in a library. This is exactly how the prayer life works as well. It's how speaking a foreign language works, or playing a musical instrument. You don't experience things from books, you experience things by participating. I have a book about the science of swimming, but I don't take it with me swimming. The reason people feel churchy in nature is because they are no longer watching Planet Earth on the discovery channel, they are discovering earth and creation itself. When we disconnect from cities, books, screens, traffic, noise, ego-dramas, TV shows, and every other pornish eye candy we have invented, something incredible happens. We become more whole. When we become whole we become more spiritual, because we are both body and soul, and whenever we deny the soul we becomes less human. We become only half of the image and likeness of God when we downplay the soul. Whenever I am on a hiking trail and come across someone blasting music on his smart phone, I say to myself, sarcastically, “You know what this walk in the woods is missing? Top 40 music. Thank you, Justin Beiber. You've made it complete.” The silence of the woods - the bird songs and the babbling streams - recalibrates the soul to the tune of God. Bieber does not do that. By no coincidence, fairy tales mostly occur in the woods, since that is where spirits are felt. Being in nature re-enchants us, giving us a sense of the spiritual. We feel whole in the woods, and thereby a sense of holiness. Here's a hint: these two words are related. The reason the woods doesn't need Justin Bieber is because it is already complete by itself. What people find in the woods is creation, and like God when he finished making it, we all can see: “It is good.” Even if we come across death in the woods, of plants or insects or animals, we can see the circle of life without the need for Elton John to sing about it. Like the woods, we feel more whole because a spiritual presence can be felt, and it can be stifled and ruined by simply pulling out your iPhone to take a selfie. Gadgets and phones in the woods is the guaranteed way to lose the wholeness, because they have all the temptations of the city, the world, and the nations. All the falls of man are present in the phone, so that every time you place a screen before your nose, you are less whole. This is because the self gets in the way of the soul. The mind is meant to connect body and soul, but the mind becomes the self, and even the word “Selfie” gives away the essence of the problem. We can even sense that our bodies are good in nature. I don't think a hiker looking at a grove of trees is likely to think, “I need to lose weight” or “I should inject botox into my face this week.” But if they are taking selfies, holding up the mirror to their face, those ideas leap to the forefront of the mind. Or maybe I'm wrong. Carrying a mirror of our thoughts everywhere we go doesn't give us connectedness, it reduces our wholeness. In the woods, the wholeness seeps in, the joy of something profoundly close touches you in the brush of a fern, while the sense of something higher and unreachable calls out to your soul. This is the paradox of the transcendent (farness) and the immanent (nearness) nature of God. The reason nature feels spiritual is because God made it, and he made you. Of course it feels spiritual. In the woods, you are closer to home than ever. When out among creation, you are reminded of your own creation. The spirits identified by the ancients are still in the woods. They are still everywhere but we ignore them, walled in by the sound and light produced by artificial gadgets. Distraction is the best angle the devil has to make us forget not only God, but to make us forget the devil, too. He is counting on us doing that, and every time your reach for a device, he is rubbing his hands in lieu of taking your soul on the last day. Through our obedience to science we have decided angels and devils are too childish to accept. Those ideas were for the primitive minds of people before the year 1500. Those ideas are for the fearful, we think. Surely, we are more sophisticated. Our sophistication is our paper shield against all superstition. Hence the need for cartoon Tinkerbells, Caspars, and red devils. It assures us that there is nothing to fear. But there is something to fear, and we all know it, and it's called death. The whole reason for the walls we build is to push that fear aside, down the line, away from our present. Our society reviles death to the point that open casket funerals are nearly a thing of the past. No one wants to see a body. A neat cremation is preferred - it's cleaner - much like our dinosaur chicken nuggets that bear no resemblance to the once-living chicken. This is the irony of our alleged sophistication. It isolates us the realities of life and death. We openly mock those whose lives still occupy the spaces of nature. The hillbilly with his trout, the hunter that we call savage, and the farmer who delivers piglets all have a far closer relationship to nature than the billions who live in cities. We mock what we fear. Having had a chance to work on farms, I have noticed that those who live among palpable nature, with daily chores that involve blood and manure, who see life and death as daily occurrences, have an understanding of things that books can never provide. This is why I turn the volume down whenever someone from Silicon Valley offers instructions for living. I have gained more in five minutes watching a calf being born, delivered by a farmer with an eighth grade education, than I have ever gained from one hundred hours of human resource training videos on how I should think. The birth of a calf, let alone a human being, is watching a sacred miracle of life bursting forth. Watching an HR training video is a mandatory brain-death march at the bayonet of my paycheck. The spiritual flatness we have allowed into our lives is stunningly obvious to an increasing number of people, but the pleasure of making money lures and keeps us in this trap. I was nudged, even coached into the office life, despite the movements of my heart telling me from my very first hour in a cubicle: “This is a birdcage. Escape now!” The language of Babel kept me there. After all, I speak Babel. “God helps those who help themselves.” “Get rich or die trying.” This wall against the possibility of spirits is built and shored up with mockery as mortar. We've forgotten that spirits can pass through walls. Disney is freezing spirits in time every time they portray another fairy tale. By bringing fairies to the screen, fairies becomes less believable. Science has decided what is reasonable to believe and Disney has killed our imagination. Disney is in the business of turning imagination into a science, even calling their engineers, “Imagineers.” They are quantifying and qualifying the intangible. Cinderella was once a fairy tale for each of us to imagine, and now she is cast into a single image, in her blue dress, as if her image was hammered onto a stone tablet in Orlando. Science and Disney have denied the spirits by reducing them to engineered cartoons. In the former we downplay it, and in the latter we play it up as quaint fantasy. So I've taken a huge detour into the woods here, but now let's bring it back to the desert, to Jesus and that third temptation. Jesus has three temptations in the desert, and in Genesis there are three falls: Adam, Cain, and Babel. (Again, I'm skipping the Nephilim story in chapter 6 of Genesis. There is a fall there as well, but I'll stick with Adam, Cain, and Babel, or this series will never end). In all three falls, spirits are involved. In all three temptations of Christ, spirits are involved. The falls all occur due to our failure to accept God. In all three falls, humility before God is lacking. Pride reigns. Pride cometh before the fall. The whole Bible is about mastering yourself by tamping down pride. To keep from being deceived, we have to ignore the questioning whisper that suggests to you that God is lying, that he is not real. To keep sin from pouncing on you, like Cain, we have to mash our pride into a slurry and send it down the disposal. To keep from trying to manipulate God, we must offer him gratitude and praise, not sacrifices for a transaction. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit whydidpetersink.substack.com

Having a GAS...
Having a GAS with... Alex Grieve & Helen Rhodes

Having a GAS...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 54:23


Alex Grieve is the Global and London CCO of BBH. Helen Rhodes is Executive Creative Director. They both join host Greg to discuss all things creative. After 12 years Alex returned to his alma mater as Global & London Chief Creative Officer of BBH. Prior to that Alex was Chief Creative Officer at AMV BBDO where for the last three years he's been ranked the No.1 CCO in the UK by WARC & The Drum. He's also been ranked the No.1 Creative Director in the world at the Cannes Lions. In 2021 AMV BBDO achieved an industry first by winning 'The Treble': Global Agency of the Year at Cannes, D&AD and The One Show. Under his leadership, AMV has won over 30 Agency of the Year awards at regional and international shows. And won 10 Cannes Grand Prixs including Titanium & Glass Grand Prix. 3 D&AD Black Pencils in consecutive years. 2 'Commercial of the Year' at British Arrows and multiple Grand Prixs at One Show (6 in 2021 alone), Clios, Andys to name but a few. After a couple of years at the BBC's in-house creative agency, Helen Rhodes is returning to advertising to take up the role of executive creative director at Bartle Bogle Hegarty. At the BBC, as well as creating big campaigns like “Bringing Us Closer” during the pandemic, she worked on less traditional projects like an immersive online exhibition for “I May Destroy You,” a Dracula special build that got creepier as darkness fell, setting posters on fire for David Attenborough's “Perfect Planet,” and an educational film series around Steve McQeen's “Small Axe” series. Rhodes was previously at Wieden+Kennedy Portland, TBWA, Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R and DLKW/Lowe

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit
Besprechung - David Attenborough: Der lebendige Planet – Wie alles mit allem vernetzt ist

hr2 Hörbuch Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 8:43


David Attenborough: Der lebendige Planet - Wie alles mit allem vernetzt ist | Gelesen von Alexander Bandilla | 3 mp3-CD, 11 Std. 43 Min. | 22,99 € (UVP) | USM Audio ||

The Naked Scientists Podcast
8 billion: an overpopulation crisis?

The Naked Scientists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 30:31


Last month, we were told, the 8 billionth person was added to Earth's human population. But despite many acknowledging that some of the biggest threats facing us and the planet, like climate change - stem from our impact on world, and the more of us there are, the worse those threats will be, the topic of population is mysteriously absent from the dialogue at major international fora, like the recent COP27 meeting in Egypt. Surely "living sustainably" must include, as David Attenborough puts it, not over-running the planet and destroying it in the process?So how many people can, or should the... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
Gender-Empowered Climate Finance and Financial Feminism

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 36:52


Devin: What is your superpower?Miah: I genuinely think my superpower is humility and patience. My superpower now is that I've lived a life trying to uplift other people—my children, my business colleagues, the people in my community. My superpower is telling stories that are driven by experience and by data. But are told in really interesting ways from a place of humility and a place of genuine sincerity in trying to help be part of the solution.“The first thing that I want to say is that I'm by far and away not the only woman on the planet who is working in the space,” says Miah Shull Olmsted of her role in gender-empowered climate finance and financial feminism. “There are an extraordinary number of really bright, articulate, excited, enthusiastic women who are working on this.”Gender-Empowered Climate FinanceA crucial part of Miah's approach to investing is playing the long game. “I'm very happy to be a part of planting saplings in a wide variety of places where the right tree is planted in the right soil with the right conditions and the right caretakers present to help it grow. So I think that that might speak to how I feel about financing.”“For me now, what I think about in my investing thesis and in my strategy is I'm investing in the things that I hope will come into bloom when my granddaughter needs that,” Miah says. “Whether she needs that solution, whether she needs that product, or whether she needs the return on that investment, that's my hope. And my granddaughter, by the way, just turned one.”Miah explains her focus on investing in women:The statistics bear out that when you invest in women, women immediately return the bulk of what has been invested in them as an individual, in their education, in their business, that they're starting up as a fledgling enterprise. They immediately turn around and share that with their families, with their extended communities, with their region. And those circles overlap each other so that you get an extraordinarily powerful synergistic effect.Miah rattles off statistics from memory:* You have, on average, at least a 68 percent higher rate of return when you have a mixed [gender] leadership team.* The data shows that more women are creating businesses than men right now.* The data shows that 92% of women entrepreneurs are solopreneurs.Regarding the last point, she says, “If given the resources that they needed to be able to grow their businesses, we would be able to significantly increase the GDP in most countries.”In the context of difficult times, Miah notes a lack of hope. “If you want to talk about really embracing the idea of women and climate finance, what you have to do is take that step forward to believe.”Financial Feminism“When I went to apply to go to college, I still had to ask my father to cosign on a savings account, a checking account, and a loan for college because it was against the law for me to be able to access the money that I had been earning since the age of 15 in order to be able to go to college myself,” Miah says, providing context for her thoughts on financial feminism.“Financial feminism is about giving yourself permission to put some of the old forms of learning that you got predominantly from a male point of view and opening up your worldview to include the views that come from women, that are about women, that are for women,” she says.She isn't focused on biology. Men can learn from women. Members of the trans community are also a part of her view of feminism. “In the indigenous community, they are called two-spirited people for a reason. I think we could all embrace a little bit more of the two-spiritedness in ourselves by understanding what the world is like from a ‘his' point of view or a ‘her' point of view and a ‘they' point of view.”“Financial feminism is about embracing nurturing, about embracing growth, about embracing community,” Miah adds.She continues, “When you approach it from an attitude of curiosity that opens you up to entire new worlds in which you can explore, ‘How do I use money as only one tool in my toolbox for making the world a better place?' For me, that's what financial feminism is about.”At this intersection of community building and financial feminism, Miah has found a home in angel networks focused on investing in women. “It's focused around networks that are teaching people how to be better investors, absolutely making sure that in those rooms they have the ideas and the lived experiences and the contributions of women because women know what they're talking about in the same way that men know what they're talking about.”In all her work, Miah employs superpowers centered around humility.How to Develop Humility As a SuperpowerBuilding your humility is not about stepping back, Miah says. “It's important that we are humble but that we don't play small.”Humility is about seeing other people and developing empathy. “I am a person who genuinely, genuinely likes other people, and I really want to know who they are. And that comes from a place of—‘Tell me about yourself. Tell me about who you are. Tell me about what you're doing.' And then my next question is almost always, ‘What can I do next to help?'”That focus on others combined with empathy and a genuine desire to help essentially defines her sense of humility. “You walk into a garden. You're trying to talk to somebody. They're digging. You get down on your knees and start digging with them.”Miah started a business with her spouse and another couple after drafting a business plan on two napkins over barbecue with ten kids running around. Years later, they sold the company for enough to send all ten kids to college without student loans.Rather than strike out immediately as an expert entrepreneur coaching and lecturing others, she pivoted, starting as a novice at diving. After a decade and 5,700 hours underwater, she's become an accomplished diver and instructor.She shared what's come of that:I've been part of film crews, research crews, technical diving crews taught around the world, spent a huge amount of time as part of the contributing underwater cinematographers for projects like Chasing Coral, which is on Netflix right now, for submitted footage for David Attenborough documentaries, been a part of really, really interesting conversations about manta rays, about the preservation of specific coral species, about the preservation of sea turtles. All of that I was able to do because I did not brag or present myself as “better than.” I always presented myself as, “Tell me about what you're doing. Oh my gosh, that's so cool.”Humility pairs well with curiosity, she says. “I'm not saying I know it all, but I'm definitely saying I know a little bit about a lot of different things because I try hard in my life to stay curious and humble.”One part of humility is being willing to acknowledge that you need help and ask for it. A second part, equally important, is then being able to receive the support that is offered. Miah shared a story to illustrate this:Vicki [Saunders] told me a great story one time where she said that she was in a room with a lot of folks and someone stood up and you could see how brave, how incredibly hard it had been for them to stand up and ask for help for something. You could see they were shaking when they sat back down and they immediately looked down. But she said that a third of the room raised their hand, shot their hand up with an offer of help, and the person didn't see it. And she said, “Hey, hey, hey. Asking for help is only the first part of the journey. The second part of the journey is being humble enough to receive the help.”If you follow Miah's example and advice, you can make humility a superpower that enables you to do more good in the world. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

Seize the Yay
Martin Cohen // Polar play, passion projects and PENGUINOLOGY

Seize the Yay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 31:50


Beautiful people, I am finally back from the great white continent and am genuinely speechless. The yay involved with every moment in Antarctica was absolutely indescribable!!!  Although, as per usual, when I say “there are no words” I follow with a million words so you'll be getting bombarded with reflections and feelings in due course - I'm sitting down with Ang this week to unload and that will be coming your way very soon. Thank you so much for your patience by the way during the repeated breaks we've had this year to allow for travel and chaos and the general rollercoaster now turned polar-coaster of this year!  To keep you going in the meantime, I was so lucky to interview many of the incredible Intrepid crew and passengers on the Ocean Endeavour during our travels and will compile all the audio eventually - there were so many fascinating pathways that expanded my mind over and over. But I recorded one very special full episode with someone whose story made me tear up and whose passion project I am desperate to share as far and wide as possible. I gravitated towards Martin Cohen immediately because, if anyone on board qualified as the team penguinologist, it's him (although his expertise is much broader as an overall wildlife biologist - and yes, he's had drinks with one David Attenborough in his time). But as time went on, I also heard the most heartwarming and heart wrenching story behind the scenes and I hope you are as moved as I was.  I won't give you any hints as it's so much more beautiful told by Martin himself, but I WILL include links below so you can support the beautiful project he's embarked on that you'll hear all about. I'm sure many of you will be as passionate as I have become about helping him spread the word and hope the yayborhood can get behind him. Excuse the background noise the ship was pretty loud but it gives you a taste of the adventure.. Ladies and gentleman, Martin Cohen….  GET YOUR COPY OF PADDY O MELON HERE + Announcements on Insta at @spoonful_of_sarah + Join our Facebook community here + Subscribe to not miss out on the next instalment of YAY!

Journal of Biophilic Design
Nature on Film - From David Attenborough and the BBC to Termite Mounds!

Journal of Biophilic Design

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 39:53


Biophilia is more than plants, light and air, it's also about surrounding ourselves with living beings and our living natural world. If we think about it, E.O.Wilson's seminal book, Biophilia celebrates all aspects of our living planet and is a call for that direct connection with nature. Wilson's book examines our inherent connection to living species, the fascination of life, and how other living societal systems can inform our own. In fact, his lifelong interest in ant colonies emphasises this. Creating those moments of intimacy with nature has a really important place in our modern world where there is a disconnect with getting out there. In this wonderful podcast, we speak with Michael Potts, who has spent more than 30 years as a wildlife cameraman, mostly for the BBC in more than 50 countries worldwide on major series including working alongside David Attenborough filming Life of Birds, The Life of Mammals and many programmes in the Natural World series. We discuss the importance of nature connection, why we need to introduce and educate the next generation, and also how audio-visual connection to nature through our TVs and devices is a positive thing and how we could take this one step further and introduce it into our built environment. “If you see something and understand it, then you care about it, then you might do something to protect it and encourage other people to do the same.” The messaging, inspiration and education you experience through wildlife films inspire people, and footage of birds in flight for instance has a calming effect as well. Michael regales us with tales of animals, where he has filmed birds of paradise in New Guinea, Grizzly bears in Alaska, Termites in Namibia, Caribou migration, Polar Bears and more. He has spent many hours, up close and personal, feeling the heartbeat of a bird as it sits in his hand, feeling the strength of it, studying the intricacies of plumage which adapted to that way of life, their piercing eyes, incisive bills which continue to fascinate him: “every species is so special, they are all so different, so supremely adapted to where they live.” He has also seen so many changes, reduced habitats for farming birds for instance where prairie-style farming is destroying land and habitats. We can do more to improve the habitats of birds and animals, and the built environment, cities, towns and communities can do much to change how we build and design our communities. Biomimicry is one aspect of nature understanding that has a positive impact on our built environment, he mentions filming Termite mounds, huge, 12-15 feet high, made from mud, clay and sand. “They have incredible internal temperature control systems. It is +40 centigrade during the day, but to near freezing at night, but with a system of chambers and ducts, the termites maintain constant temperatures inside the mound to within 2 degrees.” This was for a study by Loughborough University which were using the knowledge garnered from the filming to use the design as an example for cooling systems in modern buildings. Nature provides us with so many answers, if we have eyes to see. Michael has a fascinating book out “Untangling the Knot, Belugas and Bears: My Natural World on Film” which you can buy directly from all good booksellers, and also directly through Michael, contact him via his website:http://michaelpottsphotography.comHe will also be at The Global Bird Fair in July 2023 https://globalbirdfair.orgDid you know our NEW printed and eBook journal is out now https://journalofbiophilicdesign.com/journal-of-biophilic-design-1 Please register for our newsletter https://mailchi.mp/4001fc945c4f/untitled-page and view previous podcasts with images here too: https://journalofbiophilicdesign.com/podcasts-journal-of-biophilic-design.Credits: with thanks to George Harvey Audio Production for the calming biophilic soundscape that backs all our podcasts. Did you know our podcast is also on Audible, Amazon Music, Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Stitcher, vurbl, podbay, podtail, and most if not all the RSS feeds?Facebook https://www.facebook.com/journalofbiophilicdesign/Twitter https://twitter.com/JofBiophilicDsnLinkedIn. https://www.linkedin.com/company/journalofbiophilicdesign/Instagram https://www.instagram.com/journalofbiophilicdesign

A Weird Time Recorded
David Attenborough

A Weird Time Recorded

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 76:13


David Attenborough by Jarrod Moxley & Matt Morris

A Weird Time Recorded
Welp.....David Attenborough!

A Weird Time Recorded

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 3:02


Welp.....David Attenborough! by Jarrod Moxley & Matt Morris

Life or a Level
Chapter 87 - David Attenborough

Life or a Level

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 44:04


Beyond the rubble we can see the lesser-hair Northerner. One of the slower members of the hominid family, but nonetheless, quite remarkable. If you don't like David Attenborough, that's not David Attenborough's fault. Here we take a dive into the unpolluted pool that is the national treasure himself, the king of the jungle, it's Richard Attenborough's baby brother, David. If you like him too, let us know on show@bookofnowt.comSupport the show

Shakespeare and Company

How to Speak Whale is an investigation into the possibility, or otherwise, of human cetacean dialogue. It looks into the history of our relationship with these creatures—in some important ways so similar to us, in others, so profoundly different. It lays out our various attempts to interpret their song, and looks at how big data, combined with an open source philosophy might allow us to create a “Google Translate for animals”.It's also one man's quest to make sense of the particular, transcendent but terrifying moment, a humpback whale almost landed on top of him.Buy How to Speak Whale: https://www.shakespeareandcompany.com/product/6534146/mustill-tom-how-to-speak-whale*SUBSCRIBE NOW FOR BONUS EPISODESLooking for Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses? https://podfollow.com/sandcoulyssesIf you want to spend even more time at Shakespeare and Company, you can now subscribe for bonus episodes and access to complete chapters of Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses.Subscribe on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/sandcoSubscribe on Apple Podcasts here: https://podcasts.apple.com/fr/podcast/shakespeare-and-company-writers-books-and-paris/id1040121937?l=enAll money raised goes to supporting “Friends of Shakespeare and Company” the bookshop's non-profit, created to fund our noncommercial activities—from the upstairs reading library, to the writers-in-residence program, to our charitable collaborations, and our free events.*Tom Mustill studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge, before becoming a conservation biologist and then a wildlife filmmaker. His work with David Attenborough, Greta Thunberg, Stephen Fry and other conservation and science heroes across the globe have won over 30 international awards, including two Webbys, a Wildscreen Panda, two Jackson Wild Awards, as well as a Primetime Emmy nomination. He directed on the blockbuster Inside Nature's Giants' series which won a BAFTA, Royal Television Society and Broadcast award, as well as the ZSL Award for Communicating Zoology.Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel Feeding Time here: https://www.shakespeareandcompany.com/product/7209940/biles-adam-feeding-timeListen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1 Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Roaring Trainers
Episode 37: Wes Side Story

The Roaring Trainers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


The gardens of Hale Manor hold old friends and old enemies alike for the gang's Pokémon. Let's see how they get on, David Attenborough style.Welcome special guest Aaron Willems, reprising his role as the great Wesley Hale (of the Celadon Hales)!www.twitter.com/roaringtrainerswww.patreon.com/roaringtrainerswww.etsy.com/shop/roaringtrainersSpecial thanks to the following for the use of their music:Poor Alexei for the use ofNostalgiaInteriorsFind more music by Poor Alexei here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Poor_AlexeiPlayer Two for the use ofKeep Sit RealFind more music by Player Two here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Player_Two/Receptors for the use ofDrill Baby DrillFind more music by Receptors here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Receptors/Rolemusic for the use ofThe Great MadejaDeath on the Battlefield Find more music by Rolemusic here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Rolemusic/Origami Repetika for the use of Medicine HeadFind more music by Origami Repetika here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Origami_Repetika/Covox for the use ofSwitchblade SquadronFind more music by Covox here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Covox/Chromix for the use of Dirt NapFind more music by Chromix here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Chromix/Lobo Loco for the use ofManhattan SkylineFind more music by Lobo Loco here!https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Lobo_Loco

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2183: How The Modern Milkman is Using Tech to Tackle Ocean Pollution

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 21:07


Simon Mellin and his friends founded Modern Milkman in 2018 to reduce waste while making sustainable choices convenient and accessible to all. Modern Milkman set out to tackle the problem of single-use plastic packaging and food waste to ultimately protect the environment by reinventing the milk round. In today's episode of Tech Talks Daily, Simon shares how his inspiration came after watching David Attenborough's 'Blue Planet' TV show and the global aim of cutting single-use plastics from ending up in the ocean in a trash area five times the size of France. I also learn more about how sustainability, supporting independent suppliers, farmers, and plastic waste reduction remain at the heart of his mission. But it's data and AI that make all this possible. We discuss how Modern Milkman uses technology to deliver on its mission and transform the consumer experience. I learn how critical it is for customers to have what they ordered on time and the key to execution is capturing all the data points and running live analytics on the data so that Modern Milkman can map deliveries and predict demand and order flows to ensure no waste. Simon also speaks about the role of ThoughtSpot as part of the Modern Milkman data story and how it powers both business growth as well as Modern Milkman's mission.

Dawn of an Era of Well-Being: The Podcast
In Memory of QEII with Anne Baring and Jude Currivan

Dawn of an Era of Well-Being: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 65:17


Welcome listeners to the debut episode of Season 2 of Dawn of an Era of Well-Being: The Podcast.On September 8 of 2022, Elizabeth II, Queen of the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms, passed away peacefully at her residence of Balmoral Castle, thus concluding the longest reign of any British Monarch, and one of the most elongated terms of any leader known to history. The funeral was a tremendous spectacle as British subjects poured to the streets while an estimated 4.1 billion people around the world tuned in to the televised ceremony, an astounding number by any stretch pf the imagination. The French President Emmanuel Macron summed it up in his statement to the people of Britain, “To you, she was your Queen. To us, she was The Queen.” Queen to the World, the death of Queen Elizabeth was very much a global event.In today's episode of Dawn of an Era of Well-Being our special guests, Anne Baring and Jude Currivan, share their reflections on Elizabeth's legacy in a candid and at times quite emotional discussion. We understand of course that the history of the British Empire is deeply problematic in many respects, but our focus here is on the single figure of Elizabeth and her contribution to a tradition that has found significance at a time when the Empire's twilight has already passed. We will primarily discuss Elizabeth as the embodiment of an archetype, a highly performative role that she used to unify and inspire people across the world with a sense of duty and service to a higher purpose. It was a performance that lasted over seventy years and witnessed the arrivals and departures of fifteen Prime Ministers, and it is not one that will be repeated any time soon, if ever.

Cinematic Underdogs
75. Hard Knocks: Training Camp w/ the Detroit Lions (2022)

Cinematic Underdogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 94:43


On the latest episode, we continue to explore the long-form format of docu-series by tackling HBO's Hard Knocks: Training Camp w/ the Detroit Lions. Sure, it's classifiable as Reality TV, but when it comes to getting an in-depth, behind-the-scenes, all-access look at the ins and outs of running a professional football team, you'd be hard-pressed to find a more illuminating source than the first and longest-running sports documentary series in TV history. Produced by NFL Films and narrated by Liev Schreiber (a tidbit neither of us were privy to during the recording and were both undeniably shocked to learn), the flashy series feels shackled by some of its dated/vestigial stylistic traditions. The narration, aping David Attenborough's Nat-Geo style of zoological/anthropological objectivism and wonder, feels oddly at ends with the subject matter - somewhat dehumanizing the players and team. Fortunately, the voice-over framing device is seldom applied, and outside of its gaucheness, the show shines. Detroit & its eternally underperforming, down-and-out Lions offer a riveting subject matter. The team/season is helmed by the imposing yet affable presence of Dan Campbell, and led by spirited personalities, including Jamaal Williams, who's passionate post-practice speech about the previous year's abysmal record went viral for good reason. Another standout is Aidan Hutchinson, the darling 1st round draft pick who knocks it out of the park with another viral bit: a spunky, training camp performance of MJ's "Billie Jean." What makes this season particularly riveting is the focus is largely on players on the cutting block still trying to make a name and earn legit, 6 or 7-figure paycheck. Instead of spending time with Swift and Goff, this pre-season look at the Lions details the ups and downs of those seeking the last spot on the depth chart - Craig Reynolds (the RB3, maybe RB4 with an older brother in jail), Obinna Eze (the Nigerian), Malcolm Rodriquez ("Rodrigo"), David Blough (the 3rd string QB), and Kalil Pimpleton (the juggling, super speedy, but butterfinger-hands slot receiver). Witnessing these players practice, prepare, and put it all on the line during pre-season matches elevates the otherwise meaningless games. For an outsider, preseason football is but a glorified practice - a chance for football teams to workout the kinks. But for players on the cutting line, each snap is a tryout - a matter of keeping their job or getting sent packing home or to another team's practice squad. For sports fans who care more about the existential dynamics of the humans behind the pads, this element couldn't be more riveting. It made the season more profound and pathos-filled than any in-season glimpse at x's and o's could ever hope to be.

Future Histories
S02E33 - Pat Devine on Negotiated Coordination

Future Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 148:34


Pat Devine on his model of participatory planning through  'negotiated coordination'. Correction: At minute 6:52 it is stated that the inflation within the UK in the 1970ties had reached up to 50%. This has been a mistake in numbers, since it had reached "only" up to 25%. English-episodes-only Future Histories Website & RSS-Feed: https://futurehistories-international.com https://futurehistories-international.com/feed.xml Collaborative Podcast Transcription If you would like to support Future Histories by contributing to the collaborative transcription of episodes, please contact us at: transkription@futurehistories.today (German) Kollaborative Podcast-Transkription FAQ: shorturl.at/eL578 Shownotes Devine, Pat. 1988. Democracy and economic planning: the political economy of a self-governing society. New York: Routledge.: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/mono/10.4324/9780429033117/democracy-economic-planning-pat-devine Devine, Pat. 2002. Participatory Planning Through Negotiated Coordination. In: Science & Society, Vol. 66, No. 1.No. 1. New York: Guilford Publications, 72-85: https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/epdfplus/10.1521/siso.66.1.72.21001 Devine, Pat. 2022. Negotiated Coordination and Socialist Democracy. In Laibman, David and Campbell, Al. (Ed.), (En)Visioning Socialism IV: Raising the Future in Our Imaginations Before Raising It in Reality. In Science & Society, Vol. 86, No. 2. New York: Guilford Publications.: https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/10.1521/siso.2022.86.2.140 Website of the Science & Society Journal: https://www.scienceandsociety.com/ Robin Hahnel (Wikipedia): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hahnel Hahnel, Robin. 2021. Democratic Economic Planning. New York: Routledge.: https://www.routledge.com/Democratic-Economic-Planning/Hahnel/p/book/9781032003320 David Laibman (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Laibman Laibman, David. 2002. Democratic Coordination: Towards a Working Socialism For the New Century. In: Science & Society, Vol. 66, No. 1. New York: Guilford Publications, 116–129: https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/10.1521/siso.66.1.116.21016 Laibman, David and Campbell, Al. 2022. (En)Visioning Socialism IV: Raising the Future in Our Imaginations Before Raising It in Reality. In Science & Society, Vol. 86, No. 2. New York: Guilford Publications: https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/10.1521/siso.2022.86.2.137   Further Shownotes Michał Kalecki (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micha%C5%82_Kalecki Fikret Adaman: http://www.politicalecology.eu/component/zoo/item/fikret-adaman Oskar R. Lange (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oskar_R._Lange Karl Polanyi (Wikipedia): https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Polanyi Maurice Dobb (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Dobb Noam Chomsky (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky Dean, Jodi. 2012. The communist horizon. Verso Books.: https://www.versobooks.com/books/2718-the-communist-horizon Dean, Jodi. 2016. Crowds and party. Verso Books.: https://www.versobooks.com/books/2802-crowds-and-party Dean, Jodi. 2019. Comrade: An essay on political belonging. Verso Books.: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3060-comrade Antonio Gramsci (Wikipedia): https://www.marxists.org/archive/gramsci/ David Attenborough's documentaries: https://earth.org/david-attenbourogh-best-documentaries/    Further Future Histories Episodes S02E21 | Robin Hahnel on Parecon (Part 1): https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s02/e21-robin-hahnel-on-parecon/ S02E19 | David Laibman on Multilevel Democratic Iterative Coordination: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s02/e19-david-laibman-on-multilevel-democratic-iterative-coordination/ S02E10 | Aaron Benanav on Associational Socialism and Democratic Planning: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s02/e10-aaron-benanav-on-associational-socialism-and-democratic-planning/ [German] S01E19 | Jan Philipp Dapprich zu sozialistischer Planwirtschaft: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e19-jan-philipp-dapprich-zu-sozialistischer-planwirtschaft/ [German] S02E14 | Jakob Heyer zu Grundproblemen einer postkapitalistischen Produktionsweise (Teil 1): https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s02/e14-jakob-heyer-zu-grundproblemen-einer-postkapitalistischen-produktionsweise-teil-1/ [German] S01E14 | Harald Welzer zu Kapitalismus, Planwirtschaft & liberaler Demokratie: https://www.futurehistories.today/episoden-blog/s01/e14-interview-mit-harald-welzer-zu-kapitalismus-planwirtschaft-amp-liberaler-demokratie/ If you like Future Histories, you can help with your support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/FutureHistories? Write me at office@futurehistories.today and join the discussion on Twitter (#FutureHistories): https://twitter.com/FutureHpodcast or on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/FutureHistories/ or on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRFz38oh9RH73-pWcME6yw www.futurehistories.today Keywords:  #PatDevine, #JanGroos, #Interview, #Podcast, #FutureHistories, #FutureHistoriesInternational, #Planning, #Sozialismus, #Socialism, #Democracy, #Demokratie, #SocialistDemocracy, #DemocraticEconomicPlanning, #Cooperation, #Decisionmaking, #Participation, #Capitalism, #Kapitalismus, #Postcapitalism, #ParticipatoryEconomics, #NegociatedCoordination, #Socialownership, #SelfgoverningSociety, #ScienceandSociety, #RobinHahnel, #DavidLaibman, #Marxism, #MarxistEconomics,

Oceans of Hope
Episode 13: Frozen Worlds

Oceans of Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 27:26


Welcome back everyone! Today's episode is the second in the series where I watch an episode of Our Planet on Netflix and provide my commentary. I had a blast recording this episode! I got to watch a new documentary series and learn some new things while chatting with you all. Feel free to watch the episode on your own either before or after listening to this episode. I really enjoyed having David Attenborough talk to me about nature and then sharing my thoughts with you all. I also really enjoyed giving commentary for the struggles between predators and prey, maybe a new TikTok/reel idea! Links to things referenced in the episode:Episode 4: One PlanetMaddie Taylor's InstagramOur Planet EpisodeOur PlanetFollow Oceans of Hope on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok! Let me know what you think of these episodes. Also, make sure to look into how you can help save sea ice and all the animals that depend upon it! Please share this episode with your friends and family if you learned something new!

Cinema Eclectica | Movies From All Walks Of Life
S2 Ep81: Bjork in The Juniper Tree (with Aidan F)

Cinema Eclectica | Movies From All Walks Of Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 42:46


Listeners, are you in the mood for some folk horror? Some folk horror with Bjork? Some, if you will, fjork horror? If so, do we have the podcast for you, as Aidan F rejoins the podcast to discuss this early entry in the Icelandic maverick's small but impeccably on-brand screen canon. Along the way, we discuss her collaborations with Robert Eggers, Matthew Barney, Peter Strickland and David Attenborough, as well as naming our favourite Bjork records. None of this, quite rightly, overshadows the film itself, a strange, Bergmanesque drama inspired by - though not quite adapted from - a Brothers Grimm story. We salute its offbeat director Nietzchka Keene, and the equally offbeat plot summaries of her films, and delve into the history of Bjork. Includes Graham making lots of heavy weather about the difference between her debut album and her album Debut, a joke which never really gets any funnier! We'd have a very Grimm future if it wasn't for our Patreon backers, and as a thank-you we give you a bonus episode of this show every month - the next one, about Boots Riley's Sorry to Bother You, is out tomorrow! Backers will also get exclusive reviews of Asian cinema from Rob, Graham's twice-weekly Doctor Who reviews and more. Find out more on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. #popscreen #moviereviews #thejunipertree #bjork #nietzchkakeene #iceland #folkhorror #brothersgrimm #fairytale #roberteggers #thenorthman #matthewbarney #peterstrickland #davidattenborough --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pop-screen/message

Poetry Koan
Episode 38: Rilke's Panther & The Cage of Self - Part I (Hysteria)

Poetry Koan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 17:47


On the 1st of May 1889, the young (33 year old) psychoanalyst-on-the-make Sigismund Schlomo Freud took on the case of a “a lady of about forty years of age”, a Frau Emmy von N., who we now know to be the Swiss noblewoman Baroness Fanny Louise von Sulzer-Wart. Baroness Fanny had married 29 years previously at the tender age of 23 the 65 year-old Swiss watchmaker and industrialist Heinrich Moser, who died 4 years after the marriage from a heart attack. In the minds of Moser's five children from his previous marriage, the idea got around that Fanny might have toe-tagged their father after having him sire her two new Moser offspring with birthright claims to his vast fortune. This is the first time that Freud decides to give his friend Josef Breuer's technique of “investigation under hypnosis” a try-out as he attempts to help his new patient with her suffering somatizations (resembling very much the symptoms of Fibromyalgia today). Freud starts using techniques which will in time become (after he has ditched the overt hypnosis angle) his own special contribution to human animal therapeutics. What have these initial forays into our so-called "hysterical" human Egos (Freud's word for the Ego was simply "Ich", I) got to do with a poem that Rainer Maria Rilke would write a decade or so later about a panther he'd spent a day watching behind bars in the Jardin des Plantes, in Paris? This first episode (part of a trio) begins exploring this koan, trying to join up some of these dots between one of Freud's first talking cure patients (Emmy/Fanny), with Joseph Mortimer Granville's invention of the medical vibrator (the percuteur) in 1880 and its uses by male doctors on their female patients' genitalia; James Strachey's mistranslations of Freud's Ich into Ego and the effect this would have on psychoanalytic thought and practice, and David Attenborough being chased around the Scottish Highlands by a large, angry grouse called The Caipercaillie. Poems discussed in this episode: THE PANTHER His vision, from the constantly passing bars, has grown so weary that it cannot hold anything else. It seems to him there are a thousand bars; and behind the bars, no world. As he paces in cramped circles, over and over, the movement of his powerful soft strides is like a ritual dance around a center in which a mighty will stands paralyzed. Only at times, the curtain of the pupils lifts, quietly–. An image enters in, rushes down through the tensed, arrested muscles, plunges into the heart and is gone. -Rainer Maria Rilke (English translation by Stephen Mitchell) -- FIRST FOOTNOTE ON ZOOMORPHISM It seems we have said too little about the heart, per se, how it sits in its chambered nub of grease and echo listening for movement in the farthest reed beds — any feathered thing will do, love being interspecific, here, more often than we imagine. If anything, I'd liken us to certain warblers, less appealing in the wild than how we'd look in coloured lithographs, yet now and then, I'm on the point of hearing bitterns at the far edge of the lake, that cry across the marshes like the doom you only get in books, where people die so readily for love, each heart becomes a species in itself, the sound it makes distinctive, one more descant in the dark, before it disappears into the marshes. -John Burnside -- Transcript: http://stevewasserman.co.uk/rilkes-panther-the-cage-of-self/

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews
#346 Photowalk: Photographing our 'Blue Planet'

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 109:52 Very Popular


Award-winning wildlife and travel photographer, filmmaker and author Sue Flood talks of her sincere love for the Arctic and photographing in the World's harshest yet most beautiful places.  Also today in the mailbag, a love for graffiti part 2, British pleasure piers, photographing with your 'wrong' hand and navigating through and out of a world pandemic. The show is recorded this week walking and photographing on the Isle of Wight. We're helped by inspirational special guests who have appeared on our shows. See the SHOW PAGE and our thanks to the Extra Milers and mpb.com.

RNZ: Morning Report
Bird of the Year campaigners make their case

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 4:56


Bird of the Year is in the home stretch, with the winner set to be announced on Morning Report on Monday morning. Campaign managers have been working hard to get their bird into the top spot and some were willing to argue their case to RNZ. [audio_play] Listen to the birds' campaign managers make their case and imitate their birds. Moho pererū/banded rail campaign manager Jacques de Satge was emphatic that any vote for a rail was a winning vote, but his campaign focused on the fact the moho pererū is in serious trouble. "The banded rail is really an underbird, one that we don't know anything about. So, I can name a couple of rails like the snipe's rail and a Dieffenbach's rail, and you would have never heard of those. Those have gone extinct within the last couple of centuries, and so what we're seeing with the banded rail is a bird that's making its way slowly towards extinction and we're not noticing that." Kārearea/NZ Falcon campaigner Frances Wright admitted she has a feisty bird, one that made headlines in early 2022 for swooping passers-by in Wellington. "My apologies on behalf of the kārearea to that victim, but I think what your question points to is a real critical part of kārearea conservation, and that's the fact that they're actually really misunderstood birds." Wright said the kārearea is facing human-introduced threats like wind turbines and powerlines, and while people may think the karearea is capable of standing up for itself it actually does need help. "I don't want to step out of line by saying this, but if I were a kārearea, and my brothers and sisters were being, sort of, slaughtered by rotating wind turbines, I probably have a peck at a person from time to time." Meanwhile Ariel Heswall is sticking up for the seabirds and has started a campaign for the Tītī/Cook's Petrel. "We have this great hotspot for seabirds, and these little Cook's Petrels. They only breed in these areas, and many of them are very vulnerable to threats, especially anthropogenic threats such as plastic, sometimes they're caught in fishing vessels, and of course, they're really vulnerable to light pollution, especially across Auckland. "So, we need to have more conversations about Cook's Petrels, and seabirds as part of Aotearoa because Aotearoa is known for this amazing place, of the land of the kiwi, the takahē, the Kākāpō, but what about all the seabirds and these little Cooks Petrels, which live right next door to us and in our waters?" The karearea has won Bird of the Year once, ten years ago in 2012, but the moho pererū and tītī are both winless. De Satge said it's about time some of the underbirds get to shine. "You get these big glamorous birds, you can call them over birds if you like, the ones that featured in nature documentaries, the ones that get so much airtime on a day-to-day basis. If you've got David Attenborough in your corner, you don't really need bird of the year. "So, I think that the under birds, they're desperate for attention, because that attention turns into conservation action, and so if we can conserve them, they'd hold just as much value to our ecosystems, to our story in New Zealand, as any of the over birds do." Asked who they think should be taken out of the competition, Heswall and Wright said it was the right call for the bat to stand down this year, while de Satge would be keen to see the Australian harrier/kahu bow out as it eats banded rails. Voting for Bird of the Year closes at 5pm on Sunday, and the winner will be announced on Morning Report on Monday at 7.45am.

The Brett Davern Show
Cold Beer Here

The Brett Davern Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 38:47


On Today’s Episode a half bucket of popcorn, David Attenborough, and the Grape Lady… Enjoy! The Brett Davern Show is streamed LIVE daily at 12pm (eastern) 9am (pacific) on idobi Radio at http://idobi.com. Follow Brett on social media @BDavv, Katie : @KatieLeclerc, the show @BrettDavernShow

The Sci-Fi Sigh Podcast
Spoken Darkly | Episode 106

The Sci-Fi Sigh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:09


Spoken Darkly | Episode 106 Amber and Ben talk about David Attenborough's misinformation and the gothic. Ben discovers origins of shock rock. Amber contrasts Black and African-American. They also plan their funerals. Join them as they discuss Leila Taylor's book, Darkly: Black History and America's Gothic Soul.  Join our Patreon for the Yoga Class:  https://www.patreon.com/posts/sunday-yoga-link-73456917?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copyLink&utm_campaign=postshare_creator Instagram Link: https://www.instagram.com/thescifisighpodcast/?hl=en Follow on Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@burr_iam?lang=en Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-quzNQbZTQ&list=PLRgBIvxlI3NZ8OyviVDNrn71KxhFWSBhK Click here to listen on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Amazon Music and Vodacast: https://linktr.ee/thescifisighpodcast

RTÉ - The Ryan Tubridy Show
Doug Allan - Planet Earth

RTÉ - The Ryan Tubridy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 29:15


Doug Allan is the cameraman for the award-winning wildlife programmes, Blue Planet and Planet Earth alongside David Attenborough. Doug will tour Ireland in November dougallan.com/

Quoi de Meuf
(Rediff) - L'éco-féminisme : une charge écologique

Quoi de Meuf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 44:24


Des grandes divinités de l'Antiquité aux justicières modernes de la Terre, les femmes ont tissé un lien particulier avec la nature. A travers les sciences, la littérature, la philosophie ou l'art, les écoféministes repensent notre rapport à la nature en établissant des connexions étroites entre les violences faites aux femmes, le racisme ou la guerre, et la destruction de l'écosystème. Si le courant a encore du mal à se développer en France, l'écoféminisme se distingue par son rapport constructif aux luttes et sa capacité à générer de nouvelles utopies collectives.Dans cet épisode, Clémentine et Kaoutar reviennent sur ce courant protéiforme et sur toutes ces femmes qui, par leurs actions, portent le dynamisme et l'avenir du mouvement écoféministe.Références entendues dans l'épisode : Le mouvement #Me Too est né en octobre 2017 dans le sillage de l'affaire Weinstein pour libérer la parole des femmes victimes de harcèlement et d'agressions sexuelles. Ecrivaine libertaire, militante, résistante, Françoise d'Eaubonne est une théoricienne féministe française à l'origine du concept d'écoféminisme.Le Women's Pentagone Action (WPA) désigne le mouvement de protestation collective et théâtralisée écoféministe qui eut lieu au mois de novembre 1980 et 1981 devant le Pentagone, temple de la Défense et de l'Armée américaine. Introduit par Paul Crutzen, le terme d'anthropocène désigne la nouvelle ère géologique qui aurait débuté à la fin de la révolution industrielle et qui succéderait ainsi à l'Holocène. Cette nouvelle ère géologique se caractérise par l'impact sans précédent des activités humaines sur la biosphère. Emma Goldman (1869-1940) est une anarchiste et féministe russe. The Green Belt Movement (GBM) est une organisation non gouvernementale citoyenne et indigène à Nairobi au Kenya. Son objectif est d'autonomiser les communautés, en particulier les femmes, pour qu'elles puissent préserver leur environnement et améliorer leurs moyens de subsistance. Catherine Larrère est professeure émérite à l'Université Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. Elle est spécialiste de philosophie morale et politique et s'intéresse aux questions éthiques et politiques liées à la crise environnementale et aux nouvelles technologies.Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986) est une romancière, philosophe et essayiste française. Elle se fait connaître en 1949 avec la publication de son essai Le Deuxième Sexe.Emilie Hache est philosophe, maîtresse de conférence à l'université de Nanterre et spécialiste de l'écologie politique. Elle est l'auteure de l'essai Ce à quoi nous tenons : propositions pour une écologie pragmatique et a publié Reclaim : recueil de textes écoféministes. Née en 1936, Carolyn Merchant est une philosophe écoféministe et une historienne des sciences américaine.Susan Griffin est une poétesse et romancière américaine. Son livre Woman and Nature : The Roaring Inside Her, paru en 1978, est reconnu pour son importance dans l'avènement de l'écoféminisme. Du 04 au 06 octobre 2019, La Mutinerie organisait le Festival Ecoqueer, un microfestival dédié à l'écologie, au féminisme et à l'anticapitalisme.Le festival Après La Pluie a été organisé le 29 juin 2019 à la Cité Fertile à Pantin. Il s'agit du premier festival écoféministe en France.Vandana Shiva est une physicienne, épistémologue, militante féministe et écologiste, figure de proue du mouvement anti-OGM et fondatrice de l'organisation indienne Navdanya.Greta Thunberg est une militante écologiste suédoise. L'article “Haro sur Greta Thunberg, la démoniaque vestale hitléro-maoïste” est à lire dans Télérama. Autumn Peltier est une militante amérindienne canadienne pour le droit à l'eau.Justin Trudeau est Premier ministre du Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015.Figure des mobilisations non violentes, altermondialistes et écologiques aux Etats-Unis, Starwhak se revendique féministe et sorcière. Silvia Federici est une historienne et militante américaine. Elle est l'une des fondatrices du mouvement Wages for Housework qui militait dans les années 70 pour rémunérer le travail domestique des femmes. Nora Bouazzouni est une auteure, journaliste et traductrice française. Son article “Comment l'impératif écologique aliène les femmes ?” est à lire sur Slate.fr. Fatima Ouassak est la fondatrice de Front de Mères, un réseau chargé de donner une résonnance nationale aux combats que mènent les collectifs de parents au niveau local.L'application 90 jours propose des défis pour adapter son mode de vie aux enjeux du changement climatique. Ophélie Damblé, agricultrice urbaine, est la fondatrice de la chaîne youtube Ta Mère Nature.Retard (2011-2019) était un magazine web d'articles et d'illustrations. Guerilla Green de Ophélie Damblé et Cookie Kalkair Les invasives est un collectif écoféministeLes Engraineuses est un collectif dédié aux femmes qui ont pour ambition de s'épanouir, d'apprendre et de créer afin de mettre en place plus d'équité dans notre société.Edeni est un organisme de formation qui a pour objectif de former les particuliers, les collectifs et les entreprises à des comportements sains, écologiques et éthiques.Sœurs en Écologie (La Mer salée, 2017) de Pascale d'ErmEcofeminism (1993) de Maria Mies et Vandana ShivaRachel Carson (1907-1964) est une biologiste marine et écologiste américaine. Son livre Printemps silencieux (1962) a marqué à la fois l'histoire du journalisme scientifique et du mouvement écologiste en dénonçant les ravages des pesticides.Le studio Ghibli est un studio d'animation japonais fondé par Hayao Miyazaki et Isao Takahata.Planet Earth est une série documentaire de la BBC narrée par David Attenborough et Sigourney WeaverErin Brokovitch (2000) est un film réalisé par Steven SoderberghNight Moves (2014) est un film écrit et réalisé par Kelly Reichardt avec Jesse Eisenberg et Dakota Fanning. Years and Years est une série d'anticipation anglaise créée et écrite par Russell T DaviesLes Crocodiles sont toujours là de Juliette Boutant et Thomas Mathieu.Something New : Tales from a Makeshift de Lucy KnisleyMes Meilleures amies (2011) est un film réalisé par Paul Feig avec Kristen Wiig.Quoi de Meuf est une émission de Nouvelles Écoutes, animée par Clémentine Gallot, et Kaoutar Harchi. Réalisée par Aurore Meyer Mahieu, montée et mixée par Laurie Galligani, prise de son et coordination par Ashley Tola.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Adventure Games Podcast
Reviews of Unknown Number, Beyond Blue, Norco, Syberia The World Before & Return to Monkey Island

Adventure Games Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 135:41


In this epic episode the three very important looking pirates go off on their greatest quest yet: to Return to Monkey Island! And yes there be spoilers! Although the first part of the review is non spoilers and the spoilers are well telegraphed but they finish the episode by discussing everything from ending, revelations and whether we think the game ultimately met our impossibly high expectations. But first there are other adventure games too! Tomas does his best David Attenborough impersonation as he reviews swimming simulator/oceon documentary Beyond Blue, Seoirse answers a wrong number in the talking adventure game Unknow Number, Seoirse and Tomas then review possibly the weirdest adventure game of the year in Norco and Seoirse then reviews Syberia: The World Before. Plus they discuss the latest including the apparent firing of the lead developers of Disco Elysium and much more!NewsDisco Elysium developers leave company "involuntarily"Francisco Gonzalez announces voice cast for RosewaterRevolution: The Quest for Game Development Greatness KickstarterFoolish Mortals KickstarterNick Bounty KickstarterGames ReviewedUnknown Number Steam PageBeyond Blue Steam PageNorco Steam PageReturn to Monkey Island Official SiteTwitch StreamsLaura Cress TwitchIf you would like to stay up to date make sure you subscribe to the podcast. You can subscribe and listen to this podcast on Itunes and Spotify and all other major Podcast Platforms! You can also subscribe to our Youtube channel for extra video content such as video reviews, video interviews, trailers and gameplay.You can also support the podcast at our PatreonYou can review this podcast here: https://ratethispodcast.com/adventuregamespodcast You can also find this podcast on our social media below:Facebook Twitter Instagram DiscordYou can also find the RSS feed here: http://www.adventuregamespodcast.com/podcast?format=rssLogo created by Siobhan. You can find her on Twitter and Instagram Music is Speedy Delta (ID 917) by Lobo Loco and can be found here:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Lobo_Loco/Welcome/Speedy_Delta_ID_917_1724

The Green Dream with Dana Thomas
Caring & Winning with Lily Cole

The Green Dream with Dana Thomas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 49:44


My guest today on the Green Dream is Lily Cole, British model-turned-environmentalist and author of https://www.lilycole.com/who-cares-wins-the-book (Who Cares Wins: How to Protect the Planet You Love), an eye-opening book about climate change. Lily began modeling twenty years ago and has been named “Model of the Year” and one of the top 30 models of the 2000s. When Lily was 17, she modeled for a jewelry company that was later accused of exploiting local Bushmen with its diamond mining practices. Lily traveled to Botswana to understand the situation, and she was so moved by what she saw, she helped the Bushmen export their own jewelry and keep the profits. This was her first campaign to help the planet and humanity, and it put her on the path toward activism. Since then, she has woven together her modeling and climate awareness work. Following the publication of her book, Lily launched a podcast of her own, also called https://www.lilycole.com/podcast (Who Cares Wins). On it, she discusses climate solutions with guests such as Chelsea Clinton, David Attenborough, and Elon Musk. I heard Lily speak at the TED Countdown Summit in Edinburgh last year, during a dinner she hosted at the botanical gardens for conference attendees, and was truly moved by her passion for climate reforms. I think you will be too. Read the https://drive.google.com/file/d/1m6qRqC5kU-PW58eNYvAZcOGJ8wN501mo/view?usp=sharing (transcript of this episode) Get to know https://www.danathomas.com/index.html (Dana Thomas) and her book https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/554229/fashionopolis-by-dana-thomas/ (Fashionopolis) Learn more about https://www.lilycole.com/ (Lily Cole)  Explore the Who Cares Wins https://www.lilycole.com/who-cares-wins-the-book (book) and https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/who-cares-wins-with-lily-cole/id1526708048 (podcast)  Discover the fashion brands http://anothertomorrow.co (Another Tomorrow) and http://skydiamond (Skydiamond)

You Beauty
"Who Will Launch A Skincare Line Next?... David Attenborough!"

You Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 12:04 Very Popular


This week in Beauty Land... Ever gone to the gym and wondered, what products can I put on my face? On today's episode Leigh road tests a new brand that combines beauty and fitness. Plus, two unlikely celebs have launched into the beauty space this week, Travis Barker and Brad Pitt. We unpack why on earth they have done it and which celebrity will drop a beauty brand next. Plus, the Allure Best Of Beauty award winners are live! We share our top picks in today's episode.  THE END BITS  Subscribe to Mamamia Find out more about The Set.Co online at theset.co/ All the products mentioned in today's episode can be found below!  NARS Light Reflecting Foundation, $73 CAUDALIE Premier Cru The Cream, $160 NYX PROFESSIONAL MAKEUP PLUMP FINISH SETTING SPRAY,$18.95 RARE BEAUTY Soft Pinch Liquid Blush, $34 Dyson Supersonic Flyaway Hair Attachment, $99 BREAD BEAUTY SUPPLY Hair-Mask Creamy Deep Conditioner, $46 CREDITS Hosts: Erin Docherty & Leigh Campbell Producer: Mikayla Floriano Audio Production: Leah Porges GET IN TOUCH: Got a beauty question you want answered?  Email us at youbeauty@mamamia.com.au or call the podphone on 02 8999 9386.  Join our You Beauty Facebook Group here. Want this and other podcasts delivered straight to your inbox? Subscribe to our podcast newsletter. You Beauty is a podcast by Mamamia. Listen to more Mamamia podcasts here. Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading or listening to our content, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au Become a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AmphibiCast
Episode 106. Pumilio in Color - Mate Selection and More with Yusan Yang

AmphibiCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 68:02


Oophaga pumilio are well known for their vivid and variable coloration. But did you know that they have extremely sophisticated mating behaviors that select for certain colors?  In this week's episode I am joined by researcher, Yusan Yang and we discuss her work studying mate selection in wild oophaga pumilio. We talk about mating both male and female behaviors associated with color selection, and how pumilo tadpoles can actually imprint on their mothers. We also discuss one of Yusan's research projects that was featured in the Netflix documentary "Life in Color," narrated by David Attenborough. To support the show by becoming a Patron, for AmphibiCast Merch , for a 10% listener discount on an In Situ Ecosystems vivarium, and to support Panamanian Frog Conservation visit: https://linktr.ee/AmphibiCastTo find out more about Yusan and her research visit: https://biology.wustl.edu/people/yusan-yang and be sure to check out her featured segment in Life in Color on Netflix https://www.outsideonline.com/culture/books-media/life-in-color-david-attenborough-behind-the-scenes/

One Life Radio Podcast
WELLNESS WEDNESDAY Chris Gronkowski - Life in the NFL, Chris Kilham - Cannabis and Yoga

One Life Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


It's Wellness Wednesday! Chris Gronkowski is here to answer all our probing questions about life in the NFL. Listen for all the insider info. you've wanted to know, but were afraid to ask. Chris Gronkowski is the owner and inventor of the Ice Shaker vacuum-insulated bottles that hold ice for over 30 hours. In 2017, Chris and his brothers successfully pitched Ice Shaker on Shark Tank, ultimately partnering with Mark Cuban who helped grow the brand nationally. Before founding Ice Shaker, Chris played in the NFL for the Dallas Cowboys, Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos. Learn more about Chris on iceshaker. com.Next, Chris Kilham, better known as the Medicine Hunter, is here to talk about his latest book, “The Lotus and The Bud: Cannabis, Consciousness, and Yoga Practice.” Chris Kilham is a medicine hunter, author, educator, yogi and media personality. He has researched botanicals in over 45 countries, speaks all over the world, and has appeared on hundreds of TV and radio programs. The New York Times called Chris "part David Attenborough, part Indiana Jones." Learn more about Chris, and order his books at medicinehunter.com.Thank you to our sponsors!enviromedica – The BEST probiotics on the planetAttend the Crazy Water Festival Oct. 6th-8th, and the Crazy Wellness Weekend, Nov. 4th-6th in Mineral Wells, TX!Wise Traditions Conference - October 21st - 23rd in Knoxville, TNIs your drinking water safe? Check by zip code at berkeyfilters.com and use the code OLR for 10% off a new Berkey Water Filter!Children's Health Defense - Order Robert F. Kennedy's latest book, "The Real Anthony Fauci" today!sunwarrior - Use the code OLR for 20% off your purchase!Vegworld MagazineWell Being JournalThorne - Get 20% off your order and free shipping!

Film.Music.Media: Podcast
Steven Price | Composer: Our Planet Live In Concert / My Policeman

Film.Music.Media: Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 45:41


Oscar-winning composer Steven Price sits down for a brand new All Access interview that takes us into recent projects such as Our Planet Live In Concert's upcoming US Tour, Beast and My Policeman. Steven breaks down his amazing score for Netflix's Our Planet, which focuses on climate change and humanity's impact on the natural world. We discuss how Steven approach the score for the series, how he navigates that iconic David Attenborough narration, and how different sound palettes are used for different natural habitats. We then talk about the journey of taking his score from the series and adapting it for the stage with Our Planet Live In Concert. Steven talks about how the live-to-picture event reimagines Our Planet for a single-viewing concert experience that still covers all the major moments of the series. We also talk about recent scores such as Beast and My Policeman, and the different approaches Steven took with those films. We also dive into Steven's general approach to composition, working with directors, and so much more! A Film.Music.Media Interview | Produced & Presented by Kaya Savas

Finding Annie
Professor Brian Cox

Finding Annie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 38:53


How can knowing more about the Universe change your life? Professor Brian Cox has the answer. A Former rock star turned physicist who has gone from playing keys in the band D:Ream, which had a UK No. 1 hit with "Things Can Only Get Better", to becoming everyone's favourite physicist selling out arenas around the world with his fascinating shows about the Universe. Brian has previously been compared to David Attenborough in the science world having presented numerous documentaries for the BBC including the ‘Wonders of' series, starting with ‘Wonders of the Solar System'. He's also co-written 8 books with his latest ‘Black Holes: The Key to Understanding the Universe' coming out in October. This episode will make you think about our significance in the Universe and maybe even change your mind about your ability to change things - Brian's certainly tried to do that with our world leaders delivering a definite mic drop moment which he relives here. You can buy tickets to the world tour of Horizons – A 21st Century Space Odyssey with Brian and comedian Robin Ince here: https://briancoxlive.co.uk/ You can also pre order Brian's new book here:https://www.waterstones.com/book/black-holes/professor-brian-cox/professor-jeffrey-forshaw/9780008597061 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Costing the Earth
Future Tourists

Costing the Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:52


Nature and wildlife tourism has surged in recent years. Millions of us seem to want to want to follow in the footsteps of David Attenborough; meeting mountain gorillas, ticking off Africa's big five mammals or hitting the waves to meet whales and dolphins. But is wildlife tourism good or bad for the world's most sensitive environments? The Covid-19 outbreak gave us a sudden, unexpected opportunity to answer that question. Some of the most magnetic natural places on the planet lost their international tourists for two years. Naturalist and broadcaster, Mike Dilger has been to the cloud forests of Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands to gauge the impact. Both of these extraordinary environments depend on tourism to pay for their protection, but should they continue to rely on travellers emitting vast quantities of carbon dioxide to get their fix of hummingbirds and marine iguanas? Mike is joined in the studio by Fiore Longo of Survival International, travel writer Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent and Vicky Smith from the eco-travel website, Earthchangers. Producer: Alasdair Cross

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James
Attenborough Is The Answer

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 30:17


National treasure David Attenborough shines light during dark times via Frozen Planet II.

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast
Propaganda · David Attenborough at Brentford

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 21:41 Very Popular


One young Brentford fan goes all wildlife documentary on us while a dinosaur roars from the desert. With levisolicitors.co.uk/thesquareball Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Give ‘Em Hell, Brigham
David Attenborough

Give ‘Em Hell, Brigham

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 66:45


Join us! https://giveemhellbrigham.com

Lady Carnarvon's Official Podcast
Ep.53 Gavin Thurston

Lady Carnarvon's Official Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 25:44


I recently had the pleasure of sitting down in the castle library to speak to Gavin Thurston.  Combining lenses and penmanship, he has written a fabulous book called “Journey into the Wild, The Secret life of a cameraman” which shares stories of his time behind the scenes during the course of many years filming with Sir David Attenborough. 

The Field Guides
Ep. 57 - Mockingbirds Gonna Mock

The Field Guides

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 63:31 Very Popular


Have you ever heard a mockingbird imitate a blue jay? How about a seal imitating a Maine fisherman? This month, the guys explore what happens when animals make sounds they're not supposed to: the wild world of vocal mimicry. Birds imitate chainsaws and car alarms, elephants speak Korean; what's going on? With a special focus on one of the bird world's best known mimics - the northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) - the guys delve into the research trying to explain why animals - especially birds - feel the need to engage in the wildlife equivalent of, “I know you are, but what am I?” Episode NotesSteve wondered about the similarity between the scientific names of the northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) and monkeyflowers (in the genus Mimulus). Turns out that both refer to mimicking; the mockingbird (whose scientific name means ““many-tongued mimic”) imitates the sounds of other species, and the monkeyflowers have flowers that, at least to some, seem to have grinning faces resembling those of monkeys.Bill mentioned that the viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) is often mistakenly cited as an example of Batesian mimicry. What's up with that? Here's what the University of Wisconsin has to say about it: “Ecologists have long preached that Viceroys have enjoyed a Batesian “Get-out-of-Jail-Free” card due to their resemblance to the toxic Monarch butterfly (Batesian mimicry—the harmless imitating the harmful). Monarchs are poisonous because their caterpillar host plant, milkweed, contains harmful cardiac glycosides. Recent research suggests that because willow leaves are very bitter, the Viceroy may be almost as distasteful as Monarchs. In that case, Monarchs and Viceroys are mimicking each other, each cashing in on the other's bad reputation (Mullerian mimicry).”Check out episode 34: The Downy-Hairy Game for more info on Batesian and Mullerian mimicryThe guys wondered, “Are there any large passerines (songbirds/perching birds)?” The largest seem to be in the raven family; “The heaviest and altogether largest passerines are the thick-billed raven and the larger races of common raven, each exceeding 1.5 kg (3.3 lb) and 70 cm (28 in). The superb lyrebird and some birds-of-paradise, due to very long tails or tail coverts, are longer overall.” (Source: Wikipedia)The guys briefly discussed mobbing behavior in birds, and Bill mentioned a couple of suspected reasons behind the behavior. He regretted not mentioning what is accepted as the most likely reason: to drive away predators! Steve wondered, “Did mimicry evolve independently?” According to a 2018 study, “Vocal mimicry evolved independently at least 237 times and was lost at least 52 times.”Since brown headed cowbirds are nest parasites and don't raise their own young, how do their young learn the brown headed cowbird song? Turns out that the good people at BirdNote did an episode on this very topic in 2021! Here's the takeaway from the episode transcript” “Scientists think that when a young cowbird hears the “chatter call” of an adult cowbird, something is triggered in its brain, and it begins to learn the song of its own species. Like a kind of “password,” the chatter call guides the young bird in recognizing what species to identify with. Then, when the young cowbird is ready — probably when it's two years old — and hears an adult male Brown-headed Cowbird sing, it will imprint on that song. It's a remarkable adaptation, even more so when you consider that cowbirds are fostered by as many as 220 different species. And they still wind up learning their own song.”LinksFind out more about Hoover, the talking seal.A clip of the superb lyrebird from the incomparable David Attenborough and his series Lives of BirdsHead down a fascinating rabbithole and explore the world of mimicryMeet Koshik, the elephant that speaks Korean SupportThe Field Guides PatreonMake a onetime Paypal donation.The Field Guides Merch ShopOur SponsorsGumleaf Boots, USAAlways Wandering ArtPhoto Credit(c) bluewing – some rights reserved (CC BY-NC)Works CitedAncillotto, L., Pafundi, D., Cappa, F., Chaverri, G., Gamba, M., Cervo, R. and Russo, D., 2022. Bats mimic hymenopteran insect sounds to deter predators. Current Biology, 32(9), pp.R408-R409. Gammon, D.E. and Altizer, C.E., 2011. Northern mockingbirds produce syntactical patterns of vocal mimicry that reflect taxonomy of imitated species. Journal of Field Ornithology, 82(2), pp.158-164. Howard, R.D., 1974. The influence of sexual selection and interspecific competition on mockingbird song (Mimus polyglottos). Evolution, pp.428-438.Owen-Ashley, N.T., Schoech, S.J. and Mumme, R.L., 2002. Context-specific response of Florida scrub-jay pairs to northern mockingbird vocal mimicry. The Condor, 104(4), pp.858-865.