Podcasts about Sequoia National Park

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National park in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California, U.S.

  • 90PODCASTS
  • 117EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 29, 2021LATEST
Sequoia National Park

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Best podcasts about Sequoia National Park

Latest podcast episodes about Sequoia National Park

KQED's The California Report
Schools in Rural Northern California See Dangerous Effects of Wildfire Smoke

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 12:32


In the second part of NPR's California Newsroom investigation, Dirty Air, we traveled to rural Northern California. There's been a shocking increase in wildfire smoke, and unhealthy air recently in California, and it can be particularly damaging for children. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED The KNP Complex Fire and Windy Fire continue to grow as they scorch parts of Sequoia National Park. Thousands of firefighters are battling challenging conditions, including steep and rugged terrain. During a contentious meeting, the San Diego Unified School District Board of Education unanimously approved a COVID-19 vaccination mandate for eligible students and staff. The plan calls for younger students to be vaccinated as well, once the vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
September 24th, 2021 7am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 18:19


Governor Newsom signs a $15 billion climate bill and wildfire package at Sequoia National Park, a Palo Alto woman was arrested on suspicion of starting the 5,500-acre Fawn Fire, Costco limits purchases on paper goods and water amid supply chain delays, and 43% of Americans say they are doing their dream job! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
California Prepares to Issue Booster Shots to More Eligible Residents

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 16:16


Now that it's received approval from the Food and Drug Administration, and been endorsed by a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel, state health officials say they're ready to give COVID-19 booster shots to anyone who's eligible. Before it's widely distributed, the efficacy of a third dose of the Pfizer vaccine still needs to be reviewed by the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup.  Movie fans will soon be able to enjoy a new museum in Los Angeles that is aimed specifically for them. The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opens on Septemeber 30, and will provide guests with a rich, visual history of the filmmaking industry. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report During a visit to the site of KNP Complex Fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Governor Gavin Newsom signed a $15 billion climate package. But how will the money be spent? Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED The KNP Complex Fire and Windy Fire are both burning in Sequoia National Park. Fire crews are trying to protect the iconic trees there and so far, have been fairly successful. Reporter: Sorreath Hok, Valley Public Radio 

Talking NorCal
Palisades Tahoe, Shasta's Sunken Ship, and a Forest Management/Climate Change Discussion with Joanna Nelson

Talking NorCal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 81:22


On this episode of the Talking NorCal Podcast, Zach and Bob discuss the news of the week including S*** Valley changing its name, the proposed name change to Patrick's Point, KNP Complex Fire in Sequoia National Park, the mysterious sunken boat in Shasta Lake, First snow of the season on Mt. Shasta, a new state-owned outdoor utopia and a the opening of the elevated boardwalk in the Jedediah Smith Redwoods (3:35). Finally, Zach sits down with Joanna Nelson from the Save the Redwoods League to discuss the unique forests of Northern California and how to manage them during our current state of climate disruption (43:27).

Phil Matier
Phil Matier: Governor Gavin Newsom to sign another bill to help reduce wildfires

Phil Matier

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 3:13


Governor Newsom has been busy signing bills since he survived the attempt to recall him earlier this month. Now, he heads to Sequoia National Park to likely sign another one. For more, KCBS Radio news anchors Dan Mitchinson and Holly Quan spoke with KCBS Radio Insider Phil Matier.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED’s Forum
Firefighters Scramble to Save Groves of Grand Sequoia Trees Threatened by Wildfire

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 15:26


When the KNP Complex fire, which has burned about 40 square miles in the Western Sierra, began spreading through Sequoia National Park, firefighters mobilized to preserve the park's groves of ancient sequoia trees. Among the trees imperiled by the still uncontained fire, was General Sherman, the world's largest tree. We'll hear about firefighters' extraordinary efforts to save the giants, including wrapping them in aluminum blankets. And we'll also talk about what a future of climate-intensified fires means for the iconic sequoias.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Tuesday 9/21 - Hour 1

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:14


Kicking off the show with the Buzz Question about the Petito case, which has now been ruined a homicide following identification of the remains found in WY. Firefighters were successful in holding off the KNP Complex Fire and protecting "the Four Guardsmen," a group of giant sequoias that form a natural entryway on the to the forest in Sequoia National Park. September is National Suicide Prevention Month and Fresno County's Department of Behavioral Health has introduced FresnoCares.org as a community support. Brandi Lidbeck, LMFT in Fresno and lead for Fresno Cares joins the show.  A Newberg staff member has been placed on leave after showing up to work in blackface to protest vaccine mandates.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
State Imposes One Year Ban on Insurance Cancellations in Wildfire Prone Areas

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 18:10


In response to California's ongoing wildfires, State Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara has issued an order requiring insurance companies with policy holders living in fire zones to keep people's policies in place and to honor insurance renewals. Guest: Ricardo Lara, California Insurance Commissioner The KNP Complex Fire burning in Sequoia National Park continues to threaten a grove of giant sequoias. That includes the General Sherman, considered one of the oldest and largest trees on earth.  Reporter: Soreath Hok, Valley Public Radio  Wildland firefighters accept risk when they head out to battle a blaze. But Cal Fire firefighters are getting sick, and some have even died, during training. Reporters: Jacob Margolis, KPCC and Brian Edwards, Columbia Journalism School The chair of the National Transportation Safety Board has told the Wall Street Journal that Tesla should address “basic safety issues” before offering its “full self-driving” package to more drivers.  Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED Bay Area Assemblyman Marc Levine is launching a run for state Insurance Commissioner and he'll be challenging a fellow Democrat. The election is next year. Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Border is an absolute disaster, with illegals streaming across without interference for the most part

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   Three— General Sherman and the giants are still out of harms way today—the biggest tree in the world—and several others in Sequoia National Park—have skirted the wildfires that have charred and scarred many of their neighbors—   Two— The Border is an absolute disaster—with illegals streaming across without interference for the most part—but it is creating a giant political disaster for Grandpa Joe and the Veep—who have zero credibility—   One— And speaking of zero credibility—lets go back to Afghanistan—and the drone strike that General Mark Milley and the rest called a righteous attack on terrorists—just days after 13 American soldiers were killed—while Joe Biden pursued a cut and run policy—   Well now we know of course—it wasn't terrorists—but rather a family of ten—and aid worker—his wife and kids— and 7 of those kids were killed by the strike—   Who gave the intel on that hit? The Taliban? How many more are being murdered by the terrorists—now that America abandoned them and left them behind?  

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 9/20/2021 (Guest: Dr. Christy Brigham, chief science officer at Sequoia and Kings Canyon Nat'l Parks)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 58:21


KFI Featured Segments
@GaryAndShannon (09/20) - What's Happening

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 5:30


The FBI have swarmed Brian Laundrie's parents' home in search of evidence on the disappearance of Gabby Peito // Could an Israeli HIV drug help treat Covid in a matter of days? // California has the lowest Covid case rate in the country // Aluminum wrap is used to protect trees in Sequoia National Park from fires // A Wiltshire grandfather celebrates his 100th birthday with the luxury Bentley S3 he last drove as a chauffeur nearly 60 years ago.

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 9/17/2021 (Guest: Kevin Drum on how Fox 'News' broke America)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 58:17


Briefly with OZY
Migrants Camp Under Texas Bridge | 'General Sherman' at Risk

Briefly with OZY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 7:43


Officials are warning of a humanitarian crisis with more than 10,000 migrants, mostly from Haiti, camped out under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas. France has accused President Joe Biden of acting like his predecessor regarding the nuclear submarine deal with Australia. And the world's biggest tree, the General Sherman in Sequoia National Park, is under threat from California's wildfires.

KQED's The California Report
Democrats Already Looking at Possible Recall Reform

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 18:15


California Democrats are looking into reforming the recall process less than 24 hours after Governor Gavin Newsom survived an effort to remove him from office. Both the Senate and the Assembly will hold hearings in the coming months to explore possible reforms. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Governor Newsom has until October 10 to decide whether to sign a bill that softens production quotas for warehouse workers. AB 701 is widely seen as targeted at Amazon, which runs more than 60 warehouses across the state.  Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED  A new health order in Los Angeles County would require proof of vaccination for COVID-19 at indoor bars, wineries, breweries, nightclubs and lounges. It would also encompass large outdoor events and theme parks. Fire crews are ramping up the battle against the so-called KNP Complex Fire threatening Sequoia National Park. The fire is moving closer to an iconic grove of giant sequoias, some of which are more than 2,000 years old.  Reporter: Alex Hall, The California Report As vaccine mandates take hold around the state, some Californians are seeking exemptions on religious grounds. But verifying claims related to these exemptions involves somewhat murky legal territory. Guest: Dorit Reiss, Law Professor, UC Hastings

5 Things
The ethics debate on COVID-19 boosters

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 12:19


The U.S. will likely start administering additional shots soon. World health leaders disagree on whether that's a good thing. Plus, SpaceX successfully launched civilians into space, wildfires close in on Sequoia National Park, it's Mexican Independence Day and 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' says goodbye.(Audio: Associated Press, NBC)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The LA Report
The P.M. Edition: New COVID rules for large L.A. events; WeHo vaccine requirements; COVID cases continue decline; 64% voted no to recall; Wildfires threaten Sequoia

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 5:14


What's happening today: New COVID rules for large events in L.A. County; West Hollywood considers vaccination requirements for indoor businesses; O.C. COVID cases continue to drop; 64% of voters said no to recall; Wildfires threaten Sequoia National Park. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

Obsessed with Joseph Scrimshaw
BIG TREES ADVENTURE: Obsessed Ep 363 with Sara and Joseph Scrimshaw

Obsessed with Joseph Scrimshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 82:59


Joseph and Sara obsess over their recent trip to Sequoia National Park. The calming and exhausting power of nature! The metaphor of fire scars! Bears working for postmates! And the most important question: do we want to be trees?

Out The Gate Sailing
Lauren Keane // Similarities and Differences Between Cruising And Back Country Hiking - Ep. 78

Out The Gate Sailing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 36:49


My wife Lauren Keane and I share a love of adventure. I brought sailing to the marriage. She introduced me to long-distance, back-country hiking. To celebrate our 10th wedding anniversary, we traversed the High Sierra Trail, a 72-mile hike across Sequoia National Park that took seven days and ended on Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the lower 48. Lauren joins me in this episode to debrief the trip and discuss the similarities and differences between backpacking and cruising.

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod
On Mineral King Loop with Bindi and Yahtzee

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 87:57


Doc hits the trail with Bindi and Yahtzee as they take on the challenging Mineral King Loop in Sequoia National Park. It's a wannabe Hiker Trash love story with plenty of stories and misadventures sprinkled in amongst all the trauma that a 28.2-mile loop with two passes over 11,500' and a total elevation gain of 9,560'. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/johnfreakinmuir/support

Okay Mary
A Necessary Catch Up

Okay Mary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 52:43


We're baaaaaaaaaack :) Catch up with us as we catch up with each other! Em shares stories about her trip to Mexico and a super scary encounter she had at Sequoia National Park (trust us you won't want to miss that). Sab talks about her new fashion brand launch, some challenges she had in the midst of getting here, and a huge revelation that will benefit EVERYONE. Lastly, we share some social media tips we have heard recently for anyone trying to elevate their insta game!  Don't forget to get your MERCH! okaymarypodcast.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Science Talk
National Park Nature Walks, Episode 8: The Blue Oaks of Sequoia

Science Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 29:29


Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may not be easily able to access these places amid the pandemic, but after you take this acoustic journey, you will be longing to get back outside. Strap on some headphones, find a quiet place, and prepare to experience an evanescent like no other--the blue oak woodlands in Sequoia National Park in California.  Catch additional episodes in the series here . 

I Need (Travel) Therapy
The Best Way to Explore National Parks While Traveling - Karlee Valley, DPT

I Need (Travel) Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 64:46


On this episode, we took a tour of America's national parks with one of our very own Med Travelers PTs! Special guest, Karlee Valley, DPT, brought us along on her journey to explore every single park—offering incredible insights into hiking and camping, her three favorite parks (so far), where she's off to next, and more.This show is made possible by Med Travelers. If you're interested in exploring a career in allied travel, visit: https://www.medtravelers.com/getting-started/become-an-allied-traveler/to learn more about the nationwide opportunities they have to offer!We Discuss(0:00) Show introduction and Karlee's travel career background(9:42) Karlee's flood experience while living in a camper(15:05) Finding travel work during COVID(16:35) Exploring national parks during COVID(19:50) Karlee's favorite national parks(20:42) Great Smoky Mountains National Park(23:48) Finding camping around national parks(28:21) Hiking & Sightseeing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park(33:27) Sequoia National Park (46:26) Channel Islands National Park(56:31) Packing essentials for the Channel Islands(58:55) Commemorating each national park visit(01:01:06) Karlee's next national park visitsAbout Karlee Valley, DPTKarlee is a travel PT, currently in Juneau, Alaska, and originally from Michigan. She travels alongside her fiancé, Ian, who is also a PT. She has taken assignments in Arizona, California, and Alaska. She spends the majority of her time road-tripping and outdoors, exploring the extensive national park system throughout the US. To keep track of Karlee's amazing adventures, be sure to follow her on Instagram!About the ShowProducer – Jonathan Cary Assistant Producer – Katie SchraubenShow Notes – Sam MacKay Music & Editing – Aidan Dykes Powered by Med Travelers

#SuccessInSight
Barbara Ann Mojica, Author of The Little Miss HISTORY Book Series - Little Miss HISTORY Travels to TOMBSTONE ARIZONA

#SuccessInSight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 33:01


Hello everyone, and welcome back to another episode of the Success InSight Podcast. Today's episode of Success InSight is another addition to our Outdoor Adventure Series.The Outdoor Adventure Series celebrates individuals & families, businesses, and organizations that seek out and promote the exploration of the great outdoors. Our guest today is Barbara Ann Mojica and her husband, Victor Mojica.Barbara Ann is the creator and author of the award-winning, Little Miss HISTORY book series. Little Miss HISTORY is a whimsical character Barbara uses to narrate her book series. With this series, Barbara hopes to educate, entertain and inspire children to learn about historical people and places. The design and illustrations for the book series were produced by her husband, Victor.Barbara Ann & Victor joined us in 2020 when we were first introduced to the Little Miss HISTORY book series. When we launched the Outdoor Adventure Series, Barbara & Victor joined us to chat about Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA National Park, and again in May to chat aboutLittle Miss HISTORY Travels to Mount Rushmore.In today's episode, we're going to chat about another book for our Outdoor Adventure series, Little Miss HISTORY Travels to TOMBSTONE ARIZONA.Little Miss HISTORY Travels to TOMBSTONE ARIZONA was the recipient of the following awards:THE B.R.A.G. MEDALLION2020 IAN BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN'S JUVENILE NONFICTION2020 PURPLE DRAGONFLY AWARD HONORABLE MENTION CHILDREN'S NONFICTIONTo learn more about Barbara and her work, visit her website at https://www.LittleMissHISTORY.comBarbara's social links include:FacebookTwitter InstagramLinkedInYouTube To learn more about Victor's illustration work, visit his Eugenus Studios website at http://eugenusstudios.com/.

Airtalk
A Preliminary Report Finds At Least 10% Of The World's Giant Sequoias Lost In The Castle Wildfire

Airtalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 9:31


At least a tenth of the world's mature giant sequoia trees were destroyed by a single California wildfire that tore through the southern Sierra Nevada last year, according to a draft report prepared by scientists with the National Park Service. The Visalia Times-Delta newspaper obtained a copy of the report that describes catastrophic destruction from the Castle Fire, which charred 273 square miles (707 square km) of timber in Sequoia National Park. Researchers used satellite imagery and modeling from previous fires to determine that between 7,500 and 10,000 of the towering species perished in the fire. That equates to 10% to 14% of the world's mature giant sequoia population, the newspaper said. “I cannot overemphasize how mind-blowing this is for all of us. These trees have lived for thousands of years. They've survived dozens of wildfires already,” said Christy Brigham, chief of resources management and science at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. The consequences of losing large numbers of giant sequoias could be felt for decades, forest managers said. Redwood and sequoia forests are among the world's most efficient at removing and storing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The groves also provide critical habitat for native wildlife and help protect the watershed that supplies farms and communities on the San Joaquin Valley floor. Brigham, the study's lead author, cautioned that the numbers are preliminary and the research paper has yet to be peer reviewed. Beginning next week, teams of scientists will hike to the groves that experienced the most fire damage for the first time since the ashes settled. “I have a vain hope that once we get out on the ground the situation won't be as bad, but that's hope — that's not science,” she said. Today on AirTalk, we're learning more about the report and what it could mean for the future of California's iconic forests. Give us a call at 866-893-5722. With files from the Associated Press Guest: Christy Brigham, chief of resources management and science at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and lead author of the new report

BRUTALLY HONEST
Hammock Talks in Sequoia National Park

BRUTALLY HONEST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 22:29


Hammock Talks in Sequoia National Park. Enjoy.Support the show (https://www.maximindset.com)

#SuccessInSight
Barbara Ann Mojica, Author of The Little Miss HISTORY Book Series - Little Miss HISTORY Travels to Mount Rushmore

#SuccessInSight

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 30:26


Hello everyone, and welcome back to another episode of the Success InSight Podcast. Today's episode of Success InSight is another addition to our Outdoor Adventure Series.The Outdoor Adventure Series celebrates individuals & families, businesses, and organizations that seek out and promote the exploration of the great outdoors. Our guest today is Barbara Ann Mojica and her husband, Victor Mojica.Barbara Ann is the creator and author of the award-winning, Little Miss HISTORY book series. Little Miss HISTORY is a whimsical character Barbara uses to narrate her book series. With this series, Barbara hopes to educate, entertain and inspire children to learn about historical people and places.The design and illustrations for the book series were produced by her husband, Victor.Barbara Ann & Victor joined us in 2020 when we were first introduced to the Little Miss HISTORY. We invited Barbara Ann & Victor back on the podcast earlier this year to chat about  Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA National Park, as this was an appropriate addition to the Outdoor Adventure Series.In today’s episode, we’re going to chat about another book for our Outdoor Adventure series, Little Miss HISTORY Travels to MOUNT RUSHMORE To learn more about Barbara and her work, visit her website at https://www.LittleMissHISTORY.comBarbara's social links include:FacebookTwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTubeThe SuccessInSight Podcast is a production of Fox Coaching, Inc.

Slack of All Trades
103: Masters of Self-Driving Cars

Slack of All Trades

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 58:57


Justine and Mike discuss self driving cars. Are they safe? Available? Would they own one? Join in on the discussion at slackofalltrades.com Topics discussed: Ford GM Tesla Waymo Google Carnegie Mellon University NAVLAB DARPA Stellantis Daimler Jaguar Volvo Check-out Topics: Travelling: Yosemite National Park, Sequoia National Park, Joshua Tree National Park Mortal Kombat Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-driving_car https://www.ucsusa.org/resources/self-driving-cars-101#:~:text=Currently%2C%20there%20are%20no%20legally,independent%2C%20self%2Ddriving%20prototypes. https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/21/tech/tesla-full-self-driving-launch/index.html https://waymo.com/ https://www.businessinsider.com/tesla-fsd-back-seat-driving-stunt-arrested-buys-new-car-2021-5

Big Blend Radio
Big Blend Radio: Three Rivers Wine Tasting Party

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 34:00


Join Nancy J. Reid and Lisa D. Smith, the mother-daughter travel team on the Love Your Parks Tour and publishers of Big Blend Magazines, for this fun Big Blend Radio wine tasting party recorded onsite at Totem Market & Gifts and Deli, located right near the entrance of Sequoia National Park in Three Rivers, Calfiornia. Talking about wine, chocolate, art, and Three Rivers as a park travel destination, featured guests include: Pam Lockhart - Totem Market & Gifts and Deli + Sequoia Pacific Holiday Homes, mixed media artist Susan Ardesch - Blue Heron Studio, and chocolatier and confectioner extraordinaire Reni Underwood of Sequoia Goods. 

Big Blend Radio Shows
Big Blend Radio Wine Tasting Party in Three Rivers, California

Big Blend Radio Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 33:26


This fun Big Blend Radio wine tasting party was recorded onsite at Totem Market & Gifts and Deli, located right near the entrance of Sequoia National Park in Three Rivers, California. Talking about wine, chocolate, art, and Three Rivers as a destination, featured guests include host Pam Lockhart - Totem Market & Gifts and Deli + Sequoia Pacific Holiday Homes, artist Susan Ardesch - Blue Heron Studio, chocolatier and confectioner Reni Underwood - Sequoia Goods. More about Three Rivers at https://nationalparktraveling.com/listing/three-rivers-california/

Tahoe TAP
Tahoe Talk - 5/11/21

Tahoe TAP

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 14:04


Quick-hitting news bits from around the globe and inside your community to keep you up to speed with the world! LOCAL NEWS:  - Exciting announcement coming out yesterday on the entertainment front – we talked about this a few episodes ago that with Douglas County opening up to 100% on the NV side, perhaps it would mean things like events and concerts could start to come back and we got not only the announcement that the summer concert series was going to be a go, we also got an initial glimpse at the lineup, which got pretty roasted on social media  - Pretty cool story about the efforts to reduce plastic waste around the basin features students from environmental clubs from 4 high schools around the region (North Tahoe, Truckee, Incline & South Tahoe) – as they learned abut the effects microplastics had on the lake they surveyed their local Raley’s stores and brought their findings to the Raley’s executive team on Earth Day – highlighting areas for improvement which Raley’s will be committing to improving  - As more and more drought talk happens, more and more fallout is likely to occur – one of them being the boat ramp at El Dorado Beach will not open this year due to the low water levels from the dry winter. As of now this is the only boat ramp that we’ve heard of, but if you were planning on launching their on the south shore, you will need to find a different point of entry – you can hit up TahoeBoatInspections.com for locations. - Governor Newsom is proposing a $5.1 billion drought response package that will expand drought emergency actions to 41 counties – should have more on this as more details become available  - As the summer starts to creep in a few notes on some road trip routes – Highway 108 over Sonora Pass has reopened for the season – Tioga pass over to Yosemite is still closed at time of this recording but chance that gets opened I’ve heard maybe even by this weekend, but we’ll wait to hear officially, and Ebbetts Pass still closed but still on track to be opened by Memorial Day weekend.  NATIONAL NEWS:  - “Coin Crowding" has arrived — and it's not just a Bitcoin trend. Crypto "mainstreamification" has reached a level that goes far beyond just Bitcoin. 14% of the US population now invests in cryptocurrency, and American crypto owners could double in 2021. This year, Bitcoin has nearly 2X'd in value – and altcoins have seen even bigger rallies: Ethereum is up ~400%, and Dogecoin has soared 13,000%. According to a Gemini survey: two-thirds of US adults who don't own crypto are "crypto curious.” - Officials from California’s Sequoia National Park made a disturbing discovery while conducting a survey to determine the effects of the 2020 Castle Fire…a giant sequoia in the area known as Board Camp Grove was found still smoldering and emitting smoke months after historic wildfires devastated the region last August. The Castle Fire, which was ignited by a lightning strike last summer ended up burning down 270+ square miles of land before it was contained in December. - CA Gov. Newsom, who is facing a recall election later this year, announced a plan to send almost $12B dollars back to taxpayers. If approved, California would give $600 checks to workers who earn up to $75,000 annually, with $500 bonuses for tax filers with dependents and undocumented families.  That’s about 80% of the state's workers and two-thirds of all residents would benefit from the plan. He also unrolled a slew of other funding proposals:  • $5.2 billion in federal funding to help low-income renters stay housed.  • $2 billion to help Californians pay overdue water and utility bills.  • $1 billion in college grants to help employees whose jobs have been decimated by the pandemic find better work. - The COVID-19 pandemic has done what more than a century of past plagues, recessions, crime waves, droughts and earthquakes couldn’t. It shrank California’s population by 182,083 people in 2020. That’s the first time that annual statistic has come with a minus sign since data collection started in 1900. Just 0.4% in case you are trying to do the math in your head. - After falling for nearly 12 months straight, the US unemployment rate unexpectedly jumped to 6.1% in April. 266K jobs were added last month — economists were expecting 1M (womp). Millions of Americans are unemployed, but companies in industries like construction, manufacturing, and restaurants still can't find enough people to hire. Potentially holding workers back: child-care burdens, Covid fears, and boosted unemployment benefits - Just 4% of iPhone users in the U.S. and 12% overall have opted in to app tracking after updating their phones to Apple’s new iOS 14.5, which introduced new privacy features. That is exactly what companies like Facebook were worried about. - Colonial Pipeline, a major system that delivers roughly 45% of fuel consumed on the East Coast was hit with a ransomware attack and halted all operations to deal with the threat. This breach underscores the vulnerabilities of crucial infrastructure, not just banks and IT. Biden is expected to issue an executive order to bolster security of federal and private systems in the next few week.

Fly Brothers
Session 13

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 60:13


In this session, Hud retells his recent catch and cook of a 27in striper from the surf, while B shares his weekend push to Alta Peak in Sequoia National Park.The fly brothers share their upcoming plan to fish the Carmel region and seek the summit of MT Shasta. We found ourselves ending early and restarting as we had more to share. Tune in to the end.  

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living
FAR OUT #127 ~ Being That Kind of Person

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 55:44


Listen and explore:Our recent time on BLM land in Sequoia National ForestThe single event that inspired Alasdair to start picking up trash roughly 8 years agoThe entropy problem or why a problem can't be solved at the same level of consciousness it was created atThree different ways we can approach trash in our environmentsThe golden practice: one piece of trash a day Transmuting lead to gold: why we believe picking up trash actually improves our experience of a placeCultivating a relationship with our environment by caring for itLeaving a place better than we found it as a practice and spiritual idealA potential solution and how it could be implemented on our public landsConnect with us:Website: www.thefarout.lifeEmail us at info@thefarout.lifeOn Instagram: @thefaroutcoupleJulie-Roxane on Instagram: @julieroxaneAlasdair @ www.alasdairplambeck.comSupport this podcast:Discount link to purchase organic, raw cacao (a portion of  the proceeds support this podcast as well as local farmers in Guatemala)Become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/thefaroutcoupleMake one-time donation with PayPal (our account is aplambeck22@gmail.com)Leave a review on iTunes!Share this episode with a friend! :DCredits:Intro music: "Complicate ya" by Otis McDonaldOutro music: "Running with wise fools" written & performed by Krackatoa (www.krackatoa.com)

The Nutrition Translator Podcast
Short Story: Experiential

The Nutrition Translator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 4:55


This bonus podcast is a short story of the recent ayahuasca experience I had this month in Sequoia National Park.  "Mother Ayahuasca, Show me the difference between truth, love, health growth and safety vs. lies, stagnation and perpetuating trauma," was my intention. A huge realization came to me: that answers are better shown through experience vs. through intellect, and with time, lots of time. This is the story of how I came to that realization. Music Credit: East Forest, Passage

The Nutrition Translator Podcast
Short Story: Understanding

The Nutrition Translator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 4:10


This bonus podcast is a short story of the recent ayahuasca experience I had last weekend in Sequoia National Park. I experienced a full on ego dissolution and was humbled by the complexities of the universe! A realization came to me that is forever imprinted in my heart- that I will never be able to understand even a fraction of all that is and exists. My human mind loves to control by trying to fixate on figuring out all the answers. The truth is that intellect is the power tool of separateness and a compassionate, intuitive heart is the doorway to unity.Music Credit: By East Forest, Deliquesce

Fly Brothers
Session 11

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2021 66:28


In this session, Hud talks about his success during the first week of the rockfish opener and how he likes to prepare and cook rockfish. B shares his upcoming trip into the backcountry snow to Pear Lake in Sequoia National Park to continue preparing for Shasta. We find our way into a previous trip to the North Fork of Big Pine and the beauty of the Palisades range in the Sierra Nevada.  Tune in. 

Morning Light Meditations
Be Strong and of Good Courage

Morning Light Meditations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 7:05


Are you weary and burned out? In this meditation Jennifer shares her intimate experience of going to the Sequoia National Park to reset in the arms of the big trees and the Elemental Kingdom. See this meditation live and visuals of her journey on video here. https://www.patreon.com/posts/49522658 Michael Gayle's, Dream State, is the perfect musical drop for this meditation.  You’ll find it on his Dream State CD. Listen to more Morning Light Meditations here. https://angelsofabundanceascensionacademy.com/morning-light-meditations/ If this podcast supports you spiritually, please consider fueling it with your financial support.  Any amount is welcome. https://Patreon.com/JenniferandMichael    

Not Getting Younger
National Treasures

Not Getting Younger

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 63:37


On this episode Coral and Desiree discuss what's their ideal vacation, Coral's recent trip to the Grand Canyon and the one time they almost got stranded at Sequoia National Park! Follow them on instagram: @notgettingyounger_ & twitter: @notyounger_

Science Talk
National Park Nature Walks, Episode 2: Sequoia Heights

Science Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2021 33:10


Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may not be easily able to access these places amid the pandemic, but after you take this acoustic journey, you will be longing to get back outside. Strap on some headphones, find a quiet place and prepare to experience the what it feels like to listen to the forest from 150 feet off the ground in Sequoia National Park .

#SuccessInSight
Barbara Ann Mojica, Author of The Little Miss HISTORY Book Series - Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA National Park

#SuccessInSight

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 27:28


Today's episode of the Success InSight Podcast is another addition to our Outdoor Adventure Series.The Outdoor Adventure Series celebrates individuals & families, businesses, and organizations that seek out and promote the exploration of the great outdoors.Our guest today is Barbara Ann MojicaBarbara Ann is the creator and author of the award-winning, Little Miss HISTORY book series.Little Miss HISTORY is a whimsical character Barbara uses to narrate her book series. With this series, Barbara hopes to educate, entertain and inspire children to learn about historical people and places.We're excited to invite Barbara Ann back on the podcast today to chat about one specific book in the series, Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA National Park.The design and illustrations for the book were produced by her husband, Victor Ramon Mojica. Click here to learn more about Victor's work at Eugenus Studios.You may recall that we interviewed Barbara Ann & Victor in 2020 when we were first introduced to the Little Miss HISTORY.https://www.successinsightpodcast.com/2020/03/barbara-ann-mojica.htmlClick here to get your copy of Little Miss HISTORY Travels to SEQUOIA National Park on Amazon.Link: To learn more about Barbara and her work, visit her website at https://www.LittleMissHISTORY.comBarbara's social links include:FacebookTwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTubeThe SuccessInSight Podcast is a production of Fox Coaching, Inc. and First Story Strategies.

Fly Brothers
Session 8

Fly Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 66:17


In this episode we talk about our recent trips to the salt, lower Kings River, and Sequoia National Park. We recap our first multi day expedition into Yosemite National Park back in 2015,  and the mistakes we made from our minimal experience in the backcountry.

Santa Cruz Naturalist
Col. Charles Young - First Black National Park Superintendent

Santa Cruz Naturalist

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 4:03


This week, in celebration of Black History Month, Sara highlights someone who made important contributions to preserving California's natural habitats and making them accessible for people to enjoy. This person was Colonel Charles Young, the first Black superintendent of a U.S. National Park. In 1903, he oversaw construction and development at Sequoia National Park and a portion of Kings Canyon national park, working to protect California's natural habitats while increasing their accessibility to the public, and securing more land in the national parks for future generations.

Symbiosis Now
#47 Hiking with Javi Herrera

Symbiosis Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2021 71:13


In this episode of the Symbiosis Now Podcast, friend & guest of the show Javier Herrera joins us to help inspire more adventure, more voyages, more hiking. Tyler & Javi share stories of hiking at places such as Yosemite, Sequoia, Big Sur, Mendocino County, and the Grand Canyon. Javi tells of his run-ins with wolves (or maybe they were coyotes) in Yosemite National Park, and Tyler shares his encounter with a bear in Sequoia National Park. Be sure to always pack in & pack out, and stay aware of the weather on your next trip. Follow friend & guest of the podcast Javi Herrera @_jherr_ on Instagram! Follow the show @symbiosisnow.podcast & the host @brodudemann for notifications of new episodes! BIG SHOUT OUT to @remingt0nblake for the new podcast art! Be sure to check out his art and give him a follow. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/symbiosisnow/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/symbiosisnow/support

The Big Wild, Celebrating 17 Years on Air

Sintia Kawasaki-Yee gives us a look at Sequoia National Park, Pete Robbins from Half Past First Cast gives some advice: Don't Wait on Trips, Mike Reinikianen of the Minnesota DNR on collecting Black Spruce Pinecones, Buzz Kemper takes us rock climbing in South Central Wisconsin.    It's all here in The Big Wild!

Rachael's Universe
SUMMIT UP! Alta Peak, Sequoia National Park.

Rachael's Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2020 14:14


A review of hiking Alta Peak at Sequoia NP, and why you shouldn't let hiking reviews stop you from getting out of your comfort zone. Sorry for the wack audio a little while in. Working on getting a new mic! Support for more hike reviews :) Thanks everyone. Instagram: @rachaeluniverse Music: Lover by David Mumford, Rocky Theme Song, Track: The Day I Met You — Arvnd [Audio Library Release] (Music provided by Audio Library Plus, Watch: https://youtu.be/0tq32HUIOu4, Free Download / Stream: https://alplus.io/day-i-met-you), Bryan Chi Music --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rachael-shek/support

Overcomers Unite
Overcoming Through Heart Revival with Brenden Bourbonnais

Overcomers Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 36:27


Brenden grew up in Riverside, CA where every summer he would go with his youth group to Hume Lake Christian Camps in the Sequoia National Park. At Hume is where he fell in love with camp, the mountains, and heard about Jesus. After high school Brenden moved to Hume to participate in Hume’s discipleship bible program. It was there where he read the Bible for the first time, put his faith and trust in Jesus Christ and grew a hunger and passion for the globe. After graduating the program Brenden moved to Visalia, CA to reach the lost and bring revival to the Central Valley. In his free time Brenden likes to play basketball, drink coffee, and travel! Connect with Brenden:Instagram: @brendenbourbonnaisPhone Number: 951 -533 - 6137Connect with Grace EstherInstagram: Grace_Esther_Facebook: Grace EstherWebsite: Grace EstherLife Rhythm Academy Application

2 AM Podcast
#9: WAP in Sequoia

2 AM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 26:50


The gang takes the podcast on the road! Adrianna and Chrissy review the new live action Mulan movie and Julia argues why the TV show F.R.I.E.N.D.S. is actually the worst. Ray leaves a review on Sequoia National Park and talks about the new WAP: worship and prayer. The group then wraps it up by talking about the best place in the world - Visalia - that is known for its mystery meat, meth, and Anti-Maskers.

Trails Worth Hiking
Ep. 2: High Sierra Trail

Trails Worth Hiking

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2020 121:42


Special guest Tony Wong joins Jeremy to talk about the High Sierra Trail in Sequoia National Park. Jeremy and Tony talk about the bizarre history of the creation of Sequoia National Park and the giant trees that give the park its name. They also recount the history of the building of the High Sierra Trail itself, some key information on hiking in the high Sierra, logistics for hiking the trail, and a possible itinerary. And then Tony tells us about gear he doesn't leave home without, the best backpacking advice he's gotten, his favorite hike, what's next on his list, and whether there's actually a hike that Jeremy couldn't convince him to do.

5 Things with Lisa Birnbach
Ep. 103 - With Stephanie ("Sweetbitter") Danler - Author, Memoirist, Survivor

5 Things with Lisa Birnbach

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2020 48:57


"Sweetbitter" author Stephanie Danler joins Lisa Birnbach to talk about her new Memoir "Stray", Surviving her early life. Family, Neglect, Love and Life, it's all so complicated! Lisa’s 5 things: 1. Family, 2. Extended family, 3. Early voting, 4. Her kitchen scale, 5. Cured of shopping via Instagram disease.Stephanie Danler’s 5 Things: 1. Poetry, 2. Meditation, 3. Marcella Hazan 4. Sequoia National Park, 5. Her Meyer lemon tree

The Outdoor Biz Podcast
A life in the Backcountry with Doug Robinson [EP 216]

The Outdoor Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2020 84:51


Doug talks about his many backcountry adventures, product design, the outdoor industry, and tells a couple of stories too.   Facebook Twitter Instagram   The Outdoor Biz Podcast   Please give us a rating and review HERE   Show Notes   This episode with a very good friend of mine. We've been buddies for over 30 years. He's been a backcountry mountain guide, rock climbing guide, ski guide, been in the industry for many, many years doing all kinds of cool things. He's a great author. Welcome to the show, Doug Robinson.   How were you introduced to the backcountry and the outdoors?   I am an unbelievably lucky kid. At five years old, my parents moved me from Washington, DC where I was born to California and we went almost immediately that summer to the backcountry and Tenaya Lake in Yosemite National Park and camped out. Back then you drove across Tenaya Creek and pulled your car up next to the Lake and we could camp right on the Lakeshore. And we did. And so at five years old, I'm building rafts and paddling out to the islands on the Lake, I could not believe the Sierra. The road was one and a half lanes, 15 miles an hour. It was a dirt road except where it went over granted slabs. So it was like, two hours from Crane Flat to Tenaya Lake, which is 40 minutes now. There were a few other people who camped by the Lake and you could tell they came back every year. We all felt like this was the luckiest thing that could possibly ever happen to us. And as time went on, we started hiking and then backpacking and you know, little by little getting into the Sierra backcountry. When I was 13, I got rescued off of Pywiack dome, which was across the Lake from our campsite. I had a pair of lug sole boots and I knew that made me a mountain climber. So I went up on the side of this dome and 400 feet up I realized that maybe I wasn't as secure. I couldn't go ahead and I couldn't back down. Some tourists stopped on the road and said, are you okay? I shouted NO, but here's where you find the Rangers and tell them to come and get me. And they did. They repelled down from the top of the dome and tied me on. So that was the first time I was ever on a rope in the backcountry.   Your folks ended up buying one of those forest service lease backcountry properties by Rock Creek up here in the Sierra   Another incredibly lucky thing. I ended up in Rock Creek because of Norman Clyde, who I had the good fortune to meet in the late sixties. Everybody knows Norman as quite a climber, but, he was also a backcountry skier. So I asked him okay, where are the good spots, you know, where should I go? And he goes, Oh, Rock Creek. That's the best place on the East side of the Sierra for backcountry skiing. So I moved in the next winter. Then the summer after that I found this one-line ad in the Inyo Register for a cabin for sale. And I mean, it sent me back $4,500. But I moved in and ended up living there many winters, cross country and backcountry skiing were just in its bloom in the seventies. There was a ski touring lodge two miles away and I could teach there and, and live up the Canyon and ski up under Bear Creek Spire every day. It was paradise.   Did you stay up there in the summers or did you go back to work or back to school?   Well in the summers I'd go into the Palisades. Cause in the mid-sixties I lucked into a job guiding there at the Palisade School of Mountaineering. Which was the first climbing school in California. You'll get tired of me saying this, but I'm one of the luckiest people alive. Lucked into that job. And then I lucked into having a place to live in Rock Creek in the winter and, it goes on and on.   So before we get too far into this, let's let everybody know you are somewhere in Wyoming, is that right?   I am somewhere in Wyoming and we won't pin it down exactly because I am caretaking a backcountry guest ranch in Wyoming. The closest clue I'll give you is that when I ski up to the Ridge several hours away, I can see the Grand Teton off to the Northwest. It's amazing. We, I say we, my partner Eva Eilenberg is with me here and we lucked into this caretaking opportunity. We've been here over a month and we've got another month to go. I just came in from, we were doing some work with the batteries that run off the DC hydro and, and kind of keep place electrified off the grid. We're way off the grid. I'm talking to you by satellite phone.   Let's circle back around to the Palisade School of Mountaineering How did you start there? You saw an ad in the paper or how did you get involved with those guys?   So I'm 20 years old. I'm in Yosemite. I pack up my backpack and I'm going to go up to the High Sierra because that's where I started, right? Tenaya like I told you. And I just love going in the backcountry, rambling around, backpacking, scrambling up peaks. So I was getting a little more advanced. I mean technical climbing because I'd been in Yosemite after all. That was the cutting edge place in the world for rock climbing in the sixties. And, you know, we were kind of hot shit and we knew it. So I walk up into the Palisades, I'd never been there. My buddy John Fisher and I had been climbing together since we were 13. He ended up owning the school later on. So I walk in there and I walk all the way up to the edge of the glacier. There's a little obvious backcountry campsite up there. And I dropped my pack and look around and there's nobody there. Now I had just come from camp 4, I mean, you could pick up a climbing partner in 30 seconds down there and I just kind of assumed there would be a scene up there too. So I soloed a couple of easy backcountry peaks and a few days later this pile of lumber appeared on the slabs below the camp and was coming up upwards me. It turned out to be a guy named Don Jensen. And he was getting ready to build a little hut up on the edge of the glacier, or the Palisade School of Mountaineering. Don turned out to be the chief guide, so we made a deal. He went climbing with me. I helped him build his hut. The first day we went climbing, we went out and across the glacier up Starlight Peak down into the notch, up North Pal down the U Notch. And we were back at camp at 10 in the morning. And he offered me a job guiding. I go, wow, I'm 20 years old. I'd never thought about being a mountain guide, but, um, okay, if Don thinks I can do it. So I have been guiding ever since. That was just another one of those really lucky things. And you're right, I was ready for it cause I'd been climbing for years. Right. Dirt bagging before that was a thing. That was 1965.   Then after Palisade School of Mountaineering, you got involved with the clean climbing movement and wrote the manifesto, tell us about that.   Here's how it started. Royal Robbins kicked it off. He went climbing in England. He saw, clean climbing there with pebbles stuffed into cracks and then machine nuts that were already on a runner. And he got all excited and came back and put up Nutcracker in Yosemite, which was the most popular route in the Valley, and is still a classic. He did it as a demonstration, Royal and Liz, his wife. Then he wrote about it in summit magazine because we were reading summit every month. None of the backcountry focused magazines that are out now existed then. It was a basically a hiker magazine, but there was occasional climbing stuff in it. So it was the only game in town. I got turned on by this and went straight down to the hardware store and bought brass machine nuts in a whole range of sizes and filed the threads out of them so they wouldn't cut the runners and strung them on runners. This was 1965 or 66. So I was guiding in the Palisades then. So I had my backup Pitons and a hammer, but I took the nuts long too. Well, it turns out that the backcountry Alpine granite is just perfect for holding nuts. You can almost throw them in the crack. So some of the very earliest all clean climbs were done there and all the other guides got turned onto it too. We're all in this together and realized that we could do things clean. We didn't need the hammer or the pins and it was lighter so we left them in camp. Then we started going to Yosemite in the spring and the fall and starting to try to climb in the backcountry clean also. So I did the East buttress of Middle Cathedral rock all clean. That was the first grade four that was done in that committed style. And then the next year did the Steck, Salathe on Sentinel without carrying hammers. And you know, we're just very gradually progressing up. Meanwhile, I had met Chouinard, we had gone ice climbing together in the Palisades, did some first backcountry ice accents of routes like the V notch. And I started going and hanging out in Ventura at the tin shed and being a laborer. I started out there, my first job was being an assistant bong bender is what they called it, but people don't even know what a bong is anymore. And we're talking about clean climbing, we're having fun doing it. Um, and um, and Chouinard and Frost got interested in it and you know just innovate equipment before breakfast. So pretty soon they're making the aluminum nuts that are really good and I'm contributing to the design. So in the end, and this is a hats off to Chouinard too, cause he'd started making Pitons in 1958 in that chicken coop in his parents' backyard in Burbank, he's a teenager and selling out of the trunk of his car. And that business was built on pitons and hammers and all the unclean stuff to go climbing. So these piton makers, they're making a living, they're being able to hire us. Thank you very much. But we're understanding that these pitons are so good at being removable, which we thought was clean and they're chipping away at the rock and destroying the cracks and then they're getting ugly looking. And so this clean climbing is the solution to that. And they bet the farm on clean climbing and it ended up eliminating the piton business. Pretty scary though because they're making all their money off pitons and they're doing all right. But we think this is the right thing to do. So anyway, I ended up writing a piece for the catalog. It was the first real catalog of the company. It was called the Great Pacific Ironworks at the time. So in the 72 catalog is my manifesto called the whole natural art of protection and it really changed things.   Val Franco is doing some pretty amazing archival work that is keeping all those times alive, talk about that.   You walk into that archive and this is only a couple years old but it's phenomenal. I mean there's examples of every piton on that Chouinard Equipment ever made and she has the newer equipment that is now called Black Diamond Equipment, but it's just this like the lineage is right straight through. And all of the clean hardware and some fascinating prototypes that I remember making with a file and a bench vise down there. And they are doing taping sessions too. I got to sit in on some sessions with Tom Frost before he died where he was talking about his part in all that. He'd been an aircraft designer, aeronautical engineer, and quit all that. He's a Stanford trained engineer, smart guy. The mechanical drawings that he made for the nuts that we were designing are phenomenal. They're just beautiful. And those are in the archive too. And so are the interviews with Tom where he talks about his role. Um, it's very cool. Val Franco is the head of that and she was a sewer at ironworks when I was there. We knew each other when we were in our twenties and she's still there and putting this thing together and she's so excited.   What was your first backcountry ski experience?   I started downhill skiing when I was seven years old at Goldridge and Sugar Bowl. And I had these Hickory skis, little segmented metal edges screwed onto them. But the bindings were interesting cause they had a cable on the heel and there were two hold-downs on the sides. And I hope you can visualize this cause, you snap the cable underneath one to hold your heel down onto the ski, right? That's the rear one. The forward one snapped from the rear. It's a walking mode and these are my downhill skis. But this is 1952 and skiing hasn't advanced that far, so it's still like walking on skis is important. It's a backcountry sport that happens to have some ski lifts and hasn't evolved into plastic boots and all that. Um, so in a sense having that gear was my heritage and I realized that you could walk on it and that meant that I could go uphill on my skis. Jeez, no big deal. They were built for it. So in a sense, it started right there and by the early sixties, I was going into the backcountry skiing Pyramid Peak. I got to move to Bishop in 1969 fresh out of college. I'm already a guide and lucky again, I had a client for the entire winter. We rented a cabin up Bishop Creek and I taught him how to backcountry ski and winter climbing in the Palisades. We ended up the next spring, spring of 1970, skiing the John Muir Trail, which we thought was a first. But it turns out that we were scooped in 1928-29 by Orland Bartholomew. And that's another whole story. Well, nothing like skiing the whole length of the range to give you some ideas of places to go and things to just do. in 1975, David Beck and some friends pioneered the Sierra High Route in the backcountry, which goes from roughly Independence across to Sequoia National Park for six days. Or I like to take eight or nine days to do it cause, once you're out there, well why rush back to the city? I was guiding that every spring or maybe even twice every spring. And by the mid-eighties, there was a time when I skied across the range, guiding it for a week and then rested a day or two. And I had another backcountry ski tour to guide starting on the Eastside. So I skied back in 22 hours. This is like a six or eight-day trip but you know, I'm really fit and by then and I have set my own track across the top of these high basins. But what a day, you know, to be out there all by myself.   I'm sure all this time in the backcountry gave you plenty of time to think about gear.   The Ultima Thule Pack evolved out of a pack that Don Jensen had designed. He was brilliant. He gave us the plans for them and for our Muir Trail backcountry ski trip we built packs that weighed 17 ounces and carried 70 pounds. I built those packs and a tent that Don Jensen designed for that trip. And then while I was working in Ventura I knew that I could improve on the Jensen pack. So Tom Frost and I ended up crawling around on pattern paper on the floor and laughing to ourselves. It was so much fun to work with him as a designer and we came up with a truly better version of that pack that carried better. And so that was wonderful and decades later I designed another carrying system for a pack for Montbell when you and I were working there. That was the Wishbone system. I mentioned that the Ultima Thule dragged on your shoulders just like the Jensen backcountry pack did. We hadn't figured that out. And so it was figuring that out over the years with essentially some internal stays in the pack that rose above the shoulder straps, like lift straps, which everybody's got now. But there was a time when that was a big deal. It was a new way and the new hybrid materials that I came up with without going way into it.   When did you write your first book?   Writing for magazines like Outside, which I helped start, another whole story. I wrote some cover stories and was having such a good time. That was the first really professional magazine that I'd ever been around. I ended up moving to San Francisco to hang out with them and I was making enough of a pest to myself that they gave me a desk and a phone and ended up staying the winter. Then I wrote cover stories and I was writing for backpacker and already mentioned Powder. So that was half of my career and guiding was the other half. By the nineties, I had all these magazine articles that I had written that I liked and other people liked so I pulled them together into a book. So my first book was really just an anthology of my own writing. Things I liked the best going back to the sixties. And it was a big success actually. It was recently named by climbing magazine as one of the 33 must-reads climbing literature of all time.   You were thinking about the listeners of the podcast, what do you want to say to them?   I was thinking about the people who might be listening to this podcast. And I'm imagining that some of them are shop people working on the floor, some are designers, some are marketers, you know, we're all in the same industry, this outdoor industry, which is so great. It's given us such great friendships and good times. I was thinking about the customer that walks into that shop and you're the guy on the floor saying “hi what can I do for you”? And that what you can do for them is not just talk about the qualities of the packs that you're selling, that they want to buy, but also the experience. You've been out in the backcountry more than they have. You have the experience they admire that and they would love to soak it up and hear some of your stories. And if you're a customer just walking into your local mountain shop, yeah you wanna walk back out with a parka and a pack and a sleeping bag, but you also want to rub shoulders with the experience itself. And so don't you guys out there sell yourself short on, on that. You got a lot to give people besides the tech specs.   Do you have any other suggestions or advice for someone wanting to get into the outdoor business or grow their career if they are already in the biz?   Follow your bliss. I mean, that's how basically all of us got in here. And I have one other sort of oddball piece of advice too. Don't think that you can get that degree from Oregon and be a product designer without the outdoor experience with it, cause you gotta be out there in the rain with the water somehow finding its way to drip in around the hood of your parka, you know, and you have to have that experience before you can know how to design around it, how to fix it.   If you could have a huge banner at the entrance to the OR show these days, what would it say?   My banner would say “take care of the planet because if you don't, nothing in this show is going to mean anything.” Y ou can follow up with Doug at his website Moving Over Stone