Podcast appearances and mentions of Oliver Stone

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American film director, screenwriter, and producer

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Oliver Stone

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Best podcasts about Oliver Stone

Latest podcast episodes about Oliver Stone

Gutting the Sacred Cow
Episode 105: Mike Price BLOWS AWAY JFK Episode 105 GTSC podcast

Gutting the Sacred Cow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:17


F is For Family creator and Simpsons writer @MikePriceinLA returns for his 3rd appearance and has firmly grabbed the title of, "any film dealing with a real life event had BETTER be perfectly represented."  Mike sits in the book depository and snipes out Oliver Stone's "JFK".  He also tells you who he thinks killed Marilyn Monroe's most notorious lover.  Do @KevinGootee and @KevinIsrael_NJ think this argument is worse than Kevin Costner's New Orleans accent?  Don't forget, you can find us on all podcasts platforms: apple iTunes, Spotify, google, spreaker, stitcher, iheartradio, castbox. You name it and we're on it! And you can also see our handsome yet smug faces on Youtube as well. https://guttingthesacredcow.com/where-to-listen-see-us/ Hello to our new friends! We love it when you click "subscribe", like us on social media, and most importantly when you tell your friends/family about our podcast. Looking to sell your product, advertise your services, or raise brand awareness? We'd love to help you and we can be reached at guttingthesacredcow@gmail.comThank you ALL for continually shouting us out on social media, we love when you do that as well as leave us those 5 star rating and 2-3 sentence reviews. Guttingthesacredcow.com is where you find us every day giving YOU those movie quotes, movies news, THAT DOESN'T HAPPEN, and more!  Lastly, check out F is For Family on Netflix and follow Mike on twitter at @MikepriceinLA   @KevinGootee and kevingootee.com @KevinIsrael_NJ and kevinisrael.com

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Roberta Bassin and Zachary Hagen

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:46


ROBERTA E. BASSIN is a professional actress and author, having received acclaim for her compelling portrayals on an array of interesting characters in film, TV and stage including Clint Eastwood's "J. Edgar opposite Leonardo DiCaprio, film classic "Barfly" opposite Mickey Rourke and Faye Dunaway, and Oliver Stone's Emmy and Golden Globe winner "Indictment: The McMartin Trial." Her many performances in television include, ”Shameless, How to Get Away with Murder, Ray Donovan, Grey's Anatomy, Major Crimes, Criminal Minds, E.R., Crossing Jordan, American Dreams, The Pretender among others. One of her greatest joys as an actress/writer, has been and continues to be, performing her one woman show, "Amelia Earhart: In Her Own Words.” At long last, she has accepted the requests of her audiences to write a book of the famous aviator along with her own personal experiences and years of research, culminating in "Amelia Earhart, Me and Our Friends, Journaling the Journey: The Amelia Earhart Self Help Book." Enjoy a fun and interactive journey of self-reflection that stimulates the reader, "Our Friends," to delve into the maze of life's complexities. Let Amelia Earhart help you to help yourself. Roberta has authored numerous published articles and was a proud contributor to “The Aspiring Actors Handbook.” She is a graduate of UCLA in History and English and holds a lifetime teaching credential. Marrying her prom date, they have a son and daughter who are also UCLA graduates.To learn more: http://www.imdb.me/robertabassinBook available at: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1523738561ZACHARY HAGEN is an Albuquerque based author and teacher. Writing has always been a passion for him since he was little kid when he put together little books from scrap paper. The earliest story he remembers writing was about a dragon who gave flowers to children. He also teaches creative writing to his students and loves to see their talents flourish. When he isn't working hard at his two passions, he enjoys spending time with his wife and dog and making music any way he can.The Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

Bored 2 Life
ep 91 - "Anime Given Sunday" w/Anders Lee

Bored 2 Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 83:11


Kellar thinks that the 1999 Oliver Stone film "Any Given Sunday" is the Great American Anime. Anders Lee thinks it's the greatest sports movie. Strenk is a heel and thinks it's just okay. Also: Dennis Kucinich, Doink The Clown, and Jesse "The Body" Ventura. Follow Anders on Twitter and check out his show Pod Damn America Ending song: Cocksparrer "Because You're Young"

Becoming Unf*@kwithable
Episode 42: Sean Stone Humanity VS The NWO

Becoming Unf*@kwithable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 60:50


Take your awakening to the next level and get ready for a mind blowing journey of red pills as we sit down with Filmmaker, Media Host, Author, Actor, Poet, Speaker, and above all, truth-seeker and spiritual activist Sean Stone. Sean Christopher Ali Stone began his spiritual quest at 10 years old, when his father took him to Tibet, Nepal and India, to illuminate the stark contrast between those worlds, and Hollywood, where he had been a child-actor in Oliver Stone films like JFK, The Doors and Natural Born Killers.  Sean took summer jobs for Jim Brown's Amer-I-Can program and Save the Children while still in high school, then studied American History at Princeton University, and Oxford, before writing his Senior Thesis on the modern history of the New World Order, now available from TrineDay and Amazon.  Sean began his own filmmaking career by apprenticing under his father on Alexander, shooting the behind-the-scenes documentary Fight Against Time.  On the film W., Sean worked as an Editorial Consultant, and on the TV series The Untold History of the United States, as an Associate Editor.  Sean Stone starred in and directed his first feature film Greystone Park in 2012, based on his real-life paranormal experiences in a haunted mental hospital.  In 2020, he published the cosmic fairy tale, Desiderata by Ali, now available from Blackstone and Audible.  His most recent release is the poetry book The Ephemeral Shades of Time.  Sean is a graduate of the Baron Brown Studio and has starred in multiple features including Night Walk, Union Bound, and Fury of the Fist and the Golden Fleece, which he also wrote.  He has directed the documentaries A Century of War, Hollywood, D.C. and MetaHuman with Deepak Chopra.  His short films include Singularity, a dystopian warning about a plague that leads to a totalitarian surveillance state, as well as the short film Anaarkali with Bollywood star Javed Jaffrey, adapted from the fairy tale of a ‘kept woman' seeking her independence in modern Mumbai.  Sean has hosted the reality show Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura, the interview program Buzzsaw, formerly on Gaia TV, and the RT news show Watching the Hawks.Sean's unique perspective from his life's work and journey, helps to connect the dots for all truth-seekers in his mind-blowing new series "Best Kept Secret". In this episode, we go back to #Homaha, home of the Oracle; Mr. Buffett himself and talk about the Franklin Scandal, the NWO, Deep State, The WEF and the IoT, (basically all your favorite 3 letter organizations) the medical system and sterilization, the Rockefellers, Freemasons and so much more. There was so much more we could have talked about, but it's better off that you watch his series for yourself. DO take note of the extra info Sean includes in the series "Best Kept Secret" to further research for yourself. Tune in and unfuckyourself Best Kept SecretHuman trafficking, pedophilia, 'Satanic' politics... The Jeffrey Epstein scandal was the tip of the iceberg as Sean Stone, the former host of Buzzsaw, lays out the hidden agenda of the dark elite in this six-part documentary series. In this 'red pill' journey, Stone explores famous cases like the Franklin Scandal, MK-Ultra and Monarch programming, the Jon Benet Ramsey murder and even the Son of Sam case, to connect the dots of a dangerous ideology, now driving the philosophy of a 'transhumanist' idea - to remake the human being. As more and more people awaken to this hidden agenda, the more rapidly we can take our power back. The full series is now on Ickonic.com , 107daily.com and Vimeo on Demand

The HFPA in Conversation
Carlo Siliotto

The HFPA in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:29


Composer Carlo Siliotto sat down with HFPA journalist Silvia Bizio to discuss his long career in music, from scoring films like Nomad, The Punisher, and Miracles from Heaven. They also talk about his connection to Oliver Stone, using international instruments to create a unique sound, how Ennio Morricone helps contextualize "what music means to him" , and more. 

Bots, Bugs, And Babes
Bots, Bugs, And Babes – Episode #108: The Hand (1981) – It lives. It crawls. And suddenly, it kills.

Bots, Bugs, And Babes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


“I’m kind of old-fashioned. I like to make it in bed, okay” On this episode of Bots, Bugs, and Babes, my father (Al Jaconetti) and I go back to the early 80's to check out The Hand (1981). We look back at this Oliver Stone often forgotten horror movie, that also [...]

Two True Freaks! Mega Feed
Bots, Bugs, And Babes – Episode #108: The Hand (1981) – It lives. It crawls. And suddenly, it kills.

Two True Freaks! Mega Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


“I’m kind of old-fashioned. I like to make it in bed, okay” On this episode of Bots, Bugs, and Babes, my father (Al Jaconetti) and I go back to the early 80's to check out The Hand (1981). We look back at this Oliver Stone often forgotten horror movie, that also [...]

Engage Video Marketing Podcast
What is Branding Anyway with Marc Gutman

Engage Video Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:24


Branding is one of those concepts that as business leaders and marketers we understand is a thing, and we get that it's important, but have you really ever thought about how to define what branding actually is? A quick google search will turn up a massive variety of definitions from design functions, to emotive responses and other more intangible ideas of what branding means. So to dive deeper into this idea, and in particular to explore the role of video in the world of branding I'm excited to introduce you to my guest today, a brand strategist from Boulder, Colorado with an interesting history in the film industry. Marc Gutman is a storyteller, entrepreneur, adventurer, and idealist. But most  importantly, Marc loves brands and their stories. Marc held several positions in the story business. He served as Story Editor for Oliver Stone's Illusion Entertainment, and wrote stories and screenplays for Oliver Stone, Warner Bros., and 20th Century Fox.  In addition to his time in Hollywood, Marc itched the entrepreneurial scratch by founding a multimillion dollar tech company in Boulder, Colorado. Today, Marc focuses his energy on Wildstory, the brand strategy studio for brands that want to outmaneuver their competition. Wildstory has worked with brands like Thor Industries, Airstream, El Cap, Planet Granite, Earth Treks, Movement, Inboard, Outward Bound School, and First Descents. Marc is on a mission to help the world après… one brand at a time. He is also the host of the Baby Got Backstory podcast; delving into the story behind great brands such as Priceline.com, Patagonia, Ugg, Build-A-Bear Workshop and Kswiss.  Support this podcast

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

LifePix Relationships
210: An Emotional and Exhilarating Process with Steven Kuhn and Dr. Moats

LifePix Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 42:50


Relationships are a process not an outcome. Think about it, what would happen if it was an outcome? When would you know you've accomplished your goal? At what point is it time for the next? Imagine I told you, you maxed out on what you can get in this marriage? Thank goodness it's not an outcome! With that being the case, focus on the intention, not the outcome. In this couple-therapist episode, we get a really interesting perspective on what it's like to be married as a veteran. There's trauma, there's emotion and a whole lot of strength. But what does it actually take? There's a lot of understanding, conversation and connecting with who you truly are. Your spouse is not here to define for what it means to be a "man" or a "lady", that's yours to discover. Just remember no judgement! Steven is a U.S. Military combat veteran who has been hand-picked to consult with some of the most influential people in the world (rock stars, singers, actors, business leaders and politicians) to turn around their business and how to expand their brand, build value and loyalty and develop strategies for increasing beneficial relationships for increased revenue and achieving true Quality of Life (QOL). Steven is a best-selling author and has a new book that was just released with his partner and co-author Lane Belone, (Special Forces Green Beret veteran) with the title Unleash Your Humble Alpha Steven has trained, coached and participated in leadership roles in nearly every capacity: historical leadership of European Royalty, Military Combat Operations leadership, political leadership in Europe and the US, spiritual leadership from the Natives in North and South America, monks in Europe, having turning around hundreds of around the world. Leadership from nearly all walks of life, all synthesized into what he calls Humble Alpha Leadership. Connect with Steven: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevenekuhn/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StevenKuhnOfficial/ Website: https://qolenterprises.com/ First and foremost, Dr. Michael Moats describes himself as a father, a husband, and a friend. His passion as a clinical psychologist lies in working with clients who are learning to redefine their lives and create new meaning, especially those dealing with grief and loss in its many forms (i.e., death, divorce, job loss, recent move, natural disaster, war.) Michael recognizes that every experience creates an opportunity to learn, to grow, and to heal, and he frequently utilizes nature, stories, and his general sense of awe and intrigue to bring psychological concepts into every relatable approaches to living. Connect with Dr. Moats: drmichaelmoats.com Dr. Michael Moats is the co-author of the newly released book "Sunrise through the Darkness" which can be found on Amazon, major retailers and right here: www.universityprofessorspress.com A vivid, grueling, step-by-step return from the dead to the living… A true story of faith, hope, and love from a man who survived 9/11 at the World Trade Center. Will inspire you, especially those without hope and those who seek to help others in jeopardy. —Oliver Stone, film director, producer, and screenwriter, Director, Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July Connect with ST: www.lifepixuniversity.com

Remote Takes
Episode 28: The Many Saints of Newark (2021) / Any Given Sunday (1999)

Remote Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 62:02


Tony & Jeremy review The Many Saints of Newark (2021) starring Ray Liotta & Michael Gandolfini and in the second half they discuss one of Jeremy's favorite movies Any Given Sunday (1999) directed by Oliver Stone starring Al Pacino, Cameron Diaz & Jamie Foxx.Chapters:Current Talk: Current Talk: Magic The Gathering Arena (00:28)The Many Saints of Newark (2021) Review (13:09)Any Given Sunday (1999) Discussion (38:42)The clips featured in this podcast were for critical review and parody, which are protected under the Fair Use laws of the United States Copyright Act of 1976. All rights are reserved and acknowledged.Show Notes:The Many Saints of Newark (2021) - Rotten TomatoesAny Given Sunday (1999) - Rotten TomatoesMagic The Gathering Arena

Don't Eat All The Meatballs!
Comedian Luca Palanca. **Unedited**

Don't Eat All The Meatballs!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:56


Long time friend, comedian and ex roommate, Luca Palanca tells all. We had such a great time telling stories that we need to do a part 2. One of the best episodes so far! Luca talks about his days in Beverly Hills and his favorite and not so favorite celebrities. You will never guess who walked in to Mulberry Street Pizza one day. Luca speaks out about how he really felt about Mitzi Shore, owner of the World Famous Comedy Store. What happened the night he met James Caan and Oliver Stone?

I Know That Face
Tony Todd

I Know That Face

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 49:20


For over 30 years, Tony Todd has been thrilling all kinds of audiences in a variety of roles and as part of our special October horror series, we're covering the career of the Candyman himself. Beginning in Oliver Stone's Platoon, the classically trained Todd soon landed two of the most iconic roles in horror cinema. In the 1990 remake of Night of the Living Dead, he played the role of Ben in a spin on George A. Romero's classic. Just two years later, he then appeared as the titular character in Bernard Rose's Candyman - a role he would reprise across all its sequels. Though perhaps best known in some quarters for his roles in several Star Trek TV shows, Todd also played mortician William Bludworth in the Final Destination series, Rev. Zombie in the Hatchet franchise and Augustus D. Cole in The X-Files episode Sleepless. Sign up to HeadStuff+ at headstuffpodcasts.com for the small price of €5 a month to unlock exclusive bonus episodes of I Know That Face. Andrew Twitter: @Andrew_Carroll0 Stephen Twitter: @StephenPorzio Andrew's Candyman article Editor: Charline Fernandez and Laura Saracino Community Manager: Charline Fernandez Instagram: @charline_frnndz I Know That Face Twitter: @IKnowThatFaceP1 / Instagram: @iknowthatface / Facebook: @iknowthatfacepod Intro and Outro Music: No Boundaries (motorik groove) by Keshco. Licence Featured Image Credit

Stinky Popcorn Boys
Episode 74: Any Given Sunday: The Football Episode

Stinky Popcorn Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 62:37


Join us on Stinky Popcorn Boys as we celebrate the return of football by reviewing the gridiron romp from Oliver Stone dubbed "Any Given Sunday". Does this film age well? The answer is...yes and no. Listen to find out why!

Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Episode 910 - New World Order with Sean Stone

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 71:04


Oliver Stone's son Sean Stone, author of 'New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism', discusses pedophilia in Hollywood, what the New World Order really implies, why he's moving from California to Florida, the death of Hollywood, and how his father's movies like 'JFK' and 'Platoon' affected how he views the world.   Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!   Go to CardoMAX.com and use promo code DB, and you get Buy One Get One FREE on your first order.   Go to BuyRaycon.com/drinkinbros for 15% off your order!

Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Episode 910 - New World Order with Sean Stone

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 71:04


Oliver Stone's son Sean Stone, author of 'New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism', discusses pedophilia in Hollywood, what the New World Order really implies, why he's moving from California to Florida, the death of Hollywood, and how his father's movies like 'JFK' and 'Platoon' affected how he views the world.   Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!   Go to CardoMAX.com and use promo code DB, and you get Buy One Get One FREE on your first order.   Go to BuyRaycon.com/drinkinbros for 15% off your order!

The Opperman Report
Babushka Lady

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 62:22


In 1970, a woman named Beverly Oliver told conspiracy researcher Gary Shaw at a church revival meeting in Joshua, Texas, that she was the Babushka Lady.[5] Oliver stated that she filmed the assassination with a Super 8 film Yashica and that she turned the undeveloped film over to two men who identified themselves to her as FBI agents.[5] According to Oliver, she obtained no receipt from the men, who told her that they would return the film to her within ten days. She did not follow up with an inquiry.[5] She reiterated her claims in the 1988 documentary The Men Who Killed Kennedy.[5] According to Vincent Bugliosi, Oliver "has never proved to most people's satisfaction that she was in Dealey Plaza that day."[5] Confronted with the fact that the Yashica Super-8 camera was not made until 1969, she stated that she received the "experimental" camera from a friend and was not even sure the manufacturer's name was on it.[5] Beverly Oliver's claims were the basis for a scene in Oliver Stone's 1991 film JFK, in which a character named "Beverly" meets Jim Garrison in a Dallas nightclub.[6] Played by Lolita Davidovich, she is depicted in the director's cut as wearing a headscarf at Dealey Plaza and speaking of having given the film she shot to two men claiming to be FBI agents.

The Opperman Report'
Babushka Lady

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 62:22


In 1970, a woman named Beverly Oliver told conspiracy researcher Gary Shaw at a church revival meeting in Joshua, Texas, that she was the Babushka Lady.[5] Oliver stated that she filmed the assassination with a Super 8 film Yashica and that she turned the undeveloped film over to two men who identified themselves to her as FBI agents.[5] According to Oliver, she obtained no receipt from the men, who told her that they would return the film to her within ten days. She did not follow up with an inquiry.[5] She reiterated her claims in the 1988 documentary The Men Who Killed Kennedy.[5] According to Vincent Bugliosi, Oliver "has never proved to most people's satisfaction that she was in Dealey Plaza that day."[5] Confronted with the fact that the Yashica Super-8 camera was not made until 1969, she stated that she received the "experimental" camera from a friend and was not even sure the manufacturer's name was on it.[5]Beverly Oliver's claims were the basis for a scene in Oliver Stone's 1991 film JFK, in which a character named "Beverly" meets Jim Garrison in a Dallas nightclub.[6] Played by Lolita Davidovich, she is depicted in the director's cut as wearing a headscarf at Dealey Plaza and speaking of having given the film she shot to two men claiming to be FBI agents.

Antena Historia
Alejandro Magno - La Cartelera de Antena Historia

Antena Historia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 73:46


Una película de Oliver Stone que complementa nuestros dos programas sobre Alejandro Magno y su camino de la conquista de Asia. Magistralmente comentada por Álvaro García de el Fancine, que nos hace un recorrido por por el film, actores, fotografía, y banda sonora Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

KPFA - Flashpoints
We Rebroadcast Our Recent Interview w/ Academy Award Winning Filmmaker, Oliver Stone

KPFA - Flashpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 59:59


Two Guys From Hollywood
EP.36: SEASON ONE FINALE - A Conversation with Oliver Stone

Two Guys From Hollywood

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 53:58


We've reached the final episode of Season One! And to close out this spectacular season, we've brought in a legendary guest. His work has been widely discussed, taught, debated and examined for decades, and he's not slowing down anytime soon. Joining the conversation this week is academy award winning writer, director and producer Oliver Stone. His movies such as Platoon, Wall Street, Natural Born Killers, JFK, Snowden - amongst many others - have changed the way we view, discuss and understand difficult topics such as war, politics, money and greed. His newly released memoir, Chasing the Light, was a huge success and on this episode he not only teases what a second book could entail, but shares rare anecdotes from set on many of his classic films, reflects on working with stars such as Tom Cruise, and talks about life as a director who follows the facts...not the fads. Tune in for an insightful and intellectual conversation about our theme this week, Art Imitating Life, and enjoy a behind the scenes look into one of the most brilliant creative minds of a generation. As always, we have a guest-inspired cocktail of the week! This week enjoy THE SPICY GIN BLOSSOM. Find the full recipe and more on @twoguysfromhollywood on Instagram, and @TGFHPodcast on Twitter and Facebook. Cheers!   FOLLOW HIM ON SOCIAL MEDIA:  Twitter: @TheOliverStone Instagram: @officialoliverstone Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheOliverStone   AND READ BOOK:  https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Light-Directing-Surviving-Midnight/dp/0358346231   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
James Woolsey‘s Operation Dragon & the Triumph of ”Crackpot Realism” in U.S. Foreign Policy w/ Jim DiEugenio

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 95:47


On this edition of Parallax Views, earlier this year a curious new book was published dealing with the assassination of John F. Kennedy.  Co-written by R. James Woolsey, former Director of the CIA under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1995, and Ion Mihai Pacepa, a former Romanian spy and a noted, high-ranking Eastern Bloc defect during the Cold War, Operation Dragon: Inside the Kremlin's Secret War Against America argues that the JFK assassination was the result of a plot involving the Soviet Union's Nikita Khrushchev and Cuba's Fidel Castro. Lee Harvey Oswald, the book claims, was instructed by Khrushchev to kill President Kennedy. According to Woolsey and Pacepa, Khrushchev actually called off the plot for fear that it might be discovered and lead right back to him as one of the perpetrators.  What Khrushchev did not count on, say Woolsey and Pacepa, is that Oswald would go rogue and carry out the assassination plot in spite of orders to the contrary. In other words, Operation Dragon alleges that President Kennedy's assassination was the result of nefarious Soviet treachery. Is Operation Dragon just another entry in dizzying array of theories positing an alternative to the Warren Commission Report's oft-contested findings concerning the fatal shooting of a sitting President of the United States in Dallas, TX on November 22nd, 1963? Perhaps. Then again, most books that challenge, in varying degrees, the official line on the Kennedy assassination aren't written by ex-CIA Directors. But the curiosity of the book's co-author, the aforementioned James Woolsey, penning a book dealing with the Kennedy assassination doesn't end with his status as the former highest-ranking official in the CIA. In addition to his tenure as DCIA, Woolsey served as U.S. Under Secretary of the Navy in the late 1970s and was involved in negotiations with the Soviet Union in the 1980s. In other words, he was in the thick of it, so to speak, during the Cold War. Most curiously of all, however, when it comes to Woolsey is his connections to the neoconservative foreign policy movement and his penchant for promoting various conspiratorial fears about foreign countries even prior to the publication of Operation Dragon. A member of the notoriously hawkish neocon think tank The Project for a New American Century (PNAC) before its dissolution in 2006, Woolsey has stoked fears that North Korea could use electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons against the United States and was also a notable proponent of the theory that al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein's Iraq were involved in the Oklahoma City Bombing. Since the publication of Operation Dragon, Woolsey has appeared on the right-wing outlet Newsmax to promote his theory about the Kennedy assassination. This, combined with his neoconservative inclinations and conspiratorial musings that align quite well with the bolstering of a hawkish, pro-war agenda, raises the question of Woolsey's political motivations in promoting what The Daily Beast has referred to as a "QAnon-style spin" on the Kennedy assassination. Joining us to pushback against Woolsey's JFK assassination theory and place it within the context of his hawkish neocon history is returning guest James DiEugenio, the leading figure behind the website Kennedys and King, writer for the upcoming Oliver Stone documentary JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass, and author of such books as Destiny Betrayed: JFK, Cuba, and the Garrison Case, Reclaiming Parkland: Tom Hanks, Vincent Bugliosi, and the JFK Assassination in the New Hollywood, and The JFK Assassination. DiEugenio argues that not only is Woolsey's Kennedy assassination theory wrong, but that it is representative of a certain brand of foreign policy thinking in Washington, D.C. that sociologist C. Wright Mills would refer to as "crackpot realism". Before delving into Operation Dragon, however, Jim fills us in on the latest news concerning the fight to declassify and release the last of the JFK records. We discuss how President Trump, despite at times signaling to the contrary, helped keep the records declassified during his Presidency. Now said records and their review for declassification lay in the hands of President Joe Biden. Then we shift our attention to Operation Dragon and discuss the problems with the book's claims that theoretical physicist and "Father of the Atomic Bomb" J. Robert Oppenheimer and British Prime Minister Clement Attlee were secretly Soviet spies, the relationship between Woolsey's theories on the Kremlin and the paranoid "Monster Plot" of the CIA's James Jesus Angleton, a brief history of neoconservatism, Woolsey's neocon credentials, the relationship between the narrative of the Cold War promoted by Woolsey and the ideas of the far right-wing John Birch Society, James Angleton and the origins of the idea that Lee Harvey Oswald was a KGB agent or asset,, Operation Dragon as a retread of the narrative put forth in Edward Jay Epstein's 1992 book Legend: The Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald, Norman Cousins and the quest for détente with Khrushchev's Soviet Union, French journalist Jean Daniel's meeting with Fidel Castro in Havana on the day of Kennedy's assassination , Kennedy and rapprochement negotiations with Cuba, Khrushchev and Castro's reactions to the assassination, why neither the Soviet Union or Cuba benefitted from Kennedy's assassination, former Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Nitze's Cold War ideology and the rise of neoconservatism, neoconservatism as an ideology that has now slipped into both the Republican and Democratic Parties, "crackpot realism" in the killing of Gaddafi in Libya and the U.S. intervention in Assad's Syria, Barack Obama and the CIA's classified weapons supply and training program in Syria known as "Timber Sycamore", the Project for American Century's agenda, George HW Bush's comments calling the neocons "the crazies in the basement" of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, the notion that Henry Kissinger and Henry Kissinger were "soft" on Communism during the Cold War, neocons as constantly seeking pretexts for war, the late Russian studies scholar Stephen F. Cohen vs. Richard Pipes on the Soviet Union, Nixon and Kissinger as being to the right of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher on Mikhail Gorbachev, neocons and the Australia nuclear submarines deal as part of a geopolitical strategy against China, "Noble Lies" and the selling of wars, NATO's expansion and the lack of historical context provided by crackpot realism in foreign policy, Woolsey's book as a psyop, PNAC member Robert Kagan and his wife Victoria Nuland's involvement in U.S. foreign policy related to Ukraine, the neocon agenda as bankrupting the U.S. and destroying social programs vis-à-vis war spending, and, much, much more.

Planet 8 Podcast
Episode 83: Sword and Sorcery on Planet 8

Planet 8 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021


 Come with us listeners, back to the mist-shrouded 1980s, when hair was big and the Walkman was king, and sword and sorcery films were abundant. Why were there so many sword and sorcery films in that decade? Perhaps it was the lucky convergence of a number of things: the rise in popularity of Dungeons and Dragons, the prevalence of fantasy art such as the Hildebrandt Brothers, Boris Vallejo, and of course, Frazetta, the Marvel Conan comics, and other factors. While there were a number of terrible movies produced in the genre during this period, there were also some excellent or at least entertaining ones. Your crew will be discussing six of their favorites.Excalibur (1981) is a John Boorman film, and it looks absolutely beautiful. A retelling of the Arthurian legend, it has a dreamlike feeling, in an England that is moving from a magical realm to one ruled by Christianity. Highlights include Nichol Williamson as a very otherworldly Merlin, and a fantastic soundtrack that features classical music including Wagner. It is well worth seeing if you haven't!Highlander (1986) is something that started as a good idea, but suffered in the execution. Immortals scattered across the globe must battle until there is only one left -"There can be only one." When an immortal kills another immortal they gain the energies of that person and all the people they have killed. It had nice production design and an interesting cast that included Christopher Lambert, Sean Connery, and Clancy Brown, but the story is lacking in parts. Still, it has its high points.Krull (1983) is an odd mix of science fiction and fantasy, with a Prince on a quest to save a Princess from an invading alien known as The Beast. He gathers a rag tag band of thugs, sorcerers and even a cyclops to help him on his rescue mission. He also acquires a magical weapon called the Glaive, which is essentially a large throwing star that always returns to his hand. Clearly influenced by Star Wars as well as fantasy films, Krull is definitely cheesy, but fun.Dragonslayer (1981) has what is still one of the best-looking dragons in all of cinema history, Vermithrax Pejorative. The film follows a young sorcerer's apprentice who tries to rid a village of a terrible dragon. This was a Disney production and featured work by ILM and Phil Tippett. The dragon was animated with Tippett's Go Motions process, and full-size pieces were also used (and a World War II flamethrower was used for the dragon's breath!). This is a cool and unique film well worth seeing.Conan the Barbarian (1982) is probably the premiere sword and sorcery film of the 80s. Nothing quite says sword and sorcery like Conan. Directed by John Milius and with a story from Oliver Stone, this film has a very hard, almost nihilistic edge. Conan sees his parents and village slaughtered in front of him as a child, is chained to the "wheel of pain" from adolescence into young adulthood, forced to become a gladiator, and freed to find his own way, in which he seeks revenge. It's hard to imagine anyone other than Arnold Schwarzenegger playing the Cimmerian. He was perfect for the role. The film also has terrific production values. It just looks like a fully realized world. The battles are exciting and most of the time it actually is Arnold in those scenes -they couldn't find a stunt man to double for him! If you haven't seen it, or it's been a while, check this out.Conan the Destroyer (1984) was the follow up to the first film and unlike the first film, this one was PG. It's obvious they wanted to reach a younger audience, but Conan loses some grit because of this. The production design also suffers some in this film. Still, there's much to enjoy, as this is a more straight-forward adventure where Conan builds a band of adventurers to obtain a magical item for a queen who offers to bring back his lost love, Valeria. Go into this one with reduced expectations and you'll probably get a kick out of it.We know there are many other sword and sorcery films from the 80s and we have certainly left out one of your favorites. Feel free to let us know what movie you would include on your list of favorites.For our Sensor Sweep, we have a completely unrelated item that Engineer Bob is excited about: the Godzilla pinball machine! Stern Pinball has partnered with Toho International to produce a line of Godzilla pinball machines. Godzilla and his kaiju allies fight off invading monsters like Ghidorah, Gigan, and Megalon. Players can also interact with the machine using a QR code reader.  There will be three versions -pro, premium, and limited edition - and they will range from $6,899 to $10,499. So if you got the dough -check out this link: https://sternpinball.com/game/godzilla/That's all this time. Send your missives to us at our various locales: Twitter: https://twitter.com/Planet8CastFacebook: www.Facebook.com/Planet8PodcastA dream to some, a nightmare to others!

Revenge of the 90s
84. Any Given Sunday (1999)

Revenge of the 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 93:31


A new football season is here, so we're kicking things off by talking about one of the most insane football movies of all time: 1999's 'Any Given Sunday'! There's plenty of brutal football action in this Oliver Stone sports epic, along with one of the greatest movie speeches of all time, which you've definitely heard if you've been to a sporting event over the past twenty years. Suit up and join us out on the podcast field, then be sure to follow us on social media @revengeof90spod.

KPFA - Flashpoints
An Exclusive Interview with Legendary Award Winning Filmmaker, Oliver Stone

KPFA - Flashpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 59:58


The 250
252. Platoon (#222)

The 250

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 138:02


Hosted by Andrew Quinn and Darren Mooney, with special guest Joe Griffin, The 250 is a (mostly) weekly trip through some of the best (and worst) movies ever made, as voted for by Internet Movie Database Users. New episodes are released every Saturday at 6pm GMT. This time, Oliver Stone's Platoon. In late 1967, Chris Taylor volunteers for service in Vietnam. Arriving in country, Taylor quickly discovers that the war is not what he expected. As the platoon descends into civil war, Taylor finds himself torn between the two sergeants: the monstrous Barnes and the philosophical Elias. Taylor discovers that he might not just be fighting for his life, but for his very soul. At time of recording, it was ranked 222nd on the list of the best movies of all time on the Internet Movie Database.

Cinema Cemetery
Cinema Cemetery: Episode 59- Platoon (1986)

Cinema Cemetery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 30:01


“Looking back, we did not fight the enemy, we fought ourselves, and the enemy was in us.” Set in the thick of the Vietnam War, Platoon tells the tale of naive enlisted soldier Chris Taylor as he realizes the horrors of war both beyond, and within, the Platoon.  A film in the spirit of The Deer Hunter and All Quiet on the Western Front, Oliver Stone's winning film depicts a cinematic version of his own experience.  As reason and madness wrestle for control, will the Platoon find itself in one piece, even if it survives the battle?  Find out now:Current Rankings:Lawerence of Arabia The GodfatherAll About EveThe Godfather Part IIGone With Wind It Happened One NightAmadeus The Deer HunterThe StingAll The King's MenThe Lost WeekendBridge on the River KwaiOne Flew Over The Cuckoos NestThe French ConnectionOn The WaterfrontThe Sound Of MusicCasablancaAll Quiet on the Western FrontRebeccaIn The Heat of the NightThe Mutiny On The BountyYou Can't Take It With You MartyMrs. Miniver My Fair LadyPattonGentleman's AgreementHamletCimarron Ben HurChariots of FireGandhiAnnie HallMidnight CowboyBest Years of Our LivesFrom Here to EternityOliver!Around the World in 80 DaysThe ApartmentThe Great ZiegfeldA Man Of All SeasonsThe West Side StoryWingsGrand HotelRockyOut of AfricaTom JonesKramer v KramerLife of Emil ZolaHow Green Was My ValleyAn American in ParisGoing My WayGreatest Show On EarthOrdinary PeopleTerms of EndearmentBroadway Melody CavalcadeGigi

Sucedió una noche
Sucedió una noche | Un tranvía, Oliver Stone y canciones en el Kit Kat Club

Sucedió una noche

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 55:55


Hace 70 años se estrenaba ‘Un tranvía llamado deseo', la película que lanzó la carrera de Marlon Brando. Celebramos el cumpleaños de Oliver Stone, el gran cronista de la vida social y política de los Estados Unidos. Charlamos con el actor Salva Reina; iba para profesor de gimnasia pero el teatro se cruzó en su camino. Y en nuestra sección dedicada al cine musical nos ocupamos de ‘Cabaret' la película que aportó dramatismo y profundidad psicológica a un género pensado esencialmente para entretener. 

Biz Bros Podcast
The Dirty Content Secret No One is Telling You (hint, you have to pay to play) With Marc Gutman

Biz Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 28:29


Today the Biz Bros chat with Marc about the dirty content secret no one is telling you. From the moment we wake up, to the moment we go to bed, we are influence by branding. What shirt am I going to wear? What car do I drive? What deodorant, marketing firm, beer, and on and on. There's a lot of noise out there and standing out isn't easy. Starting his career in screenwriting with Academy Award winning director Oliver Stone, Marc Gutman blends storytelling, psychology, and design to help brands outmaneuver their competition. An entrepreneur, speaker, and Instagram social media influencer, Marc helps build brands that stand out and get you noticed. To learn more, check out: https://www.wildstory.com/

Play Pants with Rod Ryan and Jason Ginty
Fistfights, Top 5 favorite Oliver Stone movies and MTV Awards.

Play Pants with Rod Ryan and Jason Ginty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 92:50


The MTV Music Awards just had their lowest ratings ever. Should all award shows just go away? Director Oliver Stone turns 75 and we run down our Top 5 favorite Oliver Stone movies. One third of Americas have been in a fist fight. We discuss why fighting is dumb and which one of us has had their nose broken. We also say something that has never been said before on this podcast. Like and subscribe on our Youtube channel. Thanks to our sponsors www.LuckysPub.com and www.PiratesoftheQuarter.com

Trash, Art, And The Movies
TAATM #355: Scarface (1932) vs. Scarface (1983)

Trash, Art, And The Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 100:47


Paul and Erin review two films about immigrant gangsters and their ruthless rise to power: Howard Hawks' 1932 crime classic SCARFACE, and Brian de Palma's flashy, hyperviolent 1983 SCARFACE remake. Plus: our (very) quick takes on REMINISCENCE, DON'T BREATHE 2, ESCAPE ROOM: TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS, and SHANG-CHI: THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS.

Conversation ex Nihilo
The Return of the Living...(with Ricky Neuwirth)

Conversation ex Nihilo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 92:18


Ricky is a filmmaker, screenwriter and author. He joins Billy to talk about his projects, some of which included Billy. The conversation goes from the twenty year anniversary of 9/11, to reminiscing about Oliver Stone films and a fondness for iconic film locations over other historic sites, to just a relaxed talk about their shared experiences working together on various short films (link here)

Aya Vs. The Big Boys
JFK: A 9/11 SPECIAL

Aya Vs. The Big Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 100:19


America is broken !! ANTSY PRODUCTS: https://antsyproducts.com/Use code "BIGBOY" for 10% off your purchase! Aya Lehman: https://twitter.com/ayalhmnKevin Cookman: https://twitter.com/KevinCookmanContact/Mailbag: ayavsthebigboys@gmail.com A Merry-Go-Round Magazine Podcast: https://merrygoroundmagazine.com/Support Merry-Go-Round Magazine!: https://www.patreon.com/mgrm 

ACFmovie podcast
ACF Middlebrow #39 World Trade Center

ACFmovie podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 27:07


Titus talks about Oliver Stone's most unexpected, most patriotic movie, WTC< a true story that reveals American character at its best--citizenship, public service, nobility, faith, as well as its basis in the middle class family way of life.

Bingers Assemble
Any Given Sunday

Bingers Assemble

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 121:34


Was Willie Beamen Mike Vick, Lamar Jackson, Tyrod Taylor, or Jonny Football? What are our thoughts on Cameron Diaz as a sports owner and was this as good as it got for her? We discuss all this and more as we celebrate the kickoff to the NFL season with Oliver Stone's 1999 masterpiece Any Given Sunday!

Dad Movies Podcast
Episode 27 - Any Given Sunday as told by a ex-football player and his tap dancing son

Dad Movies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 69:14


It's Any Given Sunday week on the podcast. Although John-Michael and Bill share different interests in sports, this is a mutual favorite film. We talk about Oliver Stone's unconventional narrative, what drives performers and athletes alike, and get into it about whether athletes are artists.  If you enjoy the podcast give us a follow or a review on iTunes. Every little bit helps. 

Rarified Heir Podcast
Rarified Heir Podcast # 41: Precious Chong

Rarified Heir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 79:13


Today on the Rarified Heir Podcast we are talking to Precious Chong, daughter of Tommy Chong of – you guessed it, the comedy team of Cheech and Chong. We talk to Precious about her own career in front of and behind the camera as well as intricate details of how a natural disaster kept the comedy duo (and Tommy's marriage to wife Shelby Chong) afloat just when things seemed at their worst, having people judge you as a child purely based on your father's work, how a generation of fans only know Tommy as the hippie from That 70s Show, being picked up for a carpool by Ali McGraw, the lost scenes of Up in Smoke co-starring Josh's Mom Edie Adams as Mrs. Stoner and mining familiar territories like long lost LA restaurants and the Z Channel. It's not every child of a counter culture, anti-establishment celebrity that rebels by being a straight A student but that is part of the terrain we cover on today's episode. There was so much to unpack on this episode but I ask you, where else in the world can you find out that Warren Beatty was just an okay tipper and being Oliver Stone's assistant wasn't all it was cracked up to be? Take a listen. Everyone has a story.

The Last Nighters - Free-market Film Analysis
Salvador - Free-market Film Analysis

The Last Nighters - Free-market Film Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 67:32


The great, Pete Quinones returns for only his second non-Kevin Costner movie and we delve into some vintage James Woods and talk about “Salvador” directed by Oliver Stone. Salvador was based on an autobiography of an American photojournalist played by James Woods who was on his uppers, he went to El Salvador with his best friend played by Jim Belushi. We see what happens with an adventurous foreign policy that creates losers and villians on all sides. Pete recommended this one and will have plenty to say. Join us next week as we shift into more family-friendly fare with a review of “Newsies” with Abby Cleckner, who is a friend of frequent guest Dr. Dennis Foster and thus a listener of the show. Show Notes: http://www.lastnighters.com/193 Reel Unconventional Film Analysis. We use movies as a starting point for people who may not be familiar with this way of thinking. The point is to show what anarchy actually is with instances that are presented in film. SUBSCRIBE, RATE AND REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS (or iTUNES)

Actual Anarchy Podcast - AnCap Movie Reviews from a Rothbardian Perspective

The great, Pete Quinones returns for only his second non-Kevin Costner movie and we delve into some vintage James Woods and talk about “Salvador” directed by Oliver Stone.Salvador was based on an autobiography of an American photojournalist played by James Woods who was on his uppers, he went to El Salvador with his best friend played by Jim Belushi. We see what happens with an adventurous foreign policy that creates losers and villians on all sides.Pete recommended this one and will have plenty to say.Join us next week as we shift into more family-friendly fare with a review of “Newsies” with Abby Cleckner, who is a friend of frequent guest Dr. Dennis Foster and thus a listener of the show.Show notes:   http://www.actualanarchy.com/250Presented by www.ActualAnarchy.comRobert and I analyze popular movies from a Rothbardian/Anarcho-Capitalist perspective. We use movies as a starting point for people who may not be familiar with this way of thinking. Discussion of the plot and decisions that characters make in relation to morality and violations of the non-aggression principle are our bread and butter. We also will highlight and discuss any themes or lessons from Austrian Economics that we can glean from the film. The point is to show what anarchy actually is with instances that are presented in film. We publish at least once per week; and occasionally will do specials surrounding holidays or events (elections/olympics) and have guests. SUBSCRIBE, RATE AND REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS (or iTUNES)

The Give Me Five Podcast: An Uncultured Look at Pop Culture and Nostalgia
The Self-Aggrandizing 200th Episode! (Side A)

The Give Me Five Podcast: An Uncultured Look at Pop Culture and Nostalgia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 76:55


It's been 200 episodes, and in honor of that feat, we are going back to episode one and talking about a few of our favorite things. It is also an opportunity to learn a little more about our newest host, Omar.  So in honor of episode 200 we will talk about Oliver Stone's The Doors movie and how it led Omar to a life of music.  Rob will discuss The Princess Bride and how it led to a life of redheads. And Greg will talk about Pearl Jam Ten on its 30th anniversary and how it led to a life of spending way too much on concerts and posters.  Check out episode 200 Side A and be here for episode 200 Side B when we cover Escape from New York with Rough House Publishing's Derek Rook ! PatreonThe Give Me Five Podcast is on Patreon. For just $5 you could join the fun in our patron only chat, and get early warning of our movie of the week and our top 5 list. There are other benefits too, so check it out here:  https://www.patreon.com/Givemefivepodcast Remember if you use our link (https://amzn.to/2KxR8OU) we get a little bit of money towards server costs at no extra cost to you. So go ahead and buy that Nicholas Cage Mermaid Pillow you definitely need.  Check out our website at givemefivepodcast.com We have a store! Check out our shirts, mugs, bags and phone cases here: Buy cool crap! We record using Squadcast. Squadcast is an easy to use, stable recording environment that allows you, your cohosts and any guests the ability to record out of the comfort of your own home. Just click the link and start talking with absolutely no lag. You can try it out using our link and it will help us out immensely. https://squadcast.fm/?ref=givemefive  And you can always reach us at givemefivepodcast@gmail.com or at our Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/givemefivepodcast/  Opening Theme Opening theme: GLOW by DJ Ten (feat LeBrock and ULTRABOSS )

#PirateBroadcast
Catch Marc Gutman on the #PirateBroadcast™

#PirateBroadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 31:15


From the moment we wake up, to the moment we go to bed, we are influenced by branding. What shirt am I going to wear? What car do I drive? What deodorant, marketing firm, beer, and on and on. There's a lot of noise out there and standing out isn't easy. Starting his career in screenwriting with Academy Award winning director Oliver Stone, Marc Gutman blends storytelling, psychology, and design to help brands outmaneuver their competition. An entrepreneur, speaker, and Instagram social media influencer, Marc helps build brands that stand out and get you noticed.Connect with Marchttps://www.wildstory.com/https://www.facebook.com/wildstorymedia/https://www.instagram.com/marcgutman/https://www.youtube.com/c/WildStoryMediahttps://www.linkedin.com/in/marcgutman/Connect with Russhttps://russjohns.com/https://thepiratesyndicate.com/https://nextstepnext.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/nextstepnext/Live Stream Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Bz-HjcE5oQPlease don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTz6TElo52gMGBrikwfj07A

20-Minute Health Talk
9/11 first responders reflect on 20th anniversary, Part I

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 20:41


Retired NYPD officers Scott Strauss and Eddie Reyes spent nine months working on and in "the pile" after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Now 20 years later, both suffer from health issues related to those heroic efforts, which include a remarkable rescue famously portrayed in the Oliver Stone-directed film, "World Trade Center." Both also have found treatment -- and hope -- at Northwell Health's Queens World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. Administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the program tracks medical research into physical and mental health conditions related to 9/11 exposures. Jacqueline Moline, MD, MSc, senior vice president of Northwell's Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention department, directs the WTC Health Program. She joins Eddie and Scott to reflect on the 20th anniversary of 9/11, as well as her experiences caring for those first responders. More from the experts Hear more from Scott Strauss and Eddie Reyes from Northwell's 2021 Side-by-Side NBC special. Watch episodes of 20-Minute Health Talk on YouTube. 

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
StorySmack Episode #74 — ANY GIVEN SUNDAY

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 58:24


The NFL season is here, so we kick things off with a discussion about this All-Star lineup.   Wow, what a cast! To celebrate the launch of the 2021 NFL season, we get in the trenches with Jamie Foxx, Oliver Stone, Al Pacino, Cameron Diaz, Dennis Quaid, Jim Brown, Lawrence Taylor, Charlton Heston, Mathew Modine, and Ann-Margaret. Oscars galore for this cast, and they deliver the star power. Catch our StorySmack livestream every second Saturday of the month at: Facebook.com/scottsigler Twitch.tv/scottsigler YouTube.com/scottsigler

SPENT.Media
#LateToTheParty Ep.15

SPENT.Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 23:57


@Bnosanchuk and @TheJDStaley brings you several media recommendations as they are #LateToTheParty!!! JD shares his thoughts on Oliver Stones 1991 drama, The Doors The film features Val Kilmer, Meg Ryan, Kevin Dillon, and more. They are all over the map with plenty of useless information...coming your way!  BNosanchukhttps://www.instagram.com/bnosanchuk/https://twitter.com/BNosanchuk JDhttps://www.instagram.com/qwikwits/https://twitter.com/thejdstaley SPENThttps://twitter.com/spentradio www.SPENT.media

The Envelope Please
1986: Platoon

The Envelope Please

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 49:53


Almost a decade after The Deer Hunter took home the Best Picture award, we have another Vietnam War movie front and center: Oliver Stone's Platoon. Quieter and more poetic, Platoon is one of the best depictions of what the soldiers experienced during the war. But is it OUR favorite of the year? Tune in and find out!

Endless Hustle
ENDLESS HUSTLE, EP. 89: Actor John C. McGinley, PGA Tour Golfer Abraham Ancer, & Kelsey Grammer

Endless Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 82:10


Hustlers! Today we talk with actor John C. McGinley about his role in Any given Sunday, Paul Neumann / Pacino, Office Space and why it bombed in theaters, Wall Street, Platoon, his admiration for Oliver Stone, Scrubs, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and more! Check out the hilarious McGinley in the final season of Brooklyn Nine-Nine! Next, we chat with Mexican PGA Tour Golfer Abraham Ancer about becoming a Comcast Business Tour Top 10 Athlete, winning his first PGA event, Olympics, getting into golf, tequila, and more! Catch Ancer in the FedEx Cup Playoffs! Finally, we sit down with the great actor, director and producer Kelsey Grammer to discuss fame/staying authentic, the role he missed out on, Cheers, Frasier, why he started a beer brand, and more! Check out Grammer's new movie, 'Charming The Hearts of Men.'

Actual Anarchy Podcast - AnCap Movie Reviews from a Rothbardian Perspective
Episode 249: Episode 249 - The Croods (1:26:13)

Actual Anarchy Podcast - AnCap Movie Reviews from a Rothbardian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 86:12


Rachel Kennerly of Just Add Liberty and Cannabis Heals Me returns to the stone-age with us to discuss “The Croods” in what may be a glimpse of civilization's future if we continue on the current trajectory.An eccentric cave family named the Croods – consisting of Grug, Eep, Ugga, Thunk, Sandy, and Gran – survive several natural disasters, predatory animals and the common cold by sheltering inside a dark cave, merely surviving.  Is such a life worth living?  Eep is dissatisfied with the over-protective nature of her father Grug “protecting” her from everything.  She'd rather a dangerous liberty than a temporarily calm “safety”.Rachel is a lot of fun and we will have a great time discussing this with her.Join us next week as the great, Pete Quinones returns for only his second non-Kevin Costner movie and we delve into some vintage James Woods and talk about “Salvador” directed by Oliver Stone.Show notes:   http://www.actualanarchy.com/249Presented by www.ActualAnarchy.comRobert and I analyze popular movies from a Rothbardian/Anarcho-Capitalist perspective. We use movies as a starting point for people who may not be familiar with this way of thinking. Discussion of the plot and decisions that characters make in relation to morality and violations of the non-aggression principle are our bread and butter. We also will highlight and discuss any themes or lessons from Austrian Economics that we can glean from the film. The point is to show what anarchy actually is with instances that are presented in film. We publish at least once per week; and occasionally will do specials surrounding holidays or events (elections/olympics) and have guests. SUBSCRIBE, RATE AND REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS (or iTUNES)

Jacobin Radio
Michael and Us: Money Never Tweets

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 42:43


In 1987, Oliver Stone introduced the world to a man who was not your daddy's capitalist: Gordon Gekko. We revisit WALL STREET to consider the strengths and limitations of its distinctly New Deal Liberal perspective on American capitalism; to marinate in the particular left-liberal Boomer perspective of Stone; and determine once and for all if greed is, in fact, good. Michael and Us is a podcast about political cinema and our crumbling world hosted by Will Sloan and Luke Savage. To hear weekly bonus episodes, subscribe to the Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/michaelandus/

The Beat with Ari Melber
House advances John Lewis voting rights act

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 43:30


MSNBC's Ari Melber hosts "The Beat" on Tuesday, August 24, and reports on Biden's agenda, the coronavirus, the investigation into the Jan. 6 probe, the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the new heat on Rudy Giuliani. Famed director Oliver Stone and Rep. Adam Schiff join.

Michael and Us
#261 - Money Never Tweets

Michael and Us

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 42:42


In 1987, Oliver Stone introduced the world to a man who was not your daddy's capitalist: Gordon Gekko. We revisit WALL STREET to consider the strengths and limitations of its distinctly New Deal Liberal perspective on American capitalism; to marinate in the particular left-liberal Boomer perspective of Stone; and determine once and for all if greed is, in fact, good.