Podcasts about special inspector general

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Oversight division of a United States federal or state agency

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Best podcasts about special inspector general

Latest podcast episodes about special inspector general

Booknotes+
Ep. 29 Craig Whitlock, "The Afghanistan Papers"

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 75:07


In 2019, through FOIA requests and lawsuits, the Washington Post obtained hundreds of interviews conducted by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) for its Lessons Learned Program. The interviews showed that behind the scenes, U.S. military and government officials in Afghanistan presented a far gloomier picture of the war and reconstruction efforts than was presented to the American public by officials in Washington. Washington Post investigative reporter Craig Whitlock, author of "The Afghanistan Papers," joins us to talk about the Post's efforts to obtain the SIGAR interviews, the war in Afghanistan, his reporting on the U.S. Navy's "Fat Leonard" scandal, and more.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Congressional Dish
Thank You Water Bombs

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 57:18


In this bonus "thank you" episode for producers, Jen starts off the episode with an addendum to Losing Afghanistan before thanking producers and filling everyone in on the magnificence of the new Raiders stadium. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Senator Rand Paul. “SEN. RAND PAUL asks on guy Biden Administration droned, was he an aid worker or a ISIS-K operative?” America News on Youtube. Christoph Koettl, Evan Hill, Matthieu Aikins, Eric Schmitt, Ainara Tiefenthäler and Drew Jordan. September 10, 2021. “How a U.S. Drone Strike Killed the Wrong Person.” The New York Times. Producer-recommended Sources Robert Bryce. September 6, 2021. “Franklin ‘Chuck' Spinney: Author of ‘The Defense Death Spiral.'” The Power Hungry Podcast. Vinay Prasad. September 2, 2021. “The Downsides of Masking Young Students Are Real.” The Atlantic. Glenn Greenwald. August 25, 2021. “The Bizarre Refusal to Apply Cost-Benefit Analysis to COVID Debates.” Glenn Greenwald Substack. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. August 2021. What We Need to Learn: Lessons from twenty years of Afghanistan reconstruction. World Health Organization. August 21, 2020. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Children and masks. March 7, 1983. “U.S. Defense Spending: Are Billions Being Wasted?” Time Magazine. Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2675 - The Secret History of the War on Terror w/ Craig Whitlock

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 67:34


Sam and Emma host Craig Whitlock, investigative reporter at the Washington Post, to discuss his recent book The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Sam and Emma first touch upon the resounding victory for Gavin Newsom in the California recall election from last night, and discuss Newsom's nationalizing of the recall/pinning the results to the "shadow president" for the Republicans (Trump) as a telegraph of the political strategy going forward into 2022. Then Emma and Sam are joined by Craig, who starts out by discussing how him and the Washington Post obtained the Afghanistan Papers, the trove of documents the Post obtained via the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that serve as the basis for the book, and how the book timed up perfectly with Biden's announcement of the withdrawal of troops in August, as well as the context behind the "Lessons Learned" project run through a little known federal agency called the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) that was the source of the lion's share of the notes and transcripts that comprised the papers. Craig goes deeper into describing the testimony from the interview transcripts of "Lessons Learned", citing how many past, present, and current military officials considered the war in Afghanistan "much worse than you think", and that "we didn't know what we were doing" in terms of strategic goals in Afghanistan. Craig goes so far as to report that former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld had no appreciable strategy for the war in Afghanistan beyond "chasing terrorists". Sam and Emma dive deeper into the idea that these transcripts and notes were intentionally hidden by the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations, noting that the SIGAR reports that were publicly disclosed were significantly edited and sanitized. Craig then goes back to the early 2000's, stating that there was a pretty clear game plan for the first 60 days of the war, but that there was no recognizable strategy or timetable for what the United States was doing occupying Afghanistan, especially when George W. Bush made it clear that this was not a "nation-building" project to begin with. The emphasis was also very clearly on Iraq over Afghanistan, to the point where Rumsfeld asked Bush to meet with the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan as well as the commander in Iraq. Bush only wanted to meet with the Iraq commander, and didn't even know who the Afghanistan commander was, and didn't want to meet with him anyways. Craig then pivots to the Obama years, where the Administration very clearly wanted to continue the war without calling it a war, so as to not step on the toes of their allies whose presence in Afghanistan would violate some of their own war-making laws and practices if it was called a war by their allies. Not wanting to call it a war, but not being accurate enough to call it a "peacekeeping mission", the Obama administration landed on the clunky "non-conventional war effort" to split the difference. Afterwards, Craig discloses the combustible report that the Bush Administration furiously attempted to cover up, that former Vice President Dick Cheney was almost killed in a suicide bombing at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, and how this pattern of attempting to spin every negative outcome into a positive one throughout the war persisted across every presidential administration in the 21st century. They end on the warped and strange arc of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's career, how he was a widely respected military official until his full throated embrace of Trump and QAnon stifled that perception, as well as Craig hoping that previous, current, and future administrations will learn from the mistakes of the past 20 years, but doesn't have too much hope because, well, Bush and Rumsfeld didn't learn from the mistakes of Vietnam outlined in, you guessed it, another trove of documents that made clear how badly we were losing a protracted war: The Pentagon Papers. In the Fun Half, Sam gives a brief primer on the fight over taxation between the House and the Senate Dems in the reconciliation mockups going around the Hill, the crew checks in on the House and Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings where in the House Ilhan Omar grills Secretary of State Blinken over the drone strike that may have killed a foreign aid worker instead of an ISIS-K operative, and in the Senate Idaho Senator Jim Risch gets to more pressing matters, namely: who the heck is pressing the button that controls when Biden talks? Then the crew check in on Ben Shapiro melting down over Cara Delevingne's "Peg the Patriarchy" look at the Met Gala, to which Ben feels the great need to describe what pegging means to him. And FINALLY the crew has the honor of dissecting Tucker Carlson's fascination with Nicki Minaj's cousin's friend's balls after his COVID vaccination (Tucker corrected the record to reflect it was Nicki's cousin's friend, not cousin), Tucker's quest to get him on the show, and we get a real time dispatch from the Trinidad and Tobago Health Minister over whether this dude's balls actually swelled post-vax. Plus, your calls and IM's! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: Grove: Companies around the world produce two billion pounds of new plastic every day. Yet no matter how much we put in our recycling bin, just nine percent of plastic actually gets recycled. At Grove Collaborative, they believe it's time to stop making single-use plastic. Grove is the online marketplace that delivers healthy home, beauty, and personal care products directly to you! It takes the guesswork out of going green — Every product is guaranteed to be good for you, your family, your home, and the planet. Choosing products that are better for you AND the planet has never been easier. For a limited time when our listeners go to Grove.com/MAJORITY you will get to choose a FREE starter set with your first order. Go to Grove.com/MAJORITY to get your exclusive offer! That's Grove.com/MAJORITY. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

china truth ceo staying american america americans north director war numerous audio friends democrats military losing republicans congress new york times president series donald trump peace stranded syria iraq united states white house cnn trump administration government force pennsylvania africa pakistan afghanistan harris seeking code secretary washington post middle east vice president defense barack obama osama assassination bush roosevelt waiting donations laden lower manhattan new york magazine schuster get out collapse air force tac sen prevent remain south asia commission wall street journal troops joe biden pentagon joint chiefs somalia pledge intercept testimony reform departure citizenship timeline foreign policy afghan retired compromise al qaeda nato kabul sec armed forces taliban hwy daily beast patrick tucker co chair strategic increases music alley treaty uae regulations advisors osama bin laden united states presidents afghans moulton dod contractors us government subcommittee policies publicly sludge dunford homeland security jennifer steinhauer trillion george w bush ruse qaeda behalf arabian peninsula amends preference withdrawal james risen eager al shabaab kandahar united states government fiscal year open secrets oversight turning point john f ap news afghan national police national defense authorization act matt stoller special inspector general defense department congressional dish substack immigration services matt taibbi defense news us institute defense one nancy lindborg death warrant state pompeo ghani afghanistan veterans sivs fact check york times federal news network international security assistance force sound clips lee fang seth moulton cover art design central command authorizes afghan government matthew hoh state bureau david ippolito craig whitlock afghan air force sigar jared serbu defense contracting afghan national army oren liebermann defence forces annie karni mark landler zolan kanno youngs al nusra eli clifton eric schmitt crestview government act s department
GovExec Daily
The Military Legacy of Sept. 11

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:30


Congress passed the Authorization for Use of Military Force as a joint resolution a week after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The AUMF authorized the use of the military against terrorist organizations and every president since George W. Bush has interpreted that authority to extend operations beyond al Qaeda and the Taliban. The Global War on Terror has spanned the globe over the last two decades and continues to this day under the cover of secrecy, as the full list of targeted groups remains classified.  As part of a series marking the attacks' legacy on government, GovExec Daily explores the military and foreign policy legacy of the American reaction to Sept. 11. Ben Watson and Dr. Tony Brooks, veterans of the war in Afghanistan, discuss their experiences and Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko talks about the failures in nation-building.

CNA Talks
The Collapse of the Afghan Security Forces (Part 2)

CNA Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 18:11


In part two of their discussion, CNA counterterrorism experts Alex Powell and Jon Schroden sit down with James Cunningham the lead author for two comprehensive lessons learned reports published by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR).  They discuss some positive takeaways from the development of the Afghan National Security Forces and what lessons the U.S. government can learn from Afghanistan. Timestamps by Topic 1:17: Were there effective approaches to developing the Afghan National Security Forces? 7:05: What lessons should the U.S. government learn from Afghanistan? 12:59: Will the U.S. government make any actionable change because of these lessons? Guest Biographies James Cunningham is the lead author and project lead for two comprehensive lessons learned reports published by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction focused on reconstructing the ANDSF.  For over 16 years, James has worked Afghanistan-related issues as a member of the Intelligence community and providing independent oversight of U.S. reconstruction programming. Jonathan Schroden is the Director of CNA's Countering Threats and Challenges Program (CTCP), whose mission is to support US government efforts to better understand and counter state and non-state threats and challenges. Schroden has deployed or traveled to Afghanistan 13 times. Alex Powell is an expert on terrorist group tactics, counterterrorism, and special operations forces (SOF).  He has worked extensively on security issues in Afghanistan, traveling there numerous times to conduct assessments of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces. Additional Resources SIGAR Website: https://www.sigar.mil/ Divided Responsibility: Lessons from U.S. Security Sector Assistance Efforts in Afghanistan, June 2019 (https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-19-39-LL.pdf) Reconstructing the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan, September 2017 (https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-17-62-LL.pdf)

Next in Foreign Policy
Protecting Afghans with Farhat Popal

Next in Foreign Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 37:32


This week Grant and Zoe are joined by Farhat Popal, Immigrant Affairs Manager with the City of San Diego and former Senior Program Analyst at Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). Farhat talks about what the United States can do to protect Afghans in Afghanistan and support them wherever they seek refuge. In the final segment, Zoe discusses anticipating Sally Rooney's new book Beautiful World, Where Are You and Grant endorses playing Wingspan. Help Afghan refugees here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/08/21/how-to-help-afghan-refugees/ If you are under 40 and interested in being featured on the podcast, be sure to fill out this form: https://airtable.com/shr5IpK32opINN5e9

Liberty Relearned
Why the Afghanistan debacle matters

Liberty Relearned

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 58:28


The Afghanistan Debacle and why it matters. It has provided our enemies a tremendous windfall in advanced armaments. “The Taliban has seized US weapons left in Afghanistan worth billions — possibly including 600,000 assault rifles, some 2,000 armored vehicles, and 40 aircraft, including Black Hawks, according to reports. The US gave the Afghan military an estimated $28 billion in weaponry between 2002 and 2017 — including seven brand new helicopters delivered to Kabul just a month ago. The war chest also included the supply of at least 600,000 infantry weapons — including M16 assault rifles — as well as 162,000 pieces of communication equipment and 16,000 night-vision goggles. In just two years from 2017 to 2019, the US gave 7,035 machine guns, 4,702 Humvees, 20,040 hand grenades, 2,520 bombs and 1,394 grenade launchers, The Hill noted, citing a report last year from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). “Everything that hasn't been destroyed is the Taliban's now,” one US official told Reuters, speaking on the condition of anonymity.” Excerpt from NY Post article from Taliban has billions in US weapons, including Black Hawks and up to 600K rifles Creates a potential hostage situation that could dwarf the Iran hostage crisis. (In 1979 Iranian militants took over the American embassy in Tehran and held them for 444 days.) The White House claims that between 100 and 200 Americans were left behind in Afghanistan. Every one is a potential hostage and bargaining chip to be used by the Taliban to gain monetary and other concessions Endangers Afghan Christians, women, and gays Undermines our standing in the world, especially with our allies and with Taiwan. “Several MPs said constituents, particularly former service personnel, had been in contact, with “heart-rending” stories of friends and former colleagues in Afghanistan who were now in immediate danger, piling pressure on the government to act faster to help save them. Tom Tugendhat, who chairs the foreign affairs select committee, said he was “extremely angry” at Biden's criticism of Afghan soldiers, calling those troops “incredibly brave” and saying the US withdrew “like a thief in the night” with no proper handover. The former Treasury minister Huw Merriman, who chairs the transport select committee, called Biden a “total blithering idiot” for blaming Afghan forces. “Makes me wonder if he is the Siamese twin of Donald Trump. Tony Blair left us with this mess and we did not try hard enough to clear it up,” he tweeted. Another former minister, Simon Clarke, said it was the end of an American era. “The more you reflect, the more you realise the speech [Biden] gave last night was grotesque. An utter repudiation of the America so many of us have admired so deeply all our lives – the champion of liberty and democracy and the guardian of what's right in the world,” he said.” --Excerpt from The Guardian article from 17 Aug 21 article: UK politicians decry Joe Biden's defense of Afghanistan pullout --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jp-mac/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jp-mac/support

CNA Talks
The Collapse of the Afghan Security Forces (Part 1)

CNA Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 33:42


In this episode, CNA counterterrorism experts Alex Powell and Jon Schroden sit down with James Cunningham the lead author for two comprehensive lessons learned reports published by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR).  They discuss the collapse of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF) in the face of the Taliban offensive, how the Taliban were able to take territory with so little resistance and problems with how the U.S. military trained the ANDSF. Guest Biographies James Cunningham is the lead author and project lead for two comprehensive lessons learned reports published by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction focused on reconstructing the ANDSF.  For over 16 years, James has worked Afghanistan-related issues as a member of the Intelligence community and providing independent oversight of U.S. reconstruction programming. Jonathan Schroden is the Director of CNA's Countering Threats and Challenges Program (CTCP), whose mission is to support US government efforts to better understand and counter state and non-state threats and challenges. Schroden has deployed or traveled to Afghanistan 13 times. Alex Powell is an expert on terrorist group tactics, counterterrorism, and special operations forces (SOF).  He has worked extensively on security issues in Afghanistan, traveling there numerous times to conduct assessments of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces. Additional Resources SIGAR Website: https://www.sigar.mil/ Divided Responsibility: Lessons from U.S. Security Sector Assistance Efforts in Afghanistan, June 2019 (https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-19-39-LL.pdf) Reconstructing the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan, September 2017 (https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-17-62-LL.pdf)  

The Darrell McClain show
Craig Whitlock The Afghanistan Papers

The Darrell McClain show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 59:43


"Two years ago he and a team at The Post published a prescient and ground-breaking project called “The Afghanistan Papers,” revealing hundreds of secret interviews with U.S. officials candidly discussing the failures of the war.By Martine PowersThe interviews with some 400 people were part of a project called “Lessons Learned,” undertaken by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or SIGAR, and The Post obtained them after a three-year legal battle. These Afghanistan papers are a secret history of the war, Whitlock tells Martine Powers, and “they contain these frank admissions of how the war was screwed up and that what the American people were being told about the war wasn't true.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/tablet/2021/08/20/afghanistan-papers-revisited/?utm_campaign=ext_rweb&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=extensionSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/TheDarrellmcclainshow)

Sicherheitshalber
#47 Das Afghanistan-Desaster: Wie weiter mit Deutschlands und Europas Verantwortung?

Sicherheitshalber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 68:18


“Sicherheitshalber” ist der Podcast zur sicherheitspolitischen Lage in Deutschland, Europa und der Welt. In Folge 47 sprechen Thomas Wiegold, Ulrike Franke, Frank Sauer und Carlo Masala natürlich nur über die aktuellen Entwicklungen in Afghanistan. Die Diskussion der vier Podcaster orientiert sich dabei an vier Fragen: Wie kam es zur chaotischen Situation am Flughafen von Kabul? Könnte Europa ohne die USA dort eigentlich überhaupt (weiter) operieren? Was beudetet das Debakel für zukünftige Einsätze der Bundeswehr? Was bedeutet es für die Glaubwürdigkeit des Westens und die Geopolitik in der Region? Abschließend wie immer der “Sicherheitshinweis”, der kurze Fingerzeig auf aktuelle, sicherheitspolitisch einschlägige Themen und Entwicklungen - diesmal mit neuer besorgniserregender Instabilität in Nordafrika, Corona-Impflicht bei US-Streitkräften und Bundeswehr, neuen Überwachungsballons und - mal wieder - dem nuklear angetriebenen Marschflugkörper Russlands. Afghanistan: 00:02:53 Sicherheitshinweise: 00:59:42 Web: https://sicherheitspod.de/ Shop: https://sicherheitshalbershop.myspreadshop.de/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sicherheitspod Erwähnte Literatur: Thema - Afghanistan: Operation Enduring Clusterfuck Folge #43 Afghanistan - was bleibt? https://sicherheitspod.de/2021/05/09/folge-43-afghanistan-was-bleibt-zukunftige-auslandseinsatze-koalitionen-der-willigen-keine-option/ Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, Berichte: https://www.sigar.mil/ Helene Bubrowski und Peter Carstens, Die vielen Schichten der Wahrheit, FAZ, 25.08.2021, https://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/kritik-am-bnd-die-vielen-schichten-der-wahrheit-17501340.html Sami Sadat, I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed, New York Times, 25.08.2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/25/opinion/afghanistan-taliban-army.html David Petraeus: “The Taliban are about to be acquainted with a very harsh reality—that they are broke”, Atlantic Council, 20.08.2021, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/new-atlanticist/david-petraeus-the-taliban-are-about-to-be-acquainted-with-a-very-harsh-reality-that-they-are-broke/ Mike Jason, What We Got Wrong in Afghanistan, The Atlantic, 12.08.2021, https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/08/how-america-failed-afghanistan/619740/ Lothar Gries, Afghanistans begehrte Bodenschätze, tagesschau, 18.08.2021, https://www.tagesschau.de/wirtschaft/weltwirtschaft/afghanistan-rohstoffe-bodenschaetze-china-101.html Tyler Rogoway, These Are The Military's Options For Extending Evacuations In Afghanistan. None Of Them Are Good, The Drive, 24.08.2021, https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/42128/what-the-u-s-militarys-options-look-like-for-extending-evacuations-from-afghanistan Sicherheitshinweise Carlo: Abbruch diplomatischer Beziehungen zwischen Algerien und Marokko https://taz.de/Algerien-kappt-Beziehungen-zu-Marokko/!5791563/ Thomas: Corona-Impflicht für US-Streitkräfte und Bundeswehr https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/pentagon-mandate-covid-19-vaccine-pfizer-approved-79601620 Rike: Überwachungsballon für Bundeswehr-Camp in Niger https://augengeradeaus.net/2021/08/rheinmetall-liefert-und-betreibt-ueberwachungsballon-fuer-bundeswehr-camp-in-niger/ Frank: Russland bereitet weiteren Test des “Burevestnik” Marschflugkörpers vor https://www.armscontrolwonk.com/archive/1212985/russia-resumes-burevestnik-testing/

Post Reports
The Afghanistan Papers, revisited

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 59:09


This week, Americans watched in disbelief as Afghanistan fell to the Taliban in a matter of days — and we wondered what Craig Whitlock was thinking. Two years ago he and a team at The Post published a prescient and ground-breaking project called “The Afghanistan Papers,” revealing hundreds of secret interviews with U.S. officials candidly discussing the failures of the war.The interviews with some 400 people were part of a project called “Lessons Learned,” undertaken by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or SIGAR, and The Post obtained them after a three-year legal battle. These Afghanistan papers are a secret history of the war, Whitlock tells Martine Powers, and “they contain these frank admissions of how the war was screwed up and that what the American people were being told about the war wasn't true.” “They really do bring to mind the Pentagon Papers, which were the Defense Department's top-secret history of the Vietnam War,” Whitlock says. These recordings have new resonance this week. Read excerpts from Craig Whitlock's new book, ‟The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War”.Deceptions and lies: What really happened in AfghanistanThe grand illusion: Hiding the truth about the Afghanistan war's ‘conclusion'

The Rachel Maddow Show
'We may be looking at a collapse of our health care system': Alabama doctor sounds alarm

The Rachel Maddow Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 44:48


Tonight's guests are Ahmed Mengli, NBC News Afghanistan producer, John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstructions, Dr. David Kimberlin, co-director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama, and Ben Collins, senior reporter for NBC News.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Conflicts of Interest #143: Corporate Press Covers for Israel as It Murders Palestinians By Choice

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 59:29


On COI #143, Kyle and Will break down the latest quarterly report from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), which paints a bleak picture for the country as the US' 20-year war and occupation finally appear to be winding down. A major Taliban offensive over the spring and summer has put around half of Afghanistan's districts under the militant group's control, sending civilian casualties to record levels for the period between May and June. Despite being propped up by American largesse for nearly two decades straight, the Afghan military has been woefully unprepared to meet the ongoing assault. Washington has imposed two rounds of sanctions on Cuban officials on allegations they worked to "suppress" recent anti-government protests, part of a growing pressure campaign on Havana by the Biden administration, which has vowed additional penalties in the future. With the sanctions largely symbolic so far, it's unclear whether Biden is looking to seriously take on the regime, or merely to score a short-lived domestic PR win. Israeli forces shot four Palestinians dead in the occupied West Bank last week, including a 12-year-old boy. Another victim – all were civilians – was murdered in cold blood during the child's funeral, where IDF troops deployed to terrorize mourners. Kyle and Will discuss the extreme state violence Palestinians are forced to tolerate on a daily basis, and Washington's role in ensuring it never stops. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Conflicts of Interest #143: Corporate Press Covers for Israel as It Murders Palestinians By Choice

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 59:29


On COI #143, Kyle and Will break down the latest quarterly report from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), which paints a bleak picture for the country as the US' 20-year war and occupation finally appear to be winding down. A major Taliban offensive over the spring and summer has put around half of Afghanistan's districts under the militant group's control, sending civilian casualties to record levels for the period between May and June. Despite being propped up by American largesse for nearly two decades straight, the Afghan military has been woefully unprepared to meet the ongoing assault.    Washington has imposed two rounds of sanctions on Cuban officials on allegations they worked to "suppress" recent anti-government protests, part of a growing pressure campaign on Havana by the Biden administration, which has vowed additional penalties in the future. With the sanctions largely symbolic so far, it's unclear whether Biden is looking to seriously take on the regime, or merely to score a short-lived domestic PR win. Israeli forces shot four Palestinians dead in the occupied West Bank last week, including a 12-year-old boy. Another victim – all were civilians – was murdered in cold blood during the child's funeral, where IDF troops deployed to terrorize mourners. Kyle and Will discuss the extreme state violence Palestinians are forced to tolerate on a daily basis, and Washington's role in ensuring it never stops.   Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Government Matters
COVID-19 oversight lessons, NSF Convergence Accelerator, Returning to the workplace – May 23, 2021

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2021 26:25


Lessons learned from coronavirus oversight Brian Miller, Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery, discusses challenges he has faced in his role as a Special IG and success his office is having in pandemic relief oversight Goals for the NSF Convergence Accelerator Doug Maughan, Office Head for the NSF Convergence Accelerator, talks about the National Science Foundation’s Convergence Accelerator program that uses ideation from the community to find solutions for national challenges Updates on returning to the workplace Ron Sanders, Staff Director at the Florida Center for Cybersecurity, and Dan Blair, former Deputy Director at the Office of Personnel Management, talk about the “new normal” and agency plans for bringing employees back to workplaces

GovExec Daily
Brian Miller and Pandemic Oversight

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 18:05


It has been a little under a year since Brian Miller was confirmed as the Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery. Miller told our guest today that he’s found a lot of success in uncovering fraud associated with the CARES Act in his time on the job, but there is more work to be done. Courtney Bublé is a reporter covering oversight. She spoke to Miller last week and she joined the show to talk about her conversation with him and oversight in the Biden administration.

GovExec Daily
A Year of Pandemic Oversight

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 25:40


  Eleven months ago, Brian Miller was confirmed as the Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery. Since his June confirmation, his office has staffed up his office, the COVID-19 crisis has continued and a presidential transition happened after November's election.   Recently, GovExec correspondent and frequent GovExec Daily guest Courtney Bublé interviewed Miller about his time in his office and what he has learned during the 11 months he has been at the job. 

Compliance Perspectives
Stephen Shaver on CARES Act Relief Funds and Healthcare Organizations [Podcast]

Compliance Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 8:51


Post By: Adam Turteltaub While the CARES Act provided much needed funding, it wasn’t a handout for healthcare providers. There are strings attached, explains Stephen Shaver, an attorney with Wachler & Associates and author of the Chapter “Revenue Cycle: CARES Act Relief Funds” in the new HCCA Complete Healthcare Compliance Manual. There are key restrictions under the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) on how the dollars may be used: only to prevent, prepare for and respond to coronavirus. Healthcare providers also may not use any PRF payments for an expense that another funding source has already reimbursed or is required to reimburse. The risks don’t stop there, Stephen explains. Poor documentation and comingling of the funds can cause compliance issues. To mitigate the risk, he recommends having an adequate paper trail and for compliance team to coordinate their activities with accounting and finance to ensure that there are adequate internal controls in place. Healthcare providers should also take the time to read the terms and conditions. They are rather specific and contain elements that might not be expected, such as on the use of chimpanzees. Finally, he warns not to shrug off the power of enforcement authorities. There is potential liability under the False Claims Act and the US Government has vowed aggressive response to misuse of the funding. In addition to the Office of Inspector General at Health and Human Services and the US Department of Justice, Congress created a Special Inspector General for Provider Relief. Listen in to learn more, and be sure to read the Chapter “Revenue Cycle:  CARES Act Relief Funds” in the new HCCA Complete Healthcare Compliance Manual.

Events from the Brookings Institution
Women in Afghanistan and the role of US support

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2021 92:16


On February 17, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings hosted Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) John F. Sopko for a keynote address on the release of the new SIGAR report, “Support for Gender Equality: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan.” A discussion facilitated by Brookings President John R. Allen and a panel conversation with distinguished analysts and practitioners followed Mr. Sopko’s remarks. https://www.brookings.edu/events/women-in-afghanistan-and-the-role-of-us-support/ Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Government Matters
Using data for pandemic recovery, Gov mgmt challenges, Pres. Biden & Space Force – February 7, 2021

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2021 22:31


SIGPR works to ensure pandemic relief money gets to its intended recipients Brian Miller, Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery, talks about how his office is using data to ensure money from the CARES Act is going to its intended recipients Top management challenges across government agencies Allison Lerner, Chair of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, and Michael Horowitz, Inspector General for the Department of Justice, discuss how the pandemic has complicated existing management challenges across government Ensuring the success of the sixth branch of the military Kaitlyn Johnson, Deputy Director of the Aerospace Security Project at CSIS, and Eric Gomez, Director of Defense Policy Studies at the Cato Institute, comment on the announcement of the Biden administration’s support for the Space Force and discuss ensuring the branch’s success

Prison Professors With Michael Santos
153. Why Every Business Should Invest in Compliance Training

Prison Professors With Michael Santos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020 22:10


Hello to you. My name is Michael Santos and on behalf of everyone on our team, I welcome you. Our websites include PrisonProfessors.com and ComplianceMitigation.com.   We offer services to help people and businesses with risk mitigation and avoiding government investigations.   For those who have been targeted for prosecution, we create mitigation strategies. We help with sentencing and preparations for the journey ahead.   Visit us at either Prison Professors dot com or compliance mitigation dot com. Call or text 949-205-6056.   Episode: 153: Why Every Business Should Invest in Compliance Training   If we ask any group to give us their impression of successful technology companies, we’re likely to hear the following names: • Apple, • Google, • Facebook, • Amazon, and • Microsoft. Many of us would consider the above-mentioned companies as models of excellence. They’re famous for creating trillions of dollars in value, creating millions of jobs, generating billions of dollars in tax revenues, and providing enormous value to consumers. Besides being success stories, the companies share something else in common. Each of the above-mentioned companies has been the subject of a government investigation. Our team at Compliance Mitigation does not make a judgment call with regard to the reasons behind the investigation, or the usefulness that the investigation would serve. Rather, we want more entrepreneurs, business leaders, and team members to understand how government investigations can threaten businesses and careers. The more a person knows, the more equipped a person becomes to make better decisions—hopefully to avoid being brought in as a witness, a subject, or a target of a government investigation. From our perspective: • Business leaders define success by solving problems for customers, bringing value to shareholders, and creating jobs that contribute to vibrant communities. • When investigators begin their task, they define success by obstructing business operations, or complicating the lives of business leaders and the entire teams that they target. Big-government leaders do not limit their attacks to the most successful companies. Elected officials create many government agencies that investigate business operations, business leaders, and people who have decision-making power in businesses. That means even small companies—and leaders of those companies that have decision-making power—are also vulnerable to government investigations and to charges for white collar crimes. For that reason, it makes sense for business leaders to learn about government investigations. That insight can help people involved in businesses both save and make money. You might ask, “How can investing in compliance help a company or people make more money?”  • Compliance is all about transparency. It’s about documenting processes and following best-practice approaches to business. The more we train people how to follow such procedures, the more effective we become at messaging. If we communicate well, we’re more successful at showing the value proposition we offer. How does investing in compliance help a company or an individual save more money? • Investing time and energy to develop effective compliance systems is like an insurance policy. It can lead to lower business insurance costs, and it can lower the enormous risks that business owners and decision makers have to reserve for litigation expenses. Good compliance systems can also lower the risk levels to corporate fraud. Besides saving or making money, investing in ongoing compliance training represents an excellent insurance policy for the company. No company wants to become the subject of a government investigation. They are costly. In many cases, those costs exceed millions of dollars, both for the business and in many cases, for individuals. Investigations, potentially, can obliterate a business and lead to loss of liberty for some people.   Evaluation: In June 2020, the Department of Justice’s Criminal Division updated its Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs. Essentially, the government white paper offered guidelines for prosecutors to consider when they deliberated over offering leniency, non-prosecution agreements, or deferred-prosecution agreements to businesses. According to the guidance, prosecutors must question the business as follows: 1. Is the corporation’s compliance well designed? 2. Is the program being applied earnestly and in good faith? In other words, is the program adequately resourced and empowered to function effectively? 3. Does the corporation’s compliance program work in practice? If we know that prosecutors will ask those questions when assessing a business’s compliance program, then business leaders and team members should ask similar questions. By investing time, energy, and resources to understand the importance of compliance, leaders can design a best-practice approach in the design of their compliance training. Large companies may deploy resources to hire white-glove law firms that specialize in risk management. Those law firms may earn millions of dollars in fees by doing a deep dive to understand a company’s operations. They will perform risk assessments to identify potential problems, assessing the regulatory landscape, the potential clients and the business partners, as well as transactions with foreign governments, payments to foreign officials, use of third parties, political contributions, and so forth. Small to mid-size companies may not have the resources to hire such law firms. Yet if they’re doing business, their lack of resources will not make them any less vulnerable to investigations and potential prosecution. In fact, those small- to medium-sized businesses may be easier targets for government investigators. For this reason, all businesses benefit by helping team members learn more about the real-life consequences that followed for people that lost their liberty as a result of government investigations. Such training spreads awareness on the collateral consequences that follow bad decisions made during the course of business. In making people more aware, our team at Compliance Mitigation can lessen risks for individuals, and for businesses that want to show a commitment to minimizing problems with regulators. Companies that want to minimize risk levels would do well to train their team members. As we say at ComplianceMitigation.com, we did the time so you won’t have to.   Corporate Fraud: Internal corporate fraud is an ever-growing problem. Government prosecutors bring charges against thousands of people every month for white collar crimes. Those charges leave businesses vulnerable to ongoing problems, including massive legal fees, large fines, and potentially, criminal liabilities. Management leaders may not have a clear process on how to prevent fraud, or how to respond if they uncover a fraud. We offer this introductory compliance course to assist companies with the following objectives: (i) Help all team members understand the implications of a government investigation, (ii) Identify best practices within corporate operations, and encourage employee compliance, (iii) Improve messaging and corporate storytelling, (iv) Minimize risk to litigation, (v) Teach businesses how to develop a best-practice approach to respond to a government investigation, (vi) Develop a mitigation strategy in the event of a government investigation. We encourage company leaders to use the modules our team at Compliance Mitigation creates to help more people understand the costs and collateral consequences of a government investigation. Strength comes through proper preparation. Members of our team have worked with numerous entrepreneurs that didn’t know their business practices violated regulations, or how their policies could expose them to the enormous costs of litigation or a government investigation. For example, a small business that advertised debt-relief services accepted advance payments from consumers. The business owner hired scores of telemarketers that sold the service. By accepting advance payments from consumers, the business leaders and decisions makers made themselves vulnerable to government investigations. They didn’t understand the Federal Trade Commission’s prohibitions against collecting advance fees.   Nor did they understand how a government investigation could lead to: • litigation, • an asset freeze, and • forfeitures that would cripple their business. Good compliance training helps leaders make better decisions. By investing time to both learn and teach, leaders can create a culture that minimizes exposure to risks in an era of big government. Larger companies have different complications. People become complacent, expecting that they’re operating without risk to regulation or interference from government. Sadly, many rank-and-file employees get dragged into investigations. Their responses to the investigations can bring them into further problems. Our nation’s prison system confines thousands of people that once worked in large companies. Prosecutors convicted those people of white-collar crimes, even though the people professed to be doing their jobs without any knowledge that they were breaking laws. Other people began working in a company with the best of intentions. Yet something happened during the course of the person’s career. Thinking that they could get away with something, they engaged in behavior without fully understanding the consequences. For example, consider the case of David Smith, who faced charges for crimes he committed while on the job as a manager at Quest Diagnostics. David concocted a reimbursement scheme, creating systems that would lead his employer to reimburse him for fraudulent expenses that ran through a complex web of transactions. Smith created fake companies, invoices, and expense reports for payments he’d supposedly made on Quest’s behalf. An internal investigation revealed that Smith had forged his boss’s signature. The internal investigation uncovered losses totaling more than $1.2 million. Quest referred the case to the FBI. A judge sentenced Smith to five years in prison. Beside the financial loss and Smith’s criminal liability, the distraction undermined confidence in Quest Diagnostic’s management team.   Better compliance training serves companies and individuals by: • Broadening an awareness of the consequences that follow white collar crime, • Helping people think before they compromise their values, • Providing transparency into businesses processes, potentially lessening occurrences of internal corporate fraud.   Fraud Triangle: People like David, in the example above, may not set out to engage in fraudulent behavior. Educators identified a “Fraud Triangle” that, theoretically, created a perfect storm for fraud. The three corners of the triangle include: • Opportunity: A person like David Smith had to be in the position that would allow him to create the scheme. If he were not in a managerial position, he would not have been able to initiate the scam. • Pressure: David Smith’s supervisors may have considered him a competent, trustworthy employee. They may not have known pressures he felt in his personal life. • Rationalization: A person like David Smith may think that the company is so big and profitable that no one would even notice the missing funds.   Although hindsight is 20/20, we can always learn from real case studies: • What if Quest Diagnostics invested more resources in its compliance systems? • What if the training systems included lessons on the high costs of corporate fraud, both for the business and for the people that knowingly engage in white-collar crime? • David Smith may have been in a position to commit the fraud, he may have felt pressure, and he may have been able to rationalize his crime. The question remains: would better training have convinced him to act with more integrity? Consider the example of Walt Pavlo, a person who writes a popular column for Forbes online. In January 2001, a federal judge sentenced Walt Pavlo to 41 months in federal prison. The sentence followed Pavlo’s conviction for white-collar crimes that included money laundering, wire fraud, and obstruction of justice. Walt had worked hard to earn an engineering degree and an MBA. Those credentials led to a leadership position at MCI WorldCom, one of the world’s most valuable companies at the turn of the century. In his role as a finance manager, Walt described pressure he felt to report higher revenues than the company earned. The supervisors that oversaw his department wanted to boost WorldCom’s financial performance, likely with pressure from the top. When Walt saw that other leaders entered fraudulent transactions, he felt justified to create his own fraud to enrich himself. Ordinary people may not expect a multi-billion-dollar, global corporation like WorldCom to engage in fraud. Neither would they expect a family man with a professional education to exploit the fraud he discovered—then create his own scam. Members of our team have met and interacted with thousands of people that served time for white-collar crimes. Despite leading or working with companies that had compliance-training manuals, they did not get the message.   Human Stories of Noncompliance and Fraud: To make compliance a part of any corporate culture, leaders should include regular training that includes real-life stories. Those stories will help all team members appreciate the magnitude of problems that come with a government investigation. When leaders and team members grasp the severity of consequences, fewer people will participate in the type of behavior that can increase risk levels for businesses and organizations. As an added bonus, by investing in compliance training that works, businesses and individuals may qualify for leniency or mitigation in the event that investigators begin asking questions. It’s impossible to predict who might commit fraud within an organization. The vast majority of people that engage in white-collar crime do not have criminal histories. Yet as the theory of the fraud triangle suggests: • those people may be in a position to commit fraud; • they may feel pressure that induces them to participate in fraud; • they may rationalize their behavior for any number of reasons. Good training may lower risk levels for businesses and for individuals. Consider statements that our team at Compliance Mitigation found online:  According to Carnegie Mellon University’s report on Insider Fraud in Financial Services, employees working in accounting, operations, sales, upper management, customer service, purchasing, and finance commit 75% of all corporate fraud.  Employers frequently assume that people always act with integrity, even after being hired. Since businesses incentivize managers to focus on meeting targets and goals rather than detecting fraud, commitment to ongoing compliance training frequently suffers.  In a report that Intel published, Grand Theft Data, inside sources cause 42% of all company security breaches. Those security breaches can lead to government investigations and litigation, exposing businesses and individuals to enormous levels of stress.  Corporate fraud represents one of the government’s highest criminal priorities. The FBI estimates that white-collar crime costs Americans more than $300 billion annually. Those crimes run the gamut, from accounting schemes designed to deceive management, investors, auditors, and analysts about the true financial condition of a company, to cases involving fraud on the government and insurers, vendors, and clients.  Government agencies scrutinize telemarketers, brokers, crypto currency businesses, cannabis, financial services, and the healthcare field.  The FBI partners with numerous agencies to capitalize on their experience in specific areas such as securities, taxes, pensions, energy, and commodities. The Bureau has placed greater emphasis on investigating allegations of these frauds, and FBI agents frequently broaden their reach by partnering with other agencies, such as the:  Securities and Exchange Commission  Commodity Futures Trading Commission  Federal Trade Commission  Internal Revenue Service  Department of Labor  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission,  US Postal Service  Secret Service.  The Department of Homeland Security has its own independent mandate to criminally pursue fraud, financial crimes involving blackmail, contract fraud, grant fraud, money laundering, bribery, immigration fraud and program theft.   Government investigations are likely to increase as a result of COVID-19. The CARES Act, subjects companies to additional scrutiny by establishing three new oversight bodies:  (i) the Office of the Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery within the Treasury Department;  (ii) the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee, consisting of the IGs for Departments of Defense, Education, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, Justice, Labor and the Treasury, among others; and  (iii) the Congressional Oversight Commission.  In fact, dozens of cases have already been brought in connection with abuse of the Payroll Protection Program (PPP). The Value Proposition Building a compliance program will protect businesses, shareholders, communities, and individuals. On the surface, the investment may feel like a wasteful expense and hassle. Yet effective compliance programs represent an opportunity to both increase revenues and decrease risk for debilitating costs. They provide an excellent return with peace-of-mind. As an aside, they may pay for themselves in a variety of ways, including: • Eliminating fraud, waste, and theft of company assets • Creating a more inspiring corporate culture with transparency • Opening opportunities for increased efficiencies An effective program will improve internal communications and messaging with prospective customers. Good compliance metrics may also put a company in a good position for a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA), which may avoid total disruption. In these cases, the government brings an action but realizes it needs the assistance of the company itself in order to prove wrongdoing by the individuals involved. For example, federal prosecutors entered into Deferred Prosecution Agreement with Samsung Heavy Industries in 2019. The company agreed to settle matters by paying a fine and cooperating in with the government’s investigation of bribery. The DPA likely saved millions of dollars for shareholders and may have spared some people from going to prison. Maintaining compliance equips employees to do their jobs well, reach career goals, and keep customers happy. To paraphrase Warren Buffet: • It takes five years to grow a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it.   An integrated compliance program becomes a valuable corporate asset. Leverage the compliance training so that people can empower themselves to reach their highest potential. By showing everyone to act in accordance with corporate values, leaders protect the enterprise, the team members, and shareholder value.        

Detroit Regional Chamber
Restart: PPP Loan Audits: What To Expect And How To Prepare

Detroit Regional Chamber

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 63:31


Borrowers receiving PPP Loans from the SBA are subject to audit and investigation by the federal government’s Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery in the U.S. Treasury Department, which also has the authority to refer matters to the Department of Justice for a civil or criminal proceeding. The SBA and the Treasury Department also announced that all PPP loans of $2 million or more WILL be subject to an audit. In addition, there is a possibility that a private litigant may sue a borrower in the name of the federal government by bringing a qui tam proceeding under the False Claims Act and receiving a portion of any recovery.Because the stakes can be high, it is important for PPP loan borrowers to prepare for and defend themselves during such audits, investigations, and litigation. Miller Canfield’s PPP Loan Audit Team will advise PPP Loan borrowers on what to expect through this process. Speakers: Brad Arbuckle, principal, corporate and transactions, Miller CanfieldGerald Gleeson II, principal, litigation and dispute resolution, Miller CanfieldJeff LaBine, principal, co-leader corporate and transactions group, Miller CanfieldRyan Riehl, principal, tax, Miller CanfieldModerator:Rick Walawender, principal, co-leader corporate group, Miller Canfield

Freedom Train Presents: Lessons From the Screen
LftS 124: 2 Trillion Dollars!?! Pt 19 Inspector General and Congressional Oversight of HR 748 Cares Act

Freedom Train Presents: Lessons From the Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2020


Thank you for Listening Please Share ​This episode of Lessons from the Screen we are into part 19 of HR 748 which covers the Office of the Special Inspector General of Pandemic Recovery and Congressional Oversight amongst other things. 2 Trillion Dollars Pt 19.mp3File Size:38396 kbFile Type:mp3Download FileThe StimulusEconomic Stabilization Pt 2Moratorium On Evictions [...]

Fraud Eats Strategy
Fraud Has No Place to Hide (in a Down Economy)

Fraud Eats Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 27:02


In this second episode of Fraud Eats Strategy, Scott Moritz speaks to Neil Barofsky, a partner at Jenner & Block and the former Special Inspector General of the Troubled Asset Relief Program about these issues. We will explore the increased discovery of financial crimes that occur in a down cycle of the economy and how organizations can use fraud risk assessments to identify fraud, pursue avenues of recovery and strengthen their organizations against the potential negative consequences of fraud.

National Security Law Today
Inspectors General: Anti-Corruption in Afghanistan Part II with John Sopko

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2020 30:27


This episode references: SIGAR's 2019 High Risk Listhttps://www.sigar.mil/pdf/spotlight/2019_High-Risk_List.pdf Interactive High Risk Listhttps://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/high-risk-list/index.html SIGAR's April 30, 2020 Quarterly Report to Congresshttps://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2020-04-30qr.pdf Learning Lessons: Capturing and Institutionalizing Lessonsfrom Complex Stabilization Effortshttps://www.sigar.mil/pdf/lessonslearned/SIGAR-17-15-LL.pdf "Boondoggle HQ: The $25 Million Building in Afghanistan Nobody Needed" Pro Publica, May 20, 2015.https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/boondoggle Cleveland.Com "John Sopko fought the Mafia in Cleveland and now he's fighting fraud and corruption in Afghanistan", updated January 12, 2019https://www.cleveland.com/open/2013/07/he_fought_the_mafia_in_clevela.html John Sopko is the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstructionhttps://www.sigar.mil/about/leadership/leadership.aspx?SSR=1&SubSSR=2&Sub2SSR=1&WP=IG%20SIGAR

Latest News Suno
40000 Cyber Attacks attempted by China said Maharashtra Cyber Police Department

Latest News Suno

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2020 0:50


Hackers based in China attempted over 40,000 cyber attacks on India's Information Technology infrastructure and banking sector in the last five days. A top police official in Maharashtra cyber police department said on Tuesday. The spurt in online attacks from across the border was noticed after tensions rose between the two countries. In eastern Ladakh, said Yashasvi Yadav, Special Inspector General of Police of the Maharashtra's cyber police department. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/latestnewssuno/support

National Security Law Today
Inspectors General: Anti-Corruption in Afghanistan Part I with John Sopko

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2020 30:55


This episode references: The Inspector General Act of 1978, As Amended https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title5/title5a/node20&edition=prelim 2008 National Defense Authorization Act, SIGAR authorities at Section 1229 https://www.congress.gov/110/plaws/publ181/PLAW-110publ181.pdf SIGAR's 2019 High Risk List https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/spotlight/2019_High-Risk_List.pdf Interactive High Risk List https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/high-risk-list/index.html SIGAR's April 30, 2020 Quarterly Report to Congress https://www.sigar.mil/pdf/quarterlyreports/2020-04-30qr.pdf Counternarcotics: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/counternarcotics/index.html Reintegration of Ex-Combatants: Lessons from the U.S.Experience in Afghanistan https://www.sigar.mil/interactive-reports/reintegration/index.html Washington Post, "The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War", December 9, 2019 https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/investigations/afghanistan-papers/documents-database/ Cleveland.Com "John Sopko fought the Mafia in Cleveland and now he's fighting fraud and corruption in Afghanistan", updated January 12, 2019 https://www.cleveland.com/open/2013/07/he_fought_the_mafia_in_clevela.html John Sopko is the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction https://www.sigar.mil/about/leadership/leadership.aspx?SSR=1&SubSSR=2&Sub2SSR=1&WP=IG%20SIGAR

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
New coronavirus stimulus oversight chief confirmed, what next?

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2020 12:23


When Congress passed and the president signed the CARES Act, it dropped more than $1 trillion into the economy. If that was like an earthquake, now it's time for the aftershocks as oversight of that spending gets underway. The Special Inspector General for Pandemic Response Brian Miller was confirmed by the Senate last week. With some perspective on what to expect, Federal Drive with Tom Temin turned to two partners at the law firm Seward & Kissel LLP. Michael Considine is a former supervisory federal prosecutor, and Robert Kurucza is a formerly with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus news, updates, hotspots and information for 06-03-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2020 4:07


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for Wednesday June 3rd, 2020. Coronavirus task force member, Dr. Fauci, said the U.S. should have one hundred million doses of a potential COVID-19 vaccine by the end of the year. Last week, the trial began enrolling 600 candidates for Phase 2, reports Forbes. The potential vaccine, should go in to phase 3 trials in July, involving about 30,000 people between 18 and 55. Candidates will be primarily from the U.S., but some international people will be included. The potential vaccine is from Moderna, working in partnership with the U.S. government who has agreed to fund production of the vaccine whether or not it’s successful. Dr. Fauci expects 100 million doses to be ready around November/December, about the time we will know if the vaccine works. By early 2021, he believes “a couple hundred million” will be available. Brian Miller was confirmed as the new Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery. He will oversee 500 billion in recovery relief funds. Miller has been a White House lawyer since 2018, working with the General Services Administration. More than 60 passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship, filed a lawsuit against Carnival Cruise Lines. Claiming the ship wasn’t sanitized between cruises and passengers were not screened as they came on board. The University of Southern California announced they will resume in person classes in August. Sweden’s top epidemiologist, who recommended the “anti-lockdown” strategy for the country, said too many people have died and aggressive measures were clearly needed, reports The Washington Post. Austria will reopen borders with seven neighboring countries tomorrow. Germany will relax their global travel warning on the 15th. New Zealand has recorded it’s 12th day in a row of no new COVID-19 cases. The locations of hotspots and U.S and Country diagnoses in a moment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Federal Newscast
Senate bill looks to make sure Coronavirus spending watchdog can hit the ground running

Federal Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2020 6:32


In today's Federal Newscast, a bipartisan bill in the Senate would fast-track hiring staff to work for the Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery, who’s now one step away from confirmation.

Stay Tuned with Preet
CAFE Insider 4/7: The Oversight Wars

Stay Tuned with Preet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 9:39


To listen to the full episode for free, head to cafe.com/preet and sign up to receive a link. Members of the CAFE Insider can listen to this episode in the podcast player of their choice. In this special episode of CAFE Insider, “The Oversight Wars,” Preet and Anne are joined by Neil Barofsky, who served as the Special Inspector General for TARP, the chief watchdog in charge of policing the 2008 Wall Street bailout. Drawing on Neil’s experience overseeing the last massive government stimulus package, Preet and Anne break down all the latest issues and developments, including: — The challenges inherent in the oversight system outlined in the stimulus law, and the incredible amount of power in the hands of Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. — Trump’s decision to appoint Brian Miller, one of his own White House lawyers, to the position of Inspector General for Pandemic Relief, and the importance of having independent-minded, qualified lawyers in oversight roles.  — The news that Trump has fired Michael Atkinson, the Inspector General for the Intelligence Community, ostensibly as payback for his role in bringing to light the whistleblower complaint that ultimately led to the President’s impeachment.  Preet and Anne also break down the latest politically-charged legal news, including: — The disturbing new report from the DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz exposing widespread problems with the FISA warrant application process. — The legal battle over voting in Wisconsin, the Supreme Court’s last-minute decision mandating that they move forward with the election, and the implications for the upcoming November election.  To hear the full episode, head to cafe.com/preet to receive a link.

Campbell Conversations
John Sopko on the Campbell Conversations

Campbell Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2020 27:24


Even accounting for inflation, the United States has spent more on the rebuilding of Afghanistan than it spent rebuilding Western Europe after World War II. What does it have to show for it? Did fraud sabotage the effort? Did our leaders lie about how it all was going? This week, Grant Reeher speaks with John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

None of the Above
Episode 22: The Washington Game

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2020 33:24


In December 2019, The Washington Post obtained and published internal documents, now known as The Afghanistan Papers, from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). These documents revealed top political and military leaders systematically lied to the American public about the war in Afghanistan’s progress, and continued its mission despite knowing victory was unachievable. Why do both Democratic and Republican administrations continue misleading us, and what is at stake? Mark Hannah sits down with Kelley B. Vlahos this week to discuss a culture in Washington which leads to a perpetual investment in unnecessary war. They discuss the military-industrial complex, military restraint, and where conservatism fits into it all.  What is the conservative case against these wars, and how can we break the blob mentality which perpetuates America’s troubling cycle of miring itself in unnecessary wars?  Kelley B. Vlahos is a national security and foreign policy writer and columnist in Washington, DC and is the executive editor of The American Conservative magazine. @KelleyBVlahos

The New American Podcast
Over 5,000, Mostly Afghans, Killed or Wounded in Afghanistan Reconstruction

The New American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 5:23


Over 5,000 people have been killed or wounded over the course of the United States’ rebuilding of Afghanistan, according to a new report from Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) John Sopko. Read the article here!

National Security Law Today
Luncheon with the General Counsel of ODNI Live

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2020 29:34


The black letter laws and articles referenced in this episode: U.S. Treasury Department’s new CIFUS regulations after FIRRMA https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/international/the-committee-on-foreign-investment-in-the-united-states-cfius Executive Order 13549 “Classified National Security Information Programs for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities” https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-press-office/2010/08/18/executive-order-13549-classified-national-security-information-programs- SECURE Technologies Act of 2018 [PDF document] https://www.congress.gov/115/plaws/publ390/PLAW-115publ390.pdf GSA Guidance on Section 889 FAR Rule of the 2019 NDAA https://www.acquisition.gov/gsa-deviation/supply-chain-aug13 Executive Order 13873 “Executive Order on Securing the Information and Communications Technology and Services Supply Chain” https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-securing-information-communications-technology-services-supply-chain/ National Security Law Breakfast with the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction https://www.americanbar.org/events-cle/mtg/inperson/394167859/ Jason Klitenic is the General Counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence https://www.dni.gov/index.php/who-we-are/leadership/general-counsel

The New American Podcast
Inspector General Confirms Government Lies About Afghanistan

The New American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2020 4:15


Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko, in testimony before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, confirmed the Washington Post’s December report that the government has routinely lied about the progress it has made in its 18-year Afghanistan war and reconstruction efforts. “There’s an odor of mendacity throughout the Afghanistan issue ... mendacity and hubris,” Sopko testified Wednesday. “The problem is there is a disincentive, really, to tell the truth. We have created an incentive to almost require people to lie.” Read the article here!

The Castle Report
The Afghanistan Papers

The Castle Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2020 9:25


Darrell Castle talks about the series of government documents recently released to the Washington Post by court order regarding the U.S. involvement in Afghanistan. Transcription / Notes: THE AFGHANISTAN PAPERS        Hello, this is Darrell Castle with today's Castle Report. Today is Friday, January 3, 2020, the first Friday of the New Year, and the first of a new decade. I am now 6 weeks post surgery to repair a severed tendon in my left knee and I am happy to report that I am making great progress toward being able to walk again. This week I began physical therapy and I can now bear some weight on my leg so thanks for bearing with me and thanks for the prayers and well wishes. Since this is the beginning of the New Year, a year in review episode would be appropriate.  What was the biggest story of the year? My vote would go to the never ending impeachment investigation against President Trump, but there are the presidential election campaigns of all the Democrats; the Constitution becoming ever more irrelevant because it is voluntary and not self-enforcing so goodbye Constitution. I could also talk about rising debt at every level of government and the public, and the inevitable debt crises, but instead I have decided to revisit the Middle East, specifically Afghanistan. Where do we stand in Afghanistan after 18 years of fighting, dying and killing? A New Year is a good time to ask that question. Washington invaded Afghanistan 18 years ago and as a result has suffered more than 2400 dead Americans, more than 20,000 wounded Americans along with more than 110,000 Afghan dead and the expenditure of more than 1 trillion dollars. We don't have to wonder what it was all about anymore because a report in the Washington Post published December 9, 2019 tells us. The report consists of about 2000 pages of material that a court ordered the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction to release to the Post. The Report paints a Robert McNamara type picture of America's entry into and occupation of Afghanistan. McNamara, who was Secretary of Defense, and therefore responsible for the conduct of much of the Vietnam War, in a televised interview after the war said it was all a mistake that we shouldn't have made. He said we, and by that he meant he and president Johnson, who created the lies and deception to justify what they had already decided to do..  The Afghanistan Papers, as the Post calls the Report, I suppose to remind us of the Pentagon Papers of Daniel Ellsberg fame, paints a devastating picture of the lying fraud that made up U.S. war policy and continues to do so to this day. The report consists of interviews and recorded conversations of those who began the war, as well as the generals and bureaucrats who conducted it. It cuts across the Bush and Obama Administrations and points out that the Trump Administration is continuing down the same path. The documents contradict a long chorus of public statements telling us that victory was just around the corner and all the while their private comments reveal that it was all just a pack of lies. They knew and admitted they knew that the war was unwinnable from the start and that nothing of any value could be accomplished there. The “good war” in Afghanistan ,as President Obama called it, only required winning the hearts and minds of the Afghan people. The Report reveals three administrations at the presidential level, all acting in collaboration with military officers and civilian bureaucrats who lied deliberately, repeatedly, and systematically to the public and especially to the media about the actual conditions in Afghanistan. Thousands of documents reveal how despite knowing that the struggle was pointless and unwinnable, additional troops were continually added or “surged” into the struggle. These same officials regularly overstated the success the U.S. had in winning hearts and minds. They simply made up or invented much of the news coming from the w...

Unsafe Space
[Episode 292] Daily #Covfefe: Pay No Attention To Afghanistan

Unsafe Space

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2019 43:53


December 19, 2019 Watch us on BitChute instead: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/unsafespace Carter discusses the Washington Posts's investigation and Freedom of Information request regarding the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction's (SIGAR) Lessons Learned report. Here's a link to the series of articles he discussed: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/investigations/afghanistan-papers/documents-database/ YouTube link to video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/F9YGxHA-j3Q

AmerikanskaNyhetsanalyser
Av980: USA-uppdatering med Björn Norström, 10 december 2019

AmerikanskaNyhetsanalyser

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2019 21:47


Ronie Berggren och Björn Norström uppdaterar den 10 december 2019 om det senaste i den amerikanska politiken: Riksrättsprocessen; Department of Justices Inspector Generas rapport om The Steele Dossier; Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) om det förslösade biståndet till Afghanistan. ------- STÖD AMERIKANSKA NYHETSANALYSER: http://usapol.blogspot.com/p/stod-oss-support-us.html

Defense and Security - Audio
Divided Responsibility: The U.S. Approach to Security Sector Assistance in Afghanistan

Defense and Security - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2019 92:53


Please join the CSIS International Security Program for a conversation with John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). Inspector General Sopko will discuss findings from the SIGAR's latest report on U.S. security sector assistance efforts in Afghanistan, his first public remarks on the report since its publication in June 2019. This event is made possible by general support to CSIS.

Congressional Dish
CD184: Midterm Election

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2018 171:09


Divided government! The 2018 midterm elections are over and we know what the 116th Congress is going to look like: The Republican Party will continue to control the Senate and the Democratic Party will control the House of Representatives. In this episode, we discuss the likely ramifications of a divided Congress, some of the interesting results of individual Congressional races, and the opportunities available for Republicans to get their last wishes rammed into law before their complete Congressional control ends in January. Please Support Congressional Dish - Quick Links Click here to contribute a lump sum or set up a monthly contribution via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Use your bank’s online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North Number 4576 Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Episodes CD179: Hearing: Who's Tracking the Immigrant Kids? CD166: I Spy a Shutdown CD149: Fossil Fuel Foxes CD143: Trump's Law Enforcers CD089: Secrets of the CRomnibus (2015 Budget) CD087: Run for Congress with Chris Clemmons Additional Reading Article: Trump's appointment of the acting Attorney General is unconstitutional by Neal K. Katyal and George T. Conway III, The New York Times, November 8, 2018. Article: DoD is sending 7,000 troops to the border. Here's every unit going. by Tara Copp, Military Times, November 8, 2018. Article: It's not over: Days after election, these races are still undecided by Brian Naylor, NPR, November 8, 2018. Article: Rep. Duncan Hunter keeps seat despite charges by Julie Watson, WBTV, November 8, 2018. Article: Trump warns Dems over potential investigations: 'Two can play that game!' by Brett Samuels, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: Top Dems quickly announce leadership intentions by Mike Lillis, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: Nevada voters approve automatic voter registration by Aris Folley, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: Connecticut elects first black congresswoman by Jessie Hellmann, The Hill, November 11, 2018. Article: Jeff Sessions pushed out after a year of attacks from Trump by Erick Tucker and Michael Balsamo, AP News, November 7, 2018. Article: Ayanna Pressley officially Massachusetts' 1st black congresswoman by William J. Kole, Boston Globe, November 7, 2018. Article: Don Young holds on to House seat in Alaska by Miranda Green, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter wins reelection despite criminal charges by Juliegrace Brufke, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: Florida U.S. Senate race between Rick Scott, Bill Nelson could be heading for recount by Mark Skoneki, Steven Lemongello, and Gray Rohrer, The Orlando Sentinel, November 7, 2018. Article: Democrat Colin Allred grabs Dallas-area U.S. House seat from GOP's Pete Sessions by Gromer Jeffers Jr., Dallas News, November 7, 2018. Article: The investigations Trump will face now that Democrats control the House by Adam Davidson, The New Yorker, November 7, 2018. Article: With midterms over, lame-duck congress now turns to avoiding a shutdown by Eric Katz, Government Executive, November 7, 2018. Article: Next chairman of Ways and Means Committee plans to demand Trump's tax return by Justin Wise, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: The private business of for-profit prisons in the US by AYŞE NUR DOK, TRT World, November 7, 2018. Article: Newly empowered, House Democrats plan to launch immediate investigations of Trump, but leaders are wary of impeachment by Karoun Demirjian, Tom Hamburger, and Gabriel Pogrund, The Washington Post, November 7, 2018. Article: Top Judiciary Dem: Trump is about to 'learn he's not above the law' by Aris Folley, The Hill, November 7, 2018. Article: GOP Rep. Chris Collins, charged with insider trading, is projected to win re-election in New York by Dan Mangan, CNBC, November 7, 2018. Article: Former NFL players Anthony Gonzalez, Colin Allred elected to Congress by Curtis Crabtree, NBC Sports, November 6, 2018. Article: Cramer ousts Heitkamp in critical North Dakota Senate race by Max Greenwood, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Blackburn keeps Tennessee seat in GOP hands by Alexander Bolton, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Dem Lauren Underwood unseats Randy Hultgren in Illinois by Brett Samuels, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Hawley defeats McCaskill in tight Missouri Senate race by Jordain Carney, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Pence's brother wins Indiana House race by Megan Keller, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: GOP Rep. Chris Collins wins reelection in NY despite insider trading charges by Michael Burke, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Dem Colin Allredy topples Sessions in key Texas House seat by Lisa Hagen, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Graham lauds GOP Senate Results: 'Conservative judicial train is going to keep running!' by Megan Keller, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Coffman loses GOP seat in Colorado by Mike Lillis, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Mitt Romney wins Senate race in Utah by Alexander Bolton, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Rashida Tlaib becomes first Palestinian-American woman to win congressional seat by Emily Birnbaum, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Haaland becomes one of first Native American women elected to Congress by Morgan Gstalter, The Hill, November 6, 2018. Article: Sharice Davids makes history: Kansas' 1st gay rep, 1st Native American woman in Congress by Bryan Lowry and Katy Bergen, The Kansas City Star, November 6, 2018. Article: Ryan Zinke and the murky interior of Trumpworld by Timothy L. O'Brien, Bloomberg, November 1, 2018. Article: Sources: Justice Department investigating Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke by Pamela Brown, Evan Perez, Lauren Fox, and Gregory Wallace, CNN Politics, October 31, 2018. Article: Probe of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke sent to U.S. prosecutors by Ari Natter and Jennifer A. Dlouhy, Bloomberg, October 30, 2018. Article: Lieu vows aggressive investigations of Trump if Dems retake House by Julia Manchester, The Hill, October 29, 2018. Blog: Budget reconciliation is the key to building the border wall by Rep. Bradley Byrne, The Hill, October 17, 2018. Article: $35M private immigration detention center proposted for Ionia by Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press, October 16, 2018. Article: House will investigate Trump's attacks on democracy if Dems win, Cummings says by Julia Manchester, The Hill, October 1, 2018. Article: Ryan Zinke to the oil and gas industry: "Our government should work for you" by Umair Irfan, Vox, September 22, 2018. Article: Rep. Duncan Hunter and his wife indicted in use of campaign funds for personal expenses by Laura Jarrett and Maeve Reston, CNN Politics, August 21, 2018. Article: Why Rep. Chris Collins's insider trading arrest is a huge deal - and also totally unsurprising by Tara Golshan, Vox, August 9, 2018. Article: 2 Texas congressman bought shares in drug firm at heart of Rep. Chris Collins' insider trading case by Rachel Cohrs, Dallas News, August 9, 2018. Article: This company is at the center of insider trading charges against Rep. Collins by Katherine Ross, The Street, August 9, 2018. Article: Rep. Chris Collins charged with insider trading, federal prosecutors announce by Renae Merle and Mike DeBonis, The Washington Post, August 8, 2018. Article: Indicted Rep. Chris Collins shows why members of Congress should not trade stocks by Josh Barro, Business Insider, August 8, 2018. Article: Scandals pile up for interior chief Ryan Zinke by Chris D'Angelo, Huffpost, July 23, 2018. Article: Interior watchdog opens probe of land deal linking Zinke, Halliburton chairman by Ben Lefebvre, Politico, July 18, 2018. Article: Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's conduct attracts unprecedented scrutiny from government investigators by Greg Zimmerman, Medium, June 5, 2018. Article: A timeline of scandals and ethical shortfalls at Ryan Zinke's Interior Department by Evlondo Cooper and Ted MacDonald, Media Matters for America, May 7, 2018. Article: Profiting from enforcement: The role of private prisons in U.S. immigration detention by Livia Luan, Migration Policy Institute, May 2, 2018. Article: Liberal watchdog group sues Trump, alleging he violated constitutional ban by David A. Fahrenthold and Jonathan O'Connell, The Washington Post, January 23, 2017. Article: GOP congressman, overwhelmed by constituents concerned about ACA repeal, sneaks out of event early by Mark Joseph Stern, Slate, January 15, 2017. Article: Congressman defends 'Citibank' provision in spending bill by Jim Acosta, CNN Politics, December 16, 2014. Article: Wall Street's omnibus triumph, and others by Russ Choma, Open Secrets News, December 12, 2014. Article: Why Citi may soon regret its big victory on Capitol Hill by Rob Blackwell, American Banker, December 11, 2014. Article: How Wall St. got its way by Dave Clarke, Kate Davidson, and Jon Prior, Politico, December 11, 2014. Resources ACLU Talking Points: 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Bill Overview: H.R. 992 (113th): Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act Live News: CNN Election Night in the US Company Announcement: BAKKEN Binding Expansion Open Season, Energy Transfer Letter: Resignation Letter of Jeff Sessions OpenSecrets: Rep. Kevin Cramer - North Dakota District 1 OpenSecrets: Rep. Kevin Yoder, Kansas District 03 Wikipedia: Chris Collins (American Politician) Visual Resources Sound Clip Sources Interview: Schiff responds to threat from President Trump, CNN Politics, November 8, 2018. News Conference: Minority Leader Pelosi on 2018 Election Results, C-SPAN, November 7, 2018. 19:30 Representative Nancy Pelosi: In any event, next week we look forward to welcoming our new class of freshmen. We will celebrate their diversity, the freshness of their thinking, and the rest. And they will immediately be incorporated into our building consensus and how we go forward in a very open, transparent, bipartisan, unifying Congress. Any questions? 21:10 Representative Nancy Pelosi: In appropriations and in many of the other committee—all of the other committees—we have a responsibility for oversight. And, hopefully, in the course of asking for information, we can just make the request and the information will come in. We’re concerned about what’s happening at EPA, for example, to degrading the air we breathe and the water we drink despite what the president said today. So, that’s only one example. 27:30 Unknown Speaker: Follow up on what the president said this morning. He made clear that if Democrats launch investigations, that any hopes for bipartisanship is off. Do you have any concerns that these investigations could jeopardize your opportunities to legislate? Representative Nancy Pelosi: We do not intend to abandon or relinquish our responsibility as Article I, the first branch of government, and our responsibilities for accountability, for oversight, and the rest. This doesn’t mean we go looking for a fight, but it means that if we see a need to go forward, we will. But that will be the work of our committees. Every committee has oversight responsibility. Congresswoman Eshoo’s on Energy and Commerce, and that’s a big oversight committee, as some of you probably are aware. But, specifically, to some of the concerns that the president may have, the Judiciary Committee, the Intelligence Committee, the Oversight Committee, the—well, there’re a number of committees that—depending on how we go down that path—the Financial Services committee, did I say Intelligence? Oh, Homeland Security Committee, because, of course, we are shamed as a nation by a policy that takes babies out of the arms of their mothers, that builds tents, and all the rest to house people, and there’s separation of families. So we want to look into that, and we would hope that we can do so by simply having oversight. If, in fact, requires a subpoena—I hope not, but—so be it. News Conference: President Trump on 2018 Election Results, C-SPAN, November 7, 2018. 23:00 President Donald Trump: Their whole agenda has been to try not giving me anything for the wall. I really believe politically they’re hurting themselves. I actually think politically that’s a good thing for me, but I want to get the wall up because we need to— Unknown Speaker: So no shut-down scenario— President Trump: I don’t know. I can’t tell you that. Unknown Speaker: —for the, for the mid, for the lame duck. President Trump: No, I can’t commit to that, but it’s possible. News Conference: Democrat Richard Neal says he plans to seek Trump tax returns, APNews, YouTube, November 7, 2018. Hearing: Unaccompanied Immigrant Children, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, C-SPAN, August 16, 2018. 1:14:30 Senator Claire McCaskill: This is about the fourth or fifth time I’ve been on this dais, and no one seems to be worried about the fact that you all get to wash your hands of these children. You want to talk about catch and release? You’re catching these children and then you’re releasing them and everyone goes like this. Not my problem. I think the thing that really stuck out to me in the report that the committee issued was the finding—and this was finding number 14—HHS has a plan to notify state governments before placing unaccompanied children previously held in secure facilities, but HHS has failed to implement that plan. HHS explained it cannot implement the plan because it cannot determine who to notify in state government. Well, let me just tell you, Commander, I will make an offer to you today: I think my staff can get you a list of agencies and phone numbers before close of business tomorrow. Would that be helpful? Commander Jonathan White: I’ll be glad to convey that, but I think it does address—I think there are very real questions, but— Sen. McCaskill: No, they’re not. White: —widely appro— Sen. McCaskill: No. They’re not. Every state has a child-welfare agency. In Missouri, it’s the Missouri Department of Social Services, the Children’s Division, and they’re responsible for foster care, for child placement, for monitoring child detention centers, they are responsible for the welfare of children who have been separated from their families. And they have contacts in every corner of my state. There’s a hotline that they administer. There is all kinds of ways that they can communicate with school systems, with local governments, with all the people that are working as foster parents. There is a huge network in every single state, because you know what the states do? They take the responsibility for having children in their care seriously. 1:54:30 Senator Heidi Heitkamp: One facility provider basically, if my rough math is right, 11,000 children have been assigned to Southwest Key over a number of facilities, not one facility, but they’re obviously a large provider. The reports coming out of Dallas say that they basically, in a half-year period, have a contract that’s worth a half a billion dollars that they’re being paid, which, if you do the rough math, that’s about $45,000 per child. I think that we should have some pretty high expectations at $45,000 per child. So I would love a list of all the contractors that you currently have, the number of complaints, and the severity of the complaints, in each one of those cases, what disciplinary action has been, and how you’re cooperating consistently with state authorities, who usually are the licensing authorities, and I understand that. Audio Recording: Nunes on secret tape: Kavanaugh vote, then Rosenstein impeachment, MSNBC, July 30, 2018. Hearing: Wartime Contracting, Senate Homeland Security Subcommittee, C-SPAN, July 16,2013. 3:30 Senator Claire McCaskill: I learned just this week that the Defense Department spent millions to construct a building in Afghanistan that has never been used. This facility was built despite the fact that the forward commander said they neither needed nor wanted this facility, in May 2010, almost a full year before construction began. We now have a brand-new state-of-the-art building that cost the taxpayers 34 million to build. The worst part is that all indications are, we’re going to tear it down. We can’t even give it away to the Afghanistan government for free because they don’t want a building that they will have to spend millions to rewire because it was built to U.S. electrical code. I also recently learned that more than 13 million may have been wasted on a USAID agricultural development contract with a company called Chemonics. The waste alone is bad enough, but the Special Inspector General also found that the contractor failed to cooperate with the audit. Frankly, that’s just unacceptable. Hearing: Wartime Contracting, Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, C-SPAN, September 21, 2011. 46:30 Senator Claire McCaskill: I want to talk about something that I mentioned—and you mentioned in your report, but I think it’s something we need to flesh out for this committee—and that’s contractors being subject to the jurisdiction of the United States of America. Heartbreaking incident in Iraq, that I'm sure you all are aware of, where the negligence of one of our contractors killed one of our soldiers. And in trying to find justice for that family, the contractor avoided the jurisdiction of the United States, and the most insulting thing about it was he then got another—that company then got another contract with our government. After they had used the fact that they were not subject to the jurisdiction of our country as a way to avoid justice for this man’s family, we then decided we should sign up again with them. Community Suggestions Super Typhoon Yutu Relief Campaign See more Community Suggestions HERE. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)  

new york america children npr julie watson colorado democrats gop republicans utah congress new york times ny kansas house energy illinois texas brett kavanaugh donald trump medium alaska iraq democratic party united states vox tennessee commander massachusetts native americans afghanistan missouri boston globe capitol hill washington post senate congressional c span donations dave clarke new yorker frankly slate sen divided heartbreaking senate committee commerce investigations nbc sports bloomberg cummings o'brien orlando sentinel halliburton republican party cnbc business insider dems hwy politico aca msnbc music alley epa social services tom hamburger chris collins wbtv huffpost detroit free press financial services attorney general ryan zinke homeland security rosenstein kansas city star midterm elections lauren fox usaid zinke texas house brian naylor palestinian american hhs migration policy institute ionia katherine ross bill nelson cnn politics dan mangan heitkamp american banker governmental affairs means committee ap news jim acosta adam davidson justin wise mccaskill house democrats kevin yoder missouri department special inspector general defense department senate homeland security michael burke intelligence committee congressional dish duncan hunter media matters fahrenthold renae merle military times oversight committee rick scott election results judiciary committee jonathan o'connell trump no mike debonis indiana house curtis crabtree mark joseph stern dallas news interior secretary ryan zinke unknown speaker trumpworld miranda green katyal josh barro bradley byrne anthony gonzalez southwest key ben lefebvre article trump george t cover art design pamela brown kate davidson government executive karoun demirjian david ippolito cromnibus missouri senate bryan lowry laura jarrett tara golshan umair irfan rob blackwell william j trt world mike lillis jordain carney alexander bolton colin allred homeland security committee crestview
Loud & Clear
Trump Promises 15,000 Troops to U.S.-Mexican Border

Loud & Clear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2018 115:08


On today's episode of Loud & Clear, Brian Becker and John Kiriakou are joined by Juan José Gutiérrez, the executive director of the Full Rights for Immigrants Coalition, and Isabel Garcia, co-founder of Coalición de Derechos Humanos.With less than a week left before the midterm election, Donald Trump has announced that he would be sending up to 15,000 soldiers to the U.S.-Mexico border. Meanwhile Republicans released an overtly racist campaign ad yesterday showing an undocumented migrant who was convicted of killing two policemen saying with a smile that he would soon escape and kill more people and then blaming Democrats for the deaths. Thursday’s weekly series “Criminal Injustice” is about the most egregious conduct of our courts and prosecutors and how justice is denied to so many people in this country. Paul Wright, the founder and executive director of the Human Rights Defense Center and editor of Prison Legal News (PLN), and Kevin Gosztola, a writer for Shadowproof.com and co-host of the podcast Unauthorized Disclosure, join the show. More than 1,000 Google employees and contractors briefly walked off the job yesterday in Europe and Asia amid complaints of racism, sexism, and abuse of executive authority in the workplace. More walkouts are scheduled today. Google’s chief executive said in a statement that the company will carefully weigh its employees demands and respond appropriately. Brian and John speak with Patricia Gorky, an activist and a tech worker in San Francisco. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or SIGAR, issued a report yesterday showing that the Afghan government controls less territory than it has at any time since the US invasion. SIGAR said that the government of Ashraf Ghani controls only 55.5 percent of Afghanistan after 17 years of US military aid and support. Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Non-Violence, joins the show. Human Rights Watch, the US-based human rights organization, released a study yesterday based on interviews with more than 100 North Korean defectors now in South Korea, saying that North Korean government officials routinely commit sexual violence against women with impunity. The allegation is shocking, but critics say this is just another smear job to derail steps towards peace in Korea. Dr. Christine Hong, Associate Professor of Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at UC Santa Cruz and a member of the Korea Policy Institute, joins Brian and John. The Bank of England this morning warned of an economic catastrophe if the UK leaves the European Union without a Brexit deal. Bank governor Mark Carney said that absent an agreement, the UK should expect gridlock in its ports and airports, inflation, and a collapse in the value of the pound. This comes as police open a criminal probe into pro-Brexit campaign donor Arron Banks, who has been the target of conspiracy theories relating to his business interest in Russia. Steve Hedley, senior assistant general secretary of the the UK’s Rail, Maritime, and Transport Workers Union, joins the show.Rep. Steve King, a Republican of Iowa, is one of the most conservative and anti-immigrant members of the House of Representatives. He calls himself a nationalist. Many of his detractors call him a bigot, a racist, and a white nationalist. King made a controversial tweet a few days ago and instantly moved his safe Republican seat to a toss-up. Is there a limit to xenophobia, even for conservative Republicans?

District Sentinel Radio
Episode 4/5/18: Investment Advice, From The Fake Account Guys

District Sentinel Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2018 23:47


-Report: Sales quotas also impacted Wells Fargo wealth management unit under investigation -EPA aide resigns after news of sketchy bonus, with Scott Pruitt in hot water -Still no word from Jerry Brown whether California will oppose the Trump National Guard border decree -Special Inspector General flags power system project “putting Afghan lives and property at risk” -Notorious white nationalist troll outed as Preppie New England Wall Street asshole, Douglass Mackey Broadcasted from Washington, DC Music courtesy of Adam Fligsten (adamfligsten.com/) Contribute to our Patreon: www.patreon.com/DistrictSentinel/ www.districtsentinel.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/DistrictSentinel/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/TheDCSentinel

Iraq Matters
#34: Corruption and Reconstruction – Lessons Learned

Iraq Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2018 23:00


On this edition of Iraq Matters, Stuart Bowen examines the lessons learned during his ten years as Special Inspector-General for Iraq Reconstruction and how those lessons should be applied to the next phase in Iraq's post-ISIS recovery.

CNAS Podcasts
Women in National Security: Kate Bateman

CNAS Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2017 11:09


Kate Bateman is a Visiting Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, and a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow.  Bateman was the lead author on a report for the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, identifying lessons learned from the U.S. experience with corruption in Afghanistan.  Bateman has served in policy and intelligence positions at the State Department in Washington, and at embassies in Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.  She also worked in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, and was a Boren Fellow in India studying Sunni-Shia relations.

Carnegie Endowment Events
John F. Sopko on Countering Corruption in Afghanistan

Carnegie Endowment Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2016 81:23


Corruption hardly topped the threat list when U.S. military forces and civilians first entered Afghanistan in 2001. But recognition of its devastating potential to undermine U.S. national security objectives is far higher today. Despite a myriad of U.S. efforts, however, corruption remains deeply entrenched in Afghanistan. It undermines the government’s legitimacy, enables an emboldened insurgency, and puts at risk the gains from U.S. taxpayers’ nearly $115 billion investment in reconstruction. The Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) has publicly reported on corruption in Afghanistan since 2008. Now SIGAR is releasing its first lessons learned report, on U.S. efforts to address the Afghan corruption problem: Corruption in Conflict: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan. John F. Sopko explored the U.S. experience fighting corruption in Afghanistan and its broader implications, and detailed recommendations to Congress and policy makers to improve such efforts in current and future contingency operations.

Unanimous Dissent
Now That the FBI has Been Infiltrated, Let’s Abolish it!

Unanimous Dissent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2016 51:55


After FBI Director James Comey updated Congress on the Clinton email investigation last week, Democrats are accusing the G-Man of breaking the law. They were singing his praises just two months ago, when he exonerated their nominee.Also, America’s overseas military adventures might not be getting the attention they deserve this election cycle. Fortunately, our man the Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction never sleeps. News from SIGAR later in the show.And the DCist’s Rachel Kurzius stops by to talk beer and presidential politics. One lager maker is facing a backlash after jumping aboard the Trump train.Finally….God Created Adam and Eve…He did not create Atoms to Cleve. We bring you an update on the decline of the Nuclear Power Industry later in the show.

Unanimous Dissent
Now That the FBI has Been Infiltrated, Let’s Abolish it!

Unanimous Dissent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2016 51:55


After FBI Director James Comey updated Congress on the Clinton email investigation last week, Democrats are accusing the G-Man of breaking the law. They were singing his praises just two months ago, when he exonerated their nominee.Also, America’s overseas military adventures might not be getting the attention they deserve this election cycle. Fortunately, our man the Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction never sleeps. News from SIGAR later in the show.And the DCist’s Rachel Kurzius stops by to talk beer and presidential politics. One lager maker is facing a backlash after jumping aboard the Trump train.Finally….God Created Adam and Eve…He did not create Atoms to Cleve. We bring you an update on the decline of the Nuclear Power Industry later in the show.

EconTalk
Barofsky on Bailouts

EconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2012 62:50


Neil Barofsky, author of Bailout and the former Special Inspector General for the TARP program, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book and the government bailouts by the Bush and Obama Administrations. Barofsky recounts what he learned about how Washington works and the incentives facing politicians and bureaucrats. His book and this interview are a workshop in public choice economics. Along the way he unravels some of the acronyms of the last few years including TARP, TALF, and HAMP. The conversation concludes with lessons learned by Barofsky and what might be done in the future to prevent the corruption and ineffectiveness of past bailouts.

EconTalk Archives, 2012
Barofsky on Bailouts

EconTalk Archives, 2012

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2012 62:50


Neil Barofsky, author of Bailout and the former Special Inspector General for the TARP program, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book and the government bailouts by the Bush and Obama Administrations. Barofsky recounts what he learned about how Washington works and the incentives facing politicians and bureaucrats. His book and this interview are a workshop in public choice economics. Along the way he unravels some of the acronyms of the last few years including TARP, TALF, and HAMP. The conversation concludes with lessons learned by Barofsky and what might be done in the future to prevent the corruption and ineffectiveness of past bailouts.

EconTalk at GMU
Barofsky on Bailouts

EconTalk at GMU

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2012 62:50


Neil Barofsky, author of Bailout and the former Special Inspector General for the TARP program, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book and the government bailouts by the Bush and Obama Administrations. Barofsky recounts what he learned about how Washington works and the incentives facing politicians and bureaucrats. His book and this interview are a workshop in public choice economics. Along the way he unravels some of the acronyms of the last few years including TARP, TALF, and HAMP. The conversation concludes with lessons learned by Barofsky and what might be done in the future to prevent the corruption and ineffectiveness of past bailouts.