Podcasts about Soho

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District in London, England

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  • May 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Soho

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Latest podcast episodes about Soho

Kinofilme.com Lichtspielcast
Lichtspielcast – „Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness“

Kinofilme.com Lichtspielcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 92:31


Hallo zusammen! Heute besprechen wir Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. Shownotes: Geplänkel (Geschaut, gespielt, gelesen, gehört, gefühlt): The Office (US), The Dropout, Anno 1800, Benedetta, Last Night in Soho, Spider-Man: No Way Home (01:48) Review – Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (41:43) Review – Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness […] More

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast
24th June 2004 - Portugal V England - With Adam Hurrey from Football Cliches

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 77:59


Dotun and Tim go back to Euro 2004 with Adam Hurrey from Football Cliches. They discuss Wayne Rooney, Sven, Britney and the Minidisc.Get your tickets for the Brazilian Shirt Name Live Show on the 21st June in Soho from Goalsaloud.co.uk

Set Piece Menu Football Podcast
SPM 268: Why does football keep doing things that benefit the big clubs?

Set Piece Menu Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:41


We're breaking into our hiatus to do two things: 1) be with you for a run of mini-pods to mark the end of the Premier League season and more, and 2) for naked financial gain. The football: It's more than a year since the European Super League came and very quickly went, but it seems all the decisions made by the powers that be since are benefiting those who wanted the ESL in the first place, rather than satisfying the movement that mobilised so passionately against it. So why does football keep doing things that benefit the big clubs? The financial gain: Our live show is back on! Head to www.myticket.co.uk to join us on Wednesday 20th July at 21 Soho in London as part of the Goals Aloud Podcast Festival. We'll give you more details of the show over the coming weeks, but it'll be a very special night, so get your ticket for SPM Live now!!! Email: setpiecemenu@gmail.com

Aah!fter Horror
Edging (Last Night in Soho)

Aah!fter Horror

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 119:07


84 - Last Night in Soho. This week Dan is back and Mike keeps taking us to the edge.

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast

Dotun and Tim let you know about the live show which is taking place on the 21st June 2022 at 21 Soho in London as part of The Goals Aloud Festival Get your tickets now: Goalsaloud.co.uk

Radio Gorgeous
The Working Girls of Soho - Saucy Tales of Notorious Women by Josephine Pembroke on BBC Radio London interview with Jo Good

Radio Gorgeous

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 12:28


Ex Sohoite cabaret chanteuse Josephine Pembroke talks to Jo Good on BBC London about living in Soho in the 80's, Pussies Galore and more. #JosephinePembroke #Soho #Cabaret https://www.radiogorgeous.com/

She Started It with Angelica Malin
Pizza Pilgrims: from selling out a scooter in Soho to building a multi-million pound pizza empire

She Started It with Angelica Malin

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 53:33


This week's episode is all about FUN in entrepreneurship. So often, we hear stories of business growth that only talk about the hard grind and hustle, but we forget that business is meant to be enjoyable too. I'm joined in the studio by Thom and James Elliot, brothers and co-founders of Pizza Pilgrims, as they share their incredible business journey - from the early days of trading out of a Piaggio scooter in the streets of Soho to growing an empire of pizzerias across London. Tune in for a lively and informative discussion of what growing a business of this kind is REALLY like - but be warned, it will make you crave pizza. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Just Raised
S2 Ep1: How to Build a Web3 Community, With Mike Fraietta, Empire DAO

Just Raised

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:41


Kicking off Season 2 is an extraordinary guest, building way more than just a business in New York City. Mike Fraietta is creating community, art, and co-working space in this fascinating DAO. Web3 has a new home, a heart in SoHo where the Empire DAO community of entrepreneurs, startups, and developers will have ample space to create alongside artists. Joe talks to Mike, a talented founder with an ambitious vision. Mike explains his triple chicken and egg theory, how expansion is already on the cards, and the importance of building genuinely helpful products in Web3 You'll also hear what it's like being at the very tip of the adoption curve, and how you'd better have your NFT swipe card ready to book a desk. And if you're ambitious to grow your business, you need MarketerHire. Using advanced AI tech and a thorough vetting process MarketerHire will match your business with a top-tier marketer and they'll do it quickly. Get signed up today and find your marketing professional at marketerhire.com Follow Mike: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fraietta (linkedin.com/in/fraietta) Twitter:https://twitter.com/MikeFraietta ( twitter.com/MikeFraietta) Check out the Just Raised newsletter: https://bit.ly/3Ghj2tY Stay up-to-date on all things Just Raised: https://workweek.com/brand/just-raised/ or follow Joe Sweeny on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoeySweeny (https://twitter.com/JoeySweeny)   And if you're a fan of Acquired, Invest Like The Best, Business Breakdowns or 20VC, you'll love Just Raised

The Vinny Brusco Show Podcast
Episode #449 "Zen In the Art of Tattooing w/ Keith Hernandez"

The Vinny Brusco Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 96:19


You are carrying the art, but I am leaving a piece of me with you- This is the magical truth in the world of tattoos. In today's episode, I am joined by Keith Hernandez, a tattoo artist who works at the famous Bang Bang Tatoo in Soho and has tattooed athletes and celebrities. Keith is with me to talk about his humble beginnings in the tattoo industry and how he was able to cultivate his path to success. Keith and I tackled a myriad of topics in this episode ranging from the importance of pursuing your passion and how to translate the vision of the tattoo to the authentic world. Tune in to hear what we talked about and learn from Keith's experiences in life. Connect with Keith Hernandez Instagram: @keithhernandez.nyc Connect here: Website: https://www.vinnybrusco.com/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/thevbshow/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thevinnybrus... Podcast: https://www.vinnybrusco.com/connect Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Thevbshow How Can I Help?: Book your Free 30 Min Coaching Consultation Call 914-715-8845 Or VinnyBrusco.com

No Future
Intermission #4- Spin Us a Yarn

No Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 44:31


Well, it finally happened. Kate Lindsay (The Atlantic) and Dylan Fugel (Sigh) have demanded their own segments. Dylan uses his on history's least problematic safari and Kate gives us a peek behind the SoHo yarn doors.We also talk the Met Gala, hilarious movie title conventions and of course, who are today's most famous celebrities that no one has any opinion of. It's actually a harder question than you think because so many of Hollywood's elite are famously bad people. But of course we manage to do it, because we're so smart and talented at our jobs. Email us at:nofuturemailbag@gmail.comYou can follow us:On Instagram (@nofuturenyc)On Twitter (@nofuturenyc)On Letterboxd (@nofuturenyc)

United Queendom Podcast
The Charity Kase interview

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 34:59


We catch up with Charity Kase from Drag Race UK Season 3! The Wicked Witch Of The East End discuses her season, the night of 1000 Spice Girls, life after the show and her alternative style of drag. https://charitykase.com/ https://twitter.com/thecharitykase?lang=en https://www.instagram.com/charitykase/?hl=en email edward.m.dyson@googlemail.com @unitedqueendompodcast www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/samdowlertime www.twitter.com/samdowler www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

Arts & Ideas
Soho

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 44:36


Soho in films from 1948-1963 and the 1970s glamour and porn industry discussed by Matthew Sweet and his guests Jingan Young, Benjamin Halligan and David McGillivray. Producer: Torquil MacLeod Hotbeds of Licentiousness: The British Glamour Fillm and the Permissive Society by Benjamin Halligan is out now and so is Soho On Screen: Cinematic Spaces of Bohemia and Cosmopolitanism, 1948-1963 by Jingan Young David McGillivray is the author of Doing Rude Things: The History of the British Sex Film You can find a Free Thinking discussion with architects Eric Parry and Alison Brooks, pianist Belle Chen and novelists Fiona Mozley and SI Martin who have set their work in Soho in a programme about Building London https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000x6kv and A discussion about Harlots and 18th century working women with the historians Hallie Rubenhold and Laura Lammasniemi and script writer for the TV series Moira Buffini https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000rdfz

LeinwandPerlenPodcast
LWP Nr. 335 it der Hausaufgabe “Fresh”, dem Oscargewinner “Coda” uvm

LeinwandPerlenPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:06


Flori hat uns dieses mal mit dem Horrorthriller "Fresh" in den Meinungen gespalten. Felix hat sich den Oscargewinner in der Kategorie "Bester Film" "Coda" angeschaut, der ihm leider schon sehr bekant vor kam. Marge wurde in die traurigen Abgründe einer Demenzerkrankung rein gezogen bei dem Film "Supernova", sehr empfehlenswert mit Tränengarantie. Nachgeholt hat Flori den von Marge schon besprochenen Netflixfilm "The Adam Project". Zum Abschluss bespricht Felix noch den neuen Edgar Wright Film "Last Night in Soho" und Flori den kleinen Film "Windfall".

Salt & Spine
Peter Hoffman // What's Good

Salt & Spine

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:06


We're joined today by chef Peter Hoffman—of the legendary New York City restaurant Savoy, and then of others—to discuss his career and first book.To get featured recipes, subscribe to our Substack today.Today's Guest: Peter HoffmanPeter Hoffman was the chef-owner of Savoy, the farm-to-table eatery in New York City's SoHo neighborhood he opened in 1990 and that upended ideas about fine dining at the time.Savoy ran for two decades before Peter shut the doors in 2011. (His other restaurants closed in subsequent years, with the final one shuttering in 2016.) During its tenure, Savoy was one of the first U.S. restaurants to champion seasonal, local cuisine; dishes typically relied heavily on and were inspired by the produce Peter would find at the Union Square Greenmarket, where he became a fixture. (A typical greeting between farmer & chef at the greenmarket: “What's good?”)As a child growing up in New Jersey, Peter was introduced to an array of diverse foods. Both of his parents were home cooks—his mother more so than his father—and they inspired him to get comfortable in the kitchen. His mom taught him to read and follow recipes with the Joy of Cooking. And his housekeeper, Hortence, taught him the beauty of butter, an ingredient that gets a whole chapter in his new book. Peter got his start working in kitchens at a Vermont resort after his construction job there ended. As he got more and more excited about a path in food, he trained under several renowned cooks, including Richard Olney. He traveled to Japan to learn and, one summer, even ran a small fish market. Peter says that learning from these chefs and experiences taught him the beauty of local geographies and the ingredients they provide.His first book, What's Good: A Memoir in 14 Ingredients, is expressive of this type of thinking. It's part memoir, part cookbook, and features 14 chapters each named after an ingredient that fueled the forward-thinking menus at Savoy. Filled with anecdotes and stories about running a restaurant and his slow-food philosophy, Peter says the book is not just a tribute to the many relationships he formed with farmers, cooks, and the broader community, but it is also a tribute to his journey to discover what seasonality means.Get Cooking: Bookshop | Omnivore Books (signed)!We've got a great episode for you today—Peter shares some stories like those that fill the pages of his book with us, stresses the importance of simplicity and sustainability, and reflects on what the past two years have meant for the restaurant industry. And, as always, we put him to the test in our signature culinary game!Featured Recipes This WeekPaid subscribers to the Salt + Spine Substack get access to two featured recipes from What's Good this week: Susan's Peach Raspberry Pie (that's Peter's wife, Susan), and Peter's Zhoug. Subscribe today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Alcohol & Allies
Obama & Sin

Alcohol & Allies

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 78:35


Intro clip: Pulp Fiction Intro song: Soho (feat. JID) by WESTSIDE BOOGIETwitch 01:32  Barack In Tenessee 03:08  Past Partners 12:32  Being A Bad Boyfriend17:52  Procreation and Population Control 29:01  Millionaire Mindset 39:18  Americans' Philosophy Interest 52:55  The Lines Between Right and Wrong 01:12:57  The Freegan Diet    

United Queendom Podcast
And Just Like That - Breaking news from Kim Cattrall

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 30:12


Kim Cattrall has FINALLY spilled the T on what she thinks of And Just Like That… so how could we not delve into it? We did it very last minute so sorry it's a bit chaotic but we hit all the main points and wanted to have an opportunity to thank all the SATC for being so supportive to us for these recaps. This is a bonus that will give you all boners! Lots of love x x x www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/clo_at_home/ www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

Will Roadhouse Featured on HGTV's
Expat Thailand EP280: Phra Khanong The SoHo of Bangkok! The Best Place for Expats to Call HOME!

Will Roadhouse Featured on HGTV's "House Hunters International" CEO of Compass Group International

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 19:37


Expat Thailand EP280: Phra Khanong The SoHo of Bangkok! The Best Place for Expats to Call HOME! Part 2! Resort Living at its BEST! Exclusivity - Privacy - Gated Communities with First-Class services & amenities in the best Locations throughout Bangkok & Beach Cities! Our Mission: Assisting our affluent clientele (and investors) in relocating their luxury lifestyle to Thailand, and creating an "Income-Generating" real estate portfolio. Specializing in Bangkok & Beach Cities. - Beachfront Homes starting $1M (USD). - Oceanfront Luxury condos with unobstructed views of the ocean starting $500k (USD). - Bangkok 3 to 4 story "Brownstones" (luxury townhomes) starting $750k (USD). - Bangkok Luxury single-family detached homes (in gated communities) starting $500k USD. - Beachfront boutique hotels starting $1M. Based in Thailand: ROADHOUSE INTERNATIONAL (and COMPASS GROUP INTERNATIONAL) is an International Real Estate Consulting Firm solely dedicated to helping Investors & Homeowners find (or develop) their next Boutique Hotel, 5-Star Mega Resort, Commercial Building, or Luxury Home! All inquiries must sign a Compass NDA for Hotel information & pricing. Please contact us to schedule a real estate/relocation consultation! (We accept CryptoCurrency) Please Subscribe to our Podcast Shows & YouTube Channel (over 200+ Episodes)! - Expat Thailand - International Real Estate Investor iTunes - Spotify - Google Podcasts - Amazon Music (Audible): @WillRoadhouse See you in Thailand! Will & Aoy Roadhouse Will@1Compass.net Roadhouse International (Thailand Commercial & Luxury Real Estate). Specializing in Beachfront Homes & Boutique Hotels. International Real Estate Consultant & Asset Management. Compass Group International (est. 2002). All Social Media & Podcast Apps (search): Will Roadhouse --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/willroadhouse/support

Hot Date
Red Lights (Episode 149) - Hot Date with Dan and Vicky

Hot Date

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 81:38


Off of the critical success of his 2010 film Buried (which trapped star Ryan Reynolds inside a coffin for 90 minutes) director Rodrigo Cortes had the clout to attract Sigourney Weaver, Robert DeNiro, Cillian Murphy, Toby Jones and Elizabeth Olsen to his next project.  2012's Red Lights is the story of a duo of supernatural debunkers who meet their match in a celebrity psychic with a dangerous past. Dan and Vicky discuss the Spanish/Canadian thriller along with some recently seen.  Hear what Vicky had to say about Russian Doll season 2, Killing Eve season 4, the Fathom Screening of Singin' In The Rain and the Ti West horrors The Roost and Sacrament.  Dan talks about his recent surgery and the films Last Night in Soho, 1986's Eyes of Fire, Spider Man: No Way Home, and Everything Everywhere All At Once.  hotdatepod.com Follow us on social media and leave us your feedback. https://www.facebook.com/hotdatemoviepodcast Twitter:  @HotDate726 Insta:  hotdatepod

Big Blue United Podcast
It's Weird to Do the Right Thing (2022 NFL Draft Live Cast)

Big Blue United Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 71:44


This week we cast live from the Wilson flagship store in SoHo for the 2022 NFL draft. Make sure to check this episode out on YouTube! If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

United Queendom Podcast
The Blu Hydrangea (Ft Baga Chipz) Interview

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 16:52


Oh Mammy! It's the winner of UK vs The World. No, not Pangina! The bitch who took her down! BLU HYDRANGEA. Plus Baga Chipz who is fashionably late. Her time keeping might need to get… what's the term? Ah yes, much better. Enjoy! https://www.bluhydrangea.com/ https://www.instagram.com/bluhydrangea_/ https://twitter.com/bluhydrangea_ https://www.bagachipz.net/ https://www.instagram.com/bagachipz/ https://twitter.com/ChipShopBird email edward.m.dyson@googlemail.com @unitedqueendompodcast www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/samdowlertime www.twitter.com/samdowler www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

UpTown Tone Presents: Covid Chronicles w/ OG Eaze

I love the chance to use Philly slang in the title and this week I was afforded a great opportunity. Benjamin Kicks took to social media last week to subliminally point the finger for the biggest Backdoor in sneaker history at none other than MJ's son Marcus. Of course, Marcus denies all accusations. We give our opinion holding no punches. Elon Musk buys Twitter! Last episode we reported that Elon Musk made an offer to buy Twitter. Well it's a done deal! And this week we delve a lil deeper into what this play could mean on a larger scale. Travis Scott is BACK…kinda. Kevin Hart receives $100M invest for HARTBEAT which will have all black leadership. Meg sits down with Gayle and this week we actually watched enough to report on it lol. 170 Co-Defedants. 170 people walk in one of the largest criminal conspiracy cases in U.S. History. Iron Mike giving out the blues on Jet Blue, Kamala Harris test positive for Covid, 100 people have been boosted to date, Soho wings, Korean BBQ, @UpTownTone goes car shopping and much more! Also, we decided to update the episodes to our total number instead of the season number. It looks cooler lol. Let's get it!

CRE SharkEye Commercial Real Estate Show Hosted BY Yishai Breslauer
Why do we need a Construction Consultant with Barry Schmidt

CRE SharkEye Commercial Real Estate Show Hosted BY Yishai Breslauer

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 48:40


Barry Schmidt is the Founder and Principal of Schmidt Construction Consulting, a project management and advisory firm helping investors, developers, landlords and tenants get better results on their building construction, renovation and fit out projects. Barry Schmidt is a former construction project manager with more than thirty years of experience in the New York City construction market. He has managed new construction projects and renovations valued from under $1 million to over $100 million, including the construction of the New York Public Library's Science, Industry and Business Library in the B. Altman Building and Scholastic Incorporated's corporate headquarters building in Soho. Mr. Schmidt holds an MBA in Management from New York University's Stern School of Business, and a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree from the University at Stony Brook. For the past thirteen years Mr. Schmidt has operated his construction consulting firm, advising a variety of private and public sector clients including Ritz Carton on Central Park South, Carl Icahn Charter School, the US Federal Government and a number of small and large developers. https://www.linkedin.com/in/barry-schmidt-5797655/ The CRE SharkEye Show https://www.youtube.com/c/YishaiBreslauer The best 6 secrets of commercial real estate download free https://lnkd.in/dZkCUFR The CRE Crash Course - Everything you need in order to get the Must Have Skills for Commercial Real Estate, in only 2 weeks https://www.crelaunchpad.com/cre-crash-course

Julia en la onda
Antonio Banderas: "He sido una persona muy apasionada con la vida, me gusta mucho vivir"

Julia en la onda

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 25:26


Banderas llega este lunes a Barcelona con su obra "Company" tras varios meses llenando su Teatro del Soho en Málaga.

Monkey Off My Backlog
Ep. 98 - Marvel's Avengers, Last Night in Soho, The Witch

Monkey Off My Backlog

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 77:32


1:30 - Sam talks about Marvel's Avengers and why she decided to play it after reading only "meh" reviews. 40:00 - Tessa explains details about Edgar Wright's Last Night, which she watched in Soho for some reason.. 1:04:00 - Andy talks about how to pronounce the Witch and gets lectured by two english majors about what constitutes "Olde English"

Weave Your Bliss
49: The Science of Yoga with Eddie Stern

Weave Your Bliss

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 74:21


We've seen huge growth in the popularity of yoga in recent years, and people turn to yoga for many different reasons. Today's show brings interesting insights and perspectives from a longtime expert in the field. Join us for this beautiful conversation. Eddie Stern is a yogi, author, and lecturer from NYC. He has studied yoga since 1987 and runs the Broome Street Ganesha Temple in Soho. His latest book, https://amzn.to/3y1noVD (One Simple Thing: A New Look at the Science of Yoga and How It Can TransformYour Life), examines a decade's worth of study on the correlations between the yogic and western views of the nervous system. The book gives an in-depth look at the underlying scientific mechanisms that make yoga work. This is an enlightening conversation about breath and its importance to yoga, the cool story of the founding of the Ganesha Temple, and Eddie's surprising views about yoga in the US today. The beautiful Broome Street Ganesha Temple is the site of our interview, which unfortunately ended abruptly with technical difficulties. You'll miss some of Eddie's answers to my rapid-fire questions, especially about the books he's reading, but we've included two of his recommendations in our Resources section.  Show Highlights: Why the Broome Street Ganesha Temple is a labor of love that has taken several years to become “a beautiful sanctuary in the middle of the city” Eddie's journey to yoga, which began around age 19-20 and became the most important part of his life Why the science of yoga intrigues and fascinates Eddie How the science of breath ties into yoga and has become a prominent subject in recent years How breathing and other autonomic functions help restore and maintain balance in our bodies Why the yogic tradition teaches that we should measure our lives in breaths Why we should apply the idea of expansiveness to our sense of time and allow breathing to slow down the speed of our minds Why most yoga practices are only surface level, where people attempt to live more conscious lives How yoga is greatly misrepresented in the west Why Eddie wrote his book, One Simple Thing Eddie's thoughts about gurus, the guru tradition, and the correlation to yoga Why the guru tradition probably won't work in America because of our hedonistic attitudes The connection between activism, social justice, and effecting change in yoga practice How Eddie views his relationship with social media and his advice about using social media What it means to Eddie to live in his purpose Hear Eddie's answers to rapid-fire questions about helpful advice, grounding habits, favorite hot beverage, last meal on earth, an inspiring person, and his morning routine Resources: Connect with Eddie: https://eddiestern.com/ ( www.eddiestern.com),https://broomestreetganesh.org/ ( Broome Street Ganesh), andhttp://www.instagram.com/eddiestern ( Instagram) https://amzn.to/3y1noVD (One Simple Thing: A New Look at the Science of Yoga and How It Can Transform Your Life,) by Eddie Stern Also mentioned in this episode: https://amzn.to/3735h6D (Autobiography of a Yogi,) by Paramahansa Yogananda https://amzn.to/3xZuiuu (Be Here Now,) by Ram Dass Connect with me: Join me for myhttps://weaveyourbliss.ck.page/86140bff98 ( FREE Aligned AF Visibility Challenge) starting soon! Are you an online business owner? Join my free Facebook group:https://m.facebook.com/groups/weaveyourbusinessbliss/ ( Weave Your Business Bliss). Learn more and book a call forhttps://www.weaveyourbliss.com/vedic-business-coaching ( Vedic Business Coaching). Limited spots are still available! Join thehttps://www.patreon.com/weaveyourbliss ( Patreon) for weekly updates and more information!

Persistent and Nasty
Julie Tsang

Persistent and Nasty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 54:20


Today Elaine chats with playwright Julie Tsang. We discuss the benefits of being an actor before becoming a writer. The ups and downs of being a creative generally and during the pandemic and about finding what your passion is at any age. JULIE TSANG Julie Tsang is an award-winning writer currently on residencies with the National Theatre of Scotland, Open Clasp Theatre, Edinburgh International Film Festival and CBBC. Julie was part of Oli Lansley's (Les Enfants Terribles) Wild Child scheme to develop her TV scripts and she is currently writing content for Children's BBC. Julie's plays have been performed at Oxford Playhouse, Theatre 503, Soho theatre, Tron theatre, Lyceum theatre and the Pleasance theatre. Her particular interests are stories which explore mixed heritage, identity, loss and family conflict. Julie's play The Family Unit was selected for the Women Playwrights International Conference in Montreal 2022. Open Clasp Theatre, WDP writer & facilitator 2022 openclasp NTS writer in residency JMT award 2021/22 Edinburgh International Film Festival Script Starter 2021/22 Children's BBC In-House Scripted Development Mentorship 2021/22 Agent: Michael Elliot-Finch Brennan Artists Associates. brennanartists - creatives TWITTER: @executetheatre INSTAGRAM: @joolie_t LINKTREE P&N Linktr PayPal https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/persistentandnasty for those who can donate. A million thanks and love. Resources https://www.samaritans.org/?nation=scotland http://www.rapecrisisscotland.org.uk/ https://rapecrisisni.org.uk/ https://rapecrisis.org.uk/ https://www.artsminds.co.uk/ https://www.bapam.org.uk/ https://freelancersmaketheatrework.com/sexual-violence-support-services/ Stonewall UK Trevor Project Mermaids UK Switchboard LGBT+ GATE Join our Zoom Coffee Morning every Friday at 11am GMT, email persistentandnasty@gmail.com WeAudition offer: For 25% off your monthly subscription quote: NASTY25 Backstage Offers: Get a free 12 months Actor Subscription: https://join.backstage.com/persistentnasty-uk-12m-free/ Or if you've got a project to cast, you can Post Castings for free: Apply promo code PERSISTENTANDNASTY at the checkout

Fright Pub
Last Night in Soho (2021)

Fright Pub

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 63:15


This week, Lauren's birthday pick.  A very recent addition and one of 2021's best movies for sure.

Super Horror Bros.
Episode 295: #SHB295 - Choose or Die

Super Horror Bros.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 65:34


After such great heights last week of a brand new and incredible horror film at the cinema we are sadly back to the norm of finding the best on demand films to watch and next up is Choose or Die. We've actually wanted to see this one for a while after hearing about its cool premise of a retro video game come to life and hoped it would merge gaming and horror together like we so desperately want a film to pull off. Is this a worthy Netflix horror to stand alongside the Fear Street trilogy or another film on the service to avoid? Let's find out. Also this week; we get very excited for Alex Garland's Men next month. David Cronenberg's return to horror gets a release date. And finally Matt can't get over how perfect Last Night in Soho is and Mike continues to punish himself by watching The Walking Dead.Choose or Die is available on Netflix worldwide nowFollow us on Twitter @SHBPodEmail us: SuperHorrorBrosPodcast@gmail.com**Please take the time to review & rate us on iTunes or your podcast service of choice. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for potential listeners to find us. Thanks!**

Dread Media
Dread Media - Episode 765

Dread Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 65:26


This week on Dread Media, Desmond and Tom present a double feature of reviews of newer films with the theme of young women in trouble. First up, it's Edgar Wright's wild sort-of period piece Last Night in Soho. Then, the gritty, modern, weird haunted apartment building film plucked from the news The Scary of Sixty-First. Of course, there's tunes: "Slaughtered in Soho" by Carcass, "Avenues and Alleyways" by Rancid, "Room 429" by Strapping Young Lad, and "Call Me Little Sunshine" by Ghost. Send feedback to: dreadmediapodcast@gmail.com. Follow @DevilDinosaurJr and @dreadmedia on Twitter! Join the Facebook group! Support the show at www.patreon.com/dreadmedia. Visit www.desmondreddick.com, www.stayscary.wordpress.com, www.dreadmedia.bandcamp.com, www.kccinephile.com, and www.dejasdomicileofdread.blogspot.com.

Natasha Renee Presents: Disaster Dating 101

What is Black Love? Why does black love matter? Natasha and Robyn talk about black love, and what black love means to them. How and why society should see the positive images. Make sure you guys answer the question and let us know what black love is to "you". This isn't your average relationship podcast. Sooo.... Sit back, Listen and take this disastrous journey and let's get REAL. Credits Written by Natasha Renee Disaster Dating 101 was recorded and produced at WTF Media, Soho, NY Original music was created and produced by Khizman at Rec Room Recording Studio, Chesapeake, VA DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed on the Disaster Dating 101 Podcast are for ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSE ONLY. This does not reflect our personal opinions this is only for the use of entertainment. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/natasha-renee/message

Born Or Made
Chris Parnell

Born Or Made

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 27:36


Chris Parnell is a strength and muscle building coach based in NYC, and currently a natural Men's Physique competitor. When he's not competing, he's providing the most optimal training experience for high-profile clientele in Soho, New York. Chris had success at his first physique show and continues to diet and work on his bodybuilding for the next upcoming season. He placed third in his division and his goal is to become pro in 2022. Competing has been a major growth experience for Chris and helped him gain new clients in the fitness space, including fitness professionals. Chris currently guides his peers with dieting for weight loss/fat loss or muscle gain. When Chris isn't moving that iron or measuring his macros, he's writing his thoughts down and recording it over some beats. He and his friends make rap music together and are currently working on a project for the summer of 2022. In this episode, Michael and Chris talk about how to find out what you're passionate about, the number one way to take control of your day, and a super valuable piece of nutritional advice. Head over to kreaturesofhabit.com and enter the promo code KOHPOD20 to receive 20% off your first order.

Quotomania
Quotomania 201: Howard Zinn

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 1:31


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Zinn grew up in Brooklyn in a working-class, immigrant household. At 18 he became a shipyard worker and then joined the Air Force and flew bombing missions during World War II. These experiences helped shape his opposition to war and his strong belief in the importance of knowing history.After attending college under the G.I. Bill, he worked as a warehouse loader while earning a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University. From 1956 to 1963, he taught at Spelman College in Atlanta, GA, where he became active in the Civil Rights Movement. After being fired by Spelman for his support for student protesters, Zinn became a professor of political science at Boston University, where he taught until his retirement in 1988.Zinn was the author of dozens of books, including A People's History of the United States, the play Marx in Soho, Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal, and SNCC: The New Abolitionists. He received many awards including the Lannan Foundation Literary Award for Nonfiction, the Eugene V. Debs award for his writing and political activism, and the Ridenhour Courage Prize.From https://www.howardzinn.org/about/biography/. For more information about Howard Zinn:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Mona Eltahawy about Zinn, at 13:25: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-069-mona-eltahawyThe Zinn Reader: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/213913/the-zinn-reader-by-howard-zinn/“Remembering the People's Historian Howard Zinn at 90”: https://www.democracynow.org/2012/8/24/be_honest_about_the_history_of

United Queendom Podcast
The Jujubee Interview

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 33:20


Exclusive interview with star of Drag Race season two, All Stars 5, UK vs the World and pretty much every other season imaginable, the legendary Jujubee, who talks death threats from fans, not caring about UKvWorld backlash and - most importantly - cats. Juju is starting in DEATH DROP on the west end. https://deathdropplay.com/ https://www.jujubeeonline.com/ https://www.instagram.com/jujubeeonline/ @jujuboston email edward.m.dyson@googlemail.com @unitedqueendompodcast www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/samdowlertime www.twitter.com/samdowler www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

United Queendom Podcast
Drag Race S14 E15 - Reunited

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 14:45


Ed is podcasting from Venice and Sam from Devon. We've got through part of this reunion episode before technical faults with WiFi got the best of us. With quality over quantity we compare with other reunions, Rue's love for the season, was Rue actually there and who was sliding into Kerri Colby's DM's? Apologies for the disruption but to makeup for it we're putting up Sam's interview with Jujubee from our Patreon. email edward.m.dyson@googlemail.com @unitedqueendompodcast www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/samdowlertime www.twitter.com/samdowler www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

Soho Radio
Butcher Boy chats with Pete Paphides

Soho Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 15:26


John from Butcher Boy chats with Pete on his first show back on Soho Radio. You can catch the full show with all the fun and tracks here on our Mixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/sohoradio/pete-paphides-feat-john-hunt-from-butcher-boy-11042022/. This is the Soho Radio podcast, showcasing the best broadcasts from our online radio station in the heart of London.Across our Soho and NYC + Culture channels, we have a wide range of shows covering every genre alongside chat, discussions and special productions.To catch up on all things Soho Radio head on over to mixcloud.com/sohoradio, tune in live anytime at sohoradiolondon.com or get the app.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/soho-radio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jay's Analysis
The Philosophy of Horror The Cellar, Last Night in Soho, Hole in the Ground & More -Jay Dyer

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 136:06


This stream will be Half / Half in a few days, with the full version being limited soon. For the full stream sub to my site or Rokfin. It ended up being entirely about the philosophy of horror, the grotesque, virtue and vices and the realm of hades . We looked at several recent horror films I thought were instructive and illustrative for various reasons and in various ways. I tied this analysis into the notions of a modern, demythologized and disenchanted world, as well the spiritual realities we all face. Movies analyzed include: The Cellar, Hole in the Ground, You Are Not My Mother, My Friends Hate Me, Last Night in Soho, and more!

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 153 Special Follow up: How NYC's 92Y Developed the Largest Jewelry Program in the Country

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 18:06


What you'll learn in this episode: How Jonathan moved from sculpture to jewelry to drawing, and why he explores different ideas with each medium How the relationship between craft and fine art has evolved over the years Why people became more interested in jewelry during the pandemic Why jewelers working in any style benefit from strong technical skills How you can take advantage of the 92nd Street Y's jewelry programming and virtual talks About Jonathan Wahl Jonathan Wahl joined 92nd Street Y in July 1999 as director of the jewelry and metalsmithing program in 92Y's School of the Arts, the largest program of its kind in the nation. He is responsible for developing and overseeing the curriculum, which offers more than 60 classes weekly and 15 visiting artists annually. Jonathan is also responsible for hiring and supervising 25 faculty members, maintaining four state-of-the-art jewelry and metalsmithing studios, and promoting the department locally and nationally as a jewelry resource center. Named one of the top 10 jewelers to watch by W Jewelry in 2006, Jonathan is an accomplished artist who, from 1994 to 1995, served as artist-in-residence at Hochschule Der Kunst in Berlin, Germany. He has shown his work in the exhibitions Day Job (The Drawing Center), Liquid Lines (Museum of Fine Arts Houston), The Jet Drawings (Sienna Gallery, Lenox MA, and SOFA New York), Formed to Function (John Michael Kohler Arts Center), Defining Craft (American Craft Museum), Markers in Contemporary Metal (Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art), Transfigurations: 9 Contemporary Metalsmiths (University of Akron and tour), and Contemporary Craft (New York State Museum). Jonathan was awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Emerging Artist Fellowship from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, two New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships in recognition of "Outstanding Artwork," and the Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths Award for "Outstanding Achievement." As part of the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX, and The Museum of Arts and Design in New York, his work has been reviewed by Art in America (June, 2000), The New York Times (June 2005), and Metalsmith Magazine (1996, 1999, 2000 2002, 2005, 2009); his work was also featured in Metalsmith Magazine's prestigious "Exhibition in Print" (1994 and 1999). Jonathan's art work can be seen at Sienna Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts, which specializes in contemporary American and European art work, and De Vera in Soho, New York. His work can also be seen in the publications The Jet Drawings (Sienna Press, 2008), and in three collections by Lark Books: 1,000 Rings, 500 Enameled Objects and 500 Metal Vessels. Before joining 92Y, Jonathan was, first, director of the jewelry and metalsmithing department at the YMCA's Craft Students League, and later assistant director of the League itself. Mr. Wahl holds a B.F.A. in jewelry and metalsmithing from Temple University's Tyler School of Art and an M.F.A. in metalsmithing and fine arts from the State University of New York at New Paltz. He is a member of the Society of North America Goldsmiths. Additional Resources: Website: www.jonathanwahl.com Website: www.92y.org/jewelry LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jonathancwahl Instagram: @jonathancwahl/   Photos: Available at TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: With more than 60 jewelry classes offered weekly, the 92nd Street Y's Jewelry Center is by far the largest program of its kind in the country—and it's all run by award-winning sculptor, jeweler and artist Jonathan Wahl. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the different relationships he has with jewelry and sculpture; why craftsmanship should be embraced by the art world; and what he has planned for 92Y in 2022. Read the episode transcript here. Interview with Jonathan Wahl 4/3/22     Sharon: Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast.  Today, my guest is Jonathan Wahl, Director of the Jewelry Center at the 92nd Street Y in New York.  Jonathan was recently on the podcast, but we had to rush through the description of the many jewelry programs that are going on at the Y.  So, I asked him back to tell us about the programs in more detail.  Many of them are online and are recorded, so it doesn't matter where you are in the world.   Jonathan, nice to see you again.   Jonathan: Nice to see you, Sharon.  Thanks for having me back.   Sharon: You ran through it very quickly at the end because I didn't realize how much you had to say basically.  So, tell us first about your interviews you have with sculptors and jewelers.  Tell us about those.  Are there any upcoming?   Who are the next ones?  Give us--   Jonathan: Sure, so the lecture series came out of the pandemic obviously.  I think I've done about 25 or 30 lectures or interviews so far.  The most recent series was a series of three talks about female sculptors who are jewelers or jewelers who are sculptors.  As you could tell from our last conversation, I'm really interested in this line be-tween the fields of art, particularly between jewelry and sculpture or fine art and decorative art.  So, I was really curious to talk to these three in particular New Yorkers who practice in both fields and it was Joe Platner who is a longtime jeweler in New York City, Michelle Okeldoner(?) whose work was primarily sculpture and also does jewelry and Anna Corey whose work also started in sculpture, but now is primarily a jeweler.  So, it was really fascinating to talk to these women artists about how they practice and what inspires them in their practice.     Sharon: And do you have series upcoming more in the spring or summer?   Jonathan: Yup, I'm working on a series about enamel.  Enameling seems to be having a re-surgence in our department and I think in jewelry in general, we're seeing a lot more enamel and a lot more color in metals.  So, it will be with a contemporary artist, a historical collection and a contemporary fine jeweler.   Sharon: It sounds very interesting and enamel, at least in the view I see now, is becoming much more popular.   Jonathan: Yeah, yeah, I'm not exactly sure why.  I'm really curious.  I think maybe it's happy; it's colorful; it's as close to painting, I guess, as you can get in jewelry in a way.   Sharon: It's such a skill if you do it right.  It's an artistry.  Jewelry is an art, but it's such an artistry within the art in a sense.   Jonathan: Absolutely, you can, as we say, shake and bake and get color on metal pretty easily.  So, you can get pretty direct results and get color on your metal pretty simply.  Of course, to be an expert enamellist, to practice grisaille or cloisonne or brioche, you need to become master craftsman.  So, there's a lot to dig into.   Sharon: So, do we need to keep our eyes on the spring session, the summer session or when?   Jonathan: It's going to be the summer session.  I think it's going to take place in June.   Sharon: O.K., I look forward to it.   Jonathan: I'm not sure of the dates, but it's coming and you'll see it.  Most of the talks so far are on our archives at 92Y.org in the jewelry center page.   Sharon: Yeah, I know there are some that I'd really like to go look at that I missed.   Jonathan: The previous three were with three Brazilian jewelers.   Sharon: Now, you just had an interview with—I don't know how to say her last name—but she was talking about a Brazilian jeweler, Roberto Burle Marks.   Jonathan: Uhum, correct.   Sharon: But that was separate.   Jonathan: It was part of the Brazilian series because Roberto Burle Marks was a Brazilian.   Sharon: But it wasn't part of the Sculpture and Artist Series; it was a different series.   Jonathan: Correct, right, they were three and three.   Sharon: There's a lot going on.  So, tell us about this jewelry residency.  I was just looking at your Instagram and the ads for it.  So, tell us about it.   Jonathan: The Jewelry Residency Program, it would be its fifth year, but we took two years off because of the pandemic.  The Jewelry Residence Program is something that I've always dreamed of doing and I'm so happy that it's back on.  What it provides is a studio apartment here in our facility, 24-hour access to one of our studios and air-fare to and from New York City from anywhere in the world.   Sharon: Are people applying now?  When does it start?   Jonathan: Yes, the applications are open until April 15.  We extended the deadline.   Sharon: Does it start in September--   Jonathan: Sorry, it's August 18-September 19, if I'm not mistaken.  That's the residency program.   Sharon: And you get applications from all over the world or what?   Jonathan: We had applications from fifty countries in 2019.  I would love to have applications from farther afield.  Most of them come from western Europe.  We're still trying to figure out how we reach populations in Asia or sub-Saharan Africa or Africa in gen-eral or even more in South America.  It's been kind of hard to get to some of those areas.  I'm working on a trip to Korea which you know about, so I sent it to all the artists that we're going to visit in Korea.  So, I hope we get some applications from Korea and I also just was in contact with an artist who's a Ukrainian jeweler and she has started on Facebook to try and raise money and funds and help Ukrainian jewel-ers who've been displaced, so of course I've shared that residency with her and the opportunity.  We would love to support a Ukrainian jeweler and have them here in New York City for a month, particularly if they're not in a studio, but I'm also looking forward to seeing how we can support a Ukrainian jeweler in general if they are here in New York City.   Sharon: And so it doesn't matter, a male, female, anybody in between.   Jonathan: It doesn't matter and it is open to Americans.  It is an international jewelry resi-dency, but you are welcome to apply as an American.  The reason for the residency is, as I mentioned, to expand New York City's access to jewelers who don't maybe normally get here and the type of work that isn't often shown in New York City, but it's also for an artist who might not normally be able to come to New York City to come to New York City, but it's also about why an artist needs to be in New York, what would New York City do for them and that could be for a whole host of reasons and there is a jury panel that I assemble every year that helps me decide who that next person should be.     Sharon: Wow!  That sounds pretty competitive, but it's sounds really worthwhile.   Jonathan: Well, there's only one spot.  Sharon, with funding, we could expand that.  So again, if anyone wants to help support a residence.  The residency program, I'm completely open to a conversation.   Sharon: Well, I will suggest that people get in touch with you, O.K., or at least send the checks.  O.K., so tell us about the travel program to Korea.   Jonathan: I do a trip every other year to somewhere in the world and we have gone to Israel, Italy, Austria, the Czech Republic, India, Japan and this year hopefully to Korea.   Sharon: Wow!  That really sounds fabulous.   Jonathan: Yeah, the trips are centered around historical collections and contemporary jewelers and if you're not familiar with the Korean jewelry scene, it's really vibrant and really robust. It has its roots in Europe and the United States as well as with Korean tradi-tion.  So, I'm really excited to meet these artists who blend a lot of techniques and traditions and they're doing some really extraordinary work.   Sharon: Well, the Korean artists who have exhibited at the international shows have really been creative and really amazing.    Jonathan: Really strong work, yeah.   Sharon: So, the last I talked to you, I just wanted to double check.  Are you still thinking you'll be going October 6, whenever?   Jonathan: Yeah, that's the tentative plan.  The one thing.  Korea has lifted quarantine restric-tions which is great, but groups are still restricted to six or fewer, so it's a bit of a problem for our group which is about fifteen people.  So, I'm a little bit on edge about that.  I'm waiting to see if that will change.   Sharon: Wow!  Six or fewer, that's pretty--   Jonathan: That would make going out to dinner a problem and just going to into groups and staggering them, it's like taking two trips frankly.   Sharon: Yeah, no, it sounds like a lot of logistics.   Jonathan: With that being said, I have a trip to the southwest in the wings for the end of October.  If for some reason the gods are not with us to go to Korea, I'm putting together a trip to San Jose and Taos.   Sharon: There's lots to see there.     Jonathan: Uhum.   Sharon: So, you also have a program for highschoolers to teach them about the jewelry industry.  Tell us about that.   Jonathan: Yeah, this is certainly a program that's been a dream of mine for a long time.  It is a program that is offered to Title 1 art and design school in New York City and Title One schools tend to service underserve populations in general in New York City and most of those students wouldn't normally get access to a jewelry studio in high school.  Most kids don't get access to a jewelry studio in high school in general.  Particularly this population most likely wouldn't be taking a class at the 92nd Street Y as a fee-for-service program for obvious reasons.  So, this is a program to get kids who would normally be in the studio into the studio and expose them to the tech-niques and materials and offer them a view into a possible career path, if that's something they would like to pursue.  We're coordinating with New York City Jewel-ry Week who has organized wonderful guest speakers with these kids and with NYCJWM and the Department of Education, are able to offer paid internships this summer which is really exciting.  It's the first year of this program, so we're still find-ing our footing and I know there are going to be some kids who decide to go into the next year and I think particularly the juniors and seniors will hopefully take advan-tage of some of these opportunities and perhaps go deeper into the field.   Sharon: It sounds like a great opportunity, yeah.   Jonathan: Even master soldering to a teenager, regardless of whether or not you go into the field as a career, it's a great skill to have.   Sharon: I don't know that much about New York and the school system, but I would assume that there are not a lot of opportunities like this that are going on in New York.   Jonathan: To my knowledge, there is not a functioning jewelry studio in any of the public high schools in New York City.   Sharon: Now, that's really amazing to me.  Would a shop class teach jewelry and metal-smithing?   Jonathan: To my knowledge, there aren't any functioning jewelry programs classes in New York City public schools right now and we don't have trade schools for jewelry in America.  There are art schools and we've talked about how that's always the best fit if you're going into the trade.   Sharon: It sounds like a program that would really take off.  So, what else should we know about—and what else is coming up?  I know you have some great—you've had Tony Greenbaum teaching a class who teaches about modernist jewelry.   Jonathan: Yup and Bella Neyman just finished a great series on costume jewelry that was really fascinating.   Sharon: Uhuh, I do have to say it was great.  I did listen to it.  It was great because it was in Los Angeles and it was at seven in the morning which is usually not the time I'm up to watch class.  So, I watched the recorded classes which was great to have.   Jonathan: Yeah, and we're working on our fall programming, so I'm not exactly sure what the talks will be, but I'm sure there will be one.  I'm working on another few initiatives—well, one initiative in particular that is not confirmed yet, but I would like to also create a younger designer's award or fund in which we would help support a new jeweler and help them with classes and to continue their education as well as men-torship through our faculty and through our connections.  One of the huge leaps is to go from undergrad or grad in these very supportive environments and then to be let loose to fly free.  Many people hone their skills while working for another artist doing benchwork, but I would like to help an artist or a young designer home their skills through our classes and through our faculty mentorship and our professional mentorship opportunities.  So, I'm working on that.  I would love to see it happen by the fall, but TBD.   Sharon: O.K., well, you can keep us posted.  I know you have so much going on, so thank you so much.  I just envision you juggling so many balls.   Jonathan: There's always a lot going on as well as continuing to support the programing that we do on an ongoing basis here.  Every day, every week--there's a class going on right outside my office right now, one of three or four classes going on right now in the center.  We do offer over fifty classes a week for jewelry alone, so that in itself is enough of a job--   Sharon: For hands-on jewelry.   Jonathan: Hands-on jewelry, hands-on making.  To my right, there's a wax covering class going on.  To my left, there's a jewelry two class going on.  Further down the road is a goldsmithing class and then—yeah, I can't remember what's in the fourth studio right now, but the most pressing thing is if you are interested or know someone who might apply for the Jewelry Residency Program, I'd strongly encourage them to do so.  We've got some wonderful press from Town and Country Magazine last year and in the cut from New York Magazine, so there are some great opportunities.   Sharon: It sounds like it and since the deadline is right around the corner, April 15, people need to get on it.   Jonathan: But it's easy.  It's a submittable application.  You upload your images.  You make the case for why you want to be in New York City and away you go.   Sharon: I don't know.  That still involves somebody sitting down and really putting their brainpower behind it.   Jonathan: Get on it, people.   Sharon: Jonathan, thank you so much for being here today.   Jonathan: You're welcome.   Sharon: And we'll keep everyone posted on what else is going on at the Y.     Jonathan: Thank you, Sharon, it's always a pleasure.  Hope to see you soon.                    

Soho Radio
Spoon interview with Dennis Bovell

Soho Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 8:53


American rock band from Austin, Texas sat down to chat with Dennis about his dub remix of their track 'Wild'. You can catch the full show with all the fun and tracks here on our Mixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/sohoradio/dub-on-air-with-dennis-bovell-feat-spoon-27032022/. This is the Soho Radio podcast, showcasing the best broadcasts from our online radio station in the heart of London.Across our Soho and NYC + Culture channels, we have a wide range of shows covering every genre alongside chat, discussions and special productions.To catch up on all things Soho Radio head on over to mixcloud.com/sohoradio, tune in live anytime at sohoradiolondon.com or get the app.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/soho-radio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 153 Part 2: How NYC's 92Y Developed the Largest Jewelry Program in the Country

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 30:32


What you'll learn in this episode: How Jonathan moved from sculpture to jewelry to drawing, and why he explores different ideas with each medium How the relationship between craft and fine art has evolved over the years Why people became more interested in jewelry during the pandemic Why jewelers working in any style benefit from strong technical skills How you can take advantage of the 92nd Street Y's jewelry programming and virtual talks About Jonathan Wahl Jonathan Wahl joined 92nd Street Y in July 1999 as director of the jewelry and metalsmithing program in 92Y's School of the Arts, the largest program of its kind in the nation. He is responsible for developing and overseeing the curriculum, which offers more than 60 classes weekly and 15 visiting artists annually. Jonathan is also responsible for hiring and supervising 25 faculty members, maintaining four state-of-the-art jewelry and metalsmithing studios, and promoting the department locally and nationally as a jewelry resource center. Named one of the top 10 jewelers to watch by W Jewelry in 2006, Jonathan is an accomplished artist who, from 1994 to 1995, served as artist-in-residence at Hochschule Der Kunst in Berlin, Germany. He has shown his work in the exhibitions Day Job (The Drawing Center), Liquid Lines (Museum of Fine Arts Houston), The Jet Drawings (Sienna Gallery, Lenox MA, and SOFA New York), Formed to Function (John Michael Kohler Arts Center), Defining Craft (American Craft Museum), Markers in Contemporary Metal (Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art), Transfigurations: 9 Contemporary Metalsmiths (University of Akron and tour), and Contemporary Craft (New York State Museum). Jonathan was awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Emerging Artist Fellowship from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, two New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships in recognition of "Outstanding Artwork," and the Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths Award for "Outstanding Achievement." As part of the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX, and The Museum of Arts and Design in New York, his work has been reviewed by Art in America (June, 2000), The New York Times (June 2005), and Metalsmith Magazine (1996, 1999, 2000 2002, 2005, 2009); his work was also featured in Metalsmith Magazine's prestigious "Exhibition in Print" (1994 and 1999). Jonathan's art work can be seen at Sienna Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts, which specializes in contemporary American and European art work, and De Vera in Soho, New York. His work can also be seen in the publications The Jet Drawings (Sienna Press, 2008), and in three collections by Lark Books: 1,000 Rings, 500 Enameled Objects and 500 Metal Vessels. Before joining 92Y, Jonathan was, first, director of the jewelry and metalsmithing department at the YMCA's Craft Students League, and later assistant director of the League itself. Mr. Wahl holds a B.F.A. in jewelry and metalsmithing from Temple University's Tyler School of Art and an M.F.A. in metalsmithing and fine arts from the State University of New York at New Paltz. He is a member of the Society of North America Goldsmiths. Additional Resources: Website: www.jonathanwahl.com Website: www.92y.org/jewelry LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jonathancwahl Instagram: @jonathancwahl/   Photos: Available at TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: With more than 60 jewelry classes offered weekly, the 92nd Street Y's Jewelry Center is by far the largest program of its kind in the country—and it's all run by award-winning sculptor, jeweler and artist Jonathan Wahl. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the different relationships he has with jewelry and sculpture; why craftsmanship should be embraced by the art world; and what he has planned for 92Y in 2022. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. Today, my guest is Jonathan Wahl, Director of the Jewelry Center of the 92nd Street Y in New York City. The program is the largest of its kind in the country. In addition to his life in jewelry, Jonathan is an award-winning artist whose work is in the permanent collections of prestigious museums. Welcome back.    When do you have time to work on your jewelry?    Jonathan: I'm here Monday through Wednesday in the studio here. Then I'm in my studio the rest of the time, so Thursday, Friday, Saturdays and Sundays.   Sharon: Your home studio or a studio at the Y?   Jonathan: No, it's not here. It's in Brooklyn. I wouldn't be able to work here. People would be finding me. No, I maintain a studio in Brooklyn. That's where I've done all my work basically for the past 25 years.   Sharon: Tell us about your work. I was reading about you. You have a whole series of different things, drawings, collections.   Jonathan: Lest I forget, I have had a jewelry line. In 2005—and I'll get to the larger bodies of work—when I moved to New York, my work was primarily sculpture. It was the tinware. It became the oversize tinware. I got a Tiffany fellowship which gave me a nice chunk of cash, and I made a series of work based on Frederic Remington, a series called Cowboys and Unicorns. I made a series of tasseled heads for this exhibition. It took about a year. There were many bodies of work, like Aztec Astronauts, which is inspired by Jared Diamond's book, “Guns, Germs, and Steel.” There's no jewelry in it at all, but it was interesting. I had a wonderful Foundation for the Arts fellowship for Cowboys and Unicorns. I had this Tiffany fellowship. I thought I was hot to trot. I was an artist, but because I've also been very self-directed in my work, I have made choices on my own, and I certainly hadn't thought of the larger picture, like, “Who am I marketing to?”    At one point, I felt like maybe I should do something different. I saw these people putting jewelry lines together and I thought, “Well, let me try that. I'm going to throw together a jewelry line.” I did put together a jewelry line in 2004 and 2005, and it got a lot of press. Barneys called and Bergdorf called. It was exciting and, true to myself, I looked at this opportunity and thought, “What they're asking for sounds like I'm going to have to start a real business.” Between my role here as Director of the Jewelry Center and my studio practice, I wasn't sure I wanted to run a full-time jewelry business.    What this position here affords me is the time and space to work in my studio on what I want to make. I thought that if I put together a jewelry line, that was a different kind of hustle, and a hustle that was going to take over. As a consequence, I declined Barneys and Bergdorf. I did sell my line at De Vera in New York, which is a much more boutique, gorgeous store that has since moved. Interestingly enough, launching the jewelry line brought me to drawing. People who knew me and knew my work as a sculptor, when I said I'd launched a jewelry line, to put it politely, they looked confused. I've said this in many interviews: a jeweler in the art world, people don't really get. An artist who makes jewelry is different than a jeweler who makes art, may I say.   Sharon: That's interesting.    Jonathan: I think that has changed. It has changed to some extent, but it's different. It's a one-way street. A potter and a sculptor, interesting, particularly with clay being very hot right now. A painter and a bartender makes sense; people get that. Anyway, I found this look of confusion quite perplexing. I started these large drawings, renderings of jet jewelry. I was working on a series of drawings about jewelry, about history, about my love for history, and I happened upon jet jewelry. I thought it was so out of the ordinary: monochromatic, at times really epoch-shifting in terms of what it was. So, I decided to start drawing these objects to take them out of the realm of jewelry and present them to the viewer as an object. Rendered large, they took on a completely different identity. It paralleled my experience of having this conversation with people saying I'm a jeweler and a sculptor. I thought, “If I present them with these drawings that are straight-up portraits of jewelry, maybe they'll think differently about what those edges are about or what those lines are, what those determinations are.”   Sharon: That's interesting about people not getting a jeweler as a painter or an artist. That's what you said, right?    Jonathan: I wish I could deny it. Again, this is 20 or 15 or 17 years ago; I can't remember. Things have changed a lot in the art world. I'll probably get in trouble for this; I don't know if any of the Whitney curators are going to hear this, but the Whitney, one of my favorite museums, had an exhibition of artists who employ craft, I think. It was all artists who made objects or used material that represented craft in some way. It was such an artist's use of craft, and done in a way that was pure aesthetics and abstraction, which was such a different experience with respect to the materials that I think a craftsperson has. I also find that curators are really only looking at artists who use craft techniques or craft materials from this artistic, old-school, may I say modernist perspective.    I truly mean that because it was fascinating to see how a fine art museum presented craft in this way. To me, it reiterated how these fields are viewed, certainly from each corner of the art world. I found the show at the Whitney really underwhelming in terms of how they represented craft. Just because you use yarn doesn't mean it's craft. That's the takeaway. I think that represents this weird, one-way street or one-way mirror of how crafts and art are viewed together. Martin Puryear was not in that show.   Sharon: Pardon?   Jonathan: Martin Puryear, whose work definitely involves craftsmanship. He wasn't in that exhibition. There were people who I thought could have been in that exhibition to represent how craft is employed in the fine art world and would have made the statement better.   Sharon: So, what is craft? It always seems to me the question that's has no answer. How do you know, when you're looking at something, whether it's craft or fine art or jewelry made with yarn? What's the difference? Not difference, but how do you separate it?   Jonathan: I think it's many times subjective. To that point, the curators at the Whitney could have put whatever they wanted and called it craft, but I think when you see craft, you know it. I think you really do. I think their lines can be crossed. I think there's craft that's art, and I think there's art that's craft, but for myself, I know it when I see it.    I think it also depends on how you employ the materials and for what end. I've been thinking about this recently. Craft was never really thought of as espousing an agenda other than its function. That was how it started, but now in some ways, the art world is looking at craft that explores itself beyond its function. It's making social commentary and is actually functioning in the way fine art would have explained itself, as material subjugated to the thought process of the artist. Craftsmen can be both, explaining or using functional materiality. They can also use a fine arts strategy, if they're making a commentary or going beyond the object's functionality into a realm that makes you think about the object differently. That is more of a fine arts strategy. So, it gets really sticky.   Sharon: It's one of those questions. I'm thinking about craft in jewelry. I'm thinking about when you were in camp, the lanyards you would make, the necklaces you'd make with plastics. I guess you could call it a type of craft jewelry.   Jonathan: For sure. I don't think craftsmen should be offended by lanyard jewelry. That's how you start. It's weaving; it's one of the most basic weaving skills. Voice that history. Those are old skills. That's how we built civilization. Believe in that. We wouldn't be here without those skills. Don't be afraid of that. I think my own jewelry journey, if you will, has been influenced by these experiences. I love jewelry. I love objects. I love technique. I love skill. I'm so in awe of people who can make, who can really fabricate something. It takes skill. It takes work. It takes focus.    I love jewelry. I wear one ring and a watch. I change my ring up whenever I feel like that. They're mostly rings I've made, but they're a specific type of ring. Apart from my look in the 80s, I'm a relatively conservative-looking guy, so I wear jewelry that reflects the aesthetics of myself. It tends to be kind of traditional, so I have no problem with great jewelry that has a great stone, that's made well, that some would consider traditional. I'm O.K. with that. You know what? Wear whatever kind of jewelry makes you feel right.    I love art jewelry and I think it's important in pushing the boundaries or the materiality of the field. I'm happy to see and support that. I love going to SCHMUCK. I'm always blown away when I see what's happening in the world of contemporary jewelry. I think contemporary or art jewelry, the field is also changing. I have to say everything's moving more towards the middle in a way, whether it's contemporary jewelry, studio jewelry or art jewelry. When I look at work today, it's all moving a little bit towards the middle, which is fascinating. But when it comes to jewelry, I don't have any problem with good jewelry, period. I love good jewelry.   Sharon: Big stones are nice.    Jonathan: I'm just saying good jewelry, however you classify jewelry, I like jewelry.   Sharon: Why are things moving towards the middle? Why do you think that? Is that part of the ethos of the country, or that people don't want to be extreme? They don't want purple hair anymore?   Jonathan: With all that being said, the generation that's coming up now wants to have purple hair, absolutely. I look at the trends that are going on right now, and I think of myself in art school in the high 80s with my hoop earrings and my dyed red hair and my capri pants and my corny shoes and my vests and yada, yada, yada. I look at this younger generation thinking, “Wow, it's coming back around again, interesting.” Maybe I talk out of two sides of my mouth, but I think in general, the bulk of those fields are moving a little bit closer together. I think there's an appreciation in the art jewelry world for techniques and processes that might not have been so accepted 10 or 20 years ago. I think there's an appreciation all around. I think I see contemporary jewelry making gestures that might have only happened in the art jewelry world 10 or 20 years ago.    Sharon: You also talk about the rift between fine art and jewelry. Can you talk a little bit about that?   Jonathan: I've got to say, I've met some great fine art collectors in New York and their jewelry has really stunk. I find it really funny when I see people who've got a great dress on and have a great art collection and mundane jewelry. It's the last thing that people think about sometimes. Although, the one person I'll say that always bucks the trend is Lindsay Pollock, who has great jewelry and has great art and knows great art.   Sharon: Who? I'm sorry; I didn't hear.   Jonathan: Lindsay Pollock, who used to be an editor at Art Forum. Now she also works for the Whitney Museum of Art, I think, as Director of Communications. I'm not sure, but she's a wonderful collector.    Sharon: And she has great jewelry.   Jonathan: Yes, and she knows the art world really well. Your question; please repeat it.   Sharon: The rift between fine art and jewelry. Is there a rift?   Jonathan: There's a difference. I think for so long people were trying to justify themselves, so people got defensive. Now people are starting to own what they do and who they are without the defense: “I'm not an artist, I'm a craftsperson” or “I'm a craftsperson, not an artist.” I think there's less apprehension about that now in terms of owning those fields. This is a conversation had by many people, but when modernism took its toll on craft, it stepped up its identity in many ways. I think since then, craftsmen and jewelers have been trying to figure out their way back to be on par with the rest of the arts. I think for a long time, because it wasn't modern art or contemporary art, there was a real apprehension about how we define artwork.   I think about how jewelry was, for a long time, just photographed on a white background so it reads as an object, like you're presenting it like a little sculpture. For many years, that's how it was presented. I find that representative of how we explain the work we were making. When you saw it, you generally saw it sitting on nothing except white, in a void, outside of any wearability or reference to the person, which I get. But when you think about that, for me, it has resonance. I also think that's kind of who we are and what we do. I think that's changing to some extent, but the art world and the craft world have been trying to figure out the relationship for a while.   Sharon: Do you make jewelry now?   Jonathan: I do. I just made a ring for myself with a beautiful piece of lapis that I came across. It's very plain and modernist. I had an old necklace from my former landlord who passed away and left it to me. I melted down this necklace, I milled the jewelry, I rolled down the sheet and I made a half-round wire that I put through the mill again so it was more like a trapezoid and set it again. Man, I was a jeweler for a day. I love good jewelry, and I like to represent.   Sharon: You like to represent? What do you mean?   Jonathan: I like to represent the field with a good piece of jewelry.   Sharon: Wow! You made the sheet metal and then you rolled your wire. The first time I saw somebody rolling wire, I thought, “You could buy wire. Why would anybody roll it?”   Jonathan: One great thing is I didn't have to buy new gold. Another great thing is I'm recycling the gold. I recycle, recycle, recycle whenever possible. I worked it all the way down, but I do not have a jewelry line. I rarely make jewelry on commission. Most of my studio practice is focused in other ways, although as I've been drawing for the past 12 years, I recently picked up my tin shears again. I have actually been making more tinwork, which is also reflective of our current state of politics and our country again. It's been fascinating to work in metal again, so stay tuned.    Sharon: How does it reflect where we are as a country or politically?    Jonathan: I'm making tinware again, and I think a lot of what's in question right now in our country is what is traditional? Who are Americans? There's a lot of questioning about do you fit, do you belong, what are those parameters, how are you judged as an American or not as an American. The painted tin I'm making right now is so understood as a traditional object and a traditional way of making. Mixing and presenting that work within this very traditional material and history of making is, again, a metaphor for traditionality. The viewer automatically looks at this thing and things it's an original object. It's meant to look very traditional, although right now I'm working on a six-foot-by-four-foot painted stenciled decal tray, which, after a few minutes of looking at it, you will know is definitely not from the 19th century. But again, the techniques and the feeling and the look are traditional, I find that that's what we're questioning right now. We're questioning what is traditional. What are these traditions?    The more I dig into these traditions, particularly in painted tinware—Japanware is what it was called. It was meant to imitate Japanese lacquerware. It had nothing to do with America. Another iteration is painted tinware that comes from a German and Scandinavian aesthetic, also not traditional American. So, these objects that you'd see in a folk museum and be like, “Yeah, Ohio, 1840, I got it,” these traditions and materials were not traditional until they became traditional. There's a lot of this material culture history that I find fascinating. It's very layered for me. I hope it's as interesting to the viewer. I have never really found the right format for many of my ideas or questions that fit into jewelry, and that's one of those cruxes. I've never found the right way for me to use jewelry or engage in jewelry with the same intents that I have in other materials or formats.    Sharon: What do you mean exactly? It doesn't fit into a category?   Jonathan: No, I can be really political with this tinware. I've never figured out how to get the same effect, with the same feeling, in jewelry. I find, for me, the wearing of jewelry is the great part of it, and I don't want my jewelry to say the same thing as my tinware. This is personal: I don't want my jewelry to work the same way as this giant tinware piece does, because I like this ring that fits on my finger. I love it, and I love when I get compliments on it. I think jewelry is special. It's great because we wear it.    As a sidenote, it was fascinating that during the pandemic, jewelry took off. Sales of jewelry took off. All my friends in the field of luxury jewelry and studio jewelry, they had great years. Jewelry is the stuff you take with you. Jewelry is the stuff you wear. Jewelry is the intimate stuff, and I think it was fascinating to know that in this time of extreme stress and trouble, people were going to jewelers to buy these things they could hold and keep and literally run with it if they had to. There is this intimacy of jewelry that people sought out, and that's special. It doesn't exist in other places. Those are the kinds of things, the resonance, that I want to embrace and love about jewelry and that I will not run away from.    One of the reasons why I started even playing around with images of jewelry, which led me to the drawings, is because I did this class at the Met called Into the Vaults. We went through all these different departments of the Met, jewelry and old jewelry. I came across the story of the Hannebery Pearls, which were pearls that were given to Catherine de Medici from her uncle, who was the Pope. This string of pearls went through the Hanoverians and then eventually into the British Crown Jewels. I thought, “Wow, if this string of pearls could talk, what we would know. What has it seen?” I was fooling around with this image of a gem, a ring that I had Photoshopped a historical scene from a movie on top of, so it almost looked like this gem was reflecting what it saw. I thought, “Wow, wouldn't it be amazing if there was a ring from ancient Greece that was passed down every generation until now, and that ring was held and worn by 200 generations?” I don't know how many generations that would be. That intimacy and history of an object doesn't exist in other places in the same way, where it's worn and carried with it. There's something about the intimacy of jewelry and the history that it can be embraced in a specific way that I really love.   Sharon: It's something very different and novel. I don't know if it's been done already.   Jonathan: I have an idea for a novel. I'll talk about it off-camera. We should talk about it. It's about that same kind of story, a will to survive.   Sharon: All right. Jonathan, thank you so much for talking with us today.   Jonathan: You're welcome.   Sharon: I expect an invitation to the opening of the 92nd Street Y in Los Angeles. I can't wait.   Jonathan: In the meantime, I hope you can come with us to Korea. As you know, I do trips around the world. South Korea is on the books, and there are a number of other wonderful things happening. The only residency for jewelry in New York City, called the JAIR, Jewelry Artist in Residence, that's happening this summer. Applications are open on our website. We had applications from 50 countries in 2019. It has been suspended since the pandemic.   Another little sidenote: I'm excited about a program called Team Gems, which is a fully-funded program for high school kids in New York City, Title 1 high schools in New York City. It's a fully-funded program for kids to get experience in jewelry that they wouldn't normally have, and will maybe create a pathway for a career in jewelry outside the academic model. I hope I'm going to be able to tell you more about it, but it's the first year and it's very exciting. Also, keep your ears open for my new series of talks coming up. I think this topic is going to be about enamel, and then hopefully a series in June in honor of Pride Month. A lot's going on at the Jewelry Center.   Sharon: Well, thank you for being here. We want to hear more about it in the future. Thank you so much, Jonathan. We greatly appreciate it.   Jonathan: Thank you, it's such a pleasure. Be well.   Sharon: You, too.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 153 Part 1: How NYC's 92Y Developed the Largest Jewelry Program in the Country

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:20


What you'll learn in this episode: How Jonathan moved from sculpture to jewelry to drawing, and why he explores different ideas with each medium How the relationship between craft and fine art has evolved over the years Why people became more interested in jewelry during the pandemic Why jewelers working in any style benefit from strong technical skills How you can take advantage of the 92nd Street Y's jewelry programming and virtual talks About Jonathan Wahl Jonathan Wahl joined 92nd Street Y in July 1999 as director of the jewelry and metalsmithing program in 92Y's School of the Arts, the largest program of its kind in the nation. He is responsible for developing and overseeing the curriculum, which offers more than 60 classes weekly and 15 visiting artists annually. Jonathan is also responsible for hiring and supervising 25 faculty members, maintaining four state-of-the-art jewelry and metalsmithing studios, and promoting the department locally and nationally as a jewelry resource center. Named one of the top 10 jewelers to watch by W Jewelry in 2006, Jonathan is an accomplished artist who, from 1994 to 1995, served as artist-in-residence at Hochschule Der Kunst in Berlin, Germany. He has shown his work in the exhibitions Day Job (The Drawing Center), Liquid Lines (Museum of Fine Arts Houston), The Jet Drawings (Sienna Gallery, Lenox MA, and SOFA New York), Formed to Function (John Michael Kohler Arts Center), Defining Craft (American Craft Museum), Markers in Contemporary Metal (Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art), Transfigurations: 9 Contemporary Metalsmiths (University of Akron and tour), and Contemporary Craft (New York State Museum). Jonathan was awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Emerging Artist Fellowship from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, two New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships in recognition of "Outstanding Artwork," and the Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths Award for "Outstanding Achievement." As part of the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX, and The Museum of Arts and Design in New York, his work has been reviewed by Art in America (June, 2000), The New York Times (June 2005), and Metalsmith Magazine (1996, 1999, 2000 2002, 2005, 2009); his work was also featured in Metalsmith Magazine's prestigious "Exhibition in Print" (1994 and 1999). Jonathan's art work can be seen at Sienna Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts, which specializes in contemporary American and European art work, and De Vera in Soho, New York. His work can also be seen in the publications The Jet Drawings (Sienna Press, 2008), and in three collections by Lark Books: 1,000 Rings, 500 Enameled Objects and 500 Metal Vessels. Before joining 92Y, Jonathan was, first, director of the jewelry and metalsmithing department at the YMCA's Craft Students League, and later assistant director of the League itself. Mr. Wahl holds a B.F.A. in jewelry and metalsmithing from Temple University's Tyler School of Art and an M.F.A. in metalsmithing and fine arts from the State University of New York at New Paltz. He is a member of the Society of North America Goldsmiths. Additional Resources: Website: www.jonathanwahl.com Website: www.92y.org/jewelry LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jonathancwahl Instagram: @jonathancwahl/   Photos: Available at TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: With more than 60 jewelry classes offered weekly, the 92nd Street Y's Jewelry Center is by far the largest program of its kind in the country—and it's all run by award-winning sculptor, jeweler and artist Jonathan Wahl. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the different relationships he has with jewelry and sculpture; why craftsmanship should be embraced by the art world; and what he has planned for 92Y in 2022. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Here at the Jewelry Journey, we're about all things jewelry. With that in mind, I wanted to let you know about an upcoming jewelry conference, which is “Beyond Boundaries: Jewelry of the Americas.” It's sponsored by the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts, or, as it's otherwise known, ASJRA. The conference takes place virtually on Saturday and Sunday May 21 and May 22, which is around the corner. For details on the program and the speakers, go to www.jewelryconference.com. Non-members are welcome. I have to say that I attended this conference in person for several years, and it's one of my favorite conferences. It's a real treat to be able to sit in your pajamas or in comfies in your living room and listen to some extraordinary speakers. So, check it out. Register at www.jewelryconference.com. See you there.   This is a two-part Jewelry Journey podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week. Today, my guest is Jonathan Wahl, Director of the Jewelry Center at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. The program is the largest of its kind in the country. In addition to his life in jewelry, Jonathan is an award-winning artist whose work is in the permanent collections of prestigious museums. It has been exhibited nationally and internationally. We'll hear more about his jewelry journey today and how art fits into that. Jonathan, welcome to the program.   Jonathan: Thank you, Sharon. It's a pleasure to be here. It's a pleasure to see you.   Sharon: It's nice to see you. Hopefully next time, it'll be in person.    Jonathan: I would love that.   Sharon: Jonathan, tell us about your jewelry journey. How did you get to jewelry? Was that where you originally started out?   Jonathan: Recently I've been doing a lot of interviews myself with artists around the world—virtually since the pandemic—as Director of the Jewelry Center, and one of the questions I always ask them is “How did you find your way to jewelry?” It's one of the questions I love to be asked because, at least for myself, it was interesting. I think all of us start out as artists, unless we're born into a jewelry family. Everyone learns how to draw. Everyone paints on their own. Maybe they have classes in high school. If you're lucky, you have a jewelry class in high school. I didn't, so like many people, I discovered jewelry in college at Tyler School of Art, which has one of the best jewelry programs in the country, but I didn't know jewelry existed until I went to art school.    When I went to art school, I thought I was going to be a graphic designer. Being the son of a banker and coming from a prep school, I figured I was going to be an artist, but I had to make a living. I wasn't going to be a painter, so I was thinking I was going to be a graphic designer when I grew up. At the college, I discovered jewelry in my sophomore year. Stanley Lechtzin said to me—I'll never forget it—“After you graduate you could design, if you wanted, costume jewelry in New York City,” and I thought, “That sounds kind of exotic and fun in New York City.” That's how my jewelry journey really began, in an elective class as a sophomore at Tyler School of Art.   Sharon: Where is Tyler? I'm not familiar with it.   Jonathan: In Philadelphia. It's part of Temple University.   Sharon: And Stanley Lechtzin, is he one of the professors there? I don't know that name.   Jonathan: Stanley Lechtzin really put the program on the map. He's in collections internationally. He pioneered the use of electroforming in individual objects. Electroforming was a commercial process used throughout the country for many different industrial applications, but Stanley figured out how to finetune it for the individual artist. His work has recently had some new-found appreciation because of the aesthetics from the 60s and 70s that are also coming back into vogue. His pieces are extraordinary.   Sharon: Before you came to the Y, did you design jewelry? Did you do art? Did you come home from your banking job and work on that stuff?   Jonathan: My father was a banker. I was not a banker. The closest I got to banking was working at a casino in Atlantic City one summer. My family has a house in Ocean City, New Jersey, so I could get to Atlantic City. I had to count a bank of anywhere between $30,000 and $70,000 a night. That's the closest I got to being a banker.    I quickly then moved to London. This was the summer of my senior year after Tyler. After I graduated from Tyler, I moved to London briefly and worked for a crafts gallery in northern London. Then I decided I wanted to go to graduate school. I came back for about a year to work towards applying to graduate school, which ultimately became SUNY New Paltz. I graduated Tyler in 1990, so most of my undergraduate years were in the 80s. If you're familiar with 80s jewelry, it was no holds barred. It was any kind of jewelry you wanted. My work—or at least my practice—quickly started to veer away from jewelry and towards objects and what I would call small sculpture. My choice to go SUNY New Paltz was specific because I didn't really want to make jewelry, but I was interested in the field and decorative arts, the material culture of jewelry and metalsmithing. That's what I pursued while I was in graduate school. I was recreating early American tinware about my experience as a gay American at that time. I wish there were visuals included, but that's what I was doing at SUNY New Paltz.    Sharon: How did you find that material?   Jonathan: The tinware was a metaphor for America, for traditionalism. The pieces were metaphors for the function or dysfunction of America. These objects were a little perverse, a little sublime and really honest about how frustrated I felt about being an American and growing up in Philadelphia during the bicentennial. I thought life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness was for everybody, but I found myself not really able to access the full extent of that saying, like many people in our country even today. But I'm happy to report that a piece from that era was just acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. I'm thrilled that the older work is getting some interest. There's some interest from the New York Historical Society, which is not finalized yet, but it's interesting to see that work with new eyes 20-some years later.   Sharon: Congratulations!   Jonathan: When I was in Germany, my partner at the time was finishing his master's degree, and I was an artist in residence there at the Hochschule der Künste, which is now the Academy of Art, I think it's called. That was an interesting experience because Europeans in general, and Germans in particular, approach craft differently. They have a much longer and supportive tradition of craft of all kinds, so when they saw my tinware, it was a little confusing to them. I ended up in a program called small sculpture as an artist in residence because there was no jewelry program at this art university. It was interesting. It was curious.   Sharon: Tell us how you came to jewelry.   Jonathan: Jewelry eventually gets into my story. After leaving Berlin, I moved to New York. I knew I wanted to be a New York artist. That's the place I had to go. That's the place I had to find my destiny. I was walking around looking for positions in a gallery, which was what I thought I was supposed to do. I walked into one gallery and the director there said, “I don't have any gallery work for you, but I'm on the board of a not-for-profit gallery at the YWCA. That's the home of the Craft Students League. They are looking for a program associate, which pays a ridiculously low hourly wage but has health benefits.” I thought, “O.K., I can do that.”    That's when I found myself in the not-for-profit arts administration position that was developed into what I do now, at least part time. I was the program coordinator for the Craft Students League, which is unfortunately gone now, but had a wonderful ceramics, jewelry, painting, and book arts department. I ultimately became director of the jewelry studio and metalsmithing studio there, and then I became the assistant director of the whole program before I moved to the 92nd Street Y to become the director of the Jewelry Center here.   Sharon: Did they have an opening? How did you enter the 92nd Street Y?   Jonathan: Yes, there was an opening. There was John Cogswell. The Jewelry Center has some wonderful previous directors. It was Thomas Gentile from the late 60s to mid-70s, who really put this program on the map. He was followed by John Cogswell until the early 90s. Then briefly Shana Kroiz took over. She was between Baltimore and New York, and when she left the department, there was a call for a new director. That's when I joined the program here.   Sharon: Wow! I didn't know that Thomas Gentile was one of the—I don't know if you want to call it the founders, but one of the names that launched it.    Jonathan: Yeah. The program began in 1930 in its earliest form as a class in metalworking and slowly evolved into a few more classes. It became part of the one of the largest WPA programs in the country here at the 92nd Street Y, but it kind of floated along until Thomas came—and Thomas, forgive me if I get this wrong—in the mid-60s, I think, maybe later. He came in and really started to formulate a program of study here. He was the one who really created the Jewelry Center as a center.   Sharon: Was he emphasizing art jewelry or all jewelry?   Jonathan: There was a great book put out by the Museum of Modern Art in the 50s about how to make modern jewelry. Now, I don't know if the MOMA realized that they put out a book on how to make jewelry, but my point is in New York, I think there was still this idea of the modernist aesthetic and the artist as jeweler or jeweler as artist. I would say that Thomas was focused more on artist-made jewelry, the handmade, the one-of-a-kind object. It was still not looking in any way towards traditional or commercial jewelry.   Sharon: Jonathan, tell us what the 92nd Street Y is, because people may not know.   Jonathan: The 92nd Street Y is a 140-year-old institution here on the Upper East Side of New York City. It is one of New York City's most important cultural anchors. It has many different facets. We have a renowned lecture series. The November before the pandemic, I remember we had back-to-back Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Lizzo. Wednesday night it was Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Thursday night it was Lizzo. Last night we had Outlander here, and I think we had a full house of 900 people plus 2,000 people online. We also have a world-renowned dance center that has a long history with Martha Graham and Bill T. Jones. In many ways, modern dance coalesced at the 92nd Street Y. The Jewelry Center has had a presence here at the Y since 1930. We have a wonderful ceramic center. We also have one of the most prestigious nursery schools in New York City. You name it.    The 92nd Street Y is a Jewish cultural center. It's part of the UJA Association, but it's kind of its own thing. It's a whole other story about what Ys are and the difference between YWCAs, YMCAs and YM-WHAs, which is what we are, but the 92nd Street Y is really a cultural center.   Sharon: When are you opening your West Coast branch in Los Angeles? Because you have such an incredible number of speakers and programs.   Jonathan: Many of them come from the West Coast. We had Andrew Garfield here the week before last to talk about his amazing performance for a Reel Pieces program with Annette Insdorf. I think that was a full house of 900 people for a performance from “Tick Tick Boom,” which was great. I don't know when we're coming to LA. We're just reemerging from the pandemic here in New York.   Sharon: This is not related to jewelry, but do you think that without the pandemic, you would have gone online to such an extent? Would it have been possible for people around the world, including on the West Coast, to see what's going on?   Jonathan: The pandemic was the catalyst to do something we'd always thought about, but yes, the pandemic definitely forced us to do it. On March 13, New York City shut down. That Monday, we flipped all of our classes, every single one of our classes in the Art Center, which is about 200 classes, to be virtual. That worked for some classes better than others, obviously for painting and drawing. It was fine for jewelry. It's tough if you don't have a studio. What we did through the summer is offer online classes. We still offer online classes to some extent, but my focus is on building back our in-person class schedule, which we're doing. We're over about half enrollment now from the pandemic and moving quickly towards three-quarters.   Sharon: Did the people who enrolled in hands-on jewelry classes, did that just stop with the pandemic?   Jonathan: Yes, it stopped from March 2020 until September 2020. In September, we actually opened back up for in-person classes. We wore masks. We were socially distanced. We were unvaccinated. I was taking the subway and it worked. It was slow at first, but I think this process is a part of many people's lives and this program is so meaningful for so many people. Being in New York, access to a studio is important, and very few people have studios at home. This is not only an important part emotionally of their lives, it's also literally, physically, an important part of making jewelry their practice.   Sharon: Since you started as director of the program, I know you've been responsible for growing it tremendously. Was that one of your goals? Did you have that vision, or there was just so much opportunity? What happened?   Jonathan: All of the above. There was a lot of opportunity. Unfortunately, the Crafts Students League closed shortly after I left. Parsons closed their department. There were a number of continuing education programs that left Manhattan, and this is before the country of Brooklyn was discovered, even though I lived there. There were no schools in Brooklyn, really. The 92nd Street Y became one of the few places to study when I came on.    Also, to my point about studying jewelry in art school, you're studying to be an artist generally in art school; you're not really studying to be a jeweler in the way most people understand jewelers to be. Although certainly at Tyler, it was a great technical education and I learned a lot of hard skills, many people, including myself, were not adept at those hard skills. We're not taught at a trade school, and I found that most of the people who were looking for jewelry classes wanted to make more traditional jewelry than the classes we were offering. Most of our faculty came from art school. There were some amazing people, Bob Ebendorf and Lisa Grounick(?) to name just a few, but as the 90s wore on and the aesthetic changed, I found that people really wanted to learn how to work in gold, how to set a stone. The aesthetics of jewelry shifted. You probably know yourself that the art jewelry world shifted a little bit too. For myself, I wanted to learn more hard skills, and I basically started creating classes that reflected my interests in how to make better wax carvings, how to set a brilliant-cut stone. I can then make that into what I want: studio jewelry, art jewelry, whatever, but those hard skills were lacking.    I've said this many times: I don't know that this program would exist in another city other than New York because there was so much talent here. There were people from the industry here. There were artists who were studio jewelers and art jewelers all at my fingertips. I think that was one of the ways it grew, not because I reduced the perspective of what was being made here, but because I enlarged the perspective of what was being made here or taught here.   Sharon: How did you do that? Did you do that by identifying potential teachers and attracting them? What did you do?   Jonathan: I was lucky to have some wonderful people in New York City at that time. We had a wonderful faculty to begin with, but we also were able to expand the faculty with incredible people who had recently resigned. Pamela Farland, who was a master goldsmith and was the goldsmith at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for many years, was on our stuff. Klaus Burgel, who was trained at the Academy of Munich, was here in New York and came to us as a faculty member. Tovaback Winnick(?), who was a master wax carver and worked for Kieselstein-Cord for many years, came on as well. Some people work here for a shorter period of my time. My good friend, Lola Brooks, was here and taught stone setting. There was some really stellar talent around that helped me build this program.   Sharon: That's quite a lineup you're mentioning.   Jonathan: And a really diverse lineup.   Sharon: Diverse in what sense?   Jonathan: Klaus' work is pure art jewelry: the iconic object, incredibly crafted, but what one would consider as art jewelry in its most essential sense. Lola Brooks, her work crosses the lines of both art and jewelry, and she's got a beautiful studio jewelry line. Then there are people like Pamela Farland, who made very classical, Greco-Roman, high-carat granulated stones, classical goldsmithing. Then there was Tovaback Winnick who teaches carving, which is how the majority of commercial jewelry is made. We had real range as well as your regular Jewelry 1, Jewelry 2, Jewelry 3 classes where we're teaching the basics of sawing, forming and soldering.   Sharon: You answered my question in part, but if somebody says, “I'm tired of working as a banker; I want to be a jeweler,” can you come to the Y and do that? Can you go through Jewelry 1, Jewelry 2, Jewelry 3 and then graduate into granulation? I don't know if there's a direct line.   Jonathan: Absolutely. We don't have a course of study. We don't have a certificate, but you can definitely come here and put your own skillset together. That's also what I found strong about the program, that it gave people access to put their skillsets together without going through art school or going through college. You're able to learn those hard skills in an environment where it's no frills.   Sharon: Are they mostly younger people, older people, people of all ages?   Jonathan: It's people of all ages. When I joked about the country of Brooklyn not being discovered yet, I lived in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for my whole New York life, so I'm speaking the truth. There really wasn't anything out there. If you were young and hip and cool when I lived in Brooklyn, you had to come here. So, for a long time, we had a much younger population that was cool, hip. Now, everybody has moved to the country called Brooklyn. That demographic has aged a little bit for us.    We have three classes during the day. We have a morning class, an afternoon class, a late afternoon class and then an evening class. If you're a younger person, it's most likely that you have a job, so you're going to come at night for our classes. That's only one-quarter of the population that can take a class here, because there's only one slot of night classes. There could be four classes happening at the same time, but all from 7:00-9:30. So, in general our population skews old because those are the people who are generally available during the day.    That being said, it's New York City. There are lots of different ways to make a living here. There are definitely people who are actors or bartenders or artists or what have you who do have time during the day and come here. It really depends on what class, but absolutely; we have all ages for sure. We also have kids' classes in the afternoon from 4:00-6:30.

Spectator Radio
Table Talk: Michael Heath

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 34:56


Michael Heath is a British strip cartoonist and illustrator and has been working nonstop since the 1950s. He has been cartoon editor of The Spectator since 1991. On the podcast, he talks to Lara and Liv about carrying German bombs into the local pub like milk bottles during the second world war, being given chewing gum by American soldiers, and how during the heydays of Soho, the focus was a lot more on the drinking than the eating.

The Allan McKay Podcast
346 – DNEG'S VFX Supervisor Tom Proctor – Last Night in Soho

The Allan McKay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 55:16


DNEG (www.dneg.com) is one of the world's leading visual effects (VFX) and animation studios for the creation of feature film, television and multiplatform content. DNEG employs nearly 7,000 people with worldwide offices and studios across North America (Los Angeles, Montréal, Toronto, Vancouver), Europe (London) and Asia (Bangalore, Chandigarh, Chennai, Mumbai). DNEG's critically acclaimed work has earned the company six Academy Awards® for Best Visual Effects and numerous BAFTA and Primetime EMMY® Awards for its high-quality VFX work. Upcoming DNEG projects on behalf of its Hollywood and global studio and production company partners include Dune (October 2021), No Time To Die (October 2021), Ron's Gone Wrong (October 2021), Last Night In Soho (October 2021), Ghostbusters: Afterlife (November 2021), The Matrix 4 (December 2021), Uncharted (2022), Borderlands (2022), Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom (2022), The Flash (2022), and Shazam! Fury of the Gods (2023). DNEG's VFX Supervisor Tom Proctor talks about leadership and relationships skills, fine arts versus craftsmanship in VFX, the impact of virtual production on pipelines – and discusses his work on iconic titles like The Matrix, Justice League, as well as most recently, Last Night in Soho. For more show notes, visit www.allanmckay.com/346/.

United Queendom Podcast
Drag Race S14 E14 - Catwalk

United Queendom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 47:02


It's the penultimate episode, often a boring one of the series. But it's one of the best recaps of our series, cos we like to make up for when Drag Race let's you down! This week we discuss carpet cleaning, Gaga's Telephone, Terms of Endearment, supermodels and dastardly subscriptions. Educational is what it is! Oh and we're Team Willow. email edward.m.dyson@googlemail.com @unitedqueendompodcast www.patreon.com/UnitedQueendom SPONSORED BY KU BAR, SOHO, LONDON www.ku-bar.co.uk www.instagram.com/unitedqueendompodcast www.instagram.com/samdowlertime www.twitter.com/samdowler www.podtail.com/podcast/united-queendom-podcast/ open.spotify.com/show/0TDLmRw2eSeYCtODoZxjyR (Contains Explicit Content)

Blockbusting
Dave Horwitz Hates Last Night In Soho

Blockbusting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 43:10


SUPPORT THE SHOW ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/blockbusting (https://www.patreon.com/blockbusting) FOLLOW BLOCKBUSTING ON... INSTAGRAM: https://my.captivate.fm/instagram.com/blockbustingpod (instagram.com/blockbustingpod) TIKTOK: https://my.captivate.fm/tiktok.com/@blockbustingpod (tiktok.com/@blockbustingpod) TWITTER: https://my.captivate.fm/twitter.com/blockbustingpod (twitter.com/blockbustingpod) LISTEN TO MY COMEDY ALBUM: https://800pgr.lnk.to/Light (https://800PGR.lnk.to/Light) Jay (http://www.instagram.com/DietJay (@DietJay)) and Dave (http://www.twitter.com/davehorwitz (@davehorwitz)) discuss Edgar Wright's rug-pull thriller Last Night in Soho, a paint-by-numbers movie about bad men and naïve women that takes good acting and squanders it with an unfortunate lack of the cheekiness and genre-bending that Edgar Wright has become known for across his cinematic oeuvre.

StarDate Podcast
Next Life

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 2:14


When a giant radio dish entered service with NASA in 1994, its main job was to track SOHO, a spacecraft that watches the Sun. Today, one of its main jobs is to study the Sun itself. It's the centerpiece of GAVRT — Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope — a project that's turned control of the telescope over to students. The 112-foot dish is in the Mojave Desert. It's part of NASA's Deep Space Network, which stays in touch with spacecraft throughout the solar system and beyond. Network antennas are also used as radio telescopes. And that's the full-time job of this antenna. It retired from the spacecraft-tracking business years ago. It took over for another antenna that had been used for GAVRT. Today, students around the country, from elementary through high school, help select its targets, move the dish, gather data, and analyze the results. There are several main projects for GAVRT. One of them is studying the Sun. The observations can help determine how the Sun generates space weather — interactions between the Sun and Earth's magnetic field. Space weather can knock out satellites, shut down power grids, and cause other problems. Other projects monitor the radio waves produced by jets of particles shooting away from black holes; study the magnetic field of Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet; and even listen for radio signals from other civilizations — big science from a “retired” radio dish.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Ridiculous History
Day Drinkers (Sort of) Helped Stop Cholera in London

Ridiculous History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 38:27


Dr. Jon Snow -- no relation to the guy from A Song of Ice and Fire -- was in a pickle. Cholera was ravaging London, particularly in the Soho area, and no one knew how to stop it from spreading like poisonous wildfire. As the crisis raged on, Snow was able to use his medical knowledge and amateur detective skills to figure out where the contagion was coming from. His big breakthrough? Folks at the local brewery, who were known for day drinking, seemed to avoid the infection almost entirely. Tune in to learn how beer (kind of) saved London. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

/Film Daily
Mini-Water Cooler: Paris, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Bad Day at Black Rock, and More

/Film Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 38:27


On the April 5, 2022 episode of /Film Daily, /Film editor Ben Pearson is joined by /Film editor Hoai-Tran Bui to talk about what they've been up to at the virtual water cooler.   Opening Banter:    At The Water Cooler: What we've been Doing:Ben saw his favorite band in Orlando. HT in Par-ee! What we've been Reading:Ben read Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. Hoai-Tran read The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGuin What we've been Watching:Ben watched the first five episodes of Tokyo Vice, Our Flag Means Death, and Bad Day at Black Rock.  Hoai-Tran has been catching up with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, saw The Lost City, Aline, watched Old (the beach makes you old!), Last Night in Soho, and Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar on the plane.  What we've been Eating:HT ate lots of French food and drank lots of French wine and now her body hates her. What we've been Playing:    Also mentioned:      All the other stuff you need to know: You can find more about all the stories we mentioned on today's show at slashfilm.com, and linked inside the show notes. /Film Daily is published every weekday, bringing you the most exciting news from the world of movies and television as well as deeper dives into the great features from slashfilm.com.  You can subscribe to /Film Daily on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (RSS).  Send your feedback, questions, comments and concerns to us at peter@slashfilm.com. Please leave your name and general geographic location in case we mention the e-mail on the air. Please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts, tell your friends and spread the word!  Thanks to Sam Hume for our logo.

LEAVE YOUR MARK
That Famous "Blue Cardigan Guy," Adam Rose, Unpacks the Impact of Social Media on Traditional Industry Success, the Secret to His Creativity, and How to Build a Positive Community Online

LEAVE YOUR MARK

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 44:47


Adam Rose has lived the acting life in Hollywood since he was 9-years old, making his debut opposite Robin Williams and Julie Kavner in Woody Allen's Deconstructing Harry. With over 55 tinsel-town projects to date he's played roles on the sets of luminary directors and actors with credits that include The Sopranos, Veronica Mars, Netflix's Santa Clarita Diet, Supernatural, Merry Happy Whatever, and so many more. He's worked with Matthew Broderick, Matt Damon, Mark Ruffalo, and Anna Paquin, to name a few. As a writer, Adam sold his first pilot, PISSED, to Warner Bros. His short film, QUEEN, which he wrote and directed, screened at over 50 film festivals and won several awards. But back in 2009, he intuitively knew that social media would change how the world consumes content forever. At a time when most of his celebrity peers turned their noses up to anything "online," Adam began cultivating fans outside of his Hollywood projects. Today, Adam has amassed an enormous social media following, with over 3.7 million followers on TikTok and nearly half a million on Instagram, not to mention his growing YouTube. He's one of the most beloved creators with A-list brand deals, known for his viral comedy sketches, dances, and "lovely" wife, a character he plays opposite himself. In this episode, Adam and I unpack the question, "What drives the other: Does the traditional career drive a social following, or does a social following drive your traditional career?" It's an interesting debate. We dive into the story of digital identity and the famous blue cardigan that his fans are obsessed with, and how his community reacts to his content. Adam shares his content strategy, secrets to creativity, production schedule, and a typical day in his life. The whole episode is like a hug in your ear, full of warmth, comedy, and advice. *** This episode of LEAVE YOUR MARK is brought to you by Ever/Body, a New-York based cosmetic dermatology business that exists to thoughtfully support every body along their beauty journey. Ever/Body is revolutionizing the cosmetic dermatology industry with a personalized, tech-driven approach that prioritizes client education and natural-looking results. Their curated service menu includes a variety of medically-tested face and body treatments such as Botox, filler, body contouring, laser facials, micro-needling and more. Their medically-trained team provides expert care and an experience you can trust - always uniquely tailored to you. Ever/Body's mission is to thoughtfully support everybody along their individual beauty journey. Book a complimentary consultation on everbody.com and follow them on instagram @everbody. They are currently located in NYC in SoHo (453 West Broadway) and Flatiron (16 West 17th St.). Start your beauty journey with a free consultation at everbody.com and use my personal discount code, Aliza10 for 10% off your first treatment.

Why Won't You Date Me? with Nicole Byer
The System is Broken (w/ Lilly Singh)

Why Won't You Date Me? with Nicole Byer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 55:54


Comedian, actress and YouTuber star Lilly Singh (A Little Late with Lilly Singh, Dollface) chats with Nicole about April Fools' Day pranks, setting up a vision board in her shower, her experience hosting a late night talk show,  and offers her tip for getting dates on Raya. Meanwhile, Nicole tries to apply to the Soho house.  Crazy dating story? Looking for advice? Want to leave Nicole a dirty message? Submit it all to whywontyoudatemepodcast@gmail.com for a chance to have it read on-air.   Black Lives Matter. Click here for a list of over 100 different ways you can support racial justice.   Follow Nicole Byer: Tour Dates: linktr.ee/nicolebyerwastakenTwitter: @nicolebyerInstagram: @nicolebyerNew Merch!! podswag.com/datemeNicole's book: indiebound.org/book/9781524850746