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New Books Network
Cinema's First Nasty Women

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 77:03


What makes a nasty woman? Is it her unwillingness to break to the stringent standards of patriarchy, her gameness to get rough, even abject? Or is it the way she reminds polite society that the sweet, gentle screen martyr (the nasty woman's counterpart) is a fiction too, as much a trick and a dupe as an exploding housemaid on celluloid? And what a surprise—and what a treat—to discover cinema's earliest days are among their nastiest. Coming from Kino Lorber this December, “this four-disc set showcase more than fourteen hours of rarely seen silent films about feminist protest, slapstick rebellion, and suggestive gender play. These women organize labor strikes, bake (and weaponize) inedible desserts, explode out of chimneys, electrocute the police force, and assume a range of identities that gleefully dismantle traditional gender norms and sexual constraints. The films span a variety of genres including slapstick comedy, genteel farce, the trick film, cowboy melodrama, and adventure thriller. Cinema's First Nasty Women includes 99 European and American silent films, produced from 1898 to 1926, sourced from thirteen international film archives and libraries, with all-new musical scores, video introductions, commentary tracks, and a lavishly illustrated booklet.” Host Annie Berke sits down with the curators of this set, Drs. Maggie Hennefeld and Laura Horak, and Ms. Elif Rongen-Kaynakçi, to discuss how this project came to be, the steps they took to ensure an anti-racist program, and if the “nasty woman” spirit lives on in the mediascape of the present. Maggie Hennefeld is Associate Professor of Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature and McKnight Presidential Fellow at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She is author of Specters of Slapstick and Silent Film Comediennes (Columbia UP, 2018), co-editor of the journal Cultural Critique (UMN Press), co-editor of two volumes: Unwatchable (Rutgers UP, 2019) and Abjection Incorporated: Mediating the Politics of Pleasure and Violence (Duke UP, 2020). Laura Horak is an Associate Professor of Film Studies at Carleton University and director of the Transgender Media Lab. She is author of Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressing Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema (Rutgers UP, 2016) and co-editor of Silent Cinema and the Politics of Space (Indiana UP, 2014), Unwatchable (Rutgers UP, 2019), a special issue of Somatechnics on trans/cinematic/bodies and an In Focus section of the Journal of Cinema and Media Studies on “Transing Cinema and Media Studies.” Elif Rongen-Kaynakçi is the Curator of Silent film at Eye Filmmuseum, the national film archive of the Netherlands. Graduated from University of Amsterdam, Film&TV Studies in 1997 and employed since 1999 at Eye, she has worked on the discovery, restoration and presentation of many presumed lost films. She is responsible for the preservation and presentation of Eye's silent film holdings, including among others the Desmet Collection (1907-1916) and the Mutoscope & Biograph Collection (1896-1902). Annie Berke is the film editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism have been published in Literary Hub, Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Jacobin, and the Washington Post. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Textual Healing
S1E57 - INTRODUCING DJ SWEET TREAT: Ravi Mangla

Textual Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 49:55


Ravi Mangla is the author of The Observant (Spuyten Duyvil) and Understudies (Outpost19). His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, Jacobin, The Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Mid-American Review, Salon, The Paris Review Daily, Quarterly West, American Short Fiction, Tin House Online, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He lives in Rochester, NY. Intro beats by God'Aryan Support Textual Healing with Mallory Smart by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/textual-healing

Quintessential Listening: Poetry Online Radio
Quintessential Listening: Poetry Online Radio Presents Jason M. Thornberry

Quintessential Listening: Poetry Online Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 66:00


Jason M. Thornberry's writing appears in literary journals and magazines, including TAB: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Entropy, and Letters Journal. Jason is also the survivor of a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic epilepsy—a life-changing experience that abruptly terminated his quest to become a professional musician. One evening, in the summer of 1999, as Jason's band was about to release their debut album and begin touring, a pair of strangers beat him into a coma and left him for dead. When Jason awoke, he could not walk or speak. Jason spent a year in a wheelchair before returning to school. Jason earned an MFA in Creative Writing from Chapman University. He currently teaches writing at Seattle Pacific University and is finishing his first novel. https://jmthornberry.wordpress.com/

Book Club Appetizer
Laura Warrell, author of SWEET, SOFT, PLENTY RHYTHM

Book Club Appetizer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 21:40


Laura Warrell's work has appeared in HuffPost, The Rumpus, and the Los Angeles Review of Books, among other publications. SWEET, SOFT, PLENTY RHYTHM is her provocative debut novel about the perennial temptations of dangerous love, told by the women who love Circus Palmer—trumpet player and old-school ladies' man—as they ultimately discover the power of their own voices. Now let's join editor Deb Garrison in conversation with author Laura Warrell.

MFA Writers
Sean Dolan — Western Washington University

MFA Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 46:19


It's increasingly common for writers to get accepted in their second (or third) attempts at MFA applications. In this episode, Sean Dolan shares what he did differently his second time around that strengthened his application and landed him a spot in a fully-funded, genre-flexible program. Plus, he and Jared talk about how they return to the page even when it's hard, the blurred line between autofiction and fiction, and, in Sean's words, “the ephemeral experience of a short story.” Sean Dolan is a fiction writer from Missouri. His work has appeared in Hobart, 805 Lit + Art, The Los Angeles Review, and elsewhere. He is currently an MFA Candidate at Western Washington University where he is at work on his thesis -- a collection of short stories. He recently attended the Tin House Summer Workshop and will begin his position as Managing Editor of The Bellingham Review in the fall. You can find him on Twitter @SyannDoelann. MFA Writers is hosted by Jared McCormack and produced by Jared McCormack and Hanamori Skoblow. New episodes are released every two weeks. You can find more MFA Writers at MFAwriters.com. BE PART OF THE SHOW — Leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. — Submit an episode request. If there's a program you'd like to learn more about, contact us and we'll do our very best to find a guest who can speak to their experience. — Apply to be a guest on the show by filling out our application. STAY CONNECTED Twitter: @MFAwriterspod Instagram: @MFAwriterspodcast Facebook: MFA Writers Email: mfawriterspodcast@gmail.com

Textual Healing
S1E56 - Off The Record with Ravi Mangla: I Wanna Go Home

Textual Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 3:59


Ravi Mangla is the author of The Observant (Spuyten Duyvil) and Understudies (Outpost19). His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, Jacobin, The Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Mid-American Review, Salon, The Paris Review Daily, Quarterly West, American Short Fiction, Tin House Online, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He lives in Rochester, NY. Support Textual Healing with Mallory Smart by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/textual-healing

Eh Poetry Podcast - Canadian poems read 3 times - New Episodes six days a week!
Tryouts For The Flying Motorist Artist Team, 1958 by Hoa Nguyen

Eh Poetry Podcast - Canadian poems read 3 times - New Episodes six days a week!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 3:38


Born in the Mekong Delta, Hoa Nguyen was raised and educated in the United States and has lived in Canada since 2011. Hoa has had the privilege to work and teach all over the United States and Canada and is the author of several books including As Long As Trees Last, Red Juice: Poems 1998-2008, and Violet Energy Ingots which received a 2017 Griffin Prize nomination. Her fifth book of poems, A Thousand Times You Lose Your Treasure was named a finalist for a Kingsley Tufts Award, National Book Award and the Governor General's Literary Award and has garnered additional support from The Poetry Foundation, Library Journal, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Her writing has been promoted by such outlets as Granta, PEN American Center, CBC Books, Boston Review, The Best Canadian Poetry series, Poetry, The Walrus, and Pleiades. In 2019, she was nominated for a Neustadt International Prize for Literature, a prestigious international literary award often compared with the Nobel Prize in Literature. Read more about Hao here. You can follow Hoa on Twitter, here, on Instagram, here, and on Facebook, here. As always, we would love to hear from you. Have you tried sending me a message on the Eh Poetry Podcast page yet? Either way, we would like to reward you for checking out these episode notes with a special limited time coupon for 15% off your next purchase of Mary's Brigadeiro's amazing chocolate, simply use the code "ehpoetrypodcast" on the checkout page of your order. If you are a poet in Canada and are interested in hearing your poem on Eh Poetry, please feel free to send me an email: jason.e.coombs[at]gmail[dot]com Eh Poetry Podcast Music by ComaStudio from Pixabay --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ehpoetrypodcast/message

The Lives of Writers
Jody Keisner

The Lives of Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 57:53


Michael talks with Jody Keisner about coming to creative non-fiction from academic writing, her collection UNDER MY BED AND OTHER ESSAYS, writing and researching about personal fears and anxieties, adoption, writing as a false sense of control, writing about family and loved ones, chronic illness, and much more.Jody Keisner is the author of Under My Bed and Other Essays, which is out now from University of Nebraska Press. Her essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Los Angeles Review of Books, Fourth Genre, Brevity, The Rumpus, The Normal School, Essay Daily, and many more. She is the Editor-in-Chief of The Linden Review.Podcast theme: DJ Garlik & Bertholet's "Special Sause" used with permission from Bertholet.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 142 with Sadie Shorr-Parks, Lifelong Poet and Creator, Aesthete, and Educator, as Well as Author of the Wonderful Collection, Honey Month

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 70:32


Episode 142 Notes and Links to Sadie Shorr-Parks' Work        On Episode 142 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Sadie Shorr-Parks, and the two discuss, among other topics, her lifelong love of poetry, formational writers and poems, art's role in her writing life, themes of her poetry revolving around love and loss and so many more themes, and the amazing circumstances that inspired her poetry collection's title and ethos.       Sadie Shorr-Parks teaches writing at Shepherd University, where she is the Director for the Society for Creative Writing. She is the author of HONEY MONTH (Main Street Rag). Her writing has previously appeared or is forthcoming in Appalachian Heritage, Aquifer: The Florida Review, Blueline, Cimmaron Review, The Hongkong Review, Lines+Stars, Painted Bride Quarterly, Sierra Nevada Review, Southwest Review, Utne Reader, and Witness, among others. Her book reviews can be found in Los Angeles Review of Books and Southern Literary Review.  She edited Becoming International: Musings on Studying Abroad in America (Parlor Press). Sadie Shorr-Parks' Website   Buy Honey Month   Read Samples from Honey Month   “Making Light of It”-Gabby Bates Interviews Sadie for Southwest Review, Aug 2022   At about 2:00, Sadie discusses her loves in teaching, and the two discuss the power of personal narratives   At about 4:20, The two begin to explore ideas of perspective in writing   At about 4:45, Sadie lists some of the artistic works-visual, literature, etc.-that have thrilled her and inspired her   At about 8:00, Pete cites a profound quote from Sadie's work that dovetails with questions for her about art and muses; Sadie analyzes the exact quote with regard to her mother's life and her own   At about 11:50, Sadie responds to Pete's questions about works/writers that have given her “chills at will,” including Warsan Shire, “For Women Who are Difficult to Love,” Marianne Boruch, Louise Gluck (“her desert island poem”), and Ada Limón    At about 14:25, the two fanboy/girl as they discuss Andrea Cohen's legendary, chill-inducing “The Committee Weighs In”   At about 15:20, Sadie gives some Ada Limón recs   At about 16:10, Pete (again) recommends “The Gospel According to Mark” as a stunner   At about 18:00, Pete wonders about “ ‘Eureka' moments” for Sadie, and she talks about the “dreamy” feeling associated with grad school and creating   At about 21:30, Sadie delves into the significance of the title and inspirations for Honey Month   At about 23:55, The two discuss the “loving review” done by Gabby Bates for Sadie's collection   At about 24:55, the two use a quote from Bates to discuss    At about 27:20, Pete cites a quote from Honey Month's Goodreads page and the conversation moves to Pete's description of the collection as “quiet” and Sadie reacts to this description    At about 30:30, Sadie talks about her love of 16th/century poetry and its characteristics    At about 31:50, The two reflect on the quiet and nature depicted in the collection    At about 35:25, Sadie references a certain poem and ideas of beauty and love being intertwined    At about 37;00, Sadie discusses the recurring theme of love and breaks from lovers, and Pete notes the opposites that stand out that accentuate love and other ideas   At about 38:25, Pete points out some clever and interesting verb usages throughout the collection    At about 40:20, Pete cites another set of opposites and Sadie is reminded of writing this work in 2017, as the world was changing so rapidly   At about 42:00, Sadie notes how differently her upcoming collection themes are from the first    At about 43:00, Pete shouts out Nightbitch as an incredible work that so aptly describes early parenthood   At about 44:50, The two discuss “adding to subtract” and Sadie discusses ideas of body image, double-standards and metaphors that come with “destruction”   At about 47:40, the two discuss poems that feature themes of nostalgia and lost love and equilibrium    At about 49:40, Sadie talks about the importance of being “even-keeled”   At about 50:50, Pete cites a meaningful line, and Sadie discusses various meanings of “missing” someone   At about 52:40, The two discuss poems dealing with love and reconciliation     At about 55:15, The two gives differing takes on a key line about “endings”   At about 57:15-57:50, Sadie describes how a poem brought her boyfriend (now husband!) and her together   At about 57:55, A key line about daughters and mothers engenders conversation about a key theme of the book and how hard is it to write about beloved people (moms for sure!)   At about 1:00:00, The two discuss the format of    At about 1:02:50, Sadie reads “The Slowing”   At about 1:03:45, Sadie reads “Magma”   At about 1:05:20, The two discuss “comfort books”   At about 1:06:40, Sadie shouts out places to buy her book and discusses upcoming        You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com. Please tune in for Episode 143 with Neema Avashia. Neema was born and raised in southern West Virginia to Indian immigrant parents, and she has been a civics and history teacher in the Boston Public Schools since 2003. She is the author of Another Appalachia: Coming Up Queer and Indian in a Mountain Place, published in March 2022. The episode will air on September 27.

Shaping Opinion
Mike Mariani: Moving On with Life After Catastrophe

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 56:05


Author Mike Mariani joins Tim to talk about what he learned about how people move on in their lives after enduring a life-changing trauma or catastrophe. He's the author of the new book called, “What Doesn't Kill Us Makes Us: Who we become after tragedy and trauma.” In this episode, Mike uses the famous saying that inspired the title of his book as a launching point to tell a story that doesn't sugar-coat how people respond to adversity, while providing hope and inspiration. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Life_After_Catastrophe_auphonic.mp3 Friedrich Nietzsche was a late 19th Century German philosopher who had a great deal of influence on society at a pivotal time in history. His writings and his voice came along at a time when society itself was undergoing a transformation in both Europe and America, relying less on the agrarian economies of nations, and increasingly on an emerging industrial economy. Leaders and peoples were starting to question the status quo, and Nietzsche offered up some of the answers.  Yet there is one quote of his that has embedded itself into our culture, particularly in America, that is so ubiquitous that it is almost never questioned even to this day.  Nietzsche is the one who said, “What doesn't kill me makes me stronger.” This saying was the inspiration for a new book by Mike Mariani that states, “What doesn't kill us makes us,” but he doesn't finish the sentence. Does he believe it or not? Actually, it's not that simple. Mike has had his own share of troubles in life, things that didn't kill him, and for the longest time, he lived by that mantra, “What doesn't kill me makes me stronger.” But in the past ten years – Mike is only 36 years old now – he sensed that life isn't so black and white. Maybe the issue isn't whether something that doesn't kill us should make us stronger or weaker, just different. That was the starting point for his research and his book. If tragedy and trauma don't make us stronger, for better or worse, how they change us? To imagine the kinds of trauma Mike was thinking of, think of someone who lost the ability to walk, or someone who has been sent to prison for a long time and lost their freedom, or someone with a condition that prevents them from living the life they once knew. Mike asks, how does a person go about reconstructing their existence in the wake of calamity after much of that existence has been irretrievably lost? What do those whose lives have been knocked off their orbits have in common? How do we make sense of and find meaning in a life where suffering and misfortune go uncompensated? Before we talked about the stories or the themes of the book, I wanted to know how he researched it. Who did he talk to? How does he know? Links What Doesn't Kill Us Makes Us: Who we become after tragedy and trauma, by Mike Mariani (Penguin/Random House) Mike Mariani Website Review: 'What Doesn't Kill Us Makes Us,' Wall Street Journal The Curious Afterlife of a Brain Trauma Survivor, Wired Magazine About this Episode's Guest Mike Mariani Mike Mariani, Photo Credit: Diana Jahns Since graduating with his MA in literature, Mike Mariani has worked as an English professor and freelance journalist, writing feature articles for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Guardian, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Newsweek, GQ, Vanity Fair, Mother Jones, and The Atavist and essays for The Believer, Slate, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Pacific Standard, The Nation, and Hazlitt. Some of the topics Mariani has written about include the history of medical gaslighting, criminal cases involving mental illness, the opioid crisis, and the neuroscience of inequality. Mariani currently resides with his wife in Northern California.  

Life (UN)Closeted: LGBTQ & Heterosexual Coming Out Stories & Advice for coming out of life's closets!

Being gay is hard enough. Imagine being gay in the margins where immigration, race, and LGBTQ issues clash with your sexual identity, and the conservative values, expectations, and fears of your hard working migrant parents make you feel less than the perfect son. Author, Anthony Christian Ocampo, PH.D. explores these types of stories in his new book Brown and Gay in LA: The Lives of Immigrant Sons, and he shares his insights, challenges and guidance on the podcast today. https://www.amazon.com/Brown-Gay-Lives-Immigrant-Sons/dp/1479824259/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1XDK4KIZS5EY1&keywords=brown+and+gay+in+la&qid=1661098699&sprefix=brown+and+gay+in+%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-1 ()About Anthony Anthony Christian Ocampo, Ph.D. is Professor of Sociology at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He is the author of https://www.amazon.com/Brown-Gay-Lives-Immigrant-Sons/dp/1479824259/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1XDK4KIZS5EY1&keywords=brown+and+gay+in+la&qid=1661098699&sprefix=brown+and+gay+in+%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-1 (Brown and Gay in LA: The Lives of Immigrant Sons) and The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race, which has been featured on NPR, NBC News, Literary Hub, and in the Los Angeles Times. He is an Academic Director of the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity and the co-host of the podcast Professor-ing. His writing has appeared in GQ, Catapult, BuzzFeed, Los Angeles Review of Books, Colorlines, Gravy, Life & Thyme, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, among others. He has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, Jack Jones Literary Arts, Tin House, and the VONA/Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation. He was recently featured in the Netflix documentary “White Hot: The Rise and Fall of Abercrombie & Fitch,” as he was one of the employees involved in suing the company for racial discriminatory hiring practices. Raised in Northeast Los Angeles, he earned his BA in comparative studies in race and ethnicity and MA in modern thought and literature from Stanford University and his MA and PhD in sociology from UCLA. In his free time, he loves reading memoirs and essay collections, watching figure skating and gymnastics clips on YouTube, playing with his rescue dog Schmidt, binging queer content on Netflix and HBO Max, and being chaotic with his multigenerational Filipino American family. Connect With https://anthonyocampo.com/ (Website) https://www.facebook.com/latinosofasia (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/anthonyocampo.phd/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/anthonyocampo (Twitter) You can also listen to the podcast on… https://apple.co/2RBmUxZ ()https://bit.ly/2UxP9zN ()   https://spoti.fi/2JpvCfg ()https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/rick-clemons/the-coming-out-lounge ()   http://tun.in/pjtKR ()https://bit.ly/30kT4kL ()   https://bit.ly/2FVH55j ()  

Otherppl with Brad Listi
790. Jerry Stahl

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 76:14


Jerry Stahl is the author of the memoir Nein, Nein, Nein!: One Man's Tale of Depression, Psychic Torment, and a Bus Tour of the Holocaust, available from Akashic Books. Stahl has written ten books, including the best-selling memoir Permanent Midnight, made into a movie with Ben Stiller; the essay collection OG Dad; and the novels Pain Killers; I, Fatty; Perv; Plainclothes Naked; Happy Mutant Baby Pills; and Bad Sex on Speed. A Pushcart Prize–winning author, Stahl's work has appeared in Esquire, Vice, the Believer, Tin House, Los Angeles Review of Books, and the New York Times, among other places. He has written extensively for film and television, including HBO's Hemingway & Gellhorn, which earned a Writers Guild Award nomination; Bad Boys II; and the cult classic Dr. Caligari; series credits include Maron, CSI, and Escape at Dannemora, for which he received an Emmy nomination. Stahl's writing has been widely translated, and he has taught with the InsideOUT Writers program for incarcerated youth, edited The Heroin Chronicles for Akashic Books, and participated in the documentary series, San Quentin Film School. He has two daughters, and lives with artist Zoe Hansen.  *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Available where podcasts are available: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, etc. Subscribe to Brad Listi's email newsletter. Support the show on Patreon Merch @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Exit Strategy
034 - Benjamin Cunningham - The Double Agent Who Infiltrated the CIA

Exit Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 54:13


Benjamin Cunningham is a correspondent for The Economist. He covered Central and Eastern Europe for six years, and now writes about the wider Mediterranean region from Barcelona. In addition he contributes to The Guardian, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Aspen Review, Le Monde Diplomatique and is an opinion columnist for Sme, Slovakia's main daily newspaper.  His first book is called The Liar: How a Double Agent in the CIA Became the Cold War's Last Honest Man. In the mid-1970s, the CIA and KGB watched Karel Koecher closely—they were both convinced he was working for the enemy. And they were both right. Traveling with his wife, Hana, Koecher posed as a Czechoslovak asylum seeker and arrived in the US as a Communist sleeper agent. After parlaying a doctorate from Columbia into a job at the CIA, Koecher proceeded to operate as a double agent at the height of the Cold War.   Shunning a low profile, the Koechers embraced Manhattan's high life—with cocaine, swinging, and parties emblematic of the times and their penchant for risk. Hana, who was no more than a shy teenager when she arrived, grew into a sophisticated international diamond dealer who relayed messages to Karel's handlers. Riding a wave of euphoria, the Koechers felt unstoppable. But it was too good to last.   Using newly declassified documents, interrogation tapes, and extraordinary firsthand accounts from the Koechers themselves, Cunningham reconstructs their double lives and the fading Cold War, where a strange moral fog made it hard to know what truth was being fought for, and to what end.

Culture Gabfest
Mom & Dad: Bluey Knows Best

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 30:59


On this episode: Zak, Jamilah, and Elizabeth are joined by Phillip Maciak, TV editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teacher at Washington University in St. Louis. Phillip explains why Bluey, a kids show centered around a family of dogs in Australia, is the best depiction of parenthood on TV. Recommendations:  Phillip recommends reading newspaper comics with kids. Elizabeth recommends the games Stack the States and Globle. Jamilah recommends Cheers Hydrate. Zak recommends Joe Reilly's music.  Check out Phillip's original piece for Slate: Why TV's Best Kids Show Is Also Its Best Show About Parents Join us on Facebook and email us at momanddad@slate.com to ask us new questions, tell us what you thought of today's show, and give us ideas about what we should talk about in future episodes.  Podcast produced by Rosemary Belson and Kristie Taiwo-Makanjuola. Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on MADAF each week, and no ads. Sign up now at slate.com/momanddadplus to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Book Club Appetizer
Laura Warrell, author of the new novel SWEET, SOFT, PLENTY RHYTHM

Book Club Appetizer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 21:40


Laura Warrell's work has appeared in HuffPost, The Rumpus, and the Los Angeles Review of Books, among other publications. SWEET, SOFT, PLENTY RHYTHM is her provocative debut novel about the perennial temptations of dangerous love, told by the women who love Circus Palmer—trumpet player and old-school ladies' man—as they ultimately discover the power of their own voices. Now let's join editor Deb Garrison in conversation with author Laura Warrell.

Mom and Dad Are Fighting | Slate's parenting show

On this episode: Zak, Jamilah, and Elizabeth are joined by Phillip Maciak, TV editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teacher at Washington University in St. Louis. Phillip explains why Bluey, a kids show centered around a family of dogs in Australia, is the best depiction of parenthood on TV. Recommendations:  Phillip recommends reading newspaper comics with kids. Elizabeth recommends the games Stack the States and Globle. Jamilah recommends Cheers Hydrate. Zak recommends Joe Reilly's music.  Check out Phillip's original piece for Slate: Why TV's Best Kids Show Is Also Its Best Show About Parents Join us on Facebook and email us at momanddad@slate.com to ask us new questions, tell us what you thought of today's show, and give us ideas about what we should talk about in future episodes.  Podcast produced by Rosemary Belson and Kristie Taiwo-Makanjuola. Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on MADAF each week, and no ads. Sign up now at slate.com/momanddadplus to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Mom & Dad: Bluey Knows Best

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 30:59


On this episode: Zak, Jamilah, and Elizabeth are joined by Phillip Maciak, TV editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and teacher at Washington University in St. Louis. Phillip explains why Bluey, a kids show centered around a family of dogs in Australia, is the best depiction of parenthood on TV. Recommendations:  Phillip recommends reading newspaper comics with kids. Elizabeth recommends the games Stack the States and Globle. Jamilah recommends Cheers Hydrate. Zak recommends Joe Reilly's music.  Check out Phillip's original piece for Slate: Why TV's Best Kids Show Is Also Its Best Show About Parents Join us on Facebook and email us at momanddad@slate.com to ask us new questions, tell us what you thought of today's show, and give us ideas about what we should talk about in future episodes.  Podcast produced by Rosemary Belson and Kristie Taiwo-Makanjuola. Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on MADAF each week, and no ads. Sign up now at slate.com/momanddadplus to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kris Clink's Writing Table
Kelly J. Ford & Real Bad Things

Kris Clink's Writing Table

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 33:23


Kelly J. Ford is the author of Real Bad Things (summer 2022) and the award-winning Cottonmouths, a novel of “impressive depths of character and setting” according to the Los Angeles Review, which named it one of their Best Books of 2017. An Arkansas native, Kelly writes about the power and pitfalls of friendship, the danger of long-held secrets, and the transcendent grittiness of the Ozarks and their surrounds. She lives in Vermont with her wife and cat. Kelly is also a co-host of the Writer's Bone podcast Happy Hour episodes. Learn more at KELLYJFORD.COM

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

The British author, director and producer tells Georgina Godwin about his latest book, ‘Song Noir: Tom Waits and the Spirit of Los Angeles', a gritty account of Waits' formative first decade in LA. Harvey has produced and directed several films, including ‘Enter the Jungle', a feature documentary on mixed martial arts fighting in Brazil. He formerly worked on Panorama and The Late Show for the BBC and is a contributing writer for the ‘London Review of Books' and the ‘Los Angeles Review of Books'.

Philosophy as a Way of Life
32. Skye Cleary on Simone de Beauvoir, existentialism and how to be authentic

Philosophy as a Way of Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 57:48


Rob and Massimo chat with Skye Cleary, author of How to Be Authentic: Simone de Beauvoir and the Quest for Fulfillment. We talk about existentialism, authenticity, bad faith, and all sorts of other ideas relevant for an existential way of life. How to Be Authentic is a lively introduction to Simone de Beauvoir's philosophy of existentialism, as well as an exploration of the successes and failures that Beauvoir and other women have experienced in striving towards authenticity. Skye C. Cleary takes us through some of life's major relationships and milestones: friendship; romantic love; marriage; children; and death, and examines how each offers an opportunity for us to stretch toward authenticity. While many people don't get to choose their path in life―whether because of systemic oppression or the actions of other individuals―Cleary makes a compelling case that Beauvoir's ideas can help us become more conscious of living purposefully, thoughtfully, and with vitality, and she shows us how to do so in responsible ways that invigorate every person's right to become poets of their own lives. Skye C. Cleary, PhD is a philosopher and writer. She teaches at Columbia University, Barnard College, and the City University of New York, and is the author of Existentialism and Romantic Love and co-editor of How to Live a Good Life. Cleary's writing has appeared in The Paris Review, Aeon, The Times Literary Supplement, TED-Ed, and Los Angeles Review of Books, among other outlets. She won the 2017 New Philosopher Writers' Award and was a 2021 MacDowell Fellow. She lives in New York City with her partner and son.

The Write Process
Pete Hsu on If I Were the Ocean, I'd Carry You Home

The Write Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 35:55


Pete Hsu is a Taiwanese American writer based in Pasadena, CA. He is the author of the experimental chapbook, There Is a Man (Tolsun Books). His work has also been featured in several journals and anthologies, including The Asian American Writer's Workshop's The Margins, F(r)iction, The Los Angeles Review, and Los Angeles Review of Books. He was a 2017 PEN Center USA Emerging Voices Fellow, as well as the 2017 PEN in the Community Writer in Residence. Full of warmth, terror, and unsentimental humor, If I Were the Ocean, I'd Carry You Home, Pete Hsu's debut story collection, captures the essence of survival in a life set adrift. Children and young people navigate a world where the presence of violence and death rear themselves in everyday places: Vegas casinos, birthday parties, church services, and sunny days at the beach. Each story is a meditation on living in a world not made for us—the pervasive fear, the adaptations, the unexpected longings. A gripping and energetic debut, Hsu's writing beats with the naked rhythms of an unsettled human heart.

The Psychology Podcast
Skye Cleary || Simone de Beauvoir and the Quest for Authentic Living

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 43:09


Today we welcome philosopher Skye Cleary. She is a lecturer at Columbia University and the City College of New York. Skye is the author of Existentialism and Romantic Love and co-editor of How to Live a Good Life. Her writing has appeared in The Paris Review, Aeon, Business Insider, TED-Ed, and The Los Angeles Review of Books, among other outlets.In 2021, she was a MacDowell Fellow and In 2017, she won the New Philosopher Writers' Award. Her latest book is called How to Be Authentic. In this episode, I talk to Skye Cleary about Simone de Beauvoir's life and how it has informed her existentialist philosophy. As a feminist during the forties, Simone was passionate about freedom of choice. It's not a surprise then that her definition of authenticity also revolves around self-determination. Authenticity is not about finding a true self, but rather a process of creating who we want to be. We also touch on the topics of gender, power, social justice, narcissism, and fulfillment.Website: skyecleary.comTwitter: @Skye_Cleary Topics01:54 French existentialist philosophy04:05 “One is not born, but rather becomes, woman”09:58 Creating our essence12:46 Transcendancing our impulses18:01 Creative rebellion22:19 Skye's Critique of Simone de Beauvoir24:03 Authenticity is responsible freedom27:33 Power and freedom32:00 Skye's background in philosophy33:15 Intersubjectivity: the foundation of ethical relations34:48 Inauthenticity, social media, narcissism38:37 Windows of freedom, genetics, motherhood41:38 Fulfillment is embracing life 

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 86: Designing for Disability | Laura Mauldin

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 36:08


Why do we hate disability?  Why does design neglect disability? How do disabled people tap into their creativity to make the world accessible? Laura Mauldin is a writer, sociologist, and interdisciplinary scholar based in Brooklyn, NY. She's currently an associate professor at the University of Connecticut. Her research focuses broadly on disability, care, and technology. Her first book, Made to Hear: Cochlear Implants and Raising Deaf Children, documented the structure and culture of the systems we've designed to try to make deaf kids hear. Currently, she is writing a nonfiction book on spousal caregiving that weaves together research, memoir, and cultural commentary. She's recently published articles in The American Prospect, Baffler Magazine, and the Los Angeles Review of books connected to spousal caregiving. Most recently, she launched the new website DisabilityAtHome.org which documents the daily hacks that disabled people and caregivers have devised to make life work at home.  Episode Mentions: Book: Made to Hear: Cochlear Implants and Raising Deaf Children by Laura Mauldin Website: disabilityathome.org Article: Care Tactics: Hacking an Abelist World by Laura Mauldin Article: Finding Comfort at Home: New Website Logs Solutions to Everyday Problems for Disabled People and Their Caregivers Follow: Liz Jackson Follow: Imani Barbarin Website: Well Spouse Association Other related content: Website: engineeringathome.org Link: Designing for Disability - TED Talks Follow Laura: Twitter | LinkedIn Episode Website: https://mailchi.mp/designlabpod/lauramauldin More episode sources & links Sign-up for Design Lab Podcast's Newsletter Previous Episode Newsletters and Shownotes Follow @DesignLabPod on Twitter Instagram and LinkedIn Follow @BonKu on Twitter & Instagram Check out the Health Design Lab Production by Robert Pugliese Edit by Fernando Queiroz Cover Design by Eden Lew Theme song by Emmanuel Houston Indexed in the Library of Congress: ISSN 2833-2032

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Benjamin Cunningham - author of THE LIAR: How a CIA Double Agent Became Cold War's Last Honest Man

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 10:55


ABOUT BENJAMIN CUNNINGHAM AND THE LIARThe Cold War meets Mad Men in the form of Karel Koecher, a double agent whose shifting loyalties and over-the-top hedonism reverberated from New York to Moscow.In the mid-1970s, the CIA and KGB watched Karel Koecher closely-they were both convinced he was working for the enemy. And they were both right. Traveling with his wife, Hana, Koecher posed as a Czechoslovak asylum seeker and arrived in the US as a Communist sleeper agent. After parlaying a doctorate from Columbia into a job at the CIA, Koecher proceeded to operate as a double agent at the height of the Cold War.Shunning a low profile, the Koechers embraced Manhattan's high life-with cocaine, swinging, and parties emblematic of the times and their penchant for risk. Hana, who was no more than a shy teenager when she arrived, grew into a sophisticated international diamond dealer who relayed messages to Karel's handlers. Riding a wave of euphoria, the Koechers felt unstoppable. But it was too good to last.Using newly declassified documents, interrogation tapes, and extraordinary firsthand accounts from the Koechers themselves, Cunningham reconstructs their double lives and the fading Cold War, where a strange moral fog made it hard to know what truth was being fought for, and to what end.Trailer for The Liarhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-Um1o1lCgkBENJAMIN CUNNINGHAM BIOBenjamin Cunningham is a journalist, writer and PhD candidate at the Universitat de Barcelona. His book "The Liar: How a Double Agent in the CIA Became the Last Honest Man of the Cold War" is forthcoming from PublicAffairs in August 2022.Benjamin began as a daily newspaper reporter in Michigan before moving to Europe in 2006. He has since resided in Amsterdam, Prague and, now, Barcelona. Benjamin has reported from more than 40 countries, contributing to major international media likeThe Guardian, Der Spiegel, Le Monde Diplomatique, The Los Angeles Review of Books, TIME magazine, Haaretz, SME, The Detroit Free Press, Al Jazeera, The Aspen Review and The Christian Science Monitor. He was a correspondent for The Economist for nearly a decade and prior to that worked as editor-in-chief of The Prague Post.He lives near Barcelona with his wife and daughter. In his free time he practices Muay Thai and endurance sports.

Inspired Minds
Malina Saval

Inspired Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 52:21


As one of America's most prominent journalists, Malina Saval is a three-time LA Press Club award winner and National Arts & Entertainment Journalism Award winner. She's currently the Features Editor at Variety where she's penned profiles on artists and luminaries such as Sean Penn, Robert De Niro, famed litigator Mathew Rosengart and Nick Nolte. Her articles and essays have appeared in the “Los Angeles Times,” “Los Angeles Review of Books,” “LA Weekly,” “Jerusalem Post,” “Forward,” “Glamour,” “Tablet” and several other national and international publications. She's authored books including “Jewish Summer Camp Mafia” and “The Secret Lives of Boys: Inside the Raw Emotional World of Male Teens.” Her short fiction and essays have also been included in Palehouse and The Truth About the Fact literary journals and in the anthology “Now Write! Nonfiction: Memoir, Journalism and Creative Nonfiction Exercises from Today's Best Writers and Teachers.” She's also a photographer and has written screenplays for Disney and Touchstone. A graduate of Cornell University and USC's School of Cinematic Arts, Saval has appeared as a guest on such as outlets as NPR's “Talk of the Nation,” PBS and CBS Radio. She's currently at work on a memoir. 

The Common Magazine
Liesl Schwabe, "The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

The Common Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 37:14


Liesl Schwabe speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Liesl talks about the time she spent in Kolkata, India listening to the mostly-Muslim marching bands perform at Hindu weddings and religious ceremonies, and what drew her to this subject. She also discusses the research, writing, and revision that went into this essay, her approach to teaching creative writing, and her next writing projects. Liesl Schwabe's essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Review of Books, LitHub, Words Without Borders, Creative Nonfiction, The Rumpus, and Off Assignment, among other publications and anthologies. A former Fulbright-Nehru Scholar in Kolkata, India, Liesl now lives with her family in Western Massachusetts. ­­Read Liesl's essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road” in The Common at thecommononline.org/the-marching-bands-of-mahatma-gandhi-road. Follow her on Twitter @Liesllibby, and read more at lieslschwabe.com. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Literature
Liesl Schwabe, "The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 37:14


Liesl Schwabe speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Liesl talks about the time she spent in Kolkata, India listening to the mostly-Muslim marching bands perform at Hindu weddings and religious ceremonies, and what drew her to this subject. She also discusses the research, writing, and revision that went into this essay, her approach to teaching creative writing, and her next writing projects. Liesl Schwabe's essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Review of Books, LitHub, Words Without Borders, Creative Nonfiction, The Rumpus, and Off Assignment, among other publications and anthologies. A former Fulbright-Nehru Scholar in Kolkata, India, Liesl now lives with her family in Western Massachusetts. ­­Read Liesl's essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road” in The Common at thecommononline.org/the-marching-bands-of-mahatma-gandhi-road. Follow her on Twitter @Liesllibby, and read more at lieslschwabe.com. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Liesl Schwabe, "The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 37:14


Liesl Schwabe speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Liesl talks about the time she spent in Kolkata, India listening to the mostly-Muslim marching bands perform at Hindu weddings and religious ceremonies, and what drew her to this subject. She also discusses the research, writing, and revision that went into this essay, her approach to teaching creative writing, and her next writing projects. Liesl Schwabe's essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Review of Books, LitHub, Words Without Borders, Creative Nonfiction, The Rumpus, and Off Assignment, among other publications and anthologies. A former Fulbright-Nehru Scholar in Kolkata, India, Liesl now lives with her family in Western Massachusetts. ­­Read Liesl's essay “The Marching Bands of Mahatma Gandhi Road” in The Common at thecommononline.org/the-marching-bands-of-mahatma-gandhi-road. Follow her on Twitter @Liesllibby, and read more at lieslschwabe.com. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

House of Mystery True Crime History
Kelly J. Ford - Real Bad Things

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 52:53


From the author of Cottonmouths, a Los Angeles Review Best Book of 2017, comes evocative suspense about the cost of keeping secrets and the dangers of coming home.Beneath the roiling waters of the Arkansas River lie dead men and buried secrets.When Jane Mooney's violent stepfather, Warren, disappeared, most folks in Maud Bottoms, Arkansas, assumed he got drunk and drowned. After all, the river had claimed its share over the years.When Jane confessed to his murder, she should have gone to jail. That's what she wanted. But without a body, the police didn't charge her with the crime. So Jane left for Boston—and took her secrets with her.Twenty-five years later, the river floods and a body surfaces. Talk of Warren's murder grips the town. Now in her forties, Jane returns to Maud Bottoms to reckon with her past: to do jail time, to face her revenge-bent mother, to make things right.But though Jane's homecoming may enlighten some, it could threaten others. Because in this desolate river valley, some secrets are better left undisturbed.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/houseofmysteryradio.

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Now, Appalachia interview with author Kelly J. Ford

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 30:14


On the latest episode of Now, Appalachia, Eliot interviews mystery author Kelly J. Ford about her latest book REAL BAD THINGS. Kelly J. Ford is the author of the award-winning Cottonmouths, a novel of “impressive depths of character and setting” according to the Los Angeles Review, which named it one of their Best Books of 2017. An Arkansas native, Kelly writes about the power and pitfalls of friendship, the danger of long-held secrets, and the transcendent grittiness of the Ozarks and their surrounds. She lives in Vermont with her wife and cat.

Now, Appalachia Interview with author Kelly J. Ford

"Now, Appalachia"

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 30:14


On the latest episode of Now, Appalachia, Eliot interviews mystery author Kelly J. Ford about her latest novel REAL BAD THINGS. Kelly J. Ford is the author of the award-winning Cottonmouths, a novel of “impressive depths of character and setting” according to the Los Angeles Review, which named it one of their Best Books of 2017. An Arkansas native, Kelly writes about the power and pitfalls of friendship, the danger of long-held secrets, and the transcendent grittiness of the Ozarks and their surrounds. She lives in Vermont with her wife and cat. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eliot-parker/support

Seize The Moment Podcast
Skye Cleary Discusses How to Be Authentic, Existentialism, Feminism | STM #141

Seize The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 64:04


On episode 141, we welcome philosopher Skye Cleary to discuss existential authenticity and the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir, the importance of cultivating inter-subjectivity for healthy relationships, why nihilism is a lazy response to the world, how the argument of human nature is a bad-faith resistance to the obligation of fighting for structural changes, the erroneous belief that our impulsive sides encompass our authentic selves, marriage as a misogynistic construct and thinking about progressive alternatives/ways to improve it, and why Simone de Beauvoir continues to be relevant for social justice and activism. Skye C. Cleary, PhD is a philosopher and writer. She teaches at Columbia University, Barnard College, and the City University of New York, and is the author of Existentialism and Romantic Love and co-editor of How to Live a Good Life. Cleary's writing has appeared in The Paris Review, Aeon, The Times Literary Supplement, TED-Ed, and The Los Angeles Review of Books, among other outlets. She won the 2017 New Philosopher Writers' Award and was a 2021 MacDowell Fellow. Her newest book, available everywhere on August 16, 2022 is called How to Be Authentic: Simone de Beauvoir and the Quest for Fulfillment. Skye Cleary | ► Website | https://skyecleary.com/ ► Twitter |  https://twitter.com/Skye_Cleary ► Instagram |  https://www.instagram.com/skye_cleary ► How to Be Authentic Book Link | https://bit.ly/3QoUXqW Where you can find us: | Seize The Moment Podcast | ► Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/SeizeTheMoment ► Twitter | https://twitter.com/seize_podcast  ► Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/seizethemoment ► TikTok | https://www.tiktok.com/@seizethemomentpodcast ► Patreon | https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32208666

New Books in History
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Dance
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Film
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Sports
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

LARB Radio Hour
Elvia Wilk's "Death By Landscape"

LARB Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:19


Elvia Wilk joins Kate Wolf to discuss her latest book, Death by Landscape, a collection of essays, including one originally published by the Los Angeles Review of Books. The pieces in Death by Landscape invite us to look closer at the narratives that persist in this time of environmental collapse and cataclysm. Reading a range of fiction and theory — including the work of writers such as Mark Fisher, Margaret Atwood, Amitav Ghosh, Jeff VanderMeer, Octavia Butler, and Karen Russell — Wilk explores the stories and genres that might allow us to decenter our human perspective of Earth and reimagine old divisions, such as those between people and plants, dystopia and utopia, role play and reality, and existence before and after apocalypse.

LA Review of Books
Elvia Wilk's "Death By Landscape"

LA Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:18


Writer Elvia Wilk joins Kate Wolf to discuss her latest book, Death By Landscape, a collection of essays (including one published by the Los Angeles Review of Books). The pieces in Death By Landscape invite us to look closer at the narratives that persist in this time of environmental collapse and cataclysm. Reading a range of fiction and theory— including the work of writers such as Mark Fisher, Margaret Atwood, Amitav Ghosh, Jeff VandeMeer, Octavia Butler, and Karen Russell— Wilk explores the stories and genres that might allow us to decenter our human-centric perspective of Earth, and reimagine other divisions, such as the separation of people and plants, dystopia and utopia, role play and reality, and the apocalypse as a decisive moment.

Wisdom at Work
Episode #28: Being and Lovingness: Skye Cleary

Wisdom at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 95:29


Skye C. Cleary PhD MBA is a philosopher and author of How to Be Authentic: Simone de Beauvoir and the Quest for Fulfillment (St Martin's Press / Ebury 2022), Existentialism and Romantic Love (Palgrave Macmillan 2015) and co-editor of How to Live a Good Life (Vintage 2020). Her work has been published with The Paris Review, Aeon, The Times Literary Supplement, TED-Ed, Los Angeles Review of Books, The … Continue reading "Episode #28: Being and Lovingness: Skye Cleary"