Podcasts about National Theatre

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Latest podcast episodes about National Theatre

The Wrong Cat Died
Ep100 - Celebrating 100 Episodes, On Location with the 2023 US National Tour of CATS

The Wrong Cat Died

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 82:29


HAPPY 100 EPISODES!!! When The Wrong Cat Died started as a 10 episode mini series, we never expected to reach 100 episodes but here we are! After talking with various cast members from over 15 different official productions of CATS all over the world, it was time to step things up. We reached out to the US National Tour of CATS to join the party. In this special 100th episode, Mike joins the cast before a show in Washington DC to discuss the plot, character backstories, and give theories for the actors to try on stage that evening. After watching the performance, Mike came back to hear from the actors and find out if the theories worked. Watch the video and listen to this episode to hear from the amazing cast of CATS. A special thanks to Troika, the National Theatre in DC, and Bond Theatrical for helping coordinate this amazing production. Also, a big thank you to José Raúl Mangual, Ibn Snell, Luke Bernier, Brian Craig Nelson, Taryn Smithson, Yuka Notsuka, Ellie Chancellor, John Zamborsky, Megan Arseneau, Erica Cianciulli, Michelle E. Carter, and Tayler Harris who are the amazing cast members involved in the video. Check out the video : bpn.fm/twcd100 Check out the US National Tour of CATS: ustour.catsthemusical.com Produced by: Alan Seales & Broadway Podcast Network Instagram & Twitter: @TheWrongCatDied Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Past Imperfect
David Harewood

Past Imperfect

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 61:29


David Harewood (MBE, OBE) is an actor who attained international stardom with TV roles in Homeland and The Night Manager. He was the first black actor to play Othello at the National Theatre in London, and has delivered acclaimed performances as Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. His latest role is a white Conservative commentator William F Buckley pitched against the liberal Gore Vidal in the hit play Best of Enemies which has received rave reviews in the West End.But David's early life was marred by racist attacks, and mental illness, culminating in him experiencing a psychotic breakdown. Despite being awarded both an MBE and an OBE he still sees himself as an outsider. “There's a sense of displacement, “he says, “That's been constant throughout my life.” WARNING: contains some strong language and discussion of sensitive topics including: racist attacks, homophobia, drug and alcohol misuse, mental illness, suicide. Links for additional support (also on Past Imperfect podcast pages) Anti-racismhttps://www.stophateuk.org/about-hate-crime/racism-in-the-ukAlcoholism and Addictionhttps://www.drinkaware.co.uk/advice/alcohol-support-serviceshttps://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk Mental health and suicide awarenesshttps://www.mind.org.uk/ The Samaritans Tel: 116 123www.samaritans.org.uk Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Built For The Stage Podcast
#187 - Maya Britto - HAMILTON West End

Built For The Stage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 32:43


Maya Britto / @mayabritto_ is a standby for all three of the Schuyler sisters in the West End production of HAMILTON. Theatre: The Magician's Elephant (RSC); Tokyo Rose (UK Tour/Edinburgh Fringe Festival/NDI); Beyond the Circle (workshop, National Theatre); Becoming Angela (workshop, National Theatre); Arabian Nights (Hoxton Hall). Hamilton marks Maya's West End debut. TV: "British Airways 100"; "Someone You Thought You Knew" (season 2). Recording: Tokyo Rose Original Cast Album (Burnt Lemon Theatre); Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles (Alfonso Casado/Arturo Cardelús). How did you get into acting, was there a particular performance you saw that resonated with you? I remember going to the theatre for the first time to see THE LION KING when I was about 10, and couldn't believe how fun it all looked to be a part of. It seemed so unreachable to be where they were, but still I never forgot that feeling. It wasn't until I was 16 doing a school production of West Side Story in Nepal did it occur to me that singing, acting and dancing is as fun as it looks and is actually something I could pursue as a career. From thebespokeblackbook.com/interview-with-maya-britto/ by Emily Healey-Lynham https://builtforthestage.com/ - fill out the form and ask about our next fitness challenge! www.broadwaypodcastnetwork.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Built For The Stage Podcast
#187 - Maya Britto - HAMILTON West End

Built For The Stage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 32:43


Maya Britto / @mayabritto_ is a standby for all three of the Schuyler sisters in the West End production of HAMILTON. Theatre: The Magician's Elephant (RSC); Tokyo Rose (UK Tour/Edinburgh Fringe Festival/NDI); Beyond the Circle (workshop, National Theatre); Becoming Angela (workshop, National Theatre); Arabian Nights (Hoxton Hall). Hamilton marks Maya's West End debut. TV: "British Airways 100"; "Someone You Thought You Knew" (season 2). Recording: Tokyo Rose Original Cast Album (Burnt Lemon Theatre); Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles (Alfonso Casado/Arturo Cardelús). How did you get into acting, was there a particular performance you saw that resonated with you? I remember going to the theatre for the first time to see THE LION KING when I was about 10, and couldn't believe how fun it all looked to be a part of. It seemed so unreachable to be where they were, but still I never forgot that feeling. It wasn't until I was 16 doing a school production of West Side Story in Nepal did it occur to me that singing, acting and dancing is as fun as it looks and is actually something I could pursue as a career. From thebespokeblackbook.com/interview-with-maya-britto/ by Emily Healey-Lynham https://builtforthestage.com/ - fill out the form and ask about our next fitness challenge! www.broadwaypodcastnetwork.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Live at the Lortel: An Off-Broadway Podcast

Shuler Hensley is a multi-award winning star of film, television, who is currently starring on Broadway in the hit musical, The Music Man. Beginning his career in the Theatre, Shuler was cast by Susan Stroman and Trevor Nunn as Jud Fry in London in the National Theatre's revival of Oklahoma!. Shuler wowed critics and theatre-goers alike for his haunting interpretation of Jud, and he received the coveted Olivier Award–London theatre's equivalent of the Tony–for Best Supporting Performance in a Musical. Shuler subsequently made his Broadway debut in November 2000 portraying the relentless Inspector Javert in Les Misérables. In February 2002, the Trevor Nunn version of Oklahoma! was transferred to Broadway, and with it the opportunity for Shuler to reprise his critically acclaimed performance of Jud Fry. Shuler again became a proud award winner, this time of Broadway's “Triple Crown”--the Tony, the Drama Desk, and the Outer Critics' Circle.

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
Leader Weekends: Theatre Review (Othello & Best of Enemies)

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 13:59


Giles Terera in Othello at the National Theatre leads a cast giving landmark performances. Plus, why Best of Enemies at the Noël Coward Theatre had the rare ingredients for five stars.The Evening Standard's chief theatre critic Nick Curtis is joined by culture editor Nancy Durrant to discuss this week's extraordinary treats.Get ready for the 66th Evening Standard Theatre Awards, which returns after a two-year hiatus as the capital begins its Covid recovery. An exciting roster of winners will be announced on Sunday.Part 1: Othello at the National TheatreClint Dyer's production of Othello is the first major version of the play by a black director at the National Theatre.Hamilton star Giles Terera is an “extraordinary actor” who shows the “humanity” of Shakespeare's Moor.Why it's a difficult, moving and complex play to watch but you'll be glad to have seen it.“Particularly stark and harsh” with a “singular focus on Othello's race”, compared to recent productions.Rosy McEwen's stellar, strong performance as Desdemona displays an “intelligent woman who knows what she wants” and Paul Hilton presents an “almost carnivalesque” interpretation of Iago.“Pretty damn close to perfect” but listen to the end to discover Nick's criteria for awarding that hallowed fifth star.Part 2: Best of Enemies at the Noël Coward TheatreJames Graham's “tighter, richer and deeper” play transferred from the Young Vic traces back our modern adversarial climate of political debate to the 1968 American TV discussions - often explosive exchanges - between right-wing polemicist William F. Buckley Jr. and liberal left commentator Gore Vidal.Explores the political bubble and how a news network failed in its bid to “elevate boring” current affairs during presidential candidate debates.“Riveting” and “hugely enjoyable to watch”, Homeland and Supergirl star David Harewood continues in his Young Vic role of Buckley, while “excellent” Zachary Quinto is new to the Gore Vidal role, played as “serpentine” and “ghastly”.As a black actor, Harewood “wields the pompousness” of white Buckley, sending up the “flag and scotch” Republican.Why this is the show to watch this Christmas.For all the latest visit www.standard.co.uk/culture Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

15 Minute Theatre
E74 - Hex

15 Minute Theatre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 24:55


We are back!  James and vicki are reuinited, it's almost like a fairy tale, which happens to be the subect of the musical 'Hex' at the National Theatre.But was thre show magical or Fairy awful?  Download the podcast to find out!Support the show

Comfort Blanket
Beautiful Thing - with Jonathan Dryden Taylor

Comfort Blanket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 63:47


Actor and writer Jonathan Dryden Taylor (Mitchell & Webb, National Theatre) talks about the 1996 film 'Beautiful Thing', and the comforting message it offered: maybe there is another sort of rom-com that isn't just boy-meets-girl, and that maybe it's all going to be all right. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 159: “Itchycoo Park”, by the Small Faces

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022


Episode 159 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Itchycoo Park” by the Small Faces, and their transition from Mod to psychedelia. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "The First Cut is the Deepest" by P.P. Arnold. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As so many of the episodes recently have had no Mixcloud due to the number of songs by one artist, I've decided to start splitting the mixes of the recordings excerpted in the podcasts into two parts. Here's part one and part two. I've used quite a few books in this episode. The Small Faces & Other Stories by Uli Twelker and Roland Schmit is definitely a fan-work with all that that implies, but has some useful quotes. Two books claim to be the authorised biography of Steve Marriott, and I've referred to both -- All Too Beautiful by Paolo Hewitt and John Hellier, and All Or Nothing by Simon Spence. Spence also wrote an excellent book on Immediate Records, which I referred to. Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan both wrote very readable autobiographies. I've also used Andrew Loog Oldham's autobiography Stoned, co-written by Spence, though be warned that it casually uses slurs. P.P. Arnold's autobiography is a sometimes distressing read covering her whole life, including her time at Immediate. There are many, many, collections of the Small Faces' work, ranging from cheap budget CDs full of outtakes to hundred-pound-plus box sets, also full of outtakes. This three-CD budget collection contains all the essential tracks, and is endorsed by Kenney Jones, the band's one surviving member. And if you're intrigued by the section on Immediate Records, this two-CD set contains a good selection of their releases. ERRATUM-ISH: I say Jimmy Winston was “a couple” of years older than the rest of the band. This does not mean exactly two, but is used in the vague vernacular sense equivalent to “a few”. Different sources I've seen put Winston as either two or four years older than his bandmates, though two seems to be the most commonly cited figure. Transcript For once there is little to warn about in this episode, but it does contain some mild discussions of organised crime, arson, and mental illness, and a quoted joke about capital punishment in questionable taste which may upset some. One name that came up time and again when we looked at the very early years of British rock and roll was Lionel Bart. If you don't remember the name, he was a left-wing Bohemian songwriter who lived in a communal house-share which at various times was also inhabited by people like Shirley Eaton, the woman who is painted gold at the beginning of Goldfinger, Mike Pratt, the star of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), and Davey Graham, the most influential and innovative British guitarist of the fifties and early sixties. Bart and Pratt had co-written most of the hits of Britain's first real rock and roll star, Tommy Steele: [Excerpt: Tommy Steele, "Rock with the Caveman"] and then Bart had gone solo as a writer, and written hits like "Living Doll" for Britain's *biggest* rock and roll star, Cliff Richard: [Excerpt: Cliff Richard, "Living Doll"] But Bart's biggest contribution to rock music turned out not to be the songs he wrote for rock and roll stars, and not even his talent-spotting -- it was Bart who got Steele signed by Larry Parnes, and he also pointed Parnes in the direction of another of his biggest stars, Marty Wilde -- but the opportunity he gave to a lot of child stars in a very non-rock context. Bart's musical Oliver!, inspired by the novel Oliver Twist, was the biggest sensation on the West End stage in the early 1960s, breaking records for the longest-running musical, and also transferred to Broadway and later became an extremely successful film. As it happened, while Oliver! was extraordinarily lucrative, Bart didn't see much of the money from it -- he sold the rights to it, and his other musicals, to the comedian Max Bygraves in the mid-sixties for a tiny sum in order to finance a couple of other musicals, which then flopped horribly and bankrupted him. But by that time Oliver! had already been the first big break for three people who went on to major careers in music -- all of them playing the same role. Because many of the major roles in Oliver! were for young boys, the cast had to change frequently -- child labour laws meant that multiple kids had to play the same role in different performances, and people quickly grew out of the roles as teenagerhood hit. We've already heard about the career of one of the people who played the Artful Dodger in the original West End production -- Davy Jones, who transferred in the role to Broadway in 1963, and who we'll be seeing again in a few episodes' time -- and it's very likely that another of the people who played the Artful Dodger in that production, a young lad called Philip Collins, will be coming into the story in a few years' time. But the first of the artists to use the Artful Dodger as a springboard to a music career was the one who appeared in the role on the original cast album of 1960, though there's very little in that recording to suggest the sound of his later records: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott, "Consider Yourself"] Steve Marriott is the second little Stevie we've looked at in recent episodes to have been born prematurely. In his case, he was born a month premature, and jaundiced, and had to spend the first month of his life in hospital, the first few days of which were spent unsure if he was going to survive. Thankfully he did, but he was a bit of a sickly child as a result, and remained stick-thin and short into adulthood -- he never grew to be taller than five foot five. Young Steve loved music, and especially the music of Buddy Holly. He also loved skiffle, and managed to find out where Lonnie Donegan lived. He went round and knocked on Donegan's door, but was very disappointed to discover that his idol was just a normal man, with his hair uncombed and a shirt stained with egg yolk. He started playing the ukulele when he was ten, and graduated to guitar when he was twelve, forming a band which performed under a variety of different names. When on stage with them, he would go by the stage name Buddy Marriott, and would wear a pair of horn-rimmed glasses to look more like Buddy Holly. When he was twelve, his mother took him to an audition for Oliver! The show had been running for three months at the time, and was likely to run longer, and child labour laws meant that they had to have replacements for some of the cast -- every three months, any performing child had to have at least ten days off. At his audition, Steve played his guitar and sang "Who's Sorry Now?", the recent Connie Francis hit: [Excerpt: Connie Francis, "Who's Sorry Now?"] And then, ignoring the rule that performers could only do one song, immediately launched into Buddy Holly's "Oh Boy!" [Excerpt: Buddy Holly, "Oh Boy!"] His musical ability and attitude impressed the show's producers, and he was given a job which suited him perfectly -- rather than being cast in a single role, he would be swapped around, playing different small parts, in the chorus, and occasionally taking the larger role of the Artful Dodger. Steve Marriott was never able to do the same thing over and over, and got bored very quickly, but because he was moving between roles, he was able to keep interested in his performances for almost a year, and he was good enough that it was him chosen to sing the Dodger's role on the cast album when that was recorded: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott and Joyce Blair, "I'd Do Anything"] And he enjoyed performance enough that his parents pushed him to become an actor -- though there were other reasons for that, too. He was never the best-behaved child in the world, nor the most attentive student, and things came to a head when, shortly after leaving the Oliver! cast, he got so bored of his art classes he devised a plan to get out of them forever. Every art class, for several weeks, he'd sit in a different desk at the back of the classroom and stuff torn-up bits of paper under the floorboards. After a couple of months of this he then dropped a lit match in, which set fire to the paper and ended up burning down half the school. His schoolfriend Ken Hawes talked about it many decades later, saying "I suppose in a way I was impressed about how he had meticulously planned the whole thing months in advance, the sheer dogged determination to see it through. He could quite easily have been caught and would have had to face the consequences. There was no danger in anybody getting hurt because we were at the back of the room. We had to be at the back otherwise somebody would have noticed what he was doing. There was no malice against other pupils, he just wanted to burn the damn school down." Nobody could prove it was him who had done it, though his parents at least had a pretty good idea who it was, but it was clear that even when the school was rebuilt it wasn't a good idea to send him back there, so they sent him to the Italia Conti Drama School; the same school that Anthony Newley and Petula Clark, among many others, had attended. Marriott's parents couldn't afford the school's fees, but Marriott was so talented that the school waived the fees -- they said they'd get him work, and take a cut of his wages in lieu of the fees. And over the next few years they did get him a lot of work. Much of that work was for TV shows, which like almost all TV of the time no longer exist -- he was in an episode of the Sid James sitcom Citizen James, an episode of Mr. Pastry's Progress, an episode of the police drama Dixon of Dock Green, and an episode of a series based on the Just William books, none of which survive. He also did a voiceover for a carpet cleaner ad, appeared on the radio soap opera Mrs Dale's Diary playing a pop star, and had a regular spot reading listeners' letters out for the agony aunt Marje Proops on her radio show. Almost all of this early acting work wa s utterly ephemeral, but there are a handful of his performances that do survive, mostly in films. He has a small role in the comedy film Heavens Above!, a mistaken-identity comedy in which a radical left-wing priest played by Peter Sellers is given a parish intended for a more conservative priest of the same name, and upsets the well-off people of the parish by taking in a large family of travellers and appointing a Black man as his churchwarden. The film has some dated attitudes, in the way that things that were trying to be progressive and antiracist sixty years ago invariably do, but has a sparkling cast, with Sellers, Eric Sykes, William Hartnell, Brock Peters, Roy Kinnear, Irene Handl, and many more extremely recognisable faces from the period: [Excerpt: Heavens Above!] Marriott apparently enjoyed working on the film immensely, as he was a fan of the Goon Show, which Sellers had starred in and which Sykes had co-written several episodes of. There are reports of Marriott and Sellers jamming together on banjos during breaks in filming, though these are probably *slightly* inaccurate -- Sellers played the banjolele, a banjo-style instrument which is played like a ukulele. As Marriott had started on ukulele before switching to guitar, it was probably these they were playing, rather than banjoes. He also appeared in a more substantial role in a film called Live It Up!, a pop exploitation film starring David Hemmings in which he appears as a member of a pop group. Oddly, Marriott plays a drummer, even though he wasn't a drummer, while two people who *would* find fame as drummers, Mitch Mitchell and Dave Clark, appear in smaller, non-drumming, roles. He doesn't perform on the soundtrack, which is produced by Joe Meek and features Sounds Incorporated, The Outlaws, and Gene Vincent, but he does mime playing behind Heinz Burt, the former bass player of the Tornadoes who was then trying for solo stardom at Meek's instigation: [Excerpt: Heinz Burt, "Don't You Understand"] That film was successful enough that two years later, in 1965 Marriott came back for a sequel, Be My Guest, with The Niteshades, the Nashville Teens, and Jerry Lee Lewis, this time with music produced by Shel Talmy rather than Meek. But that was something of a one-off. After making Live It Up!, Marriott had largely retired from acting, because he was trying to become a pop star. The break finally came when he got an audition at the National Theatre, for a job touring with Laurence Olivier for a year. He came home and told his parents he hadn't got the job, but then a week later they were bemused by a phone call asking why Steve hadn't turned up for rehearsals. He *had* got the job, but he'd decided he couldn't face a year of doing the same thing over and over, and had pretended he hadn't. By this time he'd already released his first record. The work on Oliver! had got him a contract with Decca Records, and he'd recorded a Buddy Holly knock-off, "Give Her My Regards", written for him by Kenny Lynch, the actor, pop star, and all-round entertainer: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott, "Give Her My Regards"] That record wasn't a hit, but Marriott wasn't put off. He formed a band who were at first called the Moonlights, and then the Frantiks, and they got a management deal with Tony Calder, Andrew Oldham's junior partner in his management company. Calder got former Shadow Tony Meehan to produce a demo for the group, a version of Cliff Richard's hit "Move It", which was shopped round the record labels with no success (and which sadly appears no longer to survive). The group also did some recordings with Joe Meek, which also don't circulate, but which may exist in the famous "Teachest Tapes" which are slowly being prepared for archival releases. The group changed their name to the Moments, and added in the guitarist John Weider, who was one of those people who seem to have been in every band ever either just before or just after they became famous -- at various times he was in Johnny Kidd and the Pirates, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Family, Eric Burdon and the Animals, and the band that became Crabby Appleton, but never in their most successful lineups. They continued recording unsuccessful demos, of which a small number have turned up: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott and the Moments, "Good Morning Blues"] One of their demo sessions was produced by Andrew Oldham, and while that session didn't lead to a release, it did lead to Oldham booking Marriott as a session harmonica player for one of his "Andrew Oldham Orchestra" sessions, to play on a track titled "365 Rolling Stones (One For Every Day of the Year)": [Excerpt: The Andrew Oldham Orchestra, "365 Rolling Stones (One For Every Day of the Year)"] Oldham also produced a session for what was meant to be Marriott's second solo single on Decca, a cover version of the Rolling Stones' "Tell Me", which was actually scheduled for release but pulled at the last minute. Like many of Marriott's recordings from this period, if it exists, it doesn't seem to circulate publicly. But despite their lack of recording success, the Moments did manage to have a surprising level of success on the live circuit. Because they were signed to Calder and Oldham's management company, they got a contract with the Arthur Howes booking agency, which got them support slots on package tours with Billy J Kramer, Freddie and the Dreamers, the Kinks, and other major acts, and the band members were earning about thirty pounds a week each -- a very, very good living for the time. They even had a fanzine devoted to them, written by a fan named Stuart Tuck. But as they weren't making records, the band's lineup started changing, with members coming and going. They did manage to get one record released -- a soundalike version of the Kinks' "You Really Got Me", recorded for a budget label who rushed it out, hoping to get it picked up in the US and for it to be the hit version there: [Excerpt: The Moments, "You Really Got Me"] But the month after that was released, Marriott was sacked from the band, apparently in part because the band were starting to get billed as Steve Marriott and the Moments rather than just The Moments, and the rest of them didn't want to be anyone's backing band. He got a job at a music shop while looking around for other bands to perform with. At one point around this time he was going to form a duo with a friend of his, Davy Jones -- not the one who had also appeared in Oliver!, but another singer of the same name. This one sang with a blues band called the Mannish Boys, and both men were well known on the Mod scene in London. Marriott's idea was that they call themselves David and Goliath, with Jones being David, and Marriott being Goliath because he was only five foot five. That could have been a great band, but it never got past the idea stage. Marriott had become friendly with another part-time musician and shop worker called Ronnie Lane, who was in a band called the Outcasts who played the same circuit as the Moments: [Excerpt: The Outcasts, "Before You Accuse Me"] Lane worked in a sound equipment shop and Marriott in a musical instrument shop, and both were customers of the other as well as friends -- at least until Marriott came into the shop where Lane worked and tried to persuade him to let Marriott have a free PA system. Lane pretended to go along with it as a joke, and got sacked. Lane had then gone to the shop where Marriott worked in the hope that Marriott would give him a good deal on a guitar because he'd been sacked because of Marriott. Instead, Marriott persuaded him that he should switch to bass, on the grounds that everyone was playing guitar since the Beatles had come along, but a bass player would always be able to find work. Lane bought the bass. Shortly after that, Marriott came to an Outcasts gig in a pub, and was asked to sit in. He enjoyed playing with Lane and the group's drummer Kenney Jones, but got so drunk he smashed up the pub's piano while playing a Jerry Lee Lewis song. The resulting fallout led to the group being barred from the pub and splitting up, so Marriott, Lane, and Jones decided to form their own group. They got in another guitarist Marriott knew, a man named Jimmy Winston who was a couple of years older than them, and who had two advantages -- he was a known Face on the mod scene, with a higher status than any of the other three, and his brother owned a van and would drive the group and their equipment for ten percent of their earnings. There was a slight problem in that Winston was also as good on guitar as Marriott and looked like he might want to be the star, but Marriott neutralised that threat -- he moved Winston over to keyboards. The fact that Winston couldn't play keyboards didn't matter -- he could be taught a couple of riffs and licks, and he was sure to pick up the rest. And this way the group had the same lineup as one of Marriott's current favourites, Booker T and the MGs. While he was still a Buddy Holly fan, he was now, like the rest of the Mods, an R&B obsessive. Marriott wasn't entirely sure that this new group would be the one that would make him a star though, and was still looking for other alternatives in case it didn't play out. He auditioned for another band, the Lower Third, which counted Stuart Tuck, the writer of the Moments fanzine, among its members. But he was unsuccessful in the audition -- instead his friend Davy Jones, the one who he'd been thinking of forming a duo with, got the job: [Excerpt: Davy Jones and the Lower Third, "You've Got a Habit of Leaving"] A few months after that, Davy Jones and the Lower Third changed their name to David Bowie and the Lower Third, and we'll be picking up that story in a little over a year from now... Marriott, Lane, Jones, and Winston kept rehearsing and pulled together a five-song set, which was just about long enough to play a few shows, if they extended the songs with long jamming instrumental sections. The opening song for these early sets was one which, when they recorded it, would be credited to Marriott and Lane -- the two had struck up a writing partnership and agreed to a Lennon/McCartney style credit split, though in these early days Marriott was doing far more of the writing than Lane was. But "You Need Loving" was... heavily inspired... by "You Need Love", a song Willie Dixon had written for Muddy Waters: [Excerpt: Muddy Waters, "You Need Love"] It's not precisely the same song, but you can definitely hear the influence in the Marriott/Lane song: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "You Need Loving"] They did make some changes though, notably to the end of the song: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "You Need Loving"] You will be unsurprised to learn that Robert Plant was a fan of Steve Marriott. The new group were initially without a name, until after one of their first gigs, Winston's girlfriend, who hadn't met the other three before, said "You've all got such small faces!" The name stuck, because it had a double meaning -- as we've seen in the episode on "My Generation", "Face" was Mod slang for someone who was cool and respected on the Mod scene, but also, with the exception of Winston, who was average size, the other three members of the group were very short -- the tallest of the three was Ronnie Lane, who was five foot six. One thing I should note about the group's name, by the way -- on all the labels of their records in the UK while they were together, they were credited as "Small Faces", with no "The" in front, but all the band members referred to the group in interviews as "The Small Faces", and they've been credited that way on some reissues and foreign-market records. The group's official website is thesmallfaces.com but all the posts on the website refer to them as "Small Faces" with no "the". The use  of the word "the" or not at the start of a group's name at this time was something of a shibboleth -- for example both The Buffalo Springfield and The Pink Floyd dropped theirs after their early records -- and its status in this case is a strange one. I'll be referring to the group throughout as "The Small Faces" rather than "Small Faces" because the former is easier to say, but both seem accurate. After a few pub gigs in London, they got some bookings in the North of England, where they got a mixed reception -- they went down well at Peter Stringfellow's Mojo Club in Sheffield, where Joe Cocker was a regular performer, less well at a working-man's club, and reports differ about their performance at the Twisted Wheel in Manchester, though one thing everyone is agreed on is that while they were performing, some Mancunians borrowed their van and used it to rob a clothing warehouse, and gave the band members some very nice leather coats as a reward for their loan of the van. It was only on the group's return to London that they really started to gel as a unit. In particular, Kenney Jones had up to that point been a very stiff, precise, drummer, but he suddenly loosened up and, in Steve Marriott's tasteless phrase, "Every number swung like Hanratty" (James Hanratty was one of the last people in Britain to be executed by hanging). Shortly after that, Don Arden's secretary -- whose name I haven't been able to find in any of the sources I've used for this episode, sadly, came into the club where they were rehearsing, the Starlight Rooms, to pass a message from Arden to an associate of his who owned the club. The secretary had seen Marriott perform before -- he would occasionally get up on stage at the Starlight Rooms to duet with Elkie Brooks, who was a regular performer there, and she'd seen him do that -- but was newly impressed by his group, and passed word on to her boss that this was a group he should investigate. Arden is someone who we'll be looking at a lot in future episodes, but the important thing to note right now is that he was a failed entertainer who had moved into management and promotion, first with American acts like Gene Vincent, and then with British acts like the Nashville Teens, who had had hits with tracks like "Tobacco Road": [Excerpt: The Nashville Teens, "Tobacco Road"] Arden was also something of a gangster -- as many people in the music industry were at the time, but he was worse than most of his contemporaries, and delighted in his nickname "the Al Capone of pop". The group had a few managers looking to sign them, but Arden convinced them with his offer. They would get a percentage of their earnings -- though they never actually received that percentage -- twenty pounds a week in wages, and, the most tempting part of it all, they would get expense accounts at all the Carnaby St boutiques and could go there whenever they wanted and get whatever they wanted. They signed with Arden, which all of them except Marriott would later regret, because Arden's financial exploitation meant that it would be decades before they saw any money from their hits, and indeed both Marriott and Lane would be dead before they started getting royalties from their old records. Marriott, on the other hand, had enough experience of the industry to credit Arden with the group getting anywhere at all, and said later "Look, you go into it with your eyes open and as far as I was concerned it was better than living on brown sauce rolls. At least we had twenty quid a week guaranteed." Arden got the group signed to Decca, with Dick Rowe signing them to the same kind of production deal that Andrew Oldham had pioneered with the Stones, so that Arden would own the rights to their recordings. At this point the group still only knew a handful of songs, but Rowe was signing almost everyone with a guitar at this point, putting out a record or two and letting them sink or swim. He had already been firmly labelled as "the man who turned down the Beatles", and was now of the opinion that it was better to give everyone a chance than to make that kind of expensive mistake again. By this point Marriott and Lane were starting to write songs together -- though at this point it was still mostly Marriott writing, and people would ask him why he was giving Lane half the credit, and he'd reply "Without Ronnie's help keeping me awake and being there I wouldn't do half of it. He keeps me going." -- but for their first single Arden was unsure that they were up to the task of writing a hit. The group had been performing a version of Solomon Burke's "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love", a song which Burke always claimed to have written alone, but which is credited to him, Jerry Wexler, and Bert Berns (and has Bern's fingerprints, at least, on it to my ears): [Excerpt: Solomon Burke, "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love"] Arden got some professional writers to write new lyrics and vocal melody to their arrangement of the song -- the people he hired were Brian Potter, who would later go on to co-write "Rhinestone Cowboy", and Ian Samwell, the former member of Cliff Richard's Drifters who had written many of Richard's early hits, including "Move It", and was now working for Arden. The group went into the studio and recorded the song, titled "Whatcha Gonna Do About It?": [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Whatcha Gonna Do About It?"] That version, though was deemed too raucous, and they had to go back into the studio to cut a new version, which came out as their first single: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Whatcha Gonna Do About It?"] At first the single didn't do much on the charts, but then Arden got to work with teams of people buying copies from chart return shops, bribing DJs on pirate radio stations to play it, and bribing the person who compiled the charts for the NME. Eventually it made number fourteen, at which point it became a genuinely popular hit. But with that popularity came problems. In particular, Steve Marriott was starting to get seriously annoyed by Jimmy Winston. As the group started to get TV appearances, Winston started to act like he should be the centre of attention. Every time Marriott took a solo in front of TV cameras, Winston would start making stupid gestures, pulling faces, anything to make sure the cameras focussed on him rather than on Marriott. Which wouldn't have been too bad had Winston been a great musician, but he was still not very good on the keyboards, and unlike the others didn't seem particularly interested in trying. He seemed to want to be a star, rather than a musician. The group's next planned single was a Marriott and Lane song, "I've Got Mine". To promote it, the group mimed to it in a film, Dateline Diamonds, a combination pop film and crime caper not a million miles away from the ones that Marriott had appeared in a few years earlier. They also contributed three other songs to the film's soundtrack. Unfortunately, the film's release was delayed, and the film had been the big promotional push that Arden had planned for the single, and without that it didn't chart at all. By the time the single came out, though, Winston was no longer in the group. There are many, many different stories as to why he was kicked out. Depending on who you ask, it was because he was trying to take the spotlight away from Marriott, because he wasn't a good enough keyboard player, because he was taller than the others and looked out of place, or because he asked Don Arden where the money was. It was probably a combination of all of these, but fundamentally what it came to was that Winston just didn't fit into the group. Winston would, in later years, say that him confronting Arden was the only reason for his dismissal, saying that Arden had manipulated the others to get him out of the way, but that seems unlikely on the face of it. When Arden sacked him, he kept Winston on as a client and built another band around him, Jimmy Winston and the Reflections, and got them signed to Decca too, releasing a Kenny Lynch song, "Sorry She's Mine", to no success: [Excerpt: Jimmy Winston and the Reflections, "Sorry She's Mine"] Another version of that song would later be included on the first Small Faces album. Winston would then form another band, Winston's Fumbs, who would also release one single, before he went into acting instead. His most notable credit was as a rebel in the 1972 Doctor Who story Day of the Daleks, and he later retired from showbusiness to run a business renting out sound equipment, and died in 2020. The group hired his replacement without ever having met him or heard him play. Ian McLagan had started out as the rhythm guitarist in a Shadows soundalike band called the Cherokees, but the group had become R&B fans and renamed themselves the Muleskinners, and then after hearing "Green Onions", McLagan had switched to playing Hammond organ. The Muleskinners had played the same R&B circuit as dozens of other bands we've looked at, and had similar experiences, including backing visiting blues stars like Sonny Boy Williamson, Little Walter, and Howlin' Wolf. Their one single had been a cover version of "Back Door Man", a song Willie Dixon had written for Wolf: [Excerpt: The Muleskinners, "Back Door Man"] The Muleskinners had split up as most of the group had day jobs, and McLagan had gone on to join a group called Boz and the Boz People, who were becoming popular on the live circuit, and who also toured backing Kenny Lynch while McLagan was in the band. Boz and the Boz People would release several singles in 1966, like their version of the theme for the film "Carry on Screaming", released just as by "Boz": [Excerpt: Boz, "Carry on Screaming"] By that time, McLagan had left the group -- Boz Burrell later went on to join King Crimson and Bad Company. McLagan left the Boz People in something of a strop, and was complaining to a friend the night he left the group that he didn't have any work lined up. The friend joked that he should join the Small Faces, because he looked like them, and McLagan got annoyed that his friend wasn't taking him seriously -- he'd love to be in the Small Faces, but they *had* a keyboard player. The next day he got a phone call from Don Arden asking him to come to his office. He was being hired to join a hit pop group who needed a new keyboard player. McLagan at first wasn't allowed to tell anyone what band he was joining -- in part because Arden's secretary was dating Winston, and Winston hadn't yet been informed he was fired, and Arden didn't want word leaking out until it had been sorted. But he'd been chosen purely on the basis of an article in a music magazine which had praised his playing with the Boz People, and without the band knowing him or his playing. As soon as they met, though, he immediately fit in in a way Winston never had. He looked the part, right down to his height -- he said later "Ronnie Lane and I were the giants in the band at 5 ft 6 ins, and Kenney Jones and Steve Marriott were the really teeny tiny chaps at 5 ft 5 1/2 ins" -- and he was a great player, and shared a sense of humour with them. McLagan had told Arden he'd been earning twenty pounds a week with the Boz People -- he'd actually been on five -- and so Arden agreed to give him thirty pounds a week during his probationary month, which was more than the twenty the rest of the band were getting. As soon as his probationary period was over, McLagan insisted on getting a pay cut so he'd be on the same wages as the rest of the group. Soon Marriott, Lane, and McLagan were all living in a house rented for them by Arden -- Jones decided to stay living with his parents -- and were in the studio recording their next single. Arden was convinced that the mistake with "I've Got Mine" had been allowing the group to record an original, and again called in a team of professional songwriters. Arden brought in Mort Shuman, who had recently ended his writing partnership with Doc Pomus and struck out on his own, after co-writing songs like "Save the Last Dance for Me", "Sweets For My Sweet", and "Viva Las Vegas" together, and Kenny Lynch, and the two of them wrote "Sha-La-La-La-Lee", and Lynch added backing vocals to the record: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Sha-La-La-La-Lee"] None of the group were happy with the record, but it became a big hit, reaching number three in the charts. Suddenly the group had a huge fanbase of screaming teenage girls, which embarrassed them terribly, as they thought of themselves as serious heavy R&B musicians, and the rest of their career would largely be spent vacillating between trying to appeal to their teenybopper fanbase and trying to escape from it to fit their own self-image. They followed "Sha-La-La-La-Lee" with "Hey Girl", a Marriott/Lane song, but one written to order -- they were under strict instructions from Arden that if they wanted to have the A-side of a single, they had to write something as commercial as "Sha-La-La-La-Lee" had been, and they managed to come up with a second top-ten hit. Two hit singles in a row was enough to make an album viable, and the group went into the studio and quickly cut an album, which had their first two hits on it -- "Hey Girl" wasn't included, and nor was the flop "I've Got Mine" -- plus a bunch of semi-originals like "You Need Loving", a couple of Kenny Lynch songs, and a cover version of Sam Cooke's "Shake". The album went to number three on the album charts, with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones in the number one and two spots, and it was at this point that Arden's rivals really started taking interest. But that interest was quelled for the moment when, after Robert Stigwood enquired about managing the band, Arden went round to Stigwood's office with four goons and held him upside down over a balcony, threatening to drop him off if he ever messed with any of Arden's acts again. But the group were still being influenced by other managers. In particular, Brian Epstein came round to the group's shared house, with Graeme Edge of the Moody Blues, and brought them some slices of orange -- which they discovered, after eating them, had been dosed with LSD. By all accounts, Marriott's first trip was a bad one, but the group soon became regular consumers of the drug, and it influenced the heavier direction they took on their next single, "All or Nothing". "All or Nothing" was inspired both by Marriott's breakup with his girlfriend of the time, and his delight at the fact that Jenny Rylance, a woman he was attracted to, had split up with her then-boyfriend Rod Stewart. Rylance and Stewart later reconciled, but would break up again and Rylance would become Marriott's first wife in 1968: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "All or Nothing"] "All or Nothing" became the group's first and only number one record -- and according to the version of the charts used on Top of the Pops, it was a joint number one with the Beatles' double A-side of "Yellow Submarine" and "Eleanor Rigby", both selling exactly as well as each other. But this success caused the group's parents to start to wonder why their kids -- none of whom were yet twenty-one, the legal age of majority at the time -- were not rich. While the group were on tour, their parents came as a group to visit Arden and ask him where the money was, and why their kids were only getting paid twenty pounds a week when their group was getting a thousand pounds a night. Arden tried to convince the parents that he had been paying the group properly, but that they had spent their money on heroin -- which was very far from the truth, the band were only using soft drugs at the time. This put a huge strain on the group's relationship with Arden, and it wasn't the only thing Arden did that upset them. They had been spending a lot of time in the studio working on new material, and Arden was convinced that they were spending too much time recording, and that they were just faffing around and not producing anything of substance. They dropped off a tape to show him that they had been working -- and the next thing they knew, Arden had put out one of the tracks from that tape, "My Mind's Eye", which had only been intended as a demo, as a single: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "My Mind's Eye"] That it went to number four on the charts didn't make up for the fact that the first the band heard of the record coming out at all was when they heard it on the radio. They needed rid of Arden. Luckily for them, Arden wasn't keen on continuing to work with them either. They were unreliable and flakey, and he also needed cash quick to fund his other ventures, and he agreed to sell on their management and recording contracts. Depending on which version of the story you believe, he may have sold them on to an agent called Harold Davison, who then sold them on to Andrew Oldham and Tony Calder, but according to Oldham what happened is that in December 1966 Arden demanded the highest advance in British history -- twenty-five thousand pounds -- directly from Oldham. In cash. In a brown paper bag. The reason Oldham and Calder were interested was that in July 1965 they'd started up their own record label, Immediate Records, which had been announced by Oldham in his column in Disc and Music Echo, in which he'd said "On many occasions I have run down the large record companies over issues such as pirate stations, their promotion, and their tastes. And many readers have written in and said that if I was so disturbed by the state of the existing record companies why didn't I do something about it.  I have! On the twentieth of this month the first of three records released by my own company, Immediate Records, is to be launched." That first batch of three records contained one big hit, "Hang on Sloopy" by the McCoys, which Immediate licensed from Bert Berns' new record label BANG in the US: [Excerpt: The McCoys, "Hang on Sloopy"] The two other initial singles featured the talents of Immediate's new in-house producer, a session player who had previously been known as "Little Jimmy" to distinguish him from "Big" Jim Sullivan, the other most in-demand session guitarist, but who was now just known as Jimmy Page. The first was a version of Pete Seeger's "The Bells of Rhymney", which Page produced and played guitar on, for a group called The Fifth Avenue: [Excerpt: The Fifth Avenue, "The Bells of Rhymney"] And the second was a Gordon Lightfoot song performed by a girlfriend of Brian Jones', Nico. The details as to who was involved in the track have varied -- at different times the production has been credited to Jones, Page, and Oldham -- but it seems to be the case that both Jones and Page play on the track, as did session bass player John Paul Jones: [Excerpt: Nico, "I'm Not Sayin'"] While "Hang on Sloopy" was a big hit, the other two singles were flops, and The Fifth Avenue split up, while Nico used the publicity she'd got as an entree into Andy Warhol's Factory, and we'll be hearing more about how that went in a future episode. Oldham and Calder were trying to follow the model of the Brill Building, of Phil Spector, and of big US independents like Motown and Stax. They wanted to be a one-stop shop where they'd produce the records, manage the artists, and own the publishing -- and they also licensed the publishing for the Beach Boys' songs for a couple of years, and started publicising their records over here in a big way, to exploit the publishing royalties, and that was a major factor in turning the Beach Boys from minor novelties to major stars in the UK. Most of Immediate's records were produced by Jimmy Page, but other people got to have a go as well. Giorgio Gomelsky and Shel Talmy both produced tracks for the label, as did a teenage singer then known as Paul Raven, who would later become notorious under his later stage-name Gary Glitter. But while many of these records were excellent -- and Immediate deserves to be talked about in the same terms as Motown or Stax when it comes to the quality of the singles it released, though not in terms of commercial success -- the only ones to do well on the charts in the first few months of the label's existence were "Hang on Sloopy" and an EP by Chris Farlowe. It was Farlowe who provided Immediate Records with its first home-grown number one, a version of the Rolling Stones' "Out of Time" produced by Mick Jagger, though according to Arthur Greenslade, the arranger on that and many other Immediate tracks, Jagger had given up on getting a decent performance out of Farlowe and Oldham ended up producing the vocals. Greenslade later said "Andrew must have worked hard in there, Chris Farlowe couldn't sing his way out of a paper bag. I'm sure Andrew must have done it, where you get an artist singing and you can do a sentence at a time, stitching it all together. He must have done it in pieces." But however hard it was to make, "Out of Time" was a success: [Excerpt: Chris Farlowe, "Out of Time"] Or at least, it was a success in the UK. It did also make the top forty in the US for a week, but then it hit a snag -- it had charted without having been released in the US at all, or even being sent as a promo to DJs. Oldham's new business manager Allen Klein had been asked to work his magic on the US charts, but the people he'd bribed to hype the record into the charts had got the release date wrong and done it too early. When the record *did* come out over there, no radio station would play it in case it looked like they were complicit in the scam. But still, a UK number one wasn't too shabby, and so Immediate Records was back on track, and Oldham wanted to shore things up by bringing in some more proven hit-makers. Immediate signed the Small Faces, and even started paying them royalties -- though that wouldn't last long, as Immediate went bankrupt in 1970 and its successors in interest stopped paying out. The first work the group did for the label was actually for a Chris Farlowe single. Lane and Marriott gave him their song "My Way of Giving", and played on the session along with Farlowe's backing band the Thunderbirds. Mick Jagger is the credited producer, but by all accounts Marriott and Lane did most of the work: [Excerpt: Chris Farlowe, "My Way of Giving"] Sadly, that didn't make the top forty. After working on that, they started on their first single recorded at Immediate. But because of contractual entanglements, "I Can't Make It" was recorded at Immediate but released by Decca. Because the band weren't particularly keen on promoting something on their old label, and the record was briefly banned by the BBC for being too sexual, it only made number twenty-six on the charts. Around this time, Marriott had become friendly with another band, who had named themselves The Little People in homage to the Small Faces, and particularly with their drummer Jerry Shirley. Marriott got them signed to Immediate, and produced and played on their first single, a version of his song "(Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me?": [Excerpt: The Apostolic Intervention, "(Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me?"] When they signed to Immediate, The Little People had to change their name, and Marriott suggested they call themselves The Nice, a phrase he liked. Oldham thought that was a stupid name, and gave the group the much more sensible name The Apostolic Intervention. And then a few weeks later he signed another group and changed *their* name to The Nice. "The Nice" was also a phrase used in the Small Faces' first single for Immediate proper. "Here Come the Nice" was inspired by a routine by the hipster comedian Lord Buckley, "The Nazz", which also gave a name to Todd Rundgren's band and inspired a line in David Bowie's "Ziggy Stardust": [Excerpt: Lord Buckley, "The Nazz"] "Here Come the Nice" was very blatantly about a drug dealer, and somehow managed to reach number twelve despite that: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Here Come the Nice"] It also had another obstacle that stopped it doing as well as it might. A week before it came out, Decca released a single, "Patterns", from material they had in the vault. And in June 1967, two Small Faces albums came out. One of them was a collection from Decca of outtakes and demos, plus their non-album hit singles, titled From The Beginning, while the other was their first album on Immediate, which was titled Small Faces -- just like their first Decca album had been. To make matters worse, From The Beginning contained the group's demos of "My Way of Giving" and "(Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me?", while the group's first Immediate album contained a new recording of  "(Tell Me) Have You Ever Seen Me?", and a version of "My Way of Giving" with the same backing track but a different vocal take from the one on the Decca collection. From this point on, the group's catalogue would be a complete mess, with an endless stream of compilations coming out, both from Decca and, after the group split, from Immediate, mixing tracks intended for release with demos and jam sessions with no regard for either their artistic intent or for what fans might want. Both albums charted, with Small Faces reaching number twelve and From The Beginning reaching number sixteen, neither doing as well as their first album had, despite the Immediate album, especially, being a much better record. This was partly because the Marriott/Lane partnership was becoming far more equal. Kenney Jones later said "During the Decca period most of the self-penned stuff was 99% Steve. It wasn't until Immediate that Ronnie became more involved. The first Immediate album is made up of 50% Steve's songs and 50% of Ronnie's. They didn't collaborate as much as people thought. In fact, when they did, they often ended up arguing and fighting." It's hard to know who did what on each song credited to the pair, but if we assume that each song's principal writer also sang lead -- we know that's not always the case, but it's a reasonable working assumption -- then Jones' fifty-fifty estimate seems about right. Of the fourteen songs on the album, McLagan sings one, which is also his own composition, "Up the Wooden Hills to Bedfordshire". There's one instrumental, six with Marriott on solo lead vocals, four with Lane on solo lead vocals, and two duets, one with Lane as the main vocalist and one with Marriott. The fact that there was now a second songwriter taking an equal role in the band meant that they could now do an entire album of originals. It also meant that their next Marriott/Lane single was mostly a Lane song. "Itchycoo Park" started with a verse lyric from Lane -- "Over bridge of sighs/To rest my eyes in shades of green/Under dreaming spires/To Itchycoo Park, that's where I've been". The inspiration apparently came from Lane reading about the dreaming spires of Oxford, and contrasting it with the places he used to play as a child, full of stinging nettles. For a verse melody, they repeated a trick they'd used before -- the melody of "My Mind's Eye" had been borrowed in part from the Christmas carol "Gloria in Excelsis Deo", and here they took inspiration from the old hymn "God Be in My Head": [Excerpt: The Choir of King's College Cambridge, "God Be in My Head"] As Marriott told the story: "We were in Ireland and speeding our brains out writing this song. Ronnie had the first verse already written down but he had no melody line, so what we did was stick the verse to the melody line of 'God Be In My Head' with a few chord variations. We were going towards Dublin airport and I thought of the middle eight... We wrote the second verse collectively, and the chorus speaks for itself." [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Itchycoo Park"] Marriott took the lead vocal, even though it was mostly Lane's song, but Marriott did contribute to the writing, coming up with the middle eight. Lane didn't seem hugely impressed with Marriott's contribution, and later said "It wasn't me that came up with 'I feel inclined to blow my mind, get hung up, feed the ducks with a bun/They all come out to groove about, be nice and have fun in the sun'. That wasn't me, but the more poetic stuff was." But that part became the most memorable part of the record, not so much because of the writing or performance but because of the production. It was one of the first singles released using a phasing effect, developed by George Chkiantz (and I apologise if I'm pronouncing that name wrong), who was the assistant engineer for Glyn Johns on the album. I say it was one of the first, because at the time there was not a clear distinction between the techniques now known as phasing, flanging, and artificial double tracking, all of which have now diverged, but all of which initially came from the idea of shifting two copies of a recording slightly out of synch with each other. The phasing on "Itchycoo Park" , though, was far more extreme and used to far different effect than that on, say, Revolver: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Itchycoo Park"] It was effective enough that Jimi Hendrix, who was at the time working on Axis: Bold as Love, requested that Chkiantz come in and show his engineer how to get the same effect, which was then used on huge chunks of Hendrix's album. The BBC banned the record, because even the organisation which had missed that the Nice who "is always there when I need some speed" was a drug dealer was a little suspicious about whether "we'll get high" and "we'll touch the sky" might be drug references. The band claimed to be horrified at the thought, and explained that they were talking about swings. It's a song about a park, so if you play on the swings, you go high. What else could it mean? [Excerpt: The Small Faces, “Itchycoo Park”] No drug references there, I'm sure you'll agree. The song made number three, but the group ran into more difficulties with the BBC after an appearance on Top of the Pops. Marriott disliked the show's producer, and the way that he would go up to every act and pretend to think they had done a very good job, no matter what he actually thought, which Marriott thought of as hypocrisy rather than as politeness and professionalism. Marriott discovered that the producer was leaving the show, and so in the bar afterwards told him exactly what he thought of him, calling him a "two-faced", and then a four-letter word beginning with c which is generally considered the most offensive swear word there is. Unfortunately for Marriott, he'd been misinformed, the producer wasn't leaving the show, and the group were barred from it for a while. "Itchycoo Park" also made the top twenty in the US, thanks to a new distribution deal Immediate had, and plans were made for the group to tour America, but those plans had to be scrapped when Ian McLagan was arrested for possession of hashish, and instead the group toured France, with support from a group called the Herd: [Excerpt: The Herd, "From the Underworld"] Marriott became very friendly with the Herd's guitarist, Peter Frampton, and sympathised with Frampton's predicament when in the next year he was voted "face of '68" and developed a similar teenage following to the one the Small Faces had. The group's last single of 1967 was one of their best. "Tin Soldier" was inspired by the Hans Andersen story “The Steadfast Tin Soldier”, and was originally written for the singer P.P. Arnold, who Marriott was briefly dating around this time. But Arnold was *so* impressed with the song that Marriott decided to keep it for his own group, and Arnold was left just doing backing vocals on the track: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Tin Soldier"] It's hard to show the appeal of "Tin Soldier" in a short clip like those I use on this show, because so much of it is based on the use of dynamics, and the way the track rises and falls, but it's an extremely powerful track, and made the top ten. But it was after that that the band started falling apart, and also after that that they made the work generally considered their greatest album. As "Itchycoo Park" had made number one in Australia, the group were sent over there on tour to promote it, as support act for the Who. But the group hadn't been playing live much recently, and found it difficult to replicate their records on stage, as they were now so reliant on studio effects like phasing. The Australian audiences were uniformly hostile, and the contrast with the Who, who were at their peak as a live act at this point, couldn't have been greater. Marriott decided he had a solution. The band needed to get better live, so why not get Peter Frampton in as a fifth member? He was great on guitar and had stage presence, obviously that would fix their problems. But the other band members absolutely refused to get Frampton in. Marriott's confidence as a stage performer took a knock from which it never really recovered, and increasingly the band became a studio-only one. But the tour also put strain on the most important partnership in the band. Marriott and Lane had been the closest of friends and collaborators, but on the tour, both found a very different member of the Who to pal around with. Marriott became close to Keith Moon, and the two would get drunk and trash hotel rooms together. Lane, meanwhile, became very friendly with Pete Townshend, who introduced him to the work of the guru Meher Baba, who Townshend followed. Lane, too, became a follower, and the two would talk about religion and spirituality while their bandmates were destroying things. An attempt was made to heal the growing rifts though. Marriott, Lane, and McLagan all moved in together again like old times, but this time in a cottage -- something that became so common for bands around this time that the phrase "getting our heads together in the country" became a cliche in the music press. They started working on material for their new album. One of the tracks that they were working on was written by Marriott, and was inspired by how, before moving in to the country cottage, his neighbours had constantly complained about the volume of his music -- he'd been particularly annoyed that the pop singer Cilla Black, who lived in the same building and who he'd assumed would understand the pop star lifestyle, had complained more than anyone. It had started as as fairly serious blues song, but then Marriott had been confronted by the members of the group The Hollies, who wanted to know why Marriott always sang in a pseudo-American accent. Wasn't his own accent good enough? Was there something wrong with being from the East End of London? Well, no, Marriott decided, there wasn't, and so he decided to sing it in a Cockney accent. And so the song started to change, going from being an R&B song to being the kind of thing Cockneys could sing round a piano in a pub: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "Lazy Sunday"] Marriott intended the song just as an album track for the album they were working on, but Andrew Oldham insisted on releasing it as a single, much to the band's disgust, and it went to number two on the charts, and along with "Itchycoo Park" meant that the group were now typecast as making playful, light-hearted music. The album they were working on, Ogden's Nut-Gone Flake, was eventually as known for its marketing as its music. In the Small Faces' long tradition of twisted religious references, like their songs based on hymns and their song "Here Come the Nice", which had taken inspiration from a routine about Jesus and made it about a drug dealer, the print ads for the album read: Small Faces Which were in the studios Hallowed be thy name Thy music come Thy songs be sung On this album as they came from your heads We give you this day our daily bread Give us thy album in a round cover as we give thee 37/9d Lead us into the record stores And deliver us Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake For nice is the music The sleeve and the story For ever and ever, Immediate The reason the ad mentioned a round cover is that the original pressings of the album were released in a circular cover, made to look like a tobacco tin, with the name of the brand of tobacco changed from Ogden's Nut-Brown Flake to Ogden's Nut-Gone Flake, a reference to how after smoking enough dope your nut, or head, would be gone. This made more sense to British listeners than to Americans, because not only was the slang on the label British, and not only was it a reference to a British tobacco brand, but American and British dope-smoking habits are very different. In America a joint is generally made by taking the dried leaves and flowers of the cannabis plant -- or "weed" -- and rolling them in a cigarette paper and smoking them. In the UK and much of Europe, though, the preferred form of cannabis is the resin, hashish, which is crumbled onto tobacco in a cigarette paper and smoked that way, so having rolling or pipe tobacco was a necessity for dope smokers in the UK in a way it wasn't in the US. Side one of Ogden's was made up of normal songs, but the second side mixed songs and narrative. Originally the group wanted to get Spike Milligan to do the narration, but when Milligan backed out they chose Professor Stanley Unwin, a comedian who was known for speaking in his own almost-English language, Unwinese: [Excerpt: Stanley Unwin, "The Populode of the Musicolly"] They gave Unwin a script, telling the story that linked side two of the album, in which Happiness Stan is shocked to discover that half the moon has disappeared and goes on a quest to find the missing half, aided by a giant fly who lets him sit on his back after Stan shares his shepherd's pie with the hungry fly. After a long quest they end up at the cave of Mad John the Hermit, who points out to them that nobody had stolen half the moon at all -- they'd been travelling so long that it was a full moon again, and everything was OK. Unwin took that script, and reworked it into Unwinese, and also added in a lot of the slang he heard the group use, like "cool it" and "what's been your hang-up?": [Excerpt: The Small Faces and Professor Stanley Unwin, "Mad John"] The album went to number one, and the group were justifiably proud, but it only exacerbated the problems with their live show. Other than an appearance on the TV show Colour Me Pop, where they were joined by Stanley Unwin to perform the whole of side two of the album with live vocals but miming to instrumental backing tracks, they only performed two songs from the album live, "Rollin' Over" and "Song of a Baker", otherwise sticking to the same live show Marriott was already embarrassed by. Marriott later said "We had spent an entire year in the studios, which was why our stage presentation had not been improved since the previous year. Meanwhile our recording experience had developed in leaps and bounds. We were all keenly interested in the technical possibilities, in the art of recording. We let down a lot of people who wanted to hear Ogden's played live. We were still sort of rough and ready, and in the end the audience became uninterested as far as our stage show was concerned. It was our own fault, because we would have sussed it all out if we had only used our brains. We could have taken Stanley Unwin on tour with us, maybe a string section as well, and it would have been okay. But we didn't do it, we stuck to the concept that had been successful for a long time, which is always the kiss of death." The group's next single would be the last released while they were together. Marriott regarded "The Universal" as possibly the best thing he'd written, and recorded it quickly when inspiration struck. The finished single is actually a home recording of Marriott in his garden, including the sounds of a dog barking and his wife coming home with the shopping, onto which the band later overdubbed percussion, horns, and electric guitars: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "The Universal"] Incidentally, it seems that the dog barking on that track may also be the dog barking on “Seamus” by Pink Floyd. "The Universal" confused listeners, and only made number sixteen on the charts, crushing Marriott, who thought it was the best thing he'd done. But the band were starting to splinter. McLagan isn't on "The Universal", having quit the band before it was recorded after a falling-out with Marriott. He rejoined, but discovered that in the meantime Marriott had brought in session player Nicky Hopkins to work on some tracks, which devastated him. Marriott became increasingly unconfident in his own writing, and the writing dried up. The group did start work on some new material, some of which, like "The Autumn Stone", is genuinely lovely: [Excerpt: The Small Faces, "The Autumn Stone"] But by the time that was released, the group had already split up. The last recording they did together was as a backing group for Johnny Hallyday, the French rock star. A year earlier Hallyday had recorded a version of "My Way of Giving", under the title "Je N'Ai Jamais Rien Demandé": [Excerpt: Johnny Hallyday, "Je N'Ai Jamais Rien Demandé"] Now he got in touch with Glyn Johns to see if the Small Faces had any other material for him, and if they'd maybe back him on a few tracks on a new album. Johns and the Small Faces flew to France... as did Peter Frampton, who Marriott was still pushing to get into the band. They recorded three tracks for the album, with Frampton on extra guitar: [Excerpt: Johnny Hallyday, "Reclamation"] These tracks left Marriott more certain than ever that Frampton should be in the band, and the other three members even more certain that he shouldn't. Frampton joined the band on stage at a few shows on their next few gigs, but he was putting together his own band with Jerry Shirley from Apostolic Intervention. On New Year's Eve 1968, Marriott finally had enough. He stormed off stage mid-set, and quit the group. He phoned up Peter Frampton, who was hanging out with Glyn Johns listening to an album Johns had just produced by some of the session players who'd worked for Immediate. Side one had just finished when Marriott phoned. Could he join Frampton's new band? Frampton said of course he could, then put the phone down and listened to side two of Led Zeppelin's first record. The band Marriott and Frampton formed was called Humble Pie, and they were soon releasing stuff on Immediate. According to Oldham, "Tony Calder said to me one day 'Pick a straw'. Then he explained we had a choice. We could either go with the three Faces -- Kenney, Ronnie, and Mac -- wherever they were going to go with their lives, or we could follow Stevie. I didn't regard it as a choice. Neither did Tony. Marriott was our man". Marriott certainly seemed to agree that he was the real talent in the group. He and Lane had fairly recently bought some property together -- two houses on the same piece of land -- and with the group splitting up, Lane moved away and wanted to sell his share in the property to Marriott. Marriott wrote to him saying "You'll get nothing. This was bought with money from hits that I wrote, not that we wrote," and enclosing a PRS statement showing how much each Marriott/Lane

christmas god america tv jesus christ love american family time history black australia english europe art uk rock england france giving americans british french song australian ireland north bbc progress park reflections broadway wolf britain birds animals beatles universal mac cd mine oxford wood hang rolling stones manchester shadows pirates habit released rock and roll faces bang dublin david bowie patterns last dance stones goliath shortly diary depending shake factory djs bart wasn sellers cds moments disc lsd lynch pink floyd burke engine dixon outlaws meek bells sheffield led zeppelin pops johns dreamers screaming jimi hendrix steele motown beach boys west end hammond andy warhol pratt kinks deepest mick jagger cherokees bern spence marriott ogden calder rollin rod stewart mod mixcloud tilt oddly stoned al capone herd blah mods dodger tornadoes sam cooke keith richards pastry goldfinger booker t hermit rock music oh boy little people bohemian jimmy page caveman robert plant east end buddy holly prs sykes other stories bad company jerry lee lewis seamus phil spector my mind thunderbirds my way viva las vegas daleks oldham outcasts king crimson joe cocker humble pie national theatre drifters milligan peter frampton brian jones make it nme todd rundgren stax pete seeger peter sellers oliver twist moody blues mgs fifth avenue yellow submarine howlin cliff richard johnny hallyday pete townshend frampton cockney davy jones gordon lightfoot boz hey girl hollies laurence olivier john paul jones keith moon buffalo springfield decca unwin on new year bedfordshire mccoys ronnie wood all or nothing petula clark first cut dave clark john mayall eleanor rigby eric burdon small faces brian epstein gary glitter cilla black my generation solomon burke william hartnell live it up donegan move it spike milligan decca records allen klein lennon mccartney willie dixon townshend ron wood artful dodger green onions connie francis little walter gene vincent rhinestone cowboy sonny boy williamson brill building mitch mitchell god be anthony newley nazz bluesbreakers tin soldier joe meek glyn johns kim gardner hallyday college cambridge little jimmy living doll ronnie lane jeff beck group goon show rylance ronnies be my guest lonnie donegan everybody needs somebody you really got me cockneys steve marriott parnes jerry wexler sid james andrew loog oldham kenney jones billy j kramer long john baldry david hemmings meher baba lionel bart mike pratt robert stigwood doc pomus axis bold marty wilde moonlights bert berns sorry now graeme edge mancunians from the beginning lord buckley mclagan ian mclagan hans andersen brian potter eric sykes andrew oldham paolo hewitt dock green davey graham nothing all tilt araiza
Front Row
Antoine Fuqua on Emancipation, NDAs in film and TV casting, playwright April De Angelis

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 42:19


Film director Antoine Fuqua discusses his new film, Emancipation, which stars Will Smith. He discusses basing his film on the true story of an enslaved man in 1860s Louisiana. Earlier this year, Front Row revealed how non-disclosure agreements were being misused in film and TV casting, with actors being kept in the dark about the roles they were auditioning for. The actor's union Equity has come up with new guidance on NDAs. Carolyn Atkinson explains what this means for auditions. April De Angelis discusses her new play Kerry Jackson, which is at the National Theatre in London. Starring Faye Ripley in the title role of café owner Kerry, it explores class and gentrification. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Eliane Glaser

Built For The Stage Podcast
#184 - Tom Stacy - Olivier Award Winner for LIFE OF PI

Built For The Stage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 34:38


Tom Stacy / @tomstacy is an Olivier Award winning Actor & Puppeteer currently appearing in Life of Pi on the West End, where he is also the Movement & Puppetry Associate on the show. Since graduating from Rose Bruford (BA Acting) Tom has performed both nationally and internationally in a number of shows, including, The National Theatre's 'War Horse', as well as Theatre Témoin's 'The Marked' which won best physical theatre show at the Edinburgh Fringe. With a background in theatre, dance, sport and comedy, Tom has also performed alongside comedian Romesh Ranganathan in 'Romesh and Friends'. https://builtforthestage.com/ - fill out the form and ask about our next fitness challenge! www.broadwaypodcastnetwork.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Built For The Stage Podcast
#184 - Tom Stacy - Olivier Award Winner for LIFE OF PI

Built For The Stage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 34:38


Tom Stacy / @tomstacy is an Olivier Award winning Actor & Puppeteer currently appearing in Life of Pi on the West End, where he is also the Movement & Puppetry Associate on the show. Since graduating from Rose Bruford (BA Acting) Tom has performed both nationally and internationally in a number of shows, including, The National Theatre's 'War Horse', as well as Theatre Témoin's 'The Marked' which won best physical theatre show at the Edinburgh Fringe. With a background in theatre, dance, sport and comedy, Tom has also performed alongside comedian Romesh Ranganathan in 'Romesh and Friends'. https://builtforthestage.com/ - fill out the form and ask about our next fitness challenge! www.broadwaypodcastnetwork.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RNIB Connect
1501: Amy Forrest, VI Actor - Profile Interview

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 20:12


Amy Forrest is an Actor originally from West Yorkshire now living in London. She trained at Arts Ed, The Second City and National Youth Music Theatre. Her acting experience expands across a range of Television, Film and Theatre. Earlier this year Amy returned to the national Theatre's Olivier stage in the revival of Small Island and again taking up the role of Mrs Ryder. RNIB Connect Radio's Toby Davey caught up with Amy during the first week of performances of Small Island at the National Theatre to find out firstly what it is like treading the boards of the Olivier stage where so many great actors have performed and to find out how Amy got into acting as well as landing the role of Mrs Ryder in Small Island. Amy also talks about being cast in Small Island after being found on Profile Performers an online platform set up by Charlotte Bevan at The National Theatre.   Profile Performers in partnership with Spotlight and The National Theatre represents D/deaf and Disabled Performers. You can find out more about Profile Performers by visiting the following website- https://profileperformers.com Amy and Toby also discuss the opportunities out there for blind and partially sighted people as actors on stage, on the small screen and in films. Amy ended by giving some great advice to other blind and partially sighted people who might want to tread the boards, or get into film and television as a blind or partially sighted actor and also mentioned the Creative Confidence Collective (triple C) which provides a great resource and much more for disabled actors.  To find out more about the Creative Confidence Collective (triple C) and links to DANC as mentioned by Amy do visit the Triple C website - https://triplec.org.uk (Image shows RNIB logo. 'RNIB' written in black capital letters over a white background and underlined with a bold pink line, with the words 'See differently' underneath)

Tales of the Night Sky
S2 E1 Ganymede: The Constellation of Aquarius

Tales of the Night Sky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 25:29


Ganymede, Prince of Troy, shuns the company of men and only finds pleasure in nature. But when his exceptional beauty comes to the attention of men and gods, his life will never be the same. This episode was written and performed by Mitchell Moreno.  Direction by Bibi Jacob. Sound and production by Geoff Chong. Recorded in the studio of the National Theatre, London with Richard Coleby as sound engineer. Thanks to Suzanne Diakun. And thanks to Michel - for his help - and Jean René at Studio Scopitone, Paris. 

Front Row
Clint Dyer on Othello, Turner Prize nominee Ingrid Pollard, should museums close controversial galleries?

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 42:21


Clint Dyer discusses directing Othello starring Giles Terera at the National Theatre, the first Black director to do so. He talks about how he is approaching the racism and misogyny in the play, and the history of previous productions. In the second of Front Row's interviews with the artists nominated for this year's Turner Prize, Ingrid Pollard discusses her work, Carbon Slowly Turning, and how she explores themes of nationhood, race, history and identity through portraiture and landscape. And as the Wellcome Collection decides to close an exhibition described as sexist, racist and ableist, Front Row discusses whether museums should display historical objects that may offend gallery visitors. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Eliane Glaser Image: Giles Terera as Othello and Rosy McEwan as Desdemona. Image credit: Myah Jeffers

The Afternoon Show Podcast
Jackie Wylie & Gary McNair's new play Dear Billy about Billy Connolly

The Afternoon Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 19:34


Michelle McManus discusses the National Theatre of Scotland programme launch with Jackie Wylie & Gary McNair's new play Dear Billy about Billy Connolly

The Week in Art
Pussy Riot and Ragnar Kjartansson; Shirin Neshat on Iran; Puerto Rican art after Hurricane Maria

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 67:46


This week: as the exhibition Velvet Terrorism: Pussy Riot's Russia opens at the Kling & Bang gallery in Reykjavik, Ben Luke talks to Masha Alekhina, one of the founding members of Pussy Riot, and the artist Ragnar Kjartansson, one of the co-curators of the show. As protests continue across Iran, Aimee Dawson, The Art Newspaper's acting digital editor, speaks to Shirin Neshat, the artist whose work expressing solidarity with women in Iran was recently installed outside the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin. And this episode's Work of the Week is by the Puerto Rican artist Gabriella Torres-Ferrer. Their 2018 sculpture—called Untitled (Value Your American Lie)—is part of a major new show at the Whitney Museum in New York, exploring art in Puerto Rico in the five years since the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Maria in 2017.Velvet Terrorism: Pussy Riot's Russia, Kling & Bang, Reykjavik, until 15 January 2023. Pussy Riot: Riot Days, National Theatre of Iceland, Reykjavik, 25 November. Proceeds from the concert and the exhibition go to supporting Ukraine. You can hear an in-depth interview with Ragnar Kjartansson from 2020 on our sister podcast A brush with… on the usual podcast platforms.No existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, until 23 Apr 2023. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy
Clint Dyer on dealing with dyslexia, racism, his admiration for Shakespeare and his vision for directing

Ways to Change the World with Krishnan Guru-Murthy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 33:24


Clint Dyer is an actor, writer and director who has turned his pain into power. That power has resulted in numerous ‘firsts', the first Black British artist to have performed, written and directed a full-scale production at the National Theatre and the first Black man to direct a Shakespeare tragedy at a major British venue. In this episode, Clint joins Krishnan to discuss theatrical traditions, his vision to articulate the Black experience and his new history-making production of Shakespeare's tragedy Othello.  Warning: this podcast contains references to racist language Produced by : Imahn Robertson

Breakfast Leadership
Featured Interview with Jack Milner

Breakfast Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 26:09


I am a communication coach who provides organisations with the tools to influence, persuade, and engage—whether through storytelling, presenting, or communicating within teams. A few years ago, I got in touch with Cisco Webex with suggestions on how they could improve their software. In time, I ended up working with Webex on a regular basis, and this collaboration, in turn, led me to design virtual training programmes for some of the firm's biggest clients. My masterclasses help organisations take dry, often technical information and render it clear, memorable, and engaging. I help clients like Cigna US, Samsung, Google, Cisco, Microsoft, GVC, Ofsted, McCann, Adam&Eve DDB, Virgin Media, Commerzbank, BBC, National Theatre, and Channel 4. I have been lucky enough to coach the world's best-selling professional speakers. According to London Speakers Bureau, the largest speaking agency in the world outside the United States, I coached their three best-selling speakers in Europe in 2018 and 2019; and I coached Red Whale, the winning team for Webinars That Rock 2019, essentially the Oscars of webinars. The award was for best webinar in the world, as judged by the event platform, ON24. Away from virtual land, I also work as a comedy playwright. My plays, including “Octopus Soup” (co-written with Mark Stevenson) and “The Mummy” have completed number-one tours nationally and internationally. Link to my book: https://amzn.to/3xYAsdO Link to my website: http://standupanddeliver.co.uk Link to my online Virtual Academy: https://standupanddeliver-virtual-presentation-online.teachable.com First 10 people who contact me directly get a year on the Online Academy "How to be a Virtual Presentation Star" FREE (saving £119). Thereafter anyone who gets in touch and asks to join will get a place on the Academy at HALF PRICE and a free copy of my book for £59. Social Media Links: http://standupanddeliver.co.uk Twitter: @jackmilnertrain Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jack-milner-3246394/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jackstandupanddeliver

The Verb
Playwrighting

The Verb

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 44:03


On The Verb this week we're raising the curtain on playwriting. Ian McMillan is joined by four playwrights; Winsome Pinnock whose recent work includes The Principles of Cartography and Rockets and Blue Lights; by Liz Lochhead, whose writing ranges widely over playwriting and poetry and who has written for the National Theatre of Scotland, Steve Waters who works for stage, radio and screen and Keisha Thompson Director and CEO of Contact Theatre in Manchester. Presenter: Ian McMillan Producer: Cecile Wright

The West End Frame Show: Theatre News, Reviews & Chat
S7 Ep10 (ft. Alex Parker): Alexia Khadime & Lucy St Louis in Wicked, The Woman In Black, Strictly Ballroom, WhatsOnStage Awards + more!

The West End Frame Show: Theatre News, Reviews & Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 50:45


Musical Director, Producer and Writer Alex Parker (My Fair Lady / The Light in the Piazza) co-hosts The West End Frame Show!Andrew and Alex discuss Strictly Ballroom (New Wimbledon Theatre, UK Tour) and the WhatsOnStage Awards, as well as the latest news about Wicked casting, The Woman in Black closing, the Nanny McPhee musical and lots more. Alex is currently the musical director for the UK & Ireland tour of My Fair Lady directed by Bartlett Sher.Additionally, Alex is currently producing and musical directing a concert staging of The Light in the Piazza at the Alexandra Palace Theatre on 27th November with an all-star cast including Elena Shaddow, Amara Okereke, Jordan Luke Gage, Rebecca Lock and Amy Di Bartolomeo.Alex made a splash on the theatre scene when he produced and musical directed the London premiere of Stephen Sondheim's Putting It Together at the St James Theatre (now The Other Palace) starring Janie Dee. Most recently he produced and musical directed Wonderful Town at Opera Holland Park, Gypsy starring seven Roses at the Alexandra Palace Theatre, Sunset Boulevard at Alexandra Palace Theatre & Royal Albert Hall and his own musical AmDram at Leicester Curve.Alex has also produced and musical directed A Little Night Music on two occasions, at the Palace Theatre in the West End and Opera Holland Park.Alex was the musical director for Mame at the Hope Mill Theatre, The Color Purple at Leicester Curve and My Left Right Foot for the National Theatre of Scotland. Other shows that he has worked on include Sweet Charity, Barnum, Secret Diary of Adrain Mole, Wonderland, Working, Les Misérables, Stephen Ward, The Pajama Game, Soho Cinders and so much more. The list is endless!The Light in the Piazza is staged at the Alexandra Palace Theatre on 27th November 2022. Visit www.alexandrapalace.com for info and tickets.Hosted by Andrew Tomlins. @AndrewTomlins32  Thanks for listening! Email: andrew@westendframe.co.uk Visit westendframe.co.uk for more info about our podcasts.  

St Paul's Cathedral
In Green Pastures: The Psalms in Prayer and Music

St Paul's Cathedral

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 74:52


The psalms contain some of the most beautiful lines in Scripture, lines that inspire and comfort us when we need them most. They draw us into a life of prayer and praise and have been the prayerbook of the church, and often its hymnbook too, for 2,000 years. Jesus himself knew them and prayed them. And they are profoundly honest about what human life is really like, from the heights to the depths. They take us on a rollercoaster of emotions, from joy to anguish, praise to fury, torment to a place of deep peace. They teach us that we can bring everything - our real lives, our doubts, joys, and even our very darkest feelings - into the presence of God. In this film, Biblical scholar Paula Gooder introduces some of her favourite psalms and their themes of joy, lament, comfort and reconciliation, and reflect on how they can draw us closer to God. The film includes live music, with members of the St Paul's Cathedral Consort performing settings of psalms from across the centuries. Dr Paula Gooder is Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral. She is the author of many academic and popular books on theology, faith and the Bible including 'Journalling the Psalms: A guide for prayer and reflection' (Hodder 2022). St Paul's Cathedral Choir is led by Andrew Carwood MBE and is one of the leading choirs of the world. The reader is Adjoa Andoh, who plays lead roles in 'Bridgerton', 'Doctor Who' and 'Casualty', as well at the National Theatre and with the Royal Shakespeare Company. She is a Licenced Lay Minister in the Church of England.

Theatre Audience Podcast
Theatre Audience Podcast October/ November Round Up

Theatre Audience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 32:14


Natalie and Darren discuss a plethora of theatre we've seen in October and recommendations of whst's on in November. Productions reviewed in this episode include: Pretty Woman, My Neighbour Totoro, Tammy Faye, Blues for an Alabama Sky, Moulin Rouge, The Caucasian Chalk Circle, The Choir of Man, Eureka Day, An Improbable Musical, Enid Blyton's The Famous Five

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley
Sophia Anne Caruso & Alex Brightman

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 10:53


WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with Sophia Anne Caruso, who is currently starring in the Netflix original movie "The School for Good and Evil." They spoke in 2018 alongside Tony-nominated co-star Alex Brightman when they brought the pre-Broadway world premiere of "Beetlejuice: The Musical" to National Theatre in Washington D.C. (Theme Music: Scott Buckley's "Clarion")

Slovakia Today, English Language Current Affairs Programme from Slovak Radio
Slovak National Theatre Director General resigns. LGBTIQ+ in SK culture: ANDY WARHOL. (27.10.2022 16:00)

Slovakia Today, English Language Current Affairs Programme from Slovak Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 31:26


Culture Minister dismissed Slovak National Theatre Director General Matej Drlicka over his statement in English in Budapest. Several members of his team ended their terms too. Matej Drlicka spoke to RSI about making redundant several members of the Opera ensemble whom he mentioned in Budapest. RSI is also speaking to ex-director of the Drama ensemble Miriam Kicinova as well as to ex-director of the Opera ensemble about their reasons to resign. Starting a new series LGBTIQ+ in Slovak culture, we explore with Lucia Gregorova Stach, the chief curator of the modern and contemporary art collection at Slovak National Gallery, the reasons why Slovak curators avoid speaking about the queer identity of Andy Warhol despite the fact that the Tate Modern grand exhibition in London in 2020 as well as MUMOK exhibition in 2020 were open about this issue.

Saturday Live
Michael Ball

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 85:26


Michael Ball joins Nikki Bedi and Richard Coles. In a career spanning over 30 years the singer, actor and presenter has appeared in musicals from Les Miserables and Aspects of Love, to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Phantom of the Opera, winning Olivier Awards for his roles in Hairspray and Sweeney Todd. Michael's debut novel is a love letter to the theatre. As a boy, Hamed Amiri fled Herat with his parents and two brothers after the Taliban put out an execution order for his mother. Their journey from Afghanistan to the UK was made more complicated as his eldest brother had a heart condition. 20 years later, his story of displacement has been made into a play, shedding light on the plight of refugees. Donna Ashworth started a social media account to share inspirational quotes but after posting her poems anonymously she's now a bestselling writer. Gabby Logan shares her Inheritance Tracks: Reach Out I'll Be There by the Four Tops and One Day Like This by Elbow. Ranvir Singh is an award-winning presenter and former political editor for ITV's Good Morning Britain. She talks about her path to broadcasting and why riddles are featuring in her future. The Empire by Michael Ball is out now, Ball & Boe Together In Vegas is out on October 28th and Aspects of Love is booking from Friday 12 May 2023 until Saturday 11 November 2023 at London's Lyric Theatre. The Boy with Two Hearts is at the National Theatre and runs until 12 November. The books Love, Life and Loss by Donna Ashworth are out now. Gabby Logan's memoir The First Half is out now. Riddiculous starts on Monday 24th October at 3pm on ITV. Producer: Claire Bartleet

Woman's Hour
Erin Doherty in The Crucible, Strip clubs, Brazilian butt lifts, Angela Lansbury

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 57:35


Based on the Salem trials in Massachusetts in 1692, where young girls accused their elders of satanism, a new production of Arthur Miller's modern classic The Crucible has just opened at the National Theatre in London. Actor Erin Doherty, best known for her portrayal of a young Princess Anne in Netflix series The Crown, plays Abigail Williams, the girl whose spurned affections spark the witch hunt. She joins Jessica. Strip clubs in Edinburgh will be banned from April next year, but the venues and the strippers who work in them are fighting the decision. Supporters of the ban say it's upholding the Scottish Government's strategy on Violence Against Women and Girls which says stripping encompasses and engenders violence against women and girls. But strippers say it will impact their ability to earn a living and force them into dangerous working conditions at underground clubs. Jessica is joined by Tess Herrman from the Union of Sex Workers and also by former Labour councillor and Scotsman columnist Susan Dalgety. Dame Angela Lansbury, who won international acclaim as the star of the US TV crime series Murder, She Wrote, has died at the age of 96. The three-time Oscar nominee had a career spanning eight decades, across film, theatre and TV. She was born in London in 1925. When she moved to New York, she was discovered by a film executive who gave her, her first role as a maid in the 1944 film Gaslight. In 1973, Woman's Hour presenter Sue McGregor caught up with Dame Angela when she was performing in the stage show Gypsy. As university students settle in, are you experiencing empty nest syndrome? Listener Natalie Paddick got in touch to tell us about her feelings of loss now that all her children have left home. She joins Jessica along with author Celia Dodd who's written about the Empty Nest subtitled, 'Your Changing Family, Your New Direction'. For our occasional series Girl's World, Ena Miller went to talk to 14-year-olds Ruby, Nyima and Azelea at their school in Stroud. A Brazilian butt lift is a procedure where fat, usually from the stomach and back, is injected into the buttocks to change their shape and size. In 2018 - after the death of Leah Cambridge who had flown to Turkey to have the surgery - the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, or BAAPS, advised their members not to perform them. But this week they've released new recommendations they hope will make the procedure safer. Joining Jessica are the President of BAAPS, Marc Pacifico, and director Louise Coleman whose documentary The Bottom Line is on ITV Hub.

Writers on Film
Alistair Owen Smokes in Bed

Writers on Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 106:31


Alistair Owen is author of Smoking in Bed: Conversations with Bruce Robinson (one of David Hare's Books of the Year in the Guardian), Story and Character: Interviews with British Screenwriters, Hampton on Hampton (one of Craig Raine's Books of the Year in the Observer) and The Art of Screen Adaptation: Top Writers Reveal Their Craft.He has written original and adapted screenplays and stageplays, on spec and to commission; contributed filmmaker interviews to Creative Screenwriting and film book reviews to the Independent on Sunday; and recently published his first novel, The Vetting Officer.Alistair has chaired Q&A events at the Hay Festival, Edinburgh International Book Festival and London Screenwriters' Festival; and his platform with Christopher Hampton in the Lyttelton Theatre to celebrate Faber's 75th anniversary was published in the anthology Faber Playwrights at the National Theatre.His next nonfiction project is a book of conversations with bestselling author and screenwriter William Boyd, for Penguin.Find Alistair and his books on Amazon.com, Amazon UK, Goodreads and ShepherdSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/writers-on-film. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 65 – Unstoppable International Author with Diann Floyd Boehm

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 61:18


Diann Floyd Boehm has lived in various parts of the world. She brings her international life knowledge to the children's books and, so far, one adult book she has written. As you will find in this episode, Diann puts an incredible of amount of research and thought to everything she creates.   Diann gives a number of suggestions to anyone who might wish to write and get published. She encourages all of us to write down our stories even if we don't seek a writing career.   I hope you enjoy our talk with Diann. Who knows, you might become inspired to write and possibly even seek to get your creations published.   About the Guest:   Diann Floyd Boehm is an award-winning international author. Diann writes children's books and young adult books. In addition, Diann writes books to inspire kids to be kind, like themselves, and to "Embrace Imagination”.  You can find all her books on Amazon. Diann's Story Garden YouTube Channel gives children the opportunity to hear different children's authors read their stories. Diann is the co-host with Dr. Jacalyn on USA Global TV. Diann continues to be involved in various humanitarian projects with multiple organizations. Diann was born to the parents of George and Mabel Floyd in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but grew up in Texas with five brothers. She has traveled extensively to many parts of the world and has lived in the Philippines and Dubai. Keep in touch with Diann by joining her newsletter: www.Diannfloydboehm.com.     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome once again to yes that's right, unstoppable mindset where inclusion diversity in the unexpected meet. Today we get to meet and talk with an award winning international author. I don't know whether she writes about internationals, whatever they are, but we'll find out. Anyway, Diann Floyd Boehm, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Diann Floyd Boehm  01:45 Very well, thank you. International, because I've lived in several countries. And I've traveled a lot and and so the books are sold in different different countries. And I'm really proud of that.   Michael Hingson  01:57 Oh, cool. Do you publish them yourself? Or do you have a publisher?   Diann Floyd Boehm  02:02 Actually, I'm very blessed. I have two publishers see publish Shane Atacand. Canada and Texas sister press, obviously out of Texas. So How lucky is that? It took a lot to get here.   Michael Hingson  02:15 That is as good as it gets. Do the publishers war with each other? Do they care?   Diann Floyd Boehm  02:19 They are very kind to one another? So good. Yeah, that's   Michael Hingson  02:25 what was that is that is plus? How many books have you written?   Diann Floyd Boehm  02:28 I have nine books. And I have two more coming out one in the August late fall. Late summer, I should say sorry. And then in October, the second book? Oh, cool.   Michael Hingson  02:41 Well, we'll get to more of that. But why don't we start with the usual things that it's fun to hear about? And that is you growing up and so on. So where did you grow up? And do you have siblings or anything like that, or any of that sort of stuff that you'd like to tell us?   Diann Floyd Boehm  02:55 Sure. I love talking about my family. So I was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. But as the saying goes, we got to Texas as fast as we could. Actually Oklahoma was a lovely state. And But Mom and Daddy, job wise daddy ended up in Houston. And so we moved to Texas, and I grew up in Deer Park, Texas. And later on I became Mr. Park 77 and so is a wonderful, wonderful city to grew up in. And I have five siblings, which gives me lots of insight to having five brothers and having a feel for what boys might say, especially when they were dating. And what else mama and daddy, best parents ever one could ask for hard working. I mean, we didn't get everything we wanted because you know they've six mouths to feed. But that's how you learn to appreciate life. You know, you start babysitting, if you want something or, you know you get a job at 16 so that you learn the value of the dollar. And I really appreciated all that. So how does one growing up?   Michael Hingson  04:10 So how did you get to be Miss Deer Park? How did that work out?   Diann Floyd Boehm  04:15 It was It wasn't like I was trying to do those things, meaning contests. But a neighbor that I used to babysit for Mrs. Bedford. She said she was going to be starting to Miss San Jacinto, which is a college out here are out there because I moved and what I like to be in it and I was like, no, because I'm not pretty. And then when she said, Well, they're gonna have a talent show and you can win scholarships for college, and then my ears perked up. I wanted to go to college. And when I found out that you would develop interview skills and things that can help you for the future. I latched on to that and tried to enter as many college based contests that I could, and I won a few. And I lost them even more. But that's how you learn, you need to lose. So you learn, and then improve. And developing those interview skills has helped me all through my life so far, and hence, look where I'm   Michael Hingson  05:26 at. There you go. Where do you live? Now, by the way, you said you moved? Yes.   Diann Floyd Boehm  05:31 So I mean, I've lived in a lot of places, but we've raised our children in Austin, Texas. Ah, okay. I'm in the hill country. And I love it.   Michael Hingson  05:42 So are you in Austin? Yes. Well,   Diann Floyd Boehm  05:45 I'm in the hills section in Travis County, where the hills START to begin. So it's the beginning of the hill country. So it's really, really pretty.   Michael Hingson  05:54 I haven't been in touch for a couple of years. But have you ever eaten at a restaurant in Austin called the blind goat?   Diann Floyd Boehm  06:00 If you know people are talking about that one, and I have not, but I am going to make a point to do that.   Michael Hingson  06:07 Christine ha who started that restaurant was the winner on master chefs. In I think 2011, she is blind. She's the only blind person to my knowledge, who has ever won that she beat out, I think something like 18,000 people to do it. Wow. And, and so I haven't corresponded with her for a while. But if you get a chance, I'd love to hear what you think of it. Since you're closer than we are.   Diann Floyd Boehm  06:36 I will make a point to do that. Thank you for telling me and, and kudos for her, as she must be an excellent chef. But to beat out that many people is extraordinary. And it shows you that when you want something, you don't let anything stop you.   Michael Hingson  06:55 Exactly right. So one girl and five brothers, that must have been a lot of fun.   Diann Floyd Boehm  07:02 It was a blast. And, you know, I feel very grateful to grown up in the time period that I did. I had two older brothers, and then three younger, so I had, you know, siblings that I got to change their diapers and stuff, because they're much younger than me. So they were my dollies. But it's a great learning experience. And it also made sure that I wasn't boy crazy, because I really know what boys were all about.   Michael Hingson  07:29 And I'll bet they kind of monitored you to the older ones. Especially.   Diann Floyd Boehm  07:34 Oh my gosh, do I have stories for you? About I didn't really date that much, especially in high school. And I always thought it was because I was so ugly, because my brothers would always be telling me I was fat and ugly. And of course, I believed them because they were family. Right? And, and I was one of these girls that you know, just like people said that then it must be true. So then my brother Danny told me about four years ago, he said, you know, Diane, you know how you didn't really date that much in high school? And I said, Yeah, and he goes, Well, I have a confession to make. I told the boys if they even looked at you, that I would punch him. So there you go.   Michael Hingson  08:22 elzear Er, and so your your, your husband had a gauntlet to go through? Hmm.   Diann Floyd Boehm  08:29 Oh, well, that is a funny story too. Because all my brothers were fantastic at sports. And some of them became coaches in the neighborhood and so forth. And our else they were also a coach for schools. And so along comes my husband. And they say, you know, what sport do you play? And of course, he's like, Oh, I go fishing. And I'm a third degree black belt. And I do you know, a bunch of stuff. And they're thinking, okay, that's not football, and it's not basketball. And it's not baseball. So he's Yeah, he's not going to make it in the family. And so they didn't pay attention to him anymore. And so he just kind of slid right in. But they love them. So what can I say? He's really smart.   Michael Hingson  09:24 So that worked out. Okay, well, that's a good thing. Well, so did you mostly just grow up in Texas? Or did you? When did you start to travel abroad? I guess it's probably a better way to put the question.   Diann Floyd Boehm  09:37 Sure. Yes, I grew up in Texas. And actually, when my husband became a diplomat, our first year of marriage was in Virginia. And it was my I'd always gone to Oklahoma because that's where my daddy family was. And my mom's side they had already moved to Texas. And so that was my only experience really have a Being out of Texas. So when we moved to Virginia, it was very different for me. And I remember calling my dad and just checking in as you know, kids stay with their parents, especially on Sundays. And Daddy, so my nickname was Suge with him for short for sugar. And he said, so should, how are things going? And I'm like, Daddy, you won't believe this place. It must be like living in a foreign country. Do you know they make you pay for parking, just to see your doctor. So anyway, I think that was funny. My daddy was like, Oh, you poor thing   Michael Hingson  10:40 was bad there. You should have been in New York, but go ahead.   Diann Floyd Boehm  10:44 But it was my husband, as I said, being a diplomat that took us to be able to see the world and we lived in the Philippines for three years and, you know, traveled a lot of places there, which I dearly loved, and I loved the Filipino people. And then, fast forward. He became a lawyer in Texas, and that's where we raised our kids. And then one day he received a phone call, how would you like to move to Dubai? So we moved to Dubai, and live there 14 years. And that allowed me to travel quite a bit in Europe and Africa, and parts of Asia. So I feel very blessed.   Michael Hingson  11:27 What prompted the move to Dubai. What was the reason that they called him and wanted him to do that? Because he wasn't diplomat them? Was he or   Diann Floyd Boehm  11:34 No, he wasn't. But his the law firm that he's working for at the time, Fulbright and Jaworski wanted to open up a firm there, so they purchased one, and then they opened up a new firm in Saudi Arabia, and my husband became part of that whole experience. Yeah, it was awesome.   Michael Hingson  11:56 So what was it like living in the Philippines and like living in Dubai, and like living in Virginia, as opposed to living in Texas?   Diann Floyd Boehm  12:06 It's an eye opener.   Michael Hingson  12:08 It really is. Yeah. But it is fun to live in various parts that it is fun to live in various parts of the United States, I've had the pleasure of spending years in Massachusetts and in New Jersey. And then during a project that I worked on in the mid to late 1970s, I spent time in Iowa in New York, and Colorado. So I've had, as a speaker, I've had the opportunity to travel all over the country. And it is wonderful just to see all the different kinds of experiences.   Diann Floyd Boehm  12:40 I love our country, I absolutely love the United States. And every state is so beautiful. And there's something so positive to say about each state. And I think as an American, and it's important for us to get to know the different states because each state has things that they they do that are so important that help help each one of us. And so I can't say enough. I've been in all the states, except for Hawaii, I really need to go to Hawaii. And then I need to spend a little bit more time in Wisconsin. I haven't spent enough time there. But also living in the Philippines and answer to your question. Wow, what beautiful people they are they I just love the Philippines. I love the people I was able to teach school there as well as be one of the first Americans in the the National Theatre there and be in several other musicals. And then in Dubai, how lucky to be able to be in the Middle East, get to know the people understand the customs, and meet people from all over the world. I think there's like 172 different nationalities in that country working beautifully together. And so I can't say enough about Dubai as well. And the opportunities that gave me to travel.   Michael Hingson  14:09 So when you were overseas, and then of course, when you when you move back. What did you do? So your husband was diplomatic and lawyering and what did you do?   Diann Floyd Boehm  14:19 Excellent question. Before we left I was my background is education. I was a teacher. And I was one of the there were several of us teachers who knew how to turn on a computer and a lot of people didn't. And so we helped launch, bringing computers in the classroom, discovering what software would work with different subjects for curriculum, and then I started training teachers and computers. So by the time that happened, I was traveling quite a bit around the country in the schools, which gave me a real feel for different states. And then I had to reinvent myself when we moved to Dubai. And that allowed me to do something that I always wanted to be able to do, which was humanitarian work. And so that led me to Africa where I spent a lot of time in Ethiopia, Uganda, and Kenya. So how exciting. Is that? Right?   Michael Hingson  15:21 Right. When you say humanitarian work, what did you do? I mostly   Diann Floyd Boehm  15:24 was in the orphanages helping and learning how the orphanages work to and finding out ways that I could I and people who were with me, could assist in helping the orphans have food and clothing and so forth. In Kenya and Uganda, I was predominantly in the schools, and a couple of the schools I helped do some projects where we help provide shoes, gathered shoes, took them, there was a whole process. And and another school, I ran a project, where we helped girls, if you can imagine, some girls were 14 and 15. And they never and a bra, I still get, I still get embarrassed to say things, you know, I'm modest. And that was an exciting, that was an exciting process. Another time, we ran a project where we provided dresses for the girls to have church dresses. And then for the boys, we provided some slacks. Actually, for them, they would be more long shorts. And they were made out of pillowcases, and my quilting group made all the other dresses or skirts and pants. So that was really exciting. And I had a team helping me and also bringing them to the schools.   Michael Hingson  16:59 And all of your travels, what was maybe the most scariest thing you ever had to encounter?   Diann Floyd Boehm  17:04 Gee whiz, I'd have to think, you know, I we were with people who really understood the country. And we were always with people that were our guides, and so actually never was afraid of anything. So and we went way out into the bar. Yes. I think the only time I might have was afraid when my husband decided that he wanted to take our Datsun and head for this volcano that had not erupted in many, many years. And then he decided to take a back street and this back street was not a straight and we were driving through the jungle. And I didn't know if we were ever going to get out. And experience with my husband.   Michael Hingson  17:51 So but you never really encountered bad people or or kind of difficult things like that. And in any of your travels.   Diann Floyd Boehm  17:59 No, no, I was very lucky. Well,   Michael Hingson  18:03 so you, you traveled, you came back. And when you came back from Dubai, Did you go back to teaching? Did you do more humanitarian work or what?   Diann Floyd Boehm  18:16 Well, before I left, I was already working on tape. I've always been a storyteller. And I had decided I really wanted to take my stories and put them into print. And so I was in that process. So when I was over in Dubai, I really worked hard to figure out how to make things happen. And started also taking art lessons so that maybe I could do simple illustrations for some of the books that i i now have published. And so when I came back, I became published in Dubai actually. But when I came back home, I really concentrated on writing even more books and learning this whole skill of how to be an author and the craftsmanship and so forth. And that's where I'm at. I do go to the schools as an invited author. And I like give. I mean, I just when I'm in school, in schools with kiddos, even all the way up to 12th grade, I'm in my element because I have an opportunity to let each one of them know to love themselves believe in themselves and go after it. And if I can walk away and made a difference in their life, then I'm very, very excited.   Michael Hingson  19:38 So nowadays do you write full time? Pretty much if I'm not writing?   Diann Floyd Boehm  19:41 I'm in the garden? Are I my dog? I should say my husband's and my dog. He's a cow dog. And he's a rescue. And I can tell it was my son's wife's family who found them, and they actually have a small ranch. And Remi was used to having days where he could ride around and get out to the cows. So he gets really, or she gets very excited if she gets to go on a drive. So besides walking her, she gets her daily dose of riding in the car, and she gets very   Michael Hingson  20:26 excited. What's important, you know,   Diann Floyd Boehm  20:29 yeah, I like to keep my, I love my dog. She's amazing metrics. She's just sitting right outside, waiting, like, what are you gonna do next?   Michael Hingson  20:40 Don't I get to be part of the interview?   Diann Floyd Boehm  20:42 Yeah. I've said start liking the screen.   Michael Hingson  20:47 So you started writing? And you said you actually got published in Dubai? What kind of a book was it? That you got published in Dubai?   Diann Floyd Boehm  20:57 It was Harry the Campbell a children's book. And OC publishing out of Canada. Took it online. And that was very exciting. I wanted to write a book about camel. And I'd been wanting to do it for some time. And so they published that. And then they published right away from when I was in Dubai, the series, it's a series now the little girl in the moon. And that's morphed into the moon Ling adventures. So yeah.   Michael Hingson  21:30 So how many books have you had published altogether? Now? Nine. And what kind of what kind of books are they primarily?   Diann Floyd Boehm  21:40 The majority are children's books. And then I have my very first young adult Historical fiction Based on my grandma, it's right here, Ruby, rise, girls struggle for more. And that's my grandmother on the cover. And my books are about believing in yourselves, imagination being kind to others, even if they're different. And in the case of Ryza, girls struggle for more, that particular book is to inspire people to go after your dreams. So if a girl born in 1904, where life is so so different for young men and young women, then and, and she can make her dream come true, which was to be a business woman at the time, which was not, you know, very common, especially down south. If I could say that, and at least in her area should qualify that, then you can, then you can do that, too. And that's really important to me, when schools are as big as they are, especially in high school, it's easy in junior high, it's easy to get lost. And I want kids to know that they are special. And whatever your dream is, just stay focused and be persistent. I mean, if I can do it, I feel like you can too. And I always tell the kids, look, I grew up in a small house compared to today's homes. Men, and you can imagine, you know, six kids, a mom and dad and one bathroom. But it's not about how much you have, or it's are how little you have. It's about what if you really want something? Let's map out a goal and figure out how to make it happen.   Michael Hingson  23:39 Good advice. And, you know, we, we often just allow ourselves to be diverted or we, we tend to think, oh, we can't do something and how do we how do we change that mindset with people? Obviously, you're contributing to that by writing the books that you're writing. But in general, how do we do we get people to recognize that probably, they can do a lot more than the things they could?   Diann Floyd Boehm  24:03 Yeah, that's really true. And, and I really believe that the first thing we can do is to be a good listener. So love yourself, but be a good listener. And if we could all become a better listener, and not really want to jump in and say, okay, okay, you've had your you had your say, Now, listen to me, because I really know the answers, right? That's not being a good listener. Because if you're a good listener, then you're going to be learning and figuring out how to work together. And if you have a goal of something you're wanting to do, and someone's trying to help you map those skills out, be opened to listening so that you can design the best way to make that happen. At least that's my two cents worth.   Michael Hingson  24:55 One thing that came to mind is just what's going on In our country today where no one is listening, the politicians in general aren't listening to most everyone else. And the politicians aren't listening to each other. We've lost the art of conversation and discussion and finding solutions together, it seems to me, don't you think?   Diann Floyd Boehm  25:20 Yes, I try really hard not to discuss politics very much right? On, on what you're speaking of, I can feel a little comfortable. You know, my daddy, I remember when I was young, we would be at the dinner table. And Daddy would say, this is not a good sign that people are putting out how they're going to vet the signs in the yard. And one of my brothers would be saying, Well, why is that and it goes, because it would start infighting. And I think he was right. And then he said, Oh, zip kids, that's not good. And, you know, I'd go, why daddy, and he goes, because people are gonna think their zip code and where they live is better. It's dividing us. And then all of a sudden, he was like, I don't want to fill out these circles. And you're like, well, let's circles and he's like, we're all Americans. I'm just gonna scratch this out and say, we're all Americans, you know. And I think, you know, learning these little bit of wisdoms of knowing how things changed over time, that is led us to where we are today, that I wish I could get politicians to take some listening courses, to learn how to listen to again, and not be looking for the soundbite. That's going to be the great soundbite to have on the news. It's not about sound bites, it's about running this country. It's about working together. And seeing all of us is one, and how we can make that happen. And so you have to be able to figure out compromises and the art of compromise, I'm afraid sometimes is not happening. But I don't have a magic wand to make everybody happy. But if I did, I would.   Michael Hingson  27:06 Yeah, well, that's what you're talking about is the point of my question, which is, it's all about conversation. And it's all about listening. We've lost the art of conversation. And there are a lot of reasons that we can probably point to, as to why that's occurred. But the bottom line is that we become very undisciplined when it comes to talking with each other. And there's, there's no reason that we should be in that kind of position. There's also no reason that we shouldn't be able to ask why a lot more. And of course, the answer to that, in part is why not. So we need to really get back to finding ways to interact with each other. And I don't know whether I totally go along with the zip code idea. Because we, we have, we have a postal system, and we have to deliver mail to people. And so it's all about sorting. And as we grew, we needed to create something different. But I think it's a discipline of how we deal with some of the changes that we've made, so that we don't lose that, that conversational process in companies. So many times, the bosses know all the answers, and don't listen to workers anymore. And we see a lot of that when we have discussions about business that people don't recognize that they're when they hire people. There's a lot of expertise that comes with hiring people. And there's also a divergence of opinions. The most important thing is to get the opinions to get all the data and then synthesize it in an objective way. And we just tend to lose that skill nowadays.   Diann Floyd Boehm  29:01 I could not agree with you more, and I even agree with you on the zip codes. But would you like to run for president? That would be really nice.   Michael Hingson  29:13 Oh, that would be an interesting job.   Diann Floyd Boehm  29:17 Yeah, that's a tough one. It is a tough one. You know, I remember on Sundays Mom and Daddy like to listen to some of the political shows. And of course, my husband and I always did. And I remember, Tip O'Neill was really good about sitting down and speaking with Kennedy and I thought she was why can't we have more of that today? Yeah. Yeah, so it'd be nice. Well,   Michael Hingson  29:45 going back to your books. You had mentioned something about you have a specific type font that you use and some of the books   Diann Floyd Boehm  29:53 specific font. Oh, yes, fine. Thank you for remembering that so sweet of you. Yes. So, so it's called the dyslexia font. And once I discovered this fight, now I'm putting on my books and that font, it allows everyone to be able to read my books. And what I really love about it is that it's an empowering book, but in so many ways, so kids who had to have dyslexia, which one of my nieces has, when they go into the library, they don't have to go to a special section of books that are just for them. Now they can be like everybody and find the books and go, Oh, my gosh, I can I can actually read this. And that, to me is very empowering. And very exciting.   Michael Hingson  30:47 Have you done anything to make your books accessible to people who don't necessarily read print or read print? Well,   Diann Floyd Boehm  30:54 I need to do that? No, I haven't. You know, it's, it's very expensive to be a hybrid publisher. That's our hybrid author. And so what that means is I have a publisher, but I also help invest in the publishing. And so the cost can add up quite a bit. So I still need to go for that audio books. And I wouldn't mind having my books done in Braille as well, because that would be really good.   Michael Hingson  31:25 One place to get books converted to a usable form a readable form by people who are, if you will, individuals with print disabilities, this is an organization called bookshare.org. Bookshare is an organization that will take files and convert them to electronic media, they can be converted to Braille, but people can just plain download them as well. Now, obviously, if there are a lot of illustrations, the trick is to put in descriptions of the illustrations, but for the print parts, and so on, it is an easy way to get access to the to those books for people who don't reprint. And the the point is that the copyright laws allow organization, they'll allow books to be converted for people who are not going to reprint. And the the only people who can check books out or download books from Bookshare are people who are registered and who have print disabilities. So it's, it's a protected way. So the author doesn't lose their ability to to create an income stream and so on, other than Bookshare makes the books available for people. So it's something to look at. But the publishers should really be looking at that as well, because they should want your books to be inclusive, I would think.   Diann Floyd Boehm  32:54 Absolutely. And even if they didn't, the mere fact that you told me about it makes me want to do that. Because I think that, especially my messages that I have are for everyone. And I and I also think that being able to do something like that is giving back to the world. And I'm a total believer in that. And I am so grateful for you for telling me about Bookshare.   Michael Hingson  33:21 And so definitely, definitely something to look at. Well tell me about the little girl in the moon and the moon Ling series.   Diann Floyd Boehm  33:28 Sure, I'll be happy to. So my tagline is embrace your imagination. And the moon Ling series definitely does that. So the little girl in the moon lives on the moon. And she is a mainly just like you and I are Earthlings. And you have an opportunity to discover what Moon links look like in the little girl on the moon, the first book. The next one is the little girl on the moon and the big idea. And that book is really for everybody because it's all about making kind wishes come true. And the book might how a little kid will read it. It'll be totally different how an adult reads it. So I like to say it has a lot of layering and I I truly love that book. And then it more often to the moon Ling adventures and my youngest daughter is the illustrator for that. And in the main length of Ventures we bring in the little boy in the moon and both the little girl and the little boy Moon each one of their dog days. And they take us on adventures through going to the observatory and in and on the moon. And they experience in a simulator just like we would do back home on earth and they visit different parts. So the first one was Kenya, I'll let you in for secret because no one else knows it. But you get to know about it. And your audience, and that is my daughter is working online, the main link adventures, birds around the world. And so I'm very excited about that one. And sequel. Yes, so we'll have several. And the purpose of these books is the main length of ventures, again, is how much we are alike than different. So they live in Tycho town. And taiko is the largest crater on the moon that we can see from here on Earth. And so I build in ways that science and teachers can use this for curriculum, but also again, trying to show how much America where we are in the world, how we love different animals, how we enjoy different birds. And so find the similarities that connect us so that we can have moments to just have peace and tranquility, because we're all humans, and we share this globe together. And so that's really the purpose as the home angling adventures.   Michael Hingson  36:18 So this whole thing with the modeling Adventures is fascinating. Except how do they survive up there without an atmosphere on the Moon? Hmm. Excellent. Good technical here.   Diann Floyd Boehm  36:30 Excellent question. So I actually have one where you meet Moxie, the little girl on the moon stogie, and you go on a tour of Tyco town, and you discover that as you go inside the crater, that you there's this huge bubble, and this fig bubble allows them to be able to breathe inside their town, and, and then also, the bear, they have a fake gravity going on. Because their scientists are so smart, they can figure all that out. But when they're on the actual surface of the moon, then just like our astronauts, they even the doggies have special shoes that keep them grounded. And so I that's how I worked it all out. And I even have a whole back story about that, that one day, I'll come out. And   Michael Hingson  37:31 well, the only problem was living on the moon, that's my discomfort with living on the Moon is without an atmosphere, they must get bombarded by a whole lot more meteors than then we get hit with. Yes, those rocks come from anywhere.   Diann Floyd Boehm  37:47 That's true. But to enter a Tai Chi town, you actually have to press this one little rock that's on the surface. And you enter this inside the cavity of the moon. And so it's a whole new world, because your imagination?   Michael Hingson  38:05 Well, sure, well, there's there's nothing wrong with that. It's just that you do have to deal with the meteors and all that and, you know,   Diann Floyd Boehm  38:15 not having your inside, not appear inside   Michael Hingson  38:17 know that I understand. But it's been on the. And of course, if the meteors hit the bubble, does that get noisy? So there's another question for you to explore,   Diann Floyd Boehm  38:26 I will have to explore that. So much I will. I love it because you're getting my imagination going. But I also have this book card, a song of peace. And it's about a little boy named Tommy. And he just wants peace on earth. And there's a twist to it at the end. Because a lot of books are written about peace. So I have a fun, unique little twist to it. And it just won a couple awards. And so I'm very proud of it. And right now, with everything going on. One thing we could do is everybody take a deep breath and just say the word piece over and over and over and put it out there.   Michael Hingson  39:12 Which goes back to what we talked about earlier with conversations and listening. Yes, it sure does. What kind of research or how do you do research for your books, I'm assuming just by listening to you that a lot of thought and research goes into what you do.   Diann Floyd Boehm  39:27 Thank you. So the children's books they come to me and I'm inspired when it comes to the moon Ling adventures. Yes, I do a lot of research I needed to really study birds and where they fly and when they're migrating and if what where they migrate so I can show and teach the unity. So for example, the Dover bird it is in in Dubai I, but it also flies to several other countries migrates into the United States and to South America, and parts of Europe. And that makes it fun because again, it shows commonalities between the countries. And I always like to say rude because it was about my grandma but and rise of girls struggle for more, oh, my stars, I can't even begin to tell you how much more admiration I have for historical fiction writers. Because years of studying goes into making, making sure you have the voice, right for that time period that you actually have the facts correct about the settings and so forth. And I actually wish I can wake my grandma up from heaven and say, Grandma, you didn't yet a lot of other things you should have told me. It was because the 1920s is fascinating.   Michael Hingson  41:04 Oh, it is. And we, we talk about how in our world, we've advanced so much, and so on. But we forget a lot of the lessons that we could learn from before we and I put the term in quotes advanced so far.   Diann Floyd Boehm  41:20 Yes. You're absolutely right. And we repeat so many things. And so if we could just take a deep breath, especially you politicians, and listen to people have lived a little longer and and learn from that and learn from mistakes and history so that we don't repeat, it would be quite lovely. Right?   Michael Hingson  41:43 So do you hear a lot from other authors and readers and so on? How do you interact with them? And they must give you ideas and things to think about as well?   Diann Floyd Boehm  41:54 Thank you for the question. So I've joined several author groups, and I am always learning from them. And I appreciate so much from seasoned authors. Because, again, I was an excellent classroom teacher. And I want to be an excellent author. And the only way to do that is to learn from the seasoned authors. So I really appreciate it. And I have a publicist. Now, like I didn't even know that authors could have publicist. And so actually, that's how I met you. So kudos to my publisher, making that decision. And he is teaching me a lot as well. I am a young author in the sense of having things published. And so I have a huge learning curve. But that's okay. Cuz that means when I'm out there, especially with students, they get a kick out of me saying, I'm on a learning curve, too. So let's learn together.   Michael Hingson  42:59 Tell us about some of your speaking, trips to classes and so on. What does that been like?   Diann Floyd Boehm  43:05 Um, it depends on what country I'm in. Because that really makes a difference in the culture and how you dress and so forth. So if I was in Saudi Arabia, then, you know, I wear a baya. And I always believe that no matter what country you're in, you respect and follow their laws and their rules. And I had the opportunity. And I feel very blessed to be at a British school several times in Saudi Arabia. I spent her week there, and was with kiddos from elementary up through middle school, and then only was I in their classrooms had opportunities to teach some of them privately creative writing, read their writings have one on one conversations. But also, the principals at each school were incredible. They gave time off, I don't know how they figured it out. But where I would have all the teachers in the auditorium and they could pick my brains. And that was really exciting. And as a matter of fact, a couple of them have are now published authors because of their experience there. So I feel very lucky. In America, I've been in many classrooms. And of course, since I understand the American system, I can you know, I'm like, you know, it's like, yeah, I understand everything going on. What what is it that you want me to do? What is the outcome because I don't do a canned presentation. I want to hear what is it you want to take away to be? And when I hear what that takeaway is, then I design a program for them. I have them go over it to make sure it is exactly what they want. And then we go from there. So it can be from working with young children all the way up to. So far it's been ninth grade. And where we've done creative writing projects together. It's for   Michael Hingson  45:15 you. It's really, I think, important to not do canned speeches, I was talking with someone else about this recently. And I think that the best speakers are speakers who learn about their audiences, and who are even capable during the speech, of when necessary, making a course correction or whatever, to make sure that we're connecting with the audience, and engaging the audience. And so as I put it, I love to talk with audiences. I never like to talk to an audience, no matter their age.   Diann Floyd Boehm  45:52 I love that phrase speaking with not to, absolutely. And besides, you get energy from that, because, you know, they're listening and engaging in what you're saying. And so when they ask you a question, you're like, Oh, I didn't even really think of that. But your brain gives you an answer. It's very exciting. I actually sock away full of energy.   Michael Hingson  46:16 That's really a good point that when you open opportunities for questions, you never know what kind of questions you're gonna get, especially with little kids. And I learn more from answering questions, especially from kids, because they're not shy, generally speaking. And they're very curious. And it's fun to have real conversations, and they tend to respect you more, when you're conversing with them, not just lecturing. Even when you're answering a question, if your lecturer as opposed to talking with, they know the difference?   Diann Floyd Boehm  46:57 Absolutely. I just recently, because of COVID, there was no in person. But now some of the schools are opening up and I was at this beautiful girl school. And the young girls had very direct questions. And sometimes instead of just answering the question directly, I would give examples of my own childhood because I wanted them to understand that I actually knew and understood what it was like to be a little girl, or to be a preteen. And then from there answer the question in the smiles that went on their faces with the question because they knew I was really trying hard for them. To know. I understand. Did that make sense?   Michael Hingson  47:44 Yeah, you they knew you got it? Because you remember living it yourself.   Diann Floyd Boehm  47:50 And when people see you as an adult, sometimes they can't even your own children. Imagine you live like what you were little Are you kidding me? I bet you couldn't relate to the world.   Michael Hingson  48:02 You know, and from my perspective, as a speaker, I'm not happy unless I go away from an event learning more than I'm able to impart. And I can tell when that happens. When I get great, engaging questions, when I get an opportunity to interact before and after the event, and all the things that are occur, it is so much fun, to be able to have lots of takeaways as a speaker, so it's it's sharing knowledge and information, not just imparting knowledge and information.   Diann Floyd Boehm  48:41 Oh, you are so right sharing. And then you just you're you're so excited and jittery that you know you just like I need a Diet Coke. And Coca Cola didn't pay me to say that.   Michael Hingson  48:55 Yeah, well, so I understand. Time for something new. Yes, yeah. Well, what's on the horizon? Book wise? I know you're talking about one sequel coming up. But what's, what's next in terms of projects and so on for you?   Diann Floyd Boehm  49:09 Sure. So I am working on the sequel to rise the girls struggle for more. It'll be a good while before this out, because I just now finished the research. And so I've mapped out how it's going to go   Michael Hingson  49:23 at least you're going to be on the moon will be on the moon again. No, this   Diann Floyd Boehm  49:27 is a young adult historical fiction, the moon when I just shared the main link of venture birds around the world. And August I have coming out a time to fly and I'm supercharged about that one. It's all about a little birdie who doesn't want to leave this nest and his mama helps him get the courage to fly. And I think that is something that will every person can relate to it In US adults remembering there was a time that we were afraid to open that door. And, and so yeah, I'm really excited about that. And then in October, it's Charlie and the tire swing. And that's been on the back burner for some time. So, so excited it made it through up to the top list for the publisher to say it's time to do that one. And that'll morph and to Charlie and the tire swing adventures, so but this first one is all about how Charlie got the tire swing. And I'm really, really, both of them I'm just thrilled about and each have a different space in my heart for what they share and do.   Michael Hingson  50:45 What's your favorite character that you've created? Or that that has invaded your psyche that has come out in books?   Diann Floyd Boehm  50:51 Oh, gosh, that's really tough, because I love how my characters are also special. But I would say, goodness, I actually, I love Harry the camel, because he's all about he didn't like himself. And, and you learn all the reasons why. And but in the end, he discovers there's nothing better than being who you are. And so Harry has a real special place in my heart, because I want young people of all ages to know that they're important. And they should love themselves. And I say should but I mean actually mean, I, I want them to fill in their heart to love themselves. Because once you love yourself, you can you can accomplish things. And so I guess if I had to say someone, it would be hairy.   Michael Hingson  51:42 When you said that you just finished research for which book   Diann Floyd Boehm  51:45 rise a girl struggle for more, it'll be version two, it doesn't have a title yet. So I'm excited about that. Because it's based on my grandma's life. As I said earlier, it's continuing on to show once you're in the workforce, what it was like for the women in the 1920s. But it's set in such a way it takes place in Chicago. And it's a real eye opener for what life was like, everyone always just thinks I shouldn't say everyone, but most people think the 1920s was all about the Charleston and so forth. But there was more to that. And you actually start discovering. And there's a real parallel to us right now to in our time world, because you're starting to see the little tiny cracks that lead to hunger, and people losing their jobs, because they don't have the money to go and purchase different things. So I think it'll be a good learning experience and lots of levels. And a fun read.   Michael Hingson  52:55 And of course, of course, in the scheme of life, in Chicago, in the rest of the country in 1929, we had the stock market crash, which led to the depression, which is of course, a continuation of what can probably be a very fascinating story, how to get through all of that.   Diann Floyd Boehm  53:14 That's true. Luckily, for me, it will end before that happens. But yeah, it'll lead it'll lead right up to that. And, you know, I wish I would have been a better student in high school because I truly find history so fascinating. And I appreciate it so much more   Michael Hingson  53:33 much research left for you to do. Yeah.   Diann Floyd Boehm  53:37 So much research.   Michael Hingson  53:39 Well, what so when your downtime you you garden, you say and you have a cattle dog, and that keeps you busy. What other kinds of things do you do?   Diann Floyd Boehm  53:51 I enjoy singing. And when I was in Dubai, I was in popular productions, which is a part of the West End. So I was in musicals, and I have to get back to that again, because I do love singing. And I started taking piano lessons. And I don't know I just love doing everything since it's summertime. Now I go outside and guess swimming in our pool. And mostly I just like to look at the clouds and sing.   Michael Hingson  54:22 Well what kind of advice would you give to somebody who's interested in possibly being an author or wants to take up this kind of work?   Diann Floyd Boehm  54:31 Sure. Right. You don't have to be published. Just know right now, the moment you write something down, you are published because you've written in finder's space or your favorite couch. favorite chair, even if it's just you just have one room, find one space that you want to say that's my holy ground. That's where imaginations gonna come. And just write just Write whatever comes to you. And maybe it's like, Oh, I love zebras today, just write different things down, and then just start creating stories. Your first stories are not going to be your best. It but the stories that just keep coming and coming will end up being, you'll just become better and better. And when time is right, you'll know when it's time to go for it. And you're so lucky today, because there's so many ways that you can be an independent author, blurb, for example, allows you to get your to design your whole book, get it going. There's a lot of different places like that, but just believe you can do it, and it will happen.   Michael Hingson  55:48 And that's as good as it gets. And it's great advice. And we have to start somewhere, right. And the fact is, I think all of us have stories, and we should tell the stories.   Diann Floyd Boehm  55:59 Absolutely. We're all storytellers. The moment someone says How is your day and you go, Oh, my gosh, it was horrible. I should have seen what happened today are two stories. It was such a lovely day. I met so and so it's a story. And it's to be told. And even if the first thing you write about are the stories from your childhood, those stories can be morphed into other stories. And so we are storytellers, you are absolutely right.   Michael Hingson  56:31 If people want to reach out to you and get a hold of you, how would they do that?   56:36 Sure. So the easiest way is just to go to my website, DiannFloydBoehm.com. Now I'm gonna spell it because it s D for dog. I A N a Nancy N F, L O Y D. B as in boy. O E H M.com. Diann Floyd Boehm.com. It looks like Diann Floyd bohem. But we pronounce it by Boehm   Michael Hingson  57:09 that's all right, my screen reader pronounces it bone. So there you go.   Diann Floyd Boehm  57:14 Yeah, it's my husband's name. I adopted it when I got married. Well,   Michael Hingson  57:19 I figured it was something like that. And then I spelled it, but I'm glad that you pronounced it. So Diane, Floyd boehm.com. And people can reach out and read things there. And they can contact you and so on as well.   Diann Floyd Boehm  57:32 Yes, they may. And they can sign up for my newsletter. And all my books are on Amazon, Barnes and Noble. And you can order them through your local bookstores.   Michael Hingson  57:42 Well, on some time, we'll have to talk about how accessible your website is and how to fix that, which is, of course, one of the things that I get to do being part of this company excessively. But that's another story.   Diann Floyd Boehm  57:53 I definitely want to talk to you about that. That would be awesome,   Michael Hingson  57:57 easy to do. So we will do that. Well, I want to I want to thank everyone for joining us today. I hope that you enjoyed our time with Diane, and that you will reach out to her. As I always say you are welcome to reach out to me, I'd love to know what you think you can reach me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com. And that's M I C H A E L H I  at A C C E S S I B E.com. Or you can go to our podcast page, which is www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast and Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N just like it sounds even. So if I don't like beam yet correct, but I hope that you will reach out. We'd love to hear from you love your thoughts. If you'd like to be a guest, please reach out and let us know. If you know people who you think ought to be guests on our podcast. We'd love to hear from you about them or hear from them. Feel free to let us know about them as well. And of course, when you listen to this, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate your comments and ratings and suggestions and take them all to heart. So Diann once again. Thanks very much for joining us on unstoppable mindset.   Diann Floyd Boehm  59:13 It was my pleasure and honor thank you   Michael Hingson  59:20   You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Finding Annie
Anne Marie Duff

Finding Annie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 46:46


‘You never quite know the ripple effect you have when you're telling a tale'. Anne Marie Duff is a storyteller at heart. She is currently starring as Grace, a wife in an abusive relationship in Sharon Horgan's phenomenal dark comedy, Bad Sisters which is being talked about everywhere. She's an award-winning actress known for her BAFTA nominated roles in Shameless, The Virgin Queen and Nowhere Boy. She's also starred on Broadway and at the National Theatre playing women like Lady Macbeth or Joan of Arc and alongside Dame Judy Dench in Notes On A Scandal and Meryl Streep in Suffragette, amongst others. Recently she appeared in Netflix's Sex Education playing the role of a Mother who is a recovering drug addict, and now with the character of Grace in Bad Sisters, she portrays a bullied and abused women who is being slowly isolated from her sisters and the world. Anne Marie is incredibly versatile and, in her work, takes on complicated women in all forms. Anne Marie grew up in a working-class Irish family in London and has been through lots of change, from school to marriage to the actor James McAvoy, divorce and having a child all whilst balancing a successful career. Here, she spills the tea on Bad Sisters, and brings us through the biggest changes in her life to date. The final episode of Bad Sisters airs this Friday, 14th October on Apple TV.Content warning: domestic abuse Should you be affected by any of the issues raised in this episode, in the UK, The Samaritans can be reached on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-8255. Hotlines in other countries can be found here http://www.suicide.org/international-suicide-hotlines.htmlChanges is now a deaf friendly podcast. You can access transcripts here: https://www.anniemacmanus.com/changes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Green Room On Air
Ed Hooks - Part 2

Green Room On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 119:09


Come out and see "Frankenstein" at Oholone College! https://www.ohlone.edu/smithcenter#frankenstein This production of Frankenstein was first performed at the National Theatre in 2011. The production was directed by Danny Boyle and Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternated the roles of Victor Frankenstein and The Creature. Mary Shelley's 1818 novel was adapted for the stage by Nick Dear. You can find full details of the cast and production team below: This is the second of a multi-part conversation I had with my good friend, Ed Hooks. We talk about the state of TV and movies, acting technique, method acting, Ed's experiences in Hollywood, and so much more. Today's Interview Ed Hooks, author of Acting for Animators, created acting training especially for animators instead of stage or movie actors. He has taught his Masterclass for most major animation studios and video game companies internationally and is a popular speaker/presenter at Animation Conferences and Festival. Before he began work with animators in 1996, Ed was a professional actor and acting teacher for almost 30 years, with credits in all media. ________________________________________________________________________ Leave a review on Apple Podcasts (Itunes) Green Room On Air Web Site: http://greenroomonair.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/raysgreenroom/ Opening and Closing Music by Carly Ozard: http://carlyozard.com Contact Ray at Green Room on Air: greenroomonair@gmail.com 

This Cultural Life
Es Devlin

This Cultural Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 44:00


Es Devlin is the world's foremost set designer, having conceived stage sets for superstar musicians including Beyoncé, Stormzy, Kanye West, U2 and Adele. She has also created sets for opera houses around the world, and for productions at the National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company and many more. Es also works as an artist in her own right, designing sculptural installation pieces that address issues of social justice and sustainability. For This Cultural Life, Es Devlin remembers a scale model of her home town, Rye in Sussex, that fired her imagination and encouraged her interest in storytelling. She chooses the sleeve of Kate Bush's 1978 debut album The Kick Inside, which she tried to recreate as a collage in her teenage bedroom. She recalls a career breakthrough when, in 1998, she designed a National Theatre production of Harold Pinter's play Betrayal, a set which was inspired by Rachel Whiteread's artwork House, a concrete cast of the interior of a Victorian terraced house in London's East End, which was demolished in 1994. Her final choice of cultural inspiration is her work with the hip hop artist and producer Kanye West, with whom she collaborated on several spectacular stadium shows. Producer: Edwina Pitman Audio of 'The Story of Rye' with kind permission from The Rye Heritage Centre

RNIB Connect
1411: National Theatre London