Podcasts about Pinky

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  • 1,095PODCASTS
  • 1,831EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Pinky

Show all podcasts related to pinky

Latest podcast episodes about Pinky

Voices for Justice
Maggie Long

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 50:05


Today I am discussing the case of 17-year-old Maggie Long from Bailey, Colorado. On December 1st, 2017, Maggie left her high school to change her clothes and grab some items for a concert she was helping with that night. But Maggie never returned. When Maggie's family went to look for her at their home it was on fire with Maggie's car still in the driveway. After officials announced that no body was found in the home after extinguishing the fire, but there was also no official search for Maggie, the public was understandably confused and concerned. It would take months for officials to clear up these statements, over year to announce that Maggie was burned alive in her home that night and several years to announce that they believe Maggie was the victim of a hate crime. Maggie Long was an Asian American female with brown eyes and black hair. The police are seeking information about three men believed to be connected to this crime. It's believed they were driving a late 90s to 2000 light colored Chevy Astro van and a Ford pickup. Anyone with information is urged to call 1800 call FBI, you can also submit tips online at fbi.gov/tips. For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

THE ANYTHING SHOW WITH JON FRANCOIS
Pinky Sweat Problem!

THE ANYTHING SHOW WITH JON FRANCOIS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 93:55


Jon Francois & Andrew Vandertunt discuss Thanksgiving dinner at 7 Eleven,

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast
234- Animaniacs Reboot Season Two Episode Three! "Rug of War"

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 48:05


It's time for the Animanicast! Discussing the third episode of the second season of the Animaniacs reboot! Join your hosts Joey, Nathan and Kelly in the "Animanicast!" A podcast dedicated to Animaniacs and its sister shows.  Today the hosts talk about the third episode of the second season of the Animaniacs Reboot! This episode featured the Warners taking a trip into the Bayeux Tapestry in "Rug of War," Pinky is on a mission to save Brain in "Run Pinky Run," and Dr. Scatchansniff teaches the Warners about the dangers of lying in "The Hamburg Tickler." This episode features many elements that we have expected to see after watching the original series, but is it funny? Find out what the hosts think in today's episode! Support The Animanicast The Animanicast now has a Patreon! Head over to Patreon.com/Animanicast for exclusive episode commentaries with Tom Ruegger as well as other awesome rewards! Join the party! Head on over to Discord.Animanicast.com today to join our RetroZap discussion group. You'll get to chat with the hosts of this show as well as the hosts of other RetroZap podcasts! If you'd like to support our show there's lots of ways to do it! First of all, you could go onto Apple Podcasts and leave us a five-star positive review. Also, don't forget to tell a friend about the show! Your retweets and post shares help others find us. By going to Amazon.Animanicast.com you can find some of the newest Animaniacs merchandise including clothing, toys, videos, and even books written by some of the original writers of the show. Get some great stuff and help support our show! You can even use Amazon.Animanicast.com as your portal to Amazon on your next shopping trip and you'll still be supporting our show with any purchase you make. You could also purchase some hand prepared decals from Joey at Decals.Animanicast.com Interested in getting some Animanicast MERCHANDISE? It's in stock now at TeePublic! Get yours at Teepublic.Animanicast.com Opening theme performed by Kontra5t!  

Voices for Justice
Leah Peebles

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:28


Today I am discussing the case of missing 23-year-old Leah Peebles. In 2006 Leah moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico looking for a fresh start. But just a few weeks after she made the move, she disappeared. When her father, John Peebles, made the trip to New Mexico to search for her himself, he discovered a world of crime he'd never experienced before. Despite recognizing the danger he was putting himself in and receiving a death threat himself, he dug deeper into the world he was convinced his daughter was trapped in in hopes of bringing her home.   Leah Peebles went missing from Albuquerque New Mexico on May 22nd, 2006 at the age of 23. She would be 38 years old as of recording this episode and might be going by the name Maya. She is a white female, 5'4', 105lbs, with blue eyes and brown hair that she cuts and colors a lot. She has a few tattoos including a scroll flower design on her upper back and a Celtic cross on her lower back.   Anyone with information is urged to call the Albuquerque Police Department at 505-242-2677. Sexual Assault Resources: US: RAINN Hotline- 800-656-4673 Canadian Hotlines Listed by province/territory: https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Alberta/Pages/sexual-abuse-other-places-to-get-help.aspx Australia: The National Sexual Assault, Family & Domestic Violence Counselling Line- 1800 737 732 UK: Confidential Emotional Support Hotline (they address a variety of topics including substance abuse and trauma) 01708 765200 Addiction and Mental Health Resources: US: SAMHSA Hotline- 1-800-662-4357 Canadian Hotlines Listed by province/territory: https://www.ccsa.ca/addictions-treatment-helplines-canada Australia: National Alcohol and Other Drug Hotline- 1800 250 015 UK: Confidential Emotional Support Hotline (they address a variety of topics including substance abuse and trauma) 01708 765200   For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast
233- Animaniacs Reboot Season Two Episode Two! "Please Submit"

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 47:35


It's time for the Animanicast! Discussing the second episode of the second season of the Animaniacs reboot! Join your hosts Joey, Nathan and Kelly in the "Animanicast!" A podcast dedicated to Animaniacs and its sister shows.  Today the hosts talk about the second episode of the second season of the Animaniacs Reboot! This episode featured the Warners facing a malicious pop-up ad in "Please Submit," Pinky and the Brain traveling through sitcoms in "The Flawed Couple," and a sticky tsunami of syrup in "Safety Tips!" The first episode started season two off on a relatively good note, but will the streak stay alive with this episode? More importantly, how many water towers will this episode get? Support The Animanicast The Animanicast now has a Patreon! Head over to Patreon.com/Animanicast for exclusive episode commentaries with Tom Ruegger as well as other awesome rewards! Join the party! Head on over to Discord.Animanicast.com today to join our RetroZap discussion group. You'll get to chat with the hosts of this show as well as the hosts of other RetroZap podcasts! If you'd like to support our show there's lots of ways to do it! First of all, you could go onto Apple Podcasts and leave us a five-star positive review. Also, don't forget to tell a friend about the show! Your retweets and post shares help others find us. By going to Amazon.Animanicast.com you can find some of the newest Animaniacs merchandise including clothing, toys, videos, and even books written by some of the original writers of the show. Get some great stuff and help support our show! You can even use Amazon.Animanicast.com as your portal to Amazon on your next shopping trip and you'll still be supporting our show with any purchase you make. You could also purchase some hand prepared decals from Joey at Decals.Animanicast.com Interested in getting some Animanicast MERCHANDISE? It's in stock now at TeePublic! Get yours at Teepublic.Animanicast.com Opening theme performed by Kontra5t!

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 51 (Guest Rob Paulsen - Part 2)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 32:04


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 51.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS Catch "CLUE" on the BCT Mainstage Running through November 21st, it's "CLUE - the play, based on the film, based on the board game!  Several of our talented friends are involved in this classic who-done-it, and Greg and I sat down with them and the rest of the cast for a special behind-the-scenes preview, available now on our YouTube channel.  Find Greg's review of the show on our Facebook page and get your tickets for CLUE now, at bctshows.com. “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info and tickets at roxybremerton.org. WWCA Holiday Variety Show Opens 11/26/21 Opening November 26th at Western Washington Center for the Arts in Port Orchard, it's the “WWCA Holiday Variety Show” directed by our friend Rebecca Ewen.  Come and celebrate the season with some of your favorite WWCA performers.  The show will feature choral arrangements written by beloved Music Director, the late Bruce Ewen, dance numbers performed by Just for Kicks School of Dance, and much more.  Get your tickets now at wwca.us.   IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Voice Actor Rob Paulsen We're pleased to ring in our 50th episode with a man who has given voice to some of the most popular and timeless animated characters of our generation.  Rob Paulsen was born in Detroit, MI, and at an early age, fell in love with the talents of comedians like Pat Paulsen, Foster Brooks, Red Skelton, Carol Burnett, Jonathan Winters, Peter Sellers, and the cast of Monty Python.  His first role as an entertainer was as a singer, which trained his ear, eye, and voice to work together in a wide array of styles. Rob hit LA in the 1970's intending to be a live action actor but quickly fell under the spell of the Groundlings, the legendary Los Angeles' comedy/improv troupe, where he befriended and worked with Phil Hartman, Paul Reubens, Lynne Marie Stewart, John Paragon, Cassandra Peterson, and Laraine Newman.  His skills honed, he landed his first voice gig on “GI Joe” which opened the door to Hanna-Barbera and veteran director Gordon Hunt, who cast Rob as one of Rob favorite characters from boyhood, Hadji, in a revival of the classic series “Jonny Quest.” That early success came right at the advent of the cable revolution and the millennial baby boom, and a sudden demand for family-oriented programming that would enchant young viewers as well as their parents.  Disney, Warner Brothers, and Hanna-Barbera all started reviving old series and creating new ones, while networks like Nickelodeon and other syndication outlets began demanding more original daytime programming and Rob and his colleagues were part of it all. Rob is best known for bringing life to beloved characters like Yakko on “Animaniacs”, Raphael on “TMNT”, Pinky and Dr. Scratchansniff on “Pinky and the Brain”, Carl Wheezer on “The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron, Boy Genius”, and many, many more throughout a career spanning five decades. After fighting a successful battle with throat cancer in 2016, a story detailed in his 2019 memoir “Voice Lessons”, Rob is back and busier than ever and still one of the hardest working, most in-demand, and beloved voice artists in the industry.  In 2020 he reprised his role as Yakko in a reboot of “Animaniacs” on Hulu and has set new dates for his live show, “Animaniacs In Concert!”, performed with live music in symphony halls and theatres around the country. He is an outspoken advocate for people battling cancer and frequently makes time to bring joy and comfort to fans of all ages, all over the world.  Rob joined us from his home in San Simeon, CA. Rob on Facebook: @robpaulsenlive Rob on Twitter: @yakkopinky Rob on Instagram: @rob_paulsen Buy Rob's memoir: "Voice Lessons" on Amazon   COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us next week, Friday, November 19th, when we'll welcome Stewart Lyons to the show.  Stewart was our guest at the 2021 Seattle Film Summit and is a Co-Executive Producer, Line Producer, Unit Production Manager and Production Executive who has worked on projects with Netflix, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Brothers, Amazon, Starz, Apple, HBO, FX, AMC (including a little show called Breaking Bad!)

Funny Science Fiction
S1E58 - NARF! And Other Voice Lessons ft. Rob Paulsen

Funny Science Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 56:13


NARF! And Other Voice Lessons Are you thinking what we're thinking? Yep, Rob Paulsen is amazing and not enough cool things can be said. Rob had us in stitches from start to finish, but at the same time, giving us some great answers to questions. We talk about the cover of the Pinky and the Brain theme by Post Modern Jukebox - check it out here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqMs9WsJg2k We talk about his work on The Tick, Animaniacs, Jimmy Nuetron and more! Rob also tells us about his book - Voice Lessons - where he details the struggles of being a voice actor with throat cancer. We are thrilled to say he is now not in remission, but he is cured! We hope you enjoy it and laugh just as much as we did ... NARF!! For more on Rob Paulsen, please see the following - Twitter - @Yakkopinky TikTok - @robpaulsen311 Head and Neck Cancer Alliance - www.headandneck.org For our show partners, please visit the following River City Tees - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/rivercitytees?ref_id=22912 Level Up Lightsabers - https://leveluplightsaber.com/?wpam_id=130 Support Funny Science Fiction by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/funny-science-fiction Find out more at https://funny-science-fiction.pinecast.co

Insight On Business the News Hour
Kids, Cancer and Pinky Swear with MaryBeth Myer

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 17:21


A chance meeting the other day put me back in touch with a long-time friend MaryBeth Myer and when she told me about her work with the Pinky Swear Foundation I knew we had to have this conversation. You'll learn more about what this amazing non-profit does for kids with cancer and...their families. And how MaryBeth came to know about the organization through a first hand experience. It will...we hope...move you to become part of Pinky Swear...it truly moved us.  Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.

Voices for Justice
Daniel Robinson

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 50:43


On June 23rd, 2021, 24 year old Daniel Robinson went missing after leaving a worksite in the Buckeye, Arizona desert. his Jeep was recovered a few weeks later just miles from that worksite, but Daniel remains missing. Anyone with information is urged to call the Buckeye Police at 623-349-6499 or contact Daniel's family at PleaseHelpFindDaniel.com. GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/f/sebxxc-help-find-daniel Petition: https://www.change.org/p/buckeye-arizona-police-department-justice-for-daniel-robinson Family Website/Volunteer Form: https://pleasehelpfinddaniel.com/ For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Going Hypo with Alex Ward & Luka Muller
#89 - Whistle or Honk, Earring or Pinky Ring & more

Going Hypo with Alex Ward & Luka Muller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:34


Welcome to Going Hypo, the only podcast brave enough to talk about all the updates.   Follow Alex on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Follow Luka on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Follow the podcast on Facebook & Instagram.

The Get Up Girl
Money mindset gap with Pinky Magana

The Get Up Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 42:59


Did you know that most of us choose less because of our money mindset gap? If it's so low...why are we taught to save our money in a savings account? We were taught these lessons since we were kid. They were passed down from our parents, cartoons and almost every adult around us. The rich know tips and tricks that we were never taught. It's time to learn those secrets! Pinky Magana and I talk all about money and how you can be your own bank with insurance policies...I know right!? Insurance?? What?!? Learn how to pay less or no taxes with life insurance instead of paying 40% taxes on a 401K when you cash it out. Learn what the rich know and prepare for your retirement and for investments to use today!   ABOUT PINKY:Pinky is a mompreneur with a background in dance to now running a financial education firm. She has a  passion for teaching others how money works in a simplified way. Pinky is bringing wall street to main street!  FOLLOW PINKY:INSTAGRAMFACEBOOKWEBSITE  If you enjoyed this episode, make sure and give us a five star rating  and leave us a review on iTunes, Podcast Addict, Podchaser and Castbox.  Let's Connect:The Get Up GirlInstagramFacebookMonthly online fitness academy

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast
Pinky and the Portal

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 17:31


In this minisode, a sick Chris (he swears it's not Covid) and masked Cody talk about toilet demons and time portals. First, Cody shares a South African urban legend called Pinky Pinky. All female identifying persons may want to reconsider using public restrooms after this one, especially if you're wearing pink. Then, Chris tells a cliff-hanger story (with no certain resolution) about a group of treasure hunters who may have found a portal to another world.

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast
232- Animaniacs Reboot Season Two Episode One! "Rome Sweet Rome"

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 66:01


It's time for the Animanicast! Discussing the first episode of the second season of the Animaniacs reboot! Join your hosts Joey, Nathan and Kelly in the "Animanicast!" A podcast dedicated to Animaniacs and its sister shows.  Today Joey and Nathan get to finally talk about the first episode of the second season of the Animaniacs Reboot! This episode featured "Rome Sweet Rome," "Backwards Pinky," and "Now Loading..." Will this episode start the season off on a good note, or will it fall flat like some episodes did in season one? Find out what the Animanicast hosts think of the Warners tormenting Nero, Pinky and the Brain becoming one, and Wakko getting frustrated before playing a game! How many water towers will this episode get? Support The Animanicast The Animanicast now has a Patreon! Head over to Patreon.com/Animanicast for exclusive episode commentaries with Tom Ruegger as well as other awesome rewards! Join the party! Head on over to Discord.Animanicast.com today to join our RetroZap discussion group. You'll get to chat with the hosts of this show as well as the hosts of other RetroZap podcasts! If you'd like to support our show there's lots of ways to do it! First of all, you could go onto Apple Podcasts and leave us a five-star positive review. Also, don't forget to tell a friend about the show! Your retweets and post shares help others find us. By going to Amazon.Animanicast.com you can find some of the newest Animaniacs merchandise including clothing, toys, videos, and even books written by some of the original writers of the show. Get some great stuff and help support our show! You can even use Amazon.Animanicast.com as your portal to Amazon on your next shopping trip and you'll still be supporting our show with any purchase you make. You could also purchase some hand prepared decals from Joey at Decals.Animanicast.com Interested in getting some Animanicast MERCHANDISE? It's in stock now at TeePublic! Get yours at Teepublic.Animanicast.com Opening theme performed by Kontra5t!

The Patriots In Tune Podcast
ABOVE THE LAW - U.S. CONSTITUTION UNDER ATTACK #MAGAMusic - PIT - Ep. #485 - 11/5/2021

The Patriots In Tune Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 149:34


HAROLD WAITS & RICH CHUCK DIESEL #MAGAMUSIC Ep. # 485 Hey everybody, another WOW WEE WEEK won't be complete until you #TuneIn2InTune at 7pm to 9pm ET

The StoryTinker
Midnight Poppy Land 81: Storage Closet (with Toon Talk Cassie)

The StoryTinker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:59


In the storage closet, Poppy has a hard time reacting to Tora's confession. She finds herself wanting to express herself but unable to. Luckily, Tora is understanding, and their subsequent kiss deepens into some more exploration. Tora respectfully asks to look at her (can't say the same for Poppy's biting

Crossman Sports Talk Podcast
Episode 33: I walked away with $100K and my pinky smelled like shi*!

Crossman Sports Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 63:41


This week, we will discuss NFL, MLB, & NBA.Check us out on BuzzSprout, Stitcher, Spotify, Apple, Amazon Music, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and our website www.crossmansportstalk.com. Please give us a 5-Star Rating on Apple to increase our rankings on Apple Podcast and Subscribe!

The Best Ever You Show
Pinky Doodle Dance - Children's Book

The Best Ever You Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 22:00


Just in time for the Holidays!  Pinky Doodle Bug and Pinky Doodle Dance make a perfect gift for kids, classrooms and libraries! Learn more about the new children's book Pinky Doodle Dance directly from the authors Elizabeth Hamlton-Guarino and Kris M. Fuller. Let your child's imagination soar by joining Pinky and her friends on another adventure! Did you know that each year, around this time, Pinky and her friends all gather for the biggest dance party ever? Together, once again, they “Let their dreams fly” and help each other be their best. From the best-selling Pinky Doodle Bug authors, Elizabeth Hamilton-Guarino and Kris M. Fuller, this book is perfect for children learning to read and parents who want to share the joy of reading, writing, drawing and dreaming. Pinky Doodle Bug is full of light-footed rhymes and delightful illustrations that are sure to make this wonderful tale an instant favorite. PinkyDoodleBug.com or Amazon: https://amzn.to/3wqRKhl

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 50 (Guest Rob Paulsen)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 37:06


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 50.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS Catch "CLUE" on the BCT Mainstage Running through November 21st, it's "CLUE" - the play, based on the film, based on the board game!  Several of our talented friends are involved in this classic who-done-it, and Greg and I sat down with them and the rest of the cast for a special behind-the-scenes preview, available now on our YouTube channel.  Find Greg's review of the show on our Facebook page and get your tickets for CLUE now, at bctshows.com. “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info on the Roxy's Facebook page at @bremertonroxy.   IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Voice Actor Rob Paulsen We're pleased to ring in our 50th episode with a man who has given voice to some of the most popular and timeless animated characters of our generation.  Rob Paulsen was born in Detroit, MI, and at an early age, fell in love with the talents of comedians like Pat Paulsen, Foster Brooks, Red Skelton, Carol Burnett, Jonathan Winters, Peter Sellers, and the cast of Monty Python.  His first role as an entertainer was as a singer, which trained his ear, eye, and voice to work together in a wide array of styles. Rob hit LA in the 1970's intending to be a live action actor but quickly fell under the spell of the Groundlings, the legendary Los Angeles' comedy/improv troupe, where he befriended and worked with Phil Hartman, Paul Reubens, Lynne Marie Stewart, John Paragon, Cassandra Peterson, and Laraine Newman.  His skills honed, he landed his first voice gig on “GI Joe” which opened the door to Hanna-Barbera and veteran director Gordon Hunt, who cast Rob as one of Rob favorite characters from boyhood, Hadji, in a revival of the classic series “Jonny Quest.” That early success came right at the advent of the cable revolution and the millennial baby boom, and a sudden demand for family-oriented programming that would enchant young viewers as well as their parents.  Disney, Warner Brothers, and Hanna-Barbera all started reviving old series and creating new ones, while networks like Nickelodeon and other syndication outlets began demanding more original daytime programming and Rob and his colleagues were part of it all. Rob is best known for bringing life to beloved characters like Yakko on “Animaniacs”, Raphael on “TMNT”, Pinky and Dr. Scratchansniff on “Pinky and the Brain”, Carl Wheezer on “The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron, Boy Genius”, and many, many more throughout a career spanning five decades. After fighting a successful battle with throat cancer in 2016, a story detailed in his 2019 memoir “Voice Lessons”, Rob is back and busier than ever and still one of the hardest working, most in-demand, and beloved voice artists in the industry.  In 2020 he reprised his role as Yakko in a reboot of “Animaniacs” on Hulu and has set new dates for his live show, “Animaniacs In Concert!”, performed with live music in symphony halls and theatres around the country. He is an outspoken advocate for people battling cancer and frequently makes time to bring joy and comfort to fans of all ages, all over the world.  Rob joined us from his home in San Simeon, CA. Rob on Twitter: @yakkopinky Rob on Instagram: @rob_paulsen Buy Rob's memoir: "Voice Lessons" on Amazon   COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us Friday, November 12th, for the second half of our interview with Rob, when he'll share some of his technique as an actor behind the mic.

Voices for Justice
Losing Maura Murray

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 105:37


Today I am discussing the community surrounding Maura Murray and the effect it has had and continues to have on her case. I am joined by Maura's sister, Julie Murray, for a pretty long interview. After what I've seen, heard, and experienced with all of this, I really just wanted to have a conversation with Julie so hopefully we can clear the air a bit and help get the focus back on Maura.  For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 26: Bars, Bags, Bikepacking and weights

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 34:03


In this week's In the Dirt, Randall and Craig take a look at gravel handlebar trends, new bags from Post Carry Co, Craig's new strength training with EverAthlete, a new Bay Area bikepacking route and tease an ongoing discussion of social media and cycling in The Ridership. Bay Area Triple Bypass Route Post Carry Bags Whisky Spano Bar Support the Podcast Join The Ridership   Automated transcription, please excuse the typos and errors: Untitled [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. I'll be joined shortly by my co-host randall jacobs for another episode of in the dirt . [00:00:12] This episode is brought to you by our friends at thesis bike. Yes. That indeed is Randall's company thesis. Randall donates his time to the gravel ride podcast in the dirt series, out of an abundance of passion for the sport. But he also runs a company called thesis, as you know, is the maker of the OB one bicycle. [00:00:33] That is actually the bicycle that I ride. If you follow me on social media, you may see my custom painted pink. Thesis, OB one. I affectionately refer to as Mr. Pinky. Anyway, I wanted to give you an update. Thesis has some bikes back in stock.  [00:00:50] As I mentioned a few weeks ago, they've got some of those SRAM rival access grupos in stock. So they've got bikes ready to go, but more importantly, they've just, re-introduced their bring a friend referral program. That'll get you $500 off an OB one. When you purchase a bike with a friend. Or if you have a friend that has a thesis.  [00:01:13] You can hit them up for a $500 discount. So coordinate with the team over a thesis. If you have any questions, you can email them@helloatthesis.bike.  [00:01:23] Or check them out online@thesis.bike, they offer free one-on-one consultations, which is a great way to see if a thesis. It will be. One is the right bike for you.  [00:01:33] With that said, let me grab Randall and let's jump into in the dirt.  [00:01:37] Craig: Hey Randall, how you doing today? [00:01:39] Randall: I'm doing well, Craig, how are you? My friend.  [00:01:42] Craig: I'm good. I literally just got done recording the pre-roll.  [00:01:47] Talking about. [00:01:47] thesis, your company's new refer a friend program, which I thought was cool.  [00:01:52] Let I let the listeners know about that, and I appreciate your efforts as a cohost of in the dirt, but separately, when you wear your thesis bike company, hat. I do appreciate the time to time financial support you provide the podcast. Because it really is the type of thing that keeps the balls rolling around here. [00:02:10] Randall: For sure. Yeah. In our bring your friend program is actually something we did before and had to pull when supply chains went sideways. And now that we have bikes in stock, we'd much rather reward the community rather than. You know, paying Bookface or some ad network to, to reach people. So it's nice to be able to reward those who help spread the word. And then obviously, you know, with what you do, it's been very aligned from the beginning. So thanks for the opportunity to work with you.  [00:02:35] Craig: Yeah. [00:02:35] absolutely appreciate it. Yeah. It's so ridiculous that there was like 15 months or more in there where bike companies just didn't bother advertising or promoting themselves because it was so ridiculously hard product into consumer's hands.  [00:02:50] Randall: Yeah, there's really no point in trying to sell something you don't have. And don't don't know when you'll have it again. That seems to be. That seems to be a phenomenon that's going to continue well into the future for awhile. From what  [00:03:03] Craig: Yeah. I mean, not to bring sort of macroeconomic trends in here, but I was just, just listening to someone talk about how in Apple's earnings call. There is some suggestion that. Supply chains are improving. They have not improved entirely, but that they are. Improving and that in the grand scheme of things, this will be a temporary blip, but temporary could mean two years.  [00:03:26] Randall: Yeah. Yeah. In their case, they're dealing with chips too, which I'm getting a new chip Foundry online is a multi-year $10 billion project. So fortunately we don't have that in the bike industry. We're pretty, pretty low on the technology front, even with our. Wireless shifting, which, how did that take so long to come come about?  [00:03:46] Craig: How are you doing otherwise? Is the weather starting to change on the east coast for you? [00:03:49] Randall: We've had some beautiful days past several days. We had a nor'easter coming through. So I did steal away for a trail run between, between rains in the should have some good weather on the weekend and otherwise loving being with family here in Boston, it's a very different lifestyle than the one I was living in the bay area.  [00:04:06] And it's a very much aligned with where I'm at. Yeah.  [00:04:09] Craig: We get, we got absolutely hammered out here by that rainstorm in Moran. I think we had the highest rain count in Anywhere in California. [00:04:17] that weekend. I think we got on Tam and there's 12 inches of rain. So it was, it was literally coming out of every pore of The mountain. There were new streams and waterfalls being, being created.  [00:04:29] I mean, God knows we needed the water. [00:04:31] and is so nice. I wrote up the mountain for Dawn patrol on a Wednesday and Just to see a little water. [00:04:36] in places where it has been devoid. Void because of the drought was, was nice.  [00:04:42] Randall: When I did see your, your conversation or the conversation you chimed in on in, on, on the ridership about you know, opening up a new you know, gullies and things like this in the trails. So hopefully they're relatively intact. [00:04:55] Craig: Yeah, that was fun. I mean, that's one of those things that you and I have always like thought and hoped would happen in the ridership. Just this idea that a writer could pop a message into the forum and say, Hey, we just got this huge rainstorm. How, how are the trails looking? Is it rideable or is it too.  [00:05:11] As it a sloppy mess. [00:05:13] Randall: Yeah, it's pretty neat.  [00:05:14] Craig: The  [00:05:14] Randall: been training quite a bit lately, right?  [00:05:16] Craig: Yeah. [00:05:16] You know, I was going to say The other good.  [00:05:17] thing about the rain and not being, Wanting to ride my bike outside. [00:05:22] lately, as I have. [00:05:23] committed to a strength training program. [00:05:25] It's one of those things as I've nagged about my back on the podcast. Many months ago.  [00:05:31] That I've actually implemented a little bit of a plan And I've been. [00:05:35] working via a company called ever athlete. And I became aware of them.  [00:05:41] As one of the founder is Kate Courtney's strength and conditioning coach, Kate Courtney being a former world champion mountain Biker. [00:05:49] who comes from This area. [00:05:51] And what, what appealed to me most about. The ever athlete program was that they have a run specific program, a cycling specific program, and then basic conditioning.  [00:06:03] after chatting with them, [00:06:04] a little bit online. And I had a phone call with them just as a general consumer. You know, it was advised that I start with beginner strength training.  [00:06:12] And Totally. [00:06:14] spot on if I started anything beyond beginner. I would have been absolutely destroyed. And frankly, like some of the exercises. Do you have me sore in places that are not used to being sore?  [00:06:26] Randall: So if somebody were to ask you, do you even lift bro? The answer would be not quite yet. I'm doing the beginner stuff first.  [00:06:34] Craig: Yeah.  [00:06:35] Exactly. Like I don't have tank tops yet and a special weightlifting gear and gloves that I'm using, But I have. [00:06:42] I'm on weak. I'm proud of myself. [00:06:43] I just completed week four of an eight week, week block.  [00:06:47] Just getting my body's too. Basic strength training. I'm using a TRX, some elastic bands.  [00:06:54] And just a few basic weights. That's not a exorbitant setup, I'm just doing it. And, you know, eight by eight area of My garage. [00:07:02] every other day.  [00:07:04] Randall: That's great. Yeah, I've. I've gotten on a reasonably regular routine with a pair of 50 pound power blocks, adjustable dumbbells, which I'm a big fan of I've tried a few different types of adjustable dumbbells and these are the best have had. And just like doing a basic routine with not a crazy amount of weight and then adding some chin ups and AB work and so on squats and stuff like that, with that together with running and stretching, and I'll probably be adding yoga.  [00:07:30] As the winter progresses and I can't get outside so much.  [00:07:33] Craig: Yeah, you'll have to put a note in the show notes for me on that one. I'd be interested. Cause I know in ever athletes list of things that I may need. That type of wait setup is, will come into play at some point.  [00:07:45] Randall: Got it. Yeah. They don't, they don't pay us, but I can definitely endorse the power block sport. And it's totally sufficient for me, even at 50 pounds, because anything that I do with more than 50 pounds, I probably shouldn't be doing anyways. I don't need it.  [00:07:57] Craig: Yeah, I mean, good God Right now. [00:07:58] Randall, I'm basically doing almost exclusively body weight exercises.  [00:08:03] 50 pounds seems a long way away from where my current strength training is at.  [00:08:08] Randall: Oh, you can get a whole lot of resistance with just body weight too. So there's no need to buy too much expensive gear, but yeah, these are a good one. [00:08:15] Craig: Yeah. [00:08:16] totally. I mean, I think I'll walk away from this, knowing that just even, even strictly a body weight program would be hugely beneficial.  [00:08:23] Randall: Yeah, I think so. I'm curious to hear how your back is feeling in a couple of months.  [00:08:28] Craig: Yeah, for sure. [00:08:28] So I've got an a, as I said, I've got another month on basic, and then I think I'll just carry over into their cycling, their first cycling Specific program. [00:08:36] And I've been chatting with them. [00:08:37] and I think I'll have them on the pod so we can get just a deeper dive into.  [00:08:42] Not just Their program. [00:08:43] but just strength training specifically, and the, and the value for cyclists to take a break and do something different.  [00:08:51] Randall: I remember hearing a quote somewhere that the biggest problem with cyclists in their training program is that they only ride their bikes.  [00:08:59] Craig: A hundred percent. [00:09:00] It's funny. You mentioned that because another guest I've got coming up is a pretty world renowned. Bike fitter, but he from the UK, but he wrote a book called the midlife cyclist.  [00:09:10] And I'm going to dig into it with him, but yeah, one of the key takeaways is as an average, enthusiastic and passionate, enthusiastic cyclist.  [00:09:19] we're probably riding more and closer to our, not more by volume, but closer to our threshold than professional cyclists do because We go out there. [00:09:28] and we hammer, you know, we're just feeling like we're out there for a good time.  [00:09:31] And the best thing you could do is probably. Lose a workout or two on the bike and change it into some strength training or something. That's you know, testing different parts of your body.  [00:09:41] Randall: Yeah, I look forward to that episode. That'll be a good one.  [00:09:44] Craig: Yeah. [00:09:45] I'm super excited about it. I mean, I've just been thinking about it. In light of my own winter and what I want to achieve and how I want to set myself up for success next year. And success for me just means into being healthy and strong enough to tackle. You know, a big event or two here or there and not have it totally destroyed me.  [00:10:03] Randall: Yeah. And I think that for some of us do I, I ended up talking to a lot of athletes who are. You know, or later in years, and just being able to know that you can, you have some control over your ability to ride well into old age and maintained flexibility and bone density and injury prevention and all these other things is you know, it's, it's it's a good resource for folks to have to, to know how to, how to approach that. [00:10:28] Craig: Yeah, totally. I've. [00:10:28] got another great episode that I'm recording actually immediately after this with Brian McCulloch. Ah,  [00:10:33] Former pro road racer, former BWR winner, and most recently just won. I think it was The masters category. [00:10:40] of mountain bike nationals.  [00:10:41] So Awesome guys. [00:10:42] super enthusiastic. And one of the things he was telling me in his coaching practice. [00:10:47] was that, you know, he coaches plenty of athletes whose goal is I want to complete the event and then be totally Pepe for the beer garden afterwards. [00:10:57] And he's  [00:10:57] I'm Totally down with it. No one wants to just barely crawl across the finish line And then have to go to their car. [00:11:04] to take a nap, especially in these gravel events. We want to finish, we want to commune with our fellow participants and, you know, I think that's a. Admirable goal for anyone to not only cross the finish line, but be able to. Party Hardy as the kids say.  [00:11:20] Randall: Yeah. It's you know, you have the combination of having endured something with, with other people and then getting to connect like the, the vehicle for connection elements shines out of that, that statement there, which is certainly why I ride.  [00:11:33] Craig: Yeah, totally. And speaking of events I know I did a recap episode of Water, but I thought we chat about that a little bit since it's something you've participated in, in years past. [00:11:42] Randall: number of times. Yeah, this is actually the first year, the first time in years that I didn't go. It, I just reading the reporting. It seems like the. You know, the new stuff was relatively sparse. There's a couple of things that you and I want to, to jump into in future episodes with the new BMC.  [00:11:58] Headshot, they're not calling it a headshot, but it's, it looks like a head shock and surrounds new flight, attendants, suspension, and so on. So that'll be fun to dive into, but I'm curious, what else did you see that was compelling?  [00:12:09] Craig: Yeah. You know, I mean, it's first off for those of you who don't know, it's quite the festival. I mean, you've got everything from downhill and Duro, gravel cross-country road racing.  [00:12:20] While I find it. [00:12:21] a bit overwhelming, the sheer number of cyclists and people that are there. At Laguna Seca. It is fun to see someone in spandex and a pro road kit. Riding through the pits next to you, a downhill kid with his full face helmet, shoved back on his head with a neck brace. [00:12:39] Randall: Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah.  [00:12:41] Craig: You know, from a, from a product perspective and manufacturer perspective. The number of booths was down. I mean, it still was quite a Hardy show, but I would say. You know, with the absence of the international.  [00:12:54] Manufacturers. [00:12:55] coming is probably like 40%, less sheer booths. So it made it more manageable. Whereas now the last time they held it in person.  [00:13:03] I felt like covering it in one day was just too much. Like I really needed about a day and a half or a day and three quarters to get around. [00:13:12] and make sure I poked my head in every booth That was out there. [00:13:15] this year was a little bit more manageable. I think in three quarters of a day, I had cruised around and seen everything I wanted to see.  [00:13:22] Randall: Cool. Cool. And you only spent the one day. Yeah.  [00:13:25] Craig: Yeah. [00:13:25] I just did a day trip which I think. Made me like it a little bit more. I mean, I think the last time we were down there, It was just such a cluster AF to, you know, get in and out of there with your car and you were parked so far away. So I found that this fit where I was at this this year. [00:13:42] Randall: Yeah we had a booth last time too. So we had all of that setting up and tearing down and so on. But yeah, hopefully by next year, it's it would make sense for me to get out there again, cause I've always enjoyed that. It's actually the only, the only time I've ever lined up at a race with like international.  [00:14:00] Racers.  [00:14:01] You know, just cause they you know, even if you were a low, a low level, regional domestic pro, you could line up in the, the UCI cross-country race. So you're not necessarily racing the same race, but burry stander was there and Christoph saucer was there and it was just like my moment of oh wow.  [00:14:16] You know, getting to. Line up. 15 rows behind them.  [00:14:20] Craig: You're like, I'm going to stay on their wheel and 50 meters. And you're like, I'm not going to stay on their wheel. [00:14:24] Randall: Oh, they, they started 20 seconds before I did. By the time everyone's actually rolling. So there's, there's no staying on any wheels regardless.  [00:14:32] Craig: That's all. It's the funniest thing. When I'm at these big events, when they, they shoot off the starting gun and you're far enough back that nothing happens. There's no movement.  [00:14:41] Randall: Yeah, the slinky effect.  [00:14:43] Craig: Yeah. [00:14:44] But there have been, you know, there's been some cool stuff dropping lately that I think we should talk about. You  [00:14:49] know, I think. We should jump in a little bit into the handlebars that have been coming out because I know. In talking to you. You had a particular design in mind that you.  [00:15:01] thought was what you would design. If you.  [00:15:04] were going to design a Handlebar. [00:15:05] from the ground up, and then lo and behold, someone came out with one that was pretty darn close to what you described.  [00:15:11] Randall: Yeah. So I've called out this Aero Jaya. I think it's called my three T a number of times. And this was the closest thing to what I would design that I had seen. But whiskey just came out with a bar called the Spano. Or Spanno however they want to accentuate that a and pretty much everything about this is the way that I would design a bar.  [00:15:30] There's a few things I would do subtly differently and I can definitely share that. But You know, it's 12 degrees at the hoods and 20 degrees to the drops and it's a compound flare. And so you don't have to have the same flare. At the hoods and in the drops, because a lot of the leavers these days have some flare built in anyways. I would probably go with a little bit less flare with the hoods to give it a little more roadie position, maybe eight degrees, but still.  [00:15:53] For, you know, this is well done. It's a flat top design there. It looks like they've had some engineered flex. Built into, you know, what I would call like the wings of the bar so that you get some vertical flex. From the bar, which could help to, you know, negate the need for something as substantial as like a suspension stem.  [00:16:12] I think that these compliance structures are our real opportunity to add. Compliance to the bike without necessarily having to add mechanical linkages and things like this.  [00:16:22] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. I think that that, that compliance is something that people would really benefit from. And if, if, if the manufacturers can do it in subtle ways, I think it all adds up.  [00:16:33] Randall: Challenges that different riders are going to have different needs in terms of let's just say you want to deliver the same experience to everybody. Then, you know, with a given handlebar under a bigger rider, you are going to need it to be stiffer in order for them to have the same experiences as a lighter weight rider. Who's just not exerting the same force.  [00:16:50] So that would be one thing where, you know, that's hard to do without having two versions of the bar or some sort of tuneable flex mechanism, which is something I've played around with, but adds complexity.  [00:16:59] I do like how the, the drop is really shallow. It's a hundred mil. The reaches is pretty short, 68. I would have the drop scale with the size of the bar would be one minor thing, because presumably on average, the, you know, the width of the bar is scaling with the size of the rider. But even that there's a huge amount of variation on that bell curve.  [00:17:19] Overall, like. It's this, this is from what I've seen and what you can do with the leavers that are on the market. Because there's only two companies that make them and they control Libra design. This, this is the most interesting one to me. Hopefully we can get our hands on one at some point and provide a proper review, but it looks really, really compelling. I'm glad to see this direction towards compound flares.  [00:17:41] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. [00:17:41] I thought that I was going to key in, on that. Those words you used compound flares, because I do think that's interesting because you know, one of the things that. The F the former roadie in me, I do not like when the, when the shifter lovers are angled into too far. And it doesn't feel, it doesn't feel great. And it seems if there's a.  [00:18:00] If there's a design way too. Still get the flare you need at the bottoms while not overly adjusting where the hoods are, you know, that's a win.  [00:18:11] Randall: Yeah. And, and, you know, in our bars, we went with a. Non-compounded 10 degree flare because it is, you know, the best, the most glared you can get without it. Really effecting the ergonomics at the hoods, especially with say ceramides mechanical road leavers that have a kind of a square edge. So if you rotate them too far out, you get a kind of a pressure point in the middle of the hand. [00:18:31] But yeah, it's a pretty neat handlebar. So [00:18:35] Craig: Yeah. And with everything. You know, I think you've gotta be tooling costs are obviously like the big concern and changing it. Dramatically. Size wise each time. And so you, haven't got to think about. How many sets of tools are you willing to buy to bring this product to market? Handlebar replacement. I don't know what kind of volume any of these companies do with their handlebars, but it's, it's a little bit of a balance there. I would think from a manufacturing perspective.  [00:19:03] Randall: Yeah to, to dive a little bit into this without going too deep nerd. So if you're a big manufacturer, like a specialized or a track or something, you can amortize those tooling costs over a large number of bicycles that are specking that this handlebar at the OEM level, if you're doing an aftermarket bar,  [00:19:19] It's a lot harder. And the tooling cost is quite material on an item like this, where it's low volume and you have so many different sizes. Usually it would be three tools. You'd have. You know, or at least the three component tool. So you have. You know, the two drops and then you have the center section and maybe the center section is a single mold.  [00:19:38] With different inserts or even like you make one long one and then you chop it to the width that you want. And then you essentially bond on the drops. Which is where some extra weight comes in. So if you see bars like 250 grams or so if you want to drop 50 grams without compromising the structural integrity, that has to be a one-piece bar, which means.  [00:19:57] An independent, large mold. That's that's moderately complex for every single size. And if you're only doing a few hundred units a year, which is a good volume for an aftermarket handlebar, that's hard to justify economically.  [00:20:10] Craig: Yeah. [00:20:10] that makes a ton of sense. I'm actually curious, and maybe listeners can either hit us up on social media or in the ridership, ideally about how often.  [00:20:18] People replace their bars. And is it the type of thing that When you're building. [00:20:22] the bike, you get that bar and you never think about it otherwise. Which I suspect, I know I've certainly been there in my bike ownership life. But I do think there's a decent amount of innovation in gravel bars for people to consider and just keep an eye out there for what are the performance benefits? How do these different bars feel?  [00:20:43] When you put them on your existing bike.  [00:20:45] Randall: I do think that one of the major constraints here is simply cost and that actually has less to do with the unit cost and more to do with having to amortize the tooling costs over. So few units. But I, you know, handlebars like a carbon bar on the one hand, it's somewhat disposable. If you design it, if you don't design it right. Where if you crash, like you really want to replace it. But on the other hand, the, the opportunities for compound shapes and for compliance being built in.  [00:21:12] Negates may negate the need for more expensive and complicated solutions elsewhere on the bike to achieve the same goals. You know, I'd like to see if I could do a handlebar at scale, You know, the, the actual cost on something like this is for a tiny fraction of the actual sale price of, you know, 250 to 400 bucks on some of these bars. [00:21:31] Craig: Yeah. [00:21:31] That's the thing. I mean, once you've got, once you've got your bike frame. And you're not going to replace that. You really need to look at your attachment points as the, you know, how are you going to tune the bike? [00:21:41] Randall: Yeah, the touch points. Exactly.  [00:21:44] Craig: On the other end of the spectrum. [00:21:46] curve had a bar called the Walmart. Out for a while. And curve is probably best known for their massively wide bars. I mean like 50 plus centimeter bars.  [00:21:58] Very different riding style. They've actually gone the other way and introduced a narrower version of that. And I just think it's interesting to see them coming in. I mean, I can imagine that she super, super wide bar is a big part of the markets. I suppose it's not surprising. To see them go narrower.  [00:22:15] Randall: They're also going with aluminum. You know, your tooling cost is. It's basically a jig. So it's not, you can do smaller volume and, and carve out that little niche for oneself, but yeah, they went with a 40 and a 43 with, it looks like here, but the. My concern would be the flare is so great at the hoods.  [00:22:34] That you'd really want to be mindful of the shape of the hoods that you're using to make sure that it's not going to put a pressure point in your hand.  [00:22:42] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. [00:22:42] I think it's a bar for a very specific customer. Follow up question for you on a aluminum versus carbon in the handlebar from a field perspective, what are the what's. How should people think about the difference in feel between those two materials?  [00:22:57] Randall: It really depends on how it's engineered. It really depends heavily on how it's engineered. And I was. You know, the particulars of the material, how it's shaped, how it's drawn is it, is it. You know, buddied and so on, which is an actual budding process. And with carbon kind of same thing, like.  [00:23:13] What is, what is the shape? What type of carbon is being used? What is the layup? You can make a structure that is incredibly stiff or very compliant you could add. I think loaf their bar, they're using some You know, some fancily branded. Fiberglass material in order to create you know, some, some even, even greater, even greater flex in the part of the handlebar, just beyond the clamp with the stem.  [00:23:38] GT did this with their original grade and may still to this day on the seat stays, they actually have a fiberglass wrapped in carbon fiber. So fiberglass is what's used in like a fishing pole. So think about the extremes of flex that you can get with that before it breaks. [00:23:52] So there's it really just, it just depends, but in terms of the opportunities to tune flex and so on. Vastly greater with carbon, for sure, for sure. But this trade-offs with that.  [00:24:03] Craig: Yeah. Gotcha. Gotcha. Hey, the other thing I wanted to mention in terms of new product drops recently was our friend mark at post Kericho. I dropped a couple of new bags.  [00:24:14] Randall: Yeah, let's take a look at these. So he's got a new handlebar bag. Which these, these things are hard to. Talk too much about with action without actually experiencing one, but  [00:24:27] Craig: Yeah. [00:24:28] I think the interest, the interesting thing about all Mark's stuff is he's a very thoughtful designer and one of my pet peeves around the handlebar bags, and it's got nothing to do with. Like general use of the bag. Is that with the zipper being up top?  [00:24:43] With my bike, computer Mount, and oftentimes a light it's really hard to get at them because it's being pushed down and Mark's designed the zipper to be in the middle of the front of this bag.  [00:24:57] I saw some comments about Alex, stuff's going to drop out. But I think at the end of the day, you're going to know that it's there and that's where it's located. So I think from a practical perspective, it's still going to work, but it would solve my personal problem with trying to get in there without unstrapping the bag from the handlebar.  [00:25:14] Randall: Yeah. And this bag is also quite compact, this new bag in the mini handlebar bag that he came out with. And so I could imagine. Strapping it to the bar and the little strap on the back around the stem, as opposed to, you know, having to strap it in a way that may push cables or the bag itself into the head tube, which is a very common problem with these handlebar bags.  [00:25:35] And you know, leads me to actually on my bike packing bag to have add straps in order to have it connect both to the bar and then to like right behind the hoods. So you don't get that rotational flop and it [00:25:49] keeps it off the head tube. But that's a [00:25:51] Craig: And are they get minimum? At minimum for anyone writing. Riding. You know, a lot, lots of types of bags, just consider putting some protective film over your frame in case there's rubbing. [00:26:00] Randall: For sure. For sure. Yeah, we, yeah. Good recommendation.  [00:26:05] Craig: The other interesting one he came up with was this bomber top tube bag, which is a very long and, and Kind of not, not a big stack height bag that can go along the top tube or underneath the top tube. It's the, maybe three quarters of the length of the top two, but it looks like.  [00:26:21] We're just, it's interesting. I don't think for me, it's like a daily rider type thing, but I do love the multiple different positions of it. And I could see for a bigger trip or a bigger day out this being like one of those bags that I just add on for specific purposes. [00:26:36] Randall: Yeah, And presumably it's a bit lighter than his existing frame bag, which I own, I'm not sure if you own as well. I'm a huge fan of that bag for, for bigger days on the bike where I need to bring stuff.  [00:26:47] Craig: Yeah. [00:26:47] no. I imagine like running that quarter frame bag and then adding this one on top, you know, if you were doing some epic back country ride and wanted to maybe bring a full pump or what have you I think this is a neat option to add on and augment that kind of storage.  [00:27:02] Randall: One comment I did see in one of the articles was this idea of, you know, maybe it would be a mountable on the bottom of the down tube. Which I actually think is a a space where, you know, a design, a bag that was designed specifically for that space could both lower center of mass. And Potentially provide some protection for that part of the bike from rocks kicking up and so on, which is a significant concern, especially when you get into more Tundra terrain on one of these gravel bikes.  [00:27:31] Craig: Yeah. I think some more of the hardcore bike packing pack bag manufacturers have solutions for that area, whether they're building off the bottle cage, that's often down there and a lot of these gravel bikes. We're otherwise attaching agree. It's a, it's an interesting place. There's so many different nooks and crannies.  [00:27:50] To jam stuff on these bikes with all these new modern bags. It's a, you're not, there's no dearth of options for you, depending on how you want to set up your rig.  [00:27:58] Randall: Yeah. And the last thing we'll call out here is the the seat bag, which is a pretty standard, but really elegantly designed seat bag. And I just got to, you know, give a shout out for him on just the aesthetics of these bags. Then also the cost structure, like the seat bags, 30 bucks. You know, the, the bomber bag.  [00:28:13] I'm seeing 35 bucks. So really getting like this high quality construction and design at a very accessible price point. So Bravo mark, keep up the good work. Good to see you. Continuing to put product out.  [00:28:25] Craig: Yeah, kudos. Speaking of other things that people, we know, people from the ridership we're putting out there in the world. Some cool stuff on bike, packing.com.  [00:28:34] Randall: Yeah. So our friends Emily Chung and Seth Hur from over at bike index. So you've worked with, did he do the full triple crossover?  [00:28:44] Craig: He did.  [00:28:44] Randall: Yeah. So the bay area, triple crossover, which was published on bike, packing.com over the past week or so, 161 miles, three to four days 65% unpaved and a really, a lot of great photography and so on. And it covers essentially from Marin. North of San Francisco all the way around the bay, back to south bay.  [00:29:06] Maybe in the other direction, maybe that's how they finished up, but it's a, and there's actually a way. Yeah. And there's a way to, and we discussed this in the forum to connect to the bay area Ridge trail through the Santa Cruz mountains. If someone wanted to do an entire loop here, which  [00:29:21] She, she very well may do at some point in posts, but a really cool to see members of the community going out and having good adventures and sharing the routes with others so that others can follow in the footsteps or pedal strokes. As we may say.  [00:29:34] Craig: Yeah. [00:29:34] for sure. It's so valuable to have this sort of bait out there. And I love all the imagery. I. People should go to the bike, packing.com. Link and you can find it either in the ridership or we'll put it in the show notes for this episode, stunning pictures. And it's so cool. I think there's one picture I'm looking at right now.  [00:29:52] Of the four of them riding across the golden gate bridge. In part of their journey looks like they're heading towards Marin and this pitcher just starting off. I just love it. I'm in such, such sort of iconic. Imagery around the bay area. And for those of you not in this area,  [00:30:07] The idea. [00:30:08] that you could fly into SFO. Take a Bart train into the city with your bags or even write up and then start on this journey. From a major metropolitan area is just awesome. And even from some of the imagery, you would think you're nowhere near any sort of major city. [00:30:26] Randall: Oh, yeah, that was one of the things I loved about living in San Francisco was if I needed to be out in the middle of nowhere, I could be so with no one around in 45 minutes over in the headphones.  [00:30:36] Craig: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:30:37] exactly. [00:30:37] So kudos to MLA for all the great photography and her partners on that trip. Super cool and amazing that they put it out there. [00:30:44] Randall: Yeah. And another thing just to mention with this too, is a. They're in the forum. And so if this is something you want to do embark on one of the motivations, there was to be able to go to a new region and just reach out to folks and say, Hey, what's the beta. Hey, does anyone want to join me for a segment?  [00:31:00] You know, one of the group rides going on and we've been seeing those dynamics, which is really cool.  [00:31:04] Craig: Yeah, exactly. [00:31:05] I mean, it's so it's, so it's so great that there are so many sites out there that are publishing adventures and things like that. But being able to talk to people, locals about current conditions or.  [00:31:17] You know, even advice for that. Ad-on you described down into the Santa Cruz mountains, like That kind of stuff. [00:31:22] is awesome. And invaluable. If You're going to spend. [00:31:25] a week of Your hard earned time and vacation and money in a particular area. [00:31:30] I don't know about you, but I, I just want to get the most out of it as, as possible.  [00:31:34] Randall: Yeah, and this is something that you know, a conversation that sprung up organically in the forum and that we're going to be looking to facilitate a lot more conversation around, which is. You know, the role of, you know, what might be called social media, just online tools for connecting with others generally in the cycling experience. And so what is, what is a healthy role? What are unhealthy roles and how do we create something that.  [00:31:58] Facilitates things that, that help people live live better in gets out of the realm of say what certain large players have been accused of credibly in terms of That's the same behavior that is not, is more in the interest of profit and shareholders. Then the the people that they've disk.  [00:32:14] Describe as users.  [00:32:16] Craig: Yeah. [00:32:17] that, that thread in the ridership's really interesting and some very thoughtful commentary. It's fascinating how different people view different platforms. You know, obviously you've got mainstream social media and then more cycling specific sites that kind of serve similar purposes. So it's something, you know, I know you think a lot about, I've thought a lot about.  [00:32:38] In the context of the ridership and and generally interesting how other people are expressing their sell themselves. And. What types of things they use and don't want to use. [00:32:49] Randall: Yeah. So this is something that you know, we're also considering how to evolve the, the forum as well. We built it in slack because that was the best. Tool available. But we're exploring other tools and add ons and things like this. And if this is a conversation that interests you we'd really love your, your feedback and it's, you know, that conversation is happening in the ridership. So come join us there and let us know how we can make it better.  [00:33:12] Craig: Yeah. [00:33:12] As always. [00:33:13] I mean, we are very open to your input about these episodes and any other episode of the gravel ride podcast.  [00:33:20] The ridership forum is something that, you know, we started from Our hearts but it's really a community run initiative. [00:33:26] and we want to evolve as the community wants us to and, and directionally where they want us to go.  [00:33:33] Randall: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. [00:33:35] Craig: Yeah.  [00:33:36] Cool. [00:33:36] I think that's about it for this week's edition of in the dirt Randall. I appreciate your time as always.  [00:33:42] Randall: As always as well. Craig [00:33:43] Craig: And to all the listeners until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels. 

Crypto Centz Podcast
Walmart puts its pinky toe into the Bitcoin game.

Crypto Centz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 9:32


Check out the show and the sponsors --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cryptocentzpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cryptocentzpodcast/support

Voices for Justice
Summer Wells

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 52:19


Today I am discussing the case of missing 5-year-old Summer Moon Utah Wells. Summer went missing from her home in Rogersville, Tennessee on June 15th, 2021. Summer's mother Candus say Summer went down into the basement to play and when she went to check on her just a few minutes later, she was gone. Summer is a 5 year old white female with very short blonde hair and blue eyes. She is approximately 3 feet tall and weighs 40 pounds. Anyone with information about Summer is urged to call 1800-TBI- Find. For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Real Beauty with FD
Real Beauty Season 3 Episode 2: the famous pinky ring, authentic beauty, being an attorney then changing careers for happiness with Melody Godfred founder of Fred & Far

Real Beauty with FD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:00


Welcome back for episode 2!! This week I had the opportunity to interview Melody Godfred, the founder of Fred & Far - the famous pinky ring and also publisher of "self love poetry" As ever, please hit me up @choosandfashiondoos 

Alicyn's Wonderland
Tom Ruegger - Creator of Animaniacs, Pinky & the Brain, Tiny Toons | AW 27

Alicyn's Wonderland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 60:30


AW 27 | Tom Ruegger - Creator of Animaniacs, Pinky & the Brain, Tiny ToonsIn this week's episode, we are joined by animation legend Tom Ruegger, the creator of Animaniacs, Pinky & The Brain, and Tiny Toons. Tom has been in the animation industry for over four decades and has worked on some of the most memorable cartoons at Warner Brothers, Hanna-Barbera, and Disney. He has won seventeen Emmy Awards for his work that has defined generations of childhoods across the world. To say that I am thrilled to finally sit down with Tom is an understatement!Tune in as Tom takes us back to his journey to fully realizing his animator dreams (you won't believe what the final straw was for Tom to leave New Jersey!) and the events that led him to work amongst animation's biggest names in the 80s. Tom also shares what it was like to work with the likes of Hanna Barbera, Jo Barbera, and Steven Spielberg. Finally, Tom goes into detail about how his iconic works such as Animaniacs, Tiny Toons, and Pinky & The Brain came to be. This is definitely a very inspiring and nostalgic episode!Timestamps:[7:20]Tom Ruegger's Humble Beginnings[17:39]The Phone Booth Call That Changed Tom's Life Forever[22:13]Tom Talks About Working With Hanna-Barbera[29:39]Meeting Steven Spielberg and creating the most iconic cartoon shows of the 90s[41:21]Tom talks about the Will You Wear A Mask project[47:53]Tom shares his processFollow along with Alicyn's Wonderland on:Instagram: @AlicynTikTok: @alicynpackardYouTube: Alicyn PackardTwitter: @Alicyn 

BLUE NATION
Dr. King is Back...& Garf Loves Pinky Drinks!

BLUE NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 24:01


Our good friend, Dr King (aka, Dr. Dr. Dr.) is back in the studio this week, having just recovered from double hip replacement, and it was like he never left!! The booze was flowing early, and nobody was holding back... except maybe Garf, with his fruity-pink cocktails. Po may be clinically stupid and Beter is quite certain the BNPC is destined for cancel-culture. F**** IT ! Let's drink.

Lo piensan todos. Lo decimos nosotros.
Así dijo Pinky Pintor: "Se está segregando usted mismo" (Al no vacunarse)

Lo piensan todos. Lo decimos nosotros.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:09


Analizamos sobre las "desvinculaciones" por no vacunarse contra el COVID-19

Voices for Justice
Diane Francis

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:41


Today I am discussing the case of Diane Francis who was last seen in Jacksonville, Florida in 2005. Diane's daughter Sherri Snyder has been on a mission to find her mother pretty much ever since. Anyone with information about Diane Francis is urged to call the Palm Beach County Sheriff's office at 561-688-3000. You can also contact Sherri through the Finding Diane Francis Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/FindingDianeFrancis/ If you'd like to donate to help Sherri get back to Florida to search for Diane, you can do that through her GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-me-find-diane For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Nerd of Godcast Daily Devotion
10-19-21 // The Same Thing We Do Every Night Pinky // Ryan

Nerd of Godcast Daily Devotion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:48


Pinky And The Brain x -Proverbs 19- Your daily crossover of faith and fandom! Experience daily Biblical encouragement from nerdy Christian podcasters, bloggers and content creators. Join the Nerd of Godcast community at www.NOGSquad.com Support this podcast

Mojo In The Morning
PHONE SCAM Pinky Twinkie

Mojo In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 4:19


That's Not Quite All Folks: A Looney Tunes Podcast
Are You Pondering What We're Pondering?

That's Not Quite All Folks: A Looney Tunes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 96:44


This week we're talking about the dynamic pairing of Pinky and The Brain! Jordan looks at the incredibly wayy too similar to this podcast's title episode, 'But That's Not All Folks!' And Marc looks at baseball shenanigans in 'Pinky at The Bat' As well as finding out what could of have been done with a Spielberg robot in 'Schpiel-Borg 2000'

This Filipino American Life
Episode 152 – A Life Well Designed: The Legacy of Pinky Santos and the Influence of Filipino Art on the Lived Environment

This Filipino American Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 96:07


“If there was one thing to take away from this story, I would hope that it’s motivation for you to go create something.” -Antonio “Miko” Javiniar This is a story about chairs. Whether you knew it or not, the rattan and bamboo hourglass-style peacock chair that has been seen in photos and homes for over...

Troubled Men Podcast
TMP174 SUE FOLEY PLAYS PINKY'S BLUES

Troubled Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 75:14


The award-winning blues guitar player, vocalist, and songwriter migrated from Canada to Austin on invitation from legendary impresario Clifford Antone. The young Tele slinger immediately found herself sharing stages with giants like Albert Collins, Buddy Guy, and Jimmy Vaughan. Fifteen solo records later, she celebrates the release of “Pinky’s Blues,” backed by Mike Flanigin (Billy Gibbons), Chris Layton (SRV), and her original bassist, Jon Penner. Sue holds her own as she goes a couple of rounds with the Troubled Men. Topics include recovery, a tenant, a DUI charge, assassins, Manny for Mayor, Malevitus, a trash threat, #1 with a bullet, a blues introduction, a James Cotton show, touring with Mark Hummel, visa hassles, the blues circuit, an Antone’s residency, shooting dice, Texas love, Johnny Winter, Koko Taylor, lost legends, Will and Charlie Sexton’s birthday gig, the Continental Club, a calling, the paisley Telecaster, the Sue Foley Podcast, Charo, meeting the Iguanas, and much more. Intro music: Styler/Coman Break music: “Come To Me” featuring Charlie Sexton from “The Ice Queen” by Sue Foley Outro music: “The Lucky Ones” featuring Jimmy Vaughan from “The Ice Queen” by Sue Foley Support the podcast here. Join the Patreon page here. Shop for Troubled Men’s Wear here. Subscribe, review, and rate (5 stars) on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any podcast source. Follow on social media, share with friends, and spread the Troubled Word. Troubled Men Podcast Facebook Troubled Men Podacst Instagram Sue Foley Homepage Sue Foley Facebook Sue Foley Instagram

Voices for Justice
Najib "Jubi" Monsif

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:08


Today I am discussing the case of Najib Monsif Jr. who is affectionately known as Jubi. Jubi is a 20-year-old male who went missing from Scottsdale, Arizona on September 23rd 2021. So as of recording this episode, less than a month ago. It's important to note that Jubi has autism and functions at about the level of an 8-year-old according to his family. His family fears that Jubi may have been led away from his home or possibly been picked up by a stranger as a crime of opportunity.   Please take a moment to support Jubi's family on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/315045380388144 GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/f/finding-najib-monsif Follow his sister on IG @JosieMonsif If you have any information about Jubi, please call the Scottsdale Police Department: 480-312-5000. For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Get Up Girl
GIRL CHAT - Sex, Money and How to Generate them both with Pinky, Dr. Brandye, and Maria

The Get Up Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:33


Welcome to my new monthly GIRL CHAT! I brought 3 of my favorite gals together for a roundtable chat. I've been wanting to do this for some time and it's finally time! Pinky Magana, Dr. Brandye, and Maria Concha, and I all chat about how sex and money are a huge contribution to our lives. What is money? How can we receive more?  Listen into our conscious conversation about creating and possibilities. How does it get any better than this? DM me on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/joannavargasofficial/ and I'd love to hear what your takeaways were from this conscious conversation. Muah! ABOUT PINKY:Pinky is a mompreneur with a background in dance to now running a financial education firm. She has a  passion for teaching others how money works in a simplified way. Pinky is bringing wall street to main street!FOLLOW PINKY: INSTAGRAMFACEBOOKWEBSITE ABOUT DR. BRANDYE:Dr. Brandye Wilson-Manigat, MD, aka “Dr. Brandye,” is touted by patients and peers alike as one of the best OB/GYN physicians and surgeons. She is frequently called upon by local and national TV, print, radio, and online media to give a fresh perspective and new information on women's health trends.She is the founder and chief medical advisor for DrBrandyeMD.com, which helps women embrace their feminine essence, so they get their sexy back. Dr. Brandye consistently educates her clients. She uses her online TV show, women's pleasure coaching practice, and her signature workshop, Girls Night Out, to give you fun and engaging sessions to learn what is robbing you of your sexy, while providing simple secrets to more energy, less stress, better mood, and more pleasure in your life. If you want to learn what is blocking you from a vibrant, passionate sex life, you need to talk to Dr. Brandye.FOLLOW DR. BRANDYE:INSTAGRAMWEBSITE ABOUT MARIA:Maria Concha is a Mindset + Manifestation Coach and speaker who merges both practical and spiritual methods to empower women to the next level of life and business. Through her lifestyle brand “Manifesting Ninja”, she teaches women how to master manifestation with ease by breaking through limiting beliefs on a subconscious level so they can unapologetically own the life they were meant to live and have more fun along the way.FOLLOW MARIA: INSTAGRAMFACEBOOKWEBSITE  If you enjoyed this episode, make sure and give us a five star rating  and leave us a review on iTunes, Podcast Addict, Podchaser and Castbox.Let's Connect:The Get Up GirlInstagramFacebookMonthly online fitness academy

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #916 - Late Again

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 82:56


Show #916 Late Again Yes this show is really late... but it is goooooood! 01. Willie Mabon - Late Again (2:38) (78 RPM Single, Chess Records, 1954) 02. Carolyn Wonderland - The Laws Must Change (5:00) (Tempting Fate, Alligator Records, 2021) 03. The Reverend Shawn Amos - Little Anna Mae (2:25) (The Cause Of It All, Put Together Music, 2021) 04. David Vest - Genevieve (4:52) (Live In Calgary, Cordova Bay Records, 2021) 05. David Vest - Infirmaratin' (6:56) (Live At Hermann's, Cordova Bay Records, 2021) 06. Sue Foley - Someday (4:06) (Pinky's Blues, Stony Plain Records, 2021) 07. Mick Pini - Shadows (4:24) (Backtrack, self-release, 2021) 08. David Gogo - Old Enough To Know Better (2:36) (Silver Cup, Cordova Bay Records, 2021) 09. Tom Craig - You Made A Good Man Go Bad (2:44) (Good Man Gone Bad, 8th Train Records, 2021) 10. Soulful Femme - Set You Free (3:56) (It Is Well With My Soul, MTS Records, 2021) 11. The Cold Stares - Prosecution Blues (3:49) (Heavy Shoes, Mascot Records, 2021) 12. Tiffany Pollack & Co. - Sassy Bitch (3:51) (Bayou Liberty, Nola Blue Records, 2021) 13. Jonathon Long - Dangerous (3:07) (Parables Of A Southern Man, Wild Heart Records, 2021) 14. Chris Gill - I Fell In Love With The Blues (4:05) (Between Midnight And Louise, Endless Blues Records, 2021) 15. Tia Carroll - Leaving Again (4:37) (You Gotta Have It, Little Village Foundation, 2021) 16. Colin James - There's A Fire (4:41) (Open Road, Stony Plain Records, 2021) 17. Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen - Hot Rod Lincoln (2:43) (Lost In The Ozone, Paramount Records, 1971) 18. Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen - The Shadow Knows (2:29) (Tales From The Ozone, Warner Bros Records, 1975) 19. Commander Cody Band - Go To Hell (3:11) (Lose It Tonight, Line Records, 1980) 20. ElectroBluesSociety - Feel (4:40) (Single, Black & Tan Records, 2021) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

How Did I Get Here?
Episode 1098: Sue Foley Returns! / Swan Songs‘ Christine Albert Checks In!

How Did I Get Here?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 86:07


Hello friends! We have a great big show for you today. Blues guitar hero, Sure Foley returns to the show for episode 1098! Her new album, the smoking hot, Pinky's Blues drops on October 22nd, but you can hear singles from the album including the latest, "Hurricane Girl" feat. Jimmie Vaughan, wherever you get your music. She's heading out on tour until December and she's kicking it off in Austin, This Friday, 10/15 at Antone's. Go to suefoley.com for music, videos, tour dates and more. We have a great conversation about making Pinky's Blues with Chris layton on drums, Jon Penner on bass and the great Mike Flanigin producing, recoding live, her time under quarantine, being in The Jungle Show w/ Billy Gibbons, Jimmie Vaughan and much more! Plus, Christine Albert, from Swan Songs, checks in about "Love, Tito's & Swan Songs Serenade To Our Healthcare Community" free streaming broadcast this Sunday, 10/17 at 7 pm featuring some of Austin's best musicians performing and sending messages of encouragement and thanks to our healthcare community. Go to swansongs.org for more info on their organization and the performances. Get set up or repair on your guitars with J. Scott Lutherie! Find millions of songs and thousands of podcasts including How Did I Get Here? on Spotify.

how did i get here?
Episode 1098: Sue Foley Returns! / Swan Songs‘ Christine Albert Checks In!

how did i get here?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 86:07


Hello friends! We have a great big show for you today. Blues guitar hero, Sure Foley returns to the show for episode 1098! Her new album, the smoking hot, Pinky's Blues drops on October 22nd, but you can hear singles from the album including the latest, "Hurricane Girl" feat. Jimmie Vaughan, wherever you get your music. She's heading out on tour until December and she's kicking it off in Austin, This Friday, 10/15 at Antone's. Go to suefoley.com for music, videos, tour dates and more. We have a great conversation about making Pinky's Blues with Chris layton on drums, Jon Penner on bass and the great Mike Flanigin producing, recoding live, her time under quarantine, being in The Jungle Show w/ Billy Gibbons, Jimmie Vaughan and much more! Plus, Christine Albert, from Swan Songs, checks in about "Love, Tito's & Swan Songs Serenade To Our Healthcare Community" free streaming broadcast this Sunday, 10/17 at 7 pm featuring some of Austin's best musicians performing and sending messages of encouragement and thanks to our healthcare community. Go to swansongs.org for more info on their organization and the performances. Get set up or repair on your guitars with J. Scott Lutherie! Find millions of songs and thousands of podcasts including How Did I Get Here? on Spotify.

The StoryTinker
Midnight Poppy Land 77: Trouble (with Emily, Raluca, and Saucy)

The StoryTinker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 101:38


Tora and Poppy are making out on the bed, when they are interrupted by not Pinky, but the balcony alarm. Turning away, Tora goes through a quick series of thoughts to figure out his next steps. He decides, rationally or emotionally, that he wants to take Poppy along with him to Narin. He tells her, and when Poppy inquires, asks her if she trusts him, a question that triggers an intimate confession from Poppy and a flashback showing us her mother leaving. Cold businesswoman leaving to pursue her career, or is that what Lily wants us to think? In any case, Tora related to her hesitancy, and Poppy tells him that she feels comfortable around him, but for where it matters. Tora is confused by that, but when he asks Poppy to spell out what she means, Poppy isn't sure either. They move into banter and shelve it for another time. When Poppy asks if Tora is in trouble, Tpra recollects his recent conversation with Quincy, where our usually sunny boy enumerates the troubles ahead for Poppy and Tora. At this, Tora admits to Poppy that he is indeed in trouble, and to himself, that he is IN LOVE!!!

How Girls Talk
Even My Pinky Toe Was In The Air

How Girls Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:15


Amy's sister Stephanie is back to fill in for McKaila and dang...it got silly. From a party bus with three stripper poles to a dress that Amy got stuck in. Plus, TMI and Grab Bag and TV recommendations!

Voices for Justice
Sage Smith

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 52:05


Today I am discussing the case of Sage Smith. Sage was only 19 when she went missing from Charlottesville, Virginia in 2012. She had plans to meet up with a man that night but when police tried to question this man, he fled the area. Sage and this man remain missing to this day.  If you have any information about Sage Smith or Erik McFadden, please call the Crime Stoppers tip line at (434) 977-4000. For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Deucecast Movie Show
Episode 501: The 500th Part Two

The Deucecast Movie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 107:01


The second part of the massive Episode 500, released as 501 for everyone's listening pleasures. Among the topics discussed....An update on Stephanie (Mikey's Sister, NOT d$'s wife)... Susie's messed up buns... Steve Glosson's glorious arrival... Mikey's kids crash the show... fanning out to My Little Pony... Matt's entry... Movies that we liked much better the second time around... Napoleon Dynamite... Mean Girls... Joe isn't a teenage girl -- yet... defense of The Last Jedi... Hurricane Rhett's former love of The Last Jedi... Glosson's deep Last Jedi dive... Dune chatter... Space invasion films... M Night's Signs... in defense of Rocky V... sports films that don't feature baseball, basketball, hockey, or football... the grand return of Pinky... the whereabouts of the Pinkster... Suicide Squad... Independence Day: Resurgence... Ranch Water... Halloween Guilty Pleasures... Leprechaun in the Hood... Movies we want People to Love... Ernest Films... Ryfun's Football Talk... the longest plug ever... Honeymooning in Hazelhurst...  Also, an extended convo after the show with Mikey, Dr Earl, Matt R, Pinky, and Steve Glosson, to discuss the future of the show... Geek Out Loud.. and the issues with the new Masters of the Universe show... Glosson's problem with Kevin Smith... Sandler's dramatic roles...  The guests on this part of the show... Find Jedi Shua on Enjoy Stuff: A TechnoRetro Podcast Find Jenn Kaufman, Carnegie Hall headliner, delightful.life online, and @jnkaufman on Twitter Find Susie & Matt on The ImagineEars Podcast Find Steve Glosson on Geek Out Loud Find Jenn Novotny at The Main Street Electrical Podcast & Diva Dish Diz Find Nick Mielke on Podcast of the Whills Find RetroJoe on RetroZap Podcasting Network Find Roth in Wyoming in A Good Day for a Podcast Find the Ryfuns @Ryfun on Twitter Find Pinky in a Chinese Gulag

The Same 24 Hours
Rob Paulsen: The Voice of Pinky, Animaniacs, Ninja Turtles and More

The Same 24 Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:49


How does "being present" translate into Pinky?  Well, we cover it in this episode. Rob Paulsen is the voice of Pinky from “Pinky and the Brain,” Yakko from “Animaniacs,” Raphael (and Donatello) from “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” and Carl Wheezer from “The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius.” He has an Emmy, Annie and Peabody Award.  Paulsen has been the voice of over 250 different animated characters and performed in over 1000 commercials. Rob's memoir Voice Lessons: How a Couple of Ninja Turtles, Pinky and an Animaniac Saved My Life  chronicles his journey with throat cancer.  Ironically, a man who uses his voice for work found himself with throat cancer (now recovered.)  “Animaniacs,” the popular 90s cartoon series, has returned to Hulu with Rob reprising his original role as Yakko. The show has already been picked up for a third season.   Follow Rob: Twitter: https://twitter.com/yakkopinky    Buy the Book Here   ======================  Buy Meredith's Books: The Year of No Nonsense https://amzn.to/3su5qWp Triathlon for the Every Woman: https://amzn.to/3nOkjiH =======================   Follow Meredith Atwood & The Podcast on Social: Web: MeredithAtwood.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/meredith.atwood   =======================  Want to Connect?  Email: same24hourspodcast@gmail.com =======================  Credits: Host & Production: Meredith Atwood Copyright 2017-2020, 2021 All Rights Reserved, Meredith Atwood, LLC  

Trading Secrets
Brand your F*#cking Ass Off” with the “Slutty Vegan” creator, Pinky Cole

Trading Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 51:31


Ask a former producer of “The Maury Show” how to brand your business and you may be surprised by the answer…go for the shock value. That is specifically what Pinky Cole did when she branded her restaurants the “Slutty Vegan”. Since doing so, she has had “virgins” aka Slutty Vegan new clients, wait in line up to 8 hours to get a meal! But it wasn't all a sexy picture for Pinky as her first restaurant went bankrupt after a disastrous grease fire! She didn't have insurance and lost every penny of the $1,000,000 that she had self funded. Listen to hear bounce back and brilliant branding story! For All Access Content - join our networking group for less than 30 cents a day! Host: Jason Tartick Voice of Viewer: David Arduin Executive Producer: Evan Sahr Produced by Dear Media.

Voices for Justice
Adam Castillo

Voices for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 74:25


Today I am discussing the case of 21 year of Adam Castillo from Wilcox, Arizona. On the night of Saturday, September 13th, 2008 Adam went to a party in the desert with about 30 other people and was never seen again. Rumors began to swirl in the small town and the sheriff's office actually shut down the local high school for an entire day just to conduct interviews and see if they could figure out what happened in the desert that night. But, 13 years later the case has gone cold and we still don't know how Adam Castillo disappeared. If you have any information about the disappearance of Adam Castillo, please call The Cochise County Sheriff's Office at 520-803-3280. For more information about the podcast and the cases discussed, visit VoicesforJusticePodcast.com Don't forget to follow me on social media under Voices for Justice Podcast & SarahETurney Join the Patreon family to get instant access to a library of extra content, support the show, and support these cases https://www.patreon.com/VoicesforJustice Voices for Justice is a podcast that uses adult language and discusses sensitive and potentially triggering topics including violence, abuse, and murder. This podcast may not be appropriate for younger audiences. All parties are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Some names have been changed or omitted per their request or for safety purposes. Listener discretion is advised.  The introduction music used in Voices for Justice is Thread of Clouds by Blue Dot Sessions. Outro music is Melancholic Ending by Soft and Furious. The track used for ad transitions is Pinky by Blue Dot Sessions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

JustEldredge Podcast
114 | From Pinky Promiser to P***Y Popper ft. SexWithAshley

JustEldredge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 78:37


**Warning this is a SEX Podcast so we are way more raunchy! 18+ advisory ** From a Pinky Promiser to a Pussy Popper! Damn!

The
LONG AS IT‘S YOUR PINKY (EP. 107)

The "Meme"ing Of It All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 87:52


LONG AS IT‘S YOUR PINKY (EP. 107) by The "Meme"ing Of It All Podcast

Light After Trauma
Episode 61: Inside the World of Our Adolescents with Lynn Langan and Denise Wolf

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 54:16


On this week's episode we welcome back our good friend, Denise R. Wolf MA, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPC along with our brand new guest, author Lynn Langan. Alyssa, Denise, and Lynn are passionate about helping adolescents and use this episode to dive into the struggles and unique challenges facing our youth today. In Lynn Langan's brand new book, Duke & The Lonely Boy, she takes readers inside the world of our adolescents and emphasizes the importance of making kids feel seen and heard. Whether you are an adolescent, a young adult, a teacher, a therapist, or a parent, this discussion as well as Lynn's book will help you to better understand how to navigate the world of our adolescents.  Light After Trauma Website Support the Podcast   Purchase Lynn's Book Learn More About Denise Wolf Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:09]: Happy, happy Tuesday. Welcome back to another fun episode of Light After Trauma. It kind of feels like an oxymoron, doesn't it, to be like, "Oh yeah, this is another fun episode for a trauma-focused podcast," but I hope that if y'all have learned anything from me by now, it's that I think that the recovery process and the trauma process just isn't really possible without some humor. I am a really big fan of humor therapy, which is not officially a thing, but it's my thing because I believe if we don't laugh about some things, we'll cry about everything. We have with us two special guests today. One of them is a very familiar face on the podcast. We have got Denise Wolf back with us today, which is so exciting. She has done I believe two episodes already at this point, so this is her third episode on the podcast. We just need her to keep coming back because she's amazing. Denise has done some episodes. I think the one episode that she did with just me was on art therapy, and then the other one we did talking about law enforcement and the whole defunding the police versus backing the blue. So, definitely go and check out those episodes if you have not listened already, because Denise is really an incredible person and has a lot of awesome things to say. Plus, she's really funny as hell. I'm just going to reintroduce her in case she is new and you a new listener here on the podcast. Denise R. Wolf has so many letters after her last name, which just is a testament to how incredible she is. Denise R. Wolf is the Owner and Practitioner Therapist of Mangata Services as well as an adjunct faculty member at Drexel and Villanova Universities. Denise is a Licensed Professional Counselor, as well as a Registered Board Certified and an Art Therapy Certified Supervisor through the Art Therapy Credentials Board. For over 20 years, Denise has been practicing as a therapist primarily treating adolescents and adults with histories of complex interpersonal trauma. She works as a consultant for many Philadelphia organizations, including the Philadelphia Art Museum, providing clinical supervision and programming related to trauma informed care. Denise has presented at city, state, national, and international conferences in the areas of trauma informed care, trauma and neuro biology, pedagogy, clinical supervision. She has several articles published in peer review journals, and has contributed chapters to Seminole texts in her clinical work. Actually as I was reading that, I think you might have even done... Actually, I think the episode where we talked about art therapy with Denise, I think that one was a two person episode as well. We just love doing two person episodes with Denise, because yes, I'm pretty sure we had somebody else on that podcast as well. Regardless, go check those episodes out because they're awesome. Then I also want to highlight our other very special guest today, who is Lynn Langan. Lynn is brand new to the podcast, but I am really excited to have her on because we are talking all about adolescents, teenagers, whatever word you might have for them. I'm sure that some people have some choice words for teenagers, but I happen to absolutely love working with teenagers. As you heard, Denise with teenagers, I work with teenagers and adolescents, and kids that are young adults. That's really my wheelhouse. Lynn Langan is an author who just had a book come out that we are really going to dive in today, because it's really all about kind of diving into the adolescent brain. Lynn lives in Pennsylvania, and her love for writing developed after she finally learned how to read in the fourth grade, after being diagnosed with a learning disability. She fell in love with the characters crafted by the wonderful Judy Blume, and found a great escape into the world of fiction where everything seemed to be possible from big problems to small. She went on to graduate from Kutztown University, with a BA in professional writing, and then spent three glorious years teaching at an at risk youth high school just outside of Philadelphia. There, she was inspired to write her young adult novel, which is After You Were Gone, which is available. Her newest book is called Duke and the Lonely Boy, and that came out in August. That is published by Black Rose Writing. We are here today to talk about it. I cannot wait. Hello, Denise, Lynn. Welcome. Lynn Langan [05:34]: Hello. Denise Wolf [05:34]: Hello. Lynn Langan [05:35]: Thanks for having us. Alyssa Scolari [05:37]: I'm so happy you're here. I have to admit, I feel like I'm missing the party over there because you're both together recording this. I'm like I should be there. I should be over there with a glass of wine or something. Lynn Langan [05:49]: Absolutely. Denise Wolf [05:51]: [crosstalk 00:05:51]. Alyssa Scolari [05:54]: I'm so glad you both are here. As I was telling the listeners, Denise, one of the many things that I think are just incredible about you is your versatility and your ability to just kick absolute ass in so many different realms in the mental health field, and I love it. We've gone in depth about art therapy. We've gone in depth about the legal system. And now here we are today turning it to adolescence, which is a topic we could talk about forever, and something that I think all three of us are very passionate about. Thanks for coming back again. Denise Wolf [06:34]: Thanks so much for having me again. Alyssa Scolari [06:37]: Of course. It's such a pleasure. Lynn, it is such a pleasure to meet you. Talk to me about your journey to becoming a writer, because if I understand correctly, this isn't is your first book. You've had a book out before? Lynn Langan [06:55]: That is correct. Not published though. It's been for sale, but this is the first book that was sold for me. I went to college for writing, and then when you get out of college that's not really how you're going to make money apparently. I was doing newspapers and short story stuff, so probably when I was around 27 I was like, "You know what, I really want to write a book. I want to do this." So I spent a lot of time digging in and learning how to do this actually, because college can only teach you so much. But when you get out into the real world, you have to continue practicing and learning, and growing in your field of whatever you're doing. SCBWI conferences, which is just a whole chapter of adolescent writers from probably picture books all the way up to 18 years old, so it's a whole bunch of authors. They're getting together and to these conferences, and learning, and figuring out how to write an entire book, and query it, and all the steps that go along with it. It's been an incredibly long and hard journey, but worth it. Definitely worth it. Alyssa Scolari [08:12]: Yeah, I think that's very important that you said that because the life of a writer is not an easy one. Lynn Langan [08:18]: No. No, it's not. Alyssa Scolari [08:21]: I think it's really important to shed light on that because I think a lot of people have an idea of what it looks like. "I want to be a writer. I want to be a writer," but then putting that into practice, in theory it seems like a life of luxury. I write whenever I want. I sip my coffee. Pinky up. As I type of the computer while the birds are chirping outside. It's like [crosstalk 00:08:46]- Lynn Langan [08:45]: No. And the words are so easy. They're right there and I'm just plucking them out of the air. That is absolutely not the case. It's a lot of discipline because you work a full-time job. There's no one yelling at you to go to the computer to write this book. The future is unknown if it ever see the light of day. That's kind of where I grew my peace from, was that I'm doing this thing because this thing, this art, is what makes me me. It's my joy and my happiness, even there's struggle along the way. If I wasn't doing it, then I don't think I'd be complete. It is a lot of discipline. It's a lot of just sitting down and looking at the blank computer screen back at me like, "Come on. Put some words down." Alyssa Scolari [09:33]: Any second now. Lynn Langan [09:34]: Any second now, this big idea's going to come to me. That's not true. Alyssa Scolari [09:39]: It's so tough. It's so tough. Lynn Langan [09:42]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:43]: My next question, and this is a question I have for both of you, tell me why the love for adolescence, because all three of us share a big passion for the kiddos in this world. Why? It doesn't matter whoever can go first, but I'm very curious as to well adolescents are such a passion. At least in my experience, I always knew that I wanted to work with kids. Everybody would tell me, even my professors in college would be like, "No, you don't. No, you don't. No, you don't." In grad school, "What do you want to do?" "I want to work with kids." "No, you don't." Everybody kept trying to talk me out of working with kids. It's very unpopular. So tell me for each of you why it's so important to you. Denise Wolf [10:32]: I'll start. Part of it too, Alyssa, like I was told the same thing, "You don't want to do that." Tell me I don't want something or I can't do something, and I am going to do it 1,000% times over and everything on fire in my path. Alyssa Scolari [10:48]: Yes. Yes. Denise Wolf [10:48]: That's part of it, but it's also a connection to adolescence and that inner 15 year old kid that still lives in my heart that says, "Fuck you. I can do this. Get out of my way." That's part of it, I'm oppositional, and that connects with adolescence. Part of it is that I had a troubled adolescence, you could say. I'll stop there. Some of it I feel like is not quite payback. I don't have the right word, but making repairs for some of the errors that I made along the way. Part of it is because I can. Because I can and because a lot of people can or don't want to. I guess there's a fourth part that adolescents are so exciting from a neuro developmental perspective. It is like the Fourth of July in their brains. It was such a great time of change and shifting, and possibilities. Lynn Langan [11:46]: Discovery. Denise Wolf [11:46]: And discovery, yeah. It's really exciting. For all of those reasons. Lynn Langan [11:53]: Yeah, and I would go into that also for all those things, and say that I want to be an advocate because I remember my youth not being taken seriously because we're young, and our voices don't matter. That's not true. We are young... Well, we are not now, but we were young and they are young, and they see things and make connections in ways that if you stop and listen to them it makes sense. We're missing some of that youthful view in the way they see the world. As we get older, I think we get more narrow in our views and also take less chances where when you're young you kind of live and learn by your mistakes. I want them to know that that's okay. It's exactly how you're supposed to learn. The adults that are walking around judging you or saying what you're doing is wrong or whatever, it's not. It's your time to grow into a person. I want to be there to foster that. Authentically, I want to make sure that's in my work that they have opinions that matter, and the way they see the world matters, and they have a place for that. Alyssa Scolari [13:06]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [13:06]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [13:07]: Absolutely. Have either of you seen the Twilight saga, the movies? Lynn Langan [13:13]: Yes. Denise Wolf [13:14]: Yes. [crosstalk 00:13:14]. Alyssa Scolari [13:15]: I guess let's take it to the fourth one, Breaking Dawn Part Two. Lynn Langan [13:21]: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah, part two. Alyssa Scolari [13:23]: I know, I'm going here, right? Lynn Langan [13:25]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [13:26]: Full disclosure, I just finished watching that series again last week so it's fresh on my mind. But, this is kind of how I see adolescents and this is what I love so much about them. Remember the part in Breaking Dawn Part Two where Bella becomes a vampire and everything in the world is new to her, and her senses are heightened, and she can smell things, and run at a pace she's never been able to run before, and her skin, she's in a different body, she has a thirst for things she never thirsted before. She just feels like all of these things, like sensory overload. I feel like that's what it can be like working with adolescents. The world is just new to them. They're in bodies that they're not super familiar with. Things are explosive and exciting. Lynn Langan [14:23]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [14:24]: I love it. I feel like that's what it's like to work with kids sometimes. That's what it's like to be an adolescent sometimes. Lynn Langan [14:31]: Absolutely. Denise Wolf [14:31]: Yep. Lynn Langan [14:32]: Yeah, you've got these thoughts and everything is brand new. Everything. Your world is so small. You don't realize how big the world is until you become an adult and you start living in it. The adolescent brain, the picture that they see is very tiny and then it makes the things that they're experiencing seem so heavy. That's another thing to work with the adolescents is cool, because you can be the person that says, "Calm down. You don't know what you're talking about." Or you could be the person that says, "Sit down. Let me talk to you. Let's talk about this. Let's have a real conversation about it." This isn't the end of the world. This is just the beginning. Denise Wolf [15:09]: Yep, and it feels gigantic and soul-crushing. Lynn Langan [15:13]: Right, because it is for you. Denise Wolf [15:14]: Right. Because your life is only yea long, and this is taking up such a big part of it. Lynn Langan [15:19]: Right, yeah. Denise Wolf [15:20]: Which is cool and exciting, and to be there and to validate it and celebrate it. Lynn Langan [15:24]: Right, absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [15:26]: Yeah, to validate it and to celebrate it, especially because so many kids get shut down. Denise Wolf [15:33]: Oh, gosh. Lynn Langan [15:33]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [15:35]: The amount of times... Like I was saying before we started recording, the amount of times that adults say to children, "You don't know how easy you have it. What do you know? You're just a kid." I'm like I actually think they know a lot more than we know as adults. Lynn Langan [15:57]: Yes, absolutely. Denise Wolf [15:59]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [16:00]: They're smart as hell. Lynn Langan [16:01]: They're smart, yes. And they just need a platform for themselves to be able to... That's what's so critical too, because if that age if you have that one adult that's shoving you down and you're influenced by that, your whole trajectory of your life could be changed just by some adult making some offhanded comment to you. I see that a lot. I think we see that a lot too, probably all three of us, because everybody works with kids, or has worked with the kids. You have one person that doesn't validate, and then you get in your head and you can't put it down. Alyssa Scolari [16:37]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [16:38]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [16:39]: Absolutely. I'm sure we've been those kids. I know I for sure was that kid who really felt like... I felt like as a kid I was always too much. My emotions were always too big for somebody. It was always like "Calm down. Stop crying. Why are you crying about this? You have to get over it. You have to move on with your life." I see kids in my office who come in with those same big emotions, and those same big feelings, and I think about how they suffer so much less simply because another adult is able to say, "Aw man, of course you feel that way." Lynn Langan [17:20]: Right. Alyssa Scolari [17:20]: It makes all the difference, doesn't it? Denise Wolf [17:23]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [17:23]: It really does. "I see you." That's what you're saying, "I see you. You exist. Everything you feel exists. It's real. It's here." Don't bury that down because it's making other people feel uncomfortable it. I think a lot of kids get their voice shut off because of that. No one's validating them or they can crawl inside their head and just be quiet. [crosstalk 00:17:45]- Alyssa Scolari [17:46]: 1,000%. [crosstalk 00:17:46] 1,000%. Lynn Langan [17:48]: Yeah, and it's sad. I don't want to see that for anybody. I think it's good to think of it in terms like that. It could just feel like you have a breakup with your boyfriend or girlfriend. Yes, as an adult you're like, "Get over it. You're going to get hurt 1,000 times." Well guess what, this is the first time I'm being hurt and everything you're saying to me is how I'm going to model my life from this point on. This is how I'm going to deal with things that come up in my life because you told me to calm down, or didn't see, or didn't hear me. I think that's good to give kids voices. Denise Wolf [18:23]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [18:24]: Absolutely. It makes them feel human. I almost feel like we dehumanize kids, and we don't see them as having the same kind of complex feelings and emotions that adults have. There's always "I'm the adult and you're the kid. This doesn't concern you." It's like if we could shift that. Your kid is an independent human with independent thoughts and feelings, and viewpoints of the world. If we could shift from "You're just a kid. What the fuck do you know?" To "Hey, tell me how you view that," it would make such a big difference in the lives of adolescents I think. Lynn Langan [19:16]: Absolutely. When people say, "Oh, well you don't know how good you have it," I look at kids and I'm like, "Man, you don't know how bad you have it." Because you have to be plugged in to this social media, to this... You're always plugged in and you don't get a break from that ever. Ever. I look at my nieces and nephews and I'm just like, "What would it be like if you could just put that phone down?" I know you can't because you feel like you have to be involved in that, but it's just crazy. You don't ever have a safe spot. When we were kids, you can get away from school or all of that, and just go geek in your room and do whatever you want. But not these kids. They're just sitting there taking selfies 24/7 and feeling like they have to, and people are judging them for that, and they're not looking at what are the consequences of that? What does that really feel like to be plugged in 24/7 and never getting a break? Denise Wolf [20:13]: They don't know because they haven't had a different experience. Lynn Langan [20:15]: Right, yeah it's very disheartening when adults judge the kids. They're like, "Oh, you don't know what it's like. I walked up to school on a hill and back again on a hill." No, these kids are going through it. There's a lot of pressures on them. New things that they're coming against. There's just so much for them I feel. Denise Wolf [20:37]: Yep. I think part of the reason we collectively adopt, dismiss and minimize adolescents is because they don't want to remember their own eps because they're growing pains. Growing pains, they're emotional and physical. They shut them down, "Be quiet. Get over it. Calm down," like being on an airplane when there's a crying baby and somebody's like, "Shut that baby up." My response is, "Oh, you were born a full grown adult asshole? You were never a baby?" People want to forget or deny their adolescence. Lynn Langan [21:14]: Right, absolutely. Denise Wolf [21:16]: But we don't. That's why we're amazing. Lynn Langan [21:18]: Right. Alyssa Scolari [21:20]: No, that's right. That's why we're fucking amazing at what we do, because we understand the magic that lives in adolescence. I love it. I love it. Tell me, Lynn, where was the inspiration for this book? I'll let you answer that question before I drill you with five more questions. Lynn Langan [21:47]: The idea of we indirectly impact people versus directly impact people has always been fascinating to me, because Denise and I worked at Carson Valley Children's Aid, which is a residential facility for troubled youth. We had a lot of Philadelphian children who came out to our school that were bused in. Alyssa Scolari [22:08]: Is that how the two of you met? Lynn Langan [22:09]: Yes. Denise Wolf [22:10]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [22:10]: That's awesome. Lynn Langan [22:12]: This one day the guidance counselor came out said, "Okay, I want you to give out a soft pretzel to a student that you think is deserving." We're teachers. We're like a million miles... You just take the ticket and you're like, okay whatever. So, I gave it to this student who was very short, very quiet, very closed off. She didn't like to talk at all. I walked up to her and I said, "Here you go." She started crying. I was like, "What's going on?" She was like, "I didn't think you knew who I was." I'm like, "I'm your teacher for a long time. Of course I know who you are." She was like, "I just didn't think you saw me." From that point on I was like, wow the littlest things that we do really do make a difference sometimes. You don't know. You don't know what that thing is going to be. Then that kind of just fascinated me like how many other things have I done to people that changed their perspective or vice versa. That whole seed was planted in me that I wanted to write this book where you think you know, but you don't know. You don't know what's going on in that person's life. What does that really look like, and how would that really spawn out into a novel? How could I get that across? That's kind of where I started playing with Duke and the Lonely Boy, because they both have these ideas about each other, but they don't really know each other at all. Alyssa Scolari [23:45]: Yeah. Yeah, it seems like... Again, I'm still reading this, but from all that I've gathered from the book so far, it seems like that is the moral... One of the many morals of the story is that you truly just don't know. What you did, is you magically crafted two characters who couldn't be further apart from one another. Without giving too much away, can you say a little bit more about who Duke and the Lonely Boy are? I just love their story right from the get go. Lynn Langan [24:19]: Yeah. It seems stereotypical, but it's not, I promise. Duke is the popular boy, and he's the All-Star football player, and he's got a very bright future ahead of him, but he's struggling in math. So, something very simple. The coach gets him this tutor, Tommy, who is just this outcast, but not in the stereotypical form. He's just quiet and nobody really knows his existence in this school or the story. They meet up and that's how the story begins, but it's told obviously through two perspectives. The first half of the book you're really getting Tommy's perspective as the little person and his story of what's going on. You're seeing him through Duke's eyes as a teenager. I think it's unpacking that for Tommy. Duke's got his own struggles going on, which Tommy kind of looks at like, "What's up? You can't do math, but you got everything else going for you." The story too jumps around in time, which kind of reminds me of therapy work, where it's not like you sit down with the client the first time and tell their entire history. You're working through their story kind of like event by event, and it's not sequential. So we as therapists have to be mindful that we don't make assumptions from go because I think for me one of the big takeaways is when you know, you know, and to remember that you don't. Duke and Tommy have these really complex stories, and have this sort of initial encounter where they think they know each other. Then throughout this jumping in time, back and forth in time and these crossovers of their interactions in their own personal stories, your perspective and understanding and empathy really shifts. Alyssa Scolari [26:18]: Yeah, absolutely. You know what also I love is that you're breaking this stereotype. If a high schooler were to pick up this book and read it, whether that high schooler is the football star in the school, the popular one, or more of the loner, you can still learn something. I love that this breaks the stereotype, because I think a lot of people feel like the kids who are loners are the only kids who have stuff going on. Like "Oh, they've got issues." I can't tell you how many times I have heard other kids be like, "Oh yeah, there's the loner. That's the kid that's going to shoot up the school," and say dumb shit like that that kids say. But you als don't know how much is going on behind the football stars, the basketball stars, the most popular girl. I like that you break that stereotype as well. Lynn Langan [27:24]: I wanted the reader to be able to identify with real characters. These are not those heavy issues in there, but with... I'm not sure if [inaudible 00:27:36] that for you is the right [inaudible 00:27:38]. I feel like the reader deserves that. Alyssa Scolari [27:42]: That it's like there are heavy issues in there. Lynn Langan [27:44]: Yeah, that there's heavy [crosstalk 00:27:45]. Alyssa Scolari [27:45]: Some of its tough. Lynn Langan [27:46]: Yeah, some of its tough, and it's real and maybe you could see yourself in some of these things. I like that Duke is the popular one, but he's growing so much in this story. He's trying to find his place. Just because you're popular doesn't mean you know your place. Duke constantly questions whether is this real, or if I don't keep doing things that these people are saying that I do then I'll lose everything. I do think that that's a struggle for the popular kids. If you could pick up that book as a popular kid and be like, "Yeah. Right, I have things too and I don't know what to do with these things. They're heavy and maybe I don't want to be in the box that I've suddenly found myself in. Maybe I want to go sit with the loner or the art students, or the music group," or whoever. High school is very segregated in where you're going to be, so it's nice for the popular kid to be able to pick up that book and say, "Yeah, I do have things and I don't necessarily know what the hell I'm doing. I don't have it all. I just appear to have it all." Sometimes our appearances really plays with your head. Denise Wolf [29:01]: In a lot of ways, Tommy has more resilience than Duke because Tommy's endured a lot and in some ways that's given him a lot of strength. Lynn Langan [29:12]: Yeah, but he doesn't know he has it. Denise Wolf [29:15]: Right. Lynn Langan [29:15]: Yeah, that's his journey, is that he is authentic to himself, but he doesn't know how to get that out to the world because he's just been shut down by his life situations. Denise Wolf [29:30]: I'm thinking about The Breakfast Club. I'm like is this a modern day Breakfast Club? You know in the end when I think Jeb Nelson's narrating, he's like "In each one of us there's a cheerleader [crosstalk 00:29:40]-" Lynn Langan [29:39]: Oh yeah. Denise Wolf [29:39]: "And the football player." Lynn Langan [29:42]: Right. Denise Wolf [29:43]: Right, and they're dealing with other characters in the book. You meet Charlie, and Lexie, and I'm thinking there's a little bit... It's not like, oh the popular kid's going to read this and identify with Duke. These characters are so well developed and complex. They really speak I think collectively of the adolescent experience. Lynn Langan [30:03]: Yeah, and sometimes I find I read young adult books and they bring up something that's heavy, and then they leave it. They just leave it there- Alyssa Scolari [30:14]: Skirted away, yeah. Lynn Langan [30:15]: It's like, actually that's not what the real emotion of that is. Don't just put it in there because it's heavy. Don't brush over that. We're also, as authors, I think we have a moral code that we should say we're not going to breeze over these emotions because it's not going to sell books or it's not Hollywood enough. No. I think that's what it is. We have the duty as these authors that are writing to these young children to really be their users into the world and validate their feelings that they're feeling, and not gloss over. I was reading a book recently and the main character was raped. Then we were done. I was like nothing- Denise Wolf [31:00]: [crosstalk 00:31:00] that's not how that goes. Lynn Langan [31:01]: That is absolutely not how that goes. Denise Wolf [31:03]: [crosstalk 00:31:03] like that. Lynn Langan [31:05]: Right, my fear is that the young girl who is reading that is like, "Well, I guess I gloss over that, this thing that happened to me. I guess I don't talk about it, or I don't have real feelings about it." Well, no. That's an injustice. Alyssa Scolari [31:22]: Yeah, and as you're both saying this, my adolescence is very much on the forefront of my brain just b because of all the inner child work that I've been doing recently. I have lots of memories from my adolescence, and I was in school. The time that I was in middle school, we didn't talk about this stuff. This really wasn't something that got talked about not even in the slightest. Even today, when it is getting talked about, it's usually not getting talked about correctly, or not handled well. So, we've got a long way to go, but that's a whole other podcast. I turned to books. I was such a reader, and I turned to all of these young adult novels. I remember... As you were saying that Lynn, I'm sitting here and the feeling that I used to feel as a 14 year old is coming back to me, where I was opening these books, these young adult novels, trying to find the darkest ones I could find. I need the darkest book that is in this section that somebody will let me take from this God forsaken school library. I would read it and look, and it would touch on something dark, and that to me would be what I needed to get into. I would be like, "Okay, we're talking about drugs here. We're talking about sexual abuse here." My 14 year old brain is like, "I need more of this. I need more of this. What do you mean you were raped? Are we ever going to talk about this?" No, we're just going to talk about how you got into a fight with your best friend now, and that's the plot. The rape is... So, I love that you're doing that because I agree, and I think that that is such a missing piece for so many young adult novels, is that for Hollywood purposes, for selling purposes, for stigma purposes, because we don't like to talk about these things, a lot of authors gloss over it. There's not many people who dig right into the core and look at all facets of it, because it's uncomfortable for folks. Lynn Langan [33:34]: Yep. Yeah, definitely. There's going to be times where the reader's going to be uncomfortable in Duke and the Lonely Boy, and that's appropriate. My only hope is that I did a good enough job that if it touches one kid's life, if it's a map for one kid's life, then I've done my job. That's kind of what my philosophy is on that. I want to be authentic and give you a real picture of what's going on. Alyssa Scolari [34:04]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [34:05]: Sometimes that's ugly. Alyssa Scolari [34:08]: Sometimes it's ugly, but that's what's so helpful. I know I shared this when we were going back and forth in emails, but for me the book that I was finally able to get my hands on that went into detail, this book it was called Almost Lost. It was the journey of a teenager's healing process and recovery from addiction, and it's the transcript of his therapy sessions were in the book. I read that book and I felt like I was home. Not only did I feel like that therapist in that book was speaking to me as a 14 year old, I was in the eighth grade when I read this book and did a book report on it, but in that moment that book told me this is what I need to do with the rest of my life. When you say "If this book can help one person," I guarantee it's going to help so many more than that because I see what a book did for me. It can change lives. Lynn Langan [35:09]: Right, absolutely. There's a theory I have to bring up here. Alyssa Scolari [35:12]: Please do. Please do. Denise Wolf [35:16]: A theory about why looking at art, why we have sort of these "oh my gosh" relief moments like you're say the art museum, or listening to a piece of well composed music or whatever it is. So, [inaudible 00:35:29] have this series born in psychology to arts that we take a well crafted piece of art, like [inaudible 00:35:36], but we take our defuse tensions and anxieties from our lives, the day, whatever it is, project it into the work of art or reading a book, and through resolution of the formal elements, story after story, our plot, characters, all that kind of stuff, we then experience a sense of our own relief or release of tension, cortisol, all that kind of stuff. I'm really connecting that to when story and your story, and my story of the dark, dark books that I dug out, or the banned books from the library [crosstalk 00:36:11]. Even if it wasn't directly my story to be able to be part of somebody else's that reflected a part of me, that's well crafted, we get a sense of relief and release. Lynn Langan [36:23]: Right, absolutely. Absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [36:26]: Yeah. I have never heard of that before, and that is fascinating. As you're sitting here, I'm such a dork, as you're sitting here saying that, I'm going "Oh shit, that's why I love Harry Potter so much. That's why I can't stop reading Harry Potter." Lynn Langan [36:46]: Yes. Denise Wolf [36:47]: Right, yeah. There's a part of us that we project into these works of art. Then through the character's resolution we experience a sense of our own. Does that mean it's going to fix your problems? No, that's not at all what I'm saying. Lynn Langan [36:59]: No. But sometimes, think we're all saying it too, it's nice to not feel alone. We're not alone and that. Even if it's not our story, if it's just something that's sort of singular or where we can insert ourself, even it's just a false victory because you read the character's victory, it does give you hope. Alyssa Scolari [37:21]: Yes. Lynn Langan [37:22]: And hope is all you really need at the end of the day, because if you feel that you have that, some kind of glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel per se, then you're going to chuck through to the end and find it for yourself. I think. Denise Wolf [37:22]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [37:38]: Yes. When you are dealing with the biology of an adolescent brain, and their emotional response center is on fire, and their prefrontal cortex, the place for rational thought is under-developed, hope can be a hard, hard thing to come by. Denise Wolf [38:06]: Very. Yeah, it's abstract. I think in adolescent, the top third of their brain is like under construction. Lynn Langan [38:13]: Right. Denise Wolf [38:14]: It's not even there. So, hope is [crosstalk 00:38:16] that belongs in that top third. So, you can talk about it, you have to feel about it. That's where art comes in, to create that- Lynn Langan [38:28]: Yeah, absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [38:31]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [38:33]: There were several scenes in this book that I wrote, and then I would walk away from my desk and come back and be like, "Nope, you wrote that as an adult. Stop. You can't fix the problems like that. Stop it." Alyssa Scolari [38:50]: Yeah, now this might a little bit of a, I guess, abstract question, but was there anything that you had to do to be able to really channel your inner adolescent? Or is that something that's very easily accessible to you? Lynn Langan [39:05]: It's something I think is very easily accessible to me, for some reason. It's a gift that [crosstalk 00:39:11]- Alyssa Scolari [39:11]: It's a gift. A gift and a curse. Lynn Langan [39:15]: [crosstalk 00:39:15]. It's both those things. I was reading this book. I'm dyslexic, so there's book about... A dyslexic author wrote this book about the gifts of being dyslexic. One of the things is that the way we form memories around the events that are happening because for a normal brain it goes syntax... What's that word? Here we go, [crosstalk 00:39:39]. Denise Wolf [39:39]: It's synapsis. Lynn Langan [39:41]: Synapsis. But for a dyslexic brain, it kind of takes a U turn. It pings differently, and because of that we're really grounded in memory. We have an excellent memory for all things, but that's kind of like our survival guide because it's how we thrive. Because of that, I can basically tell you everything that's happened in my life. My memory, for some reason, well not for some reason, for that reason is extremely strong. When I sit down to write these adolescent books, I can just sit down and be like, "Okay, you're 17. Go." You got to think of high school, of events, and just remember how small my brain was, or what I was thinking or feeling at that point. Then I can dive in. That's how I know when I'm not being authentic to the characters or the voice, is when I feel like my adult brain is coming in and being like, "Well, that was easy." I'm like, wait no, it shouldn't be easy. It's not an easy [crosstalk 00:40:39] job. You can't think like that. I feel like because of all of that, that's why I'm very good with my memories and all of that. Denise Wolf [40:47]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], it makes sense. Lynn Langan [40:48]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], I'm very in touch with that. Denise Wolf [40:52]: Fun fact about Lynn, oh my gosh, this so cool, Lynn has soundtracks or song for the characters, so trying to get into character, then they're like, "Oh I need to listen [crosstalk 00:41:03]." Alyssa Scolari [41:03]: Really? Oh, that's so cool. Lynn Langan [41:06]: Right, yeah. It's that initial, here's the story that I'm thinking in my head. Here's the soundtrack that I'm going to put to that, and [inaudible 00:41:14] music. It's very helpful in rewrites because my agent's coming back and saying, "Go into this novel and fix this problem." I'm like, "What? That was so long ago. Oh, I know. I'll just hit this play button right here." And then boom, I'm right back into their world. I'm right there. Alyssa Scolari [41:32]: That is brilliant. Where did you even think to be able to do that? [inaudible 00:41:38] music, depending on whatever you put on, can get you anywhere. Anywhere you want to go- Lynn Langan [41:45]: Yes, anywhere you want to go. Alyssa Scolari [41:46]: Music will take you there. Lynn Langan [41:48]: Yes, it will take you there. The writing process is unique in the fact that you sit down to the computer and you're asking yourself to leave yourself. You're asking yourself to forget about whatever troubles you had that day, or your perspective of the world, or sometimes your gender, and go. As a writer, that's the thing that you have to work on the most, is who is actually at the keyboard today? Is it Lynn, or is it Duke, or is it Tommy? Who is it? In order for me to train my mind to do that, when I first wrote my first novel, I would play their songs. I would play them three or four times before I even put my hands to the keyboard because I knew I had to listen to it repeatedly to get all of my personal baggage out of the way so that the character could step forward and would be influenced in my writing. I can do it now without music. It's really just training your... It's almost like a meditative state, is what I would best explain. You consciously ask yourself to exit. Alyssa Scolari [42:54]: That's fascinating and brilliant. Wow. Denise Wolf [42:59]: Something else [crosstalk 00:43:00] tell me about writing, because I've done some academic writing, is to write first with an old timey pen on paper. There's something about that kinesthetic sensory, just kind of writing actual words on paper and then the first edit becomes entering it into the keyboard. That connects so much more with sort of the I think emotional part of ourselves. Lynn Langan [43:25]: Absolutely. I usually edit... My first round, I'll print out the manuscript and edit that way because there's something about that process that gets you at a computer. Alyssa Scolari [43:35]: Agreed. Lynn Langan [43:36]: It's more authentic to you. Alyssa Scolari [43:38]: Yes, agreed. There's something so different that comes out of you when you are physically writing than hitting buttons on a keyboard. It's a completely different experience. Lynn Langan [43:51]: Absolutely, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [43:54]: I talk about journaling with some of my kids who I feel like it might be helpful for, and they're like, "Can I just type it out on my phone?" I'm like, "Hell no." Lynn Langan [44:04]: No. [crosstalk 00:44:06]. Get that pen in your hand. Feel it. [crosstalk 00:44:08]. Alyssa Scolari [44:08]: And get a fun pen, right? Lynn Langan [44:10]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [44:11]: I have a set of I think it's like 100 pack. Oh God, 100 pack of glitter gel pens. I'm still a giant child. Denise Wolf [44:21]: Yep. Yeah. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Are they scented? Alyssa Scolari [44:26]: Denise, I looked for the scented ones. Lord knows that I tried. Unfortunately, they're not. Denise Wolf [44:31]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Alyssa Scolari [44:34]: But I wish. The last question I want to ask you, because I also think this is important because I do know that we have listeners out there who are parents, and if they don't have an adolescent currently, they have an up and coming adolescent or adolescents at home. Do you feel that this book is one that can also help parents and even any adults who work with kids get a better view inside the mind of a kid, which will then also better help them to relate to their kid in real life? Does that make sense? Denise Wolf [45:14]: Yes and yes. Alyssa Scolari [45:15]: Okay. Lynn Langan [45:18]: One of the things that you try to do as a young adult writer is remembering the place of everybody in their lives. Yes, you're living in a family. Yes, you have chores and you have bedtimes, and you have all those things. That's all true. But what's really important is the social aspect. That's where you're getting all your connections, and that's the most important part. As a parent, I think it's easy to look at your 17 or 16 year old kid and forget that there's this whole other life that is very complicated. You're just thinking they're upstairs in their room. They're taking out the trash. It's easy to get into the routine of life and forget that there's these little stories that these kids are having that have nothing to do with you. [crosstalk 00:46:08]. You can only hope that you're a great parent and you modeled well, because they're out there in the real world by themselves, and this is the time. I think that's why I like this age, because it is the loosening of the parents and the influence, and the family structure, which is also very hard on the parents, but it's just as hard on the kids. It's that constant, I think you see that a lot with Duke, where he feels guilty for not watching football with his dad because that's what they used to do. He has a social life now, and he needs to go out with his friends, but he still has that little internal battle like, "I'm going," but there's also a sadness that I know that this slipping away. Even though I'm looking forward to my independence, it is also scary. I think for both parents and kids, that's a good reminder of that. Denise Wolf [47:01]: Right, that it's all the feels. It's all the feels. I had to do an art engagement with youth, so I had to craft a 50 message about adolescents to adolescence. So, that's not a lot of words. Lynn helped me write it, thank you, and it started off with "No matter what, it's going to hurt." It was really great, if I do say so, and I submitted and they changed it before publication and didn't check with me. So, when I read my message to adolescents in this glossy thing they put out, it was like being a teen is great. I'm like, fuck no. Alyssa Scolari [47:37]: What the fuck? Denise Wolf [47:39]: [crosstalk 00:47:39] I said it's going to hurt, but it's okay. Alyssa Scolari [47:44]: You wrote, "It's going to hurt," and they took that and said, "Being a teen is great"? Denise Wolf [47:44]: Yeah. Lynn Langan [47:50]: Yeah. Denise Wolf [47:51]: Mm-hmm [affirmative], [crosstalk 00:47:52]. Alyssa Scolari [47:51]: Jesus Lord Almighty. Denise Wolf [47:55]: To your question earlier, Alyssa, I think it's really valuable and important for adults, educators remind ourselves of all that angsty stuff, all the feels. Get back into that. Like, no matter what it's going to hurt. You're going to be okay, but can't escape the pain. That's where growth happens. Lynn Langan [48:15]: Right, exactly. Just go ahead and feel what you need to feel. It'll be funny if you interviewed I would say Duke's family, they also I think would come away and have the perspective that everything in Duke's life is okay, where it's not. His family member that really knows that is his sister, which is also good for parents to I think see from that angle that siblings have that connection with each other and they can look out for each other, or they can call each other out on their bullshit, or any of that. Yeah, it's just a weird time in the like where everybody's learning how to let go of this family unit. Denise Wolf [48:57]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Alyssa Scolari [49:00]: I think the most important part is just what both of you were speaking to is, being able as adults to get back in touch with not just the angst, but all of the feelings. I think so much of adulthood has become just about numbing out, by working 9:00 to 5:00, playing music or a podcast, or a news radio in the car to and from work. You come home. You eat. You do whatever. You go to bed, and you do it all the next days. Weekends stereotypically include going out, drinking, this, that... it's so focused around just numbing out. As adults, we almost just even have time for our feelings. I think that's what makes the three of us so fucking incredible, because I don't sense that we do that. We feel things. Denise Wolf [49:52]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Lynn Langan [49:52]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [49:53]: And refuse to live in the numbed out state that I think a lot of adults have found themselves in. Denise Wolf [50:01]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Lynn Langan [50:01]: Yeah. I should say I think one of the best advice that Denise has ever given me in my life was that she said, when I was going through some tough times, she was like "Look, pull up a chair. Make yourself a cup of tea. Get to know that feeling that you're feeling. Ask it questions. Just don't shy away from it. Lean into it." It's really good advice to remember that as an adult, you're right, we get into these routines and again, we get more and more narrow in our thinking, in the way... I think that's part of society's pressure too, like don't talk about your feelings. Just do, do, do. It's okay to have feelings around if you want to feel sad. It's okay to feel sad. If things are not working out, it's okay that things aren't working out. It's not the end of the world. That's what's so fun about adolescents too is that they can fall down and get back up. You're so resilient when you're young, because you just haven't really quite learned to stay on the floor. I think that's probably what the three of us have learned, we keep standing up. We're going to take the punches in the ring and it's going to hurt, but we keep going and we're going to feel those feelings, we're going to figure out how not to get hit by that again- Denise Wolf [51:17]: But we probably will. Lynn Langan [51:18]: We probably will. Denise Wolf [51:19]: We will. [crosstalk 00:51:20]. Lynn Langan [51:22]: Yeah, we won't shy away from it. Denise Wolf [51:23]: Yeah, and we'll have great stories to tell. Lynn Langan [51:26]: Yeah, exactly. Alyssa Scolari [51:27]: Yes, that's living. To me, that's living at it's fullest. Lynn Langan [51:31]: Right, absolutely. Denise Wolf [51:33]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [51:34]: I love it. Lynn Langan [51:34]: Through mistakes. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [51:37]: If people would like to buy this book, where on earth can they find it? I know Amazon is one, but I also want to plug if it's in any kind of small businesses or anything like that, or is it mostly Amazon? Lynn Langan [51:50]: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and the great and wonderful Bookshop where you can go on and order it and it fosters independent bookstores. So, if you buy it from Bookshop it will be pulled from your local store. Bookshop.org, yeah. Alyssa Scolari [52:06]: Bookshop.org. Okay, I will make sure... So yeah, to the listeners out there, this is a book you absolutely going to want to get your hands on, whether you're an adolescent tuning in, whether you're in the young adult phase of your life, whether you have kids of you own, whether you are a teacher, or a therapist, truthfully even if you're a therapist who works with adults, so many of the adults that you're working with have unresolved childhood issues. I don't like the word "issues", but I can't think of a better word right now. It's very important to be able to tap into this type of stuff. Honestly, this book is very useful for everybody. Of course, feel free to use Amazon because it'll get to you very quickly, but also I am going to put the other link in there because, you know, support your local bookstore, or support small businesses as well. So, head over to the show notes. Denise and Lynn, thank you for a wonderful episode. I love talking about kids. Lynn Langan [53:13]: Yes. Alyssa Scolari [53:14]: It's been fun. Lynn Langan [53:14]: Yeah, thanks for having us. Denise Wolf [53:16]: Yeah, thank you. Alyssa Scolari [53:17]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information please head over to LightAfterTrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we @LightAfterTrauma. On Twitter, it is @LightAfterPod. Lastly, please head over to Patreon.com/LightAfterTrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5.00 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So, please head on over. Again, that's Patreon.com/LightAfterTrauma. Thank you, and we appreciate your support. [singing]

The Story Collider
Stories of COVID-19: Under the Same Roof

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 30:09


This week, we bring you two stories about negotiating life under the same roof during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Part 1: When Gail Thomas moves in with her family during the pandemic, tensions brew between sisters. Part 2: The pandemic brings Wendy Bredhold and her ex-husband back together under the same roof for Thanksgiving. Gail is a writer/actor/storytelling coach and lawyer living in NYC. Her voiceover credits include John Cameron Mitchell's Anthem: Homunculus, Angelo Rules, David Letterman, and Beavis and Butthead. Her short comedy, My BFF won audience favorite at New Filmmakers. As a speechwriter for over 30-world class events including the Tribeca Film Festival, her words have been uttered by Oscar winners and fancy people with great clothes. But none of that matters now, we're in a pandemic. Gail is out walking her dog. Wendy Bredhold works for climate and environmental justice representing the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign in Indiana and Kentucky. She lives in Evansville, Indiana with her daughter Beatrice Rose and cats, Pearl and Pinky. She loves dancing to live music, reading, writing and rabble-rousing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast
SH 23 - Baseball Mud & Sibling Rivalries

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 43:05


Short Hops & Tall Tales - Brandon (@bdriddle) & Noah (@noahascott6) are back with a brand-new episode and more weird baseball! First, Noah digs into MLB's best-kept secret — its magical baseball mud, and the family that safeguards it. Then, Brandon unravels a story of two baseball siblings with a couple of iconic nicknames: Bubbles & Pinky Hargrave.   Timestamps: Pickoff Trivia: Perfectos, Immaculate Innings, and 4K Frames (01:45) Baseball...Mud? (03:56) "Pinky & the Bubbles, Baseball Siblings" (20:48) Pickoff Trivia: MLB Siblings (38:16) Get PL+ and join our Discord: https://pitcherlist.com/plus