Barbell Logic

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Starting Strength Online Coaching owner and Starting Strength Coach Matt Reynolds with his sidekick Starting Strength Coach Scott Hambrick discuss all things strength. Follow the podcast @barbell_logic on instagram and join the Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/barbelllogicpodcast/. Contact…

Barbell Logic


    • Aug 9, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 42m AVG DURATION
    • 571 EPISODES

    Listeners of Barbell Logic that love the show mention: matt and scott, starting strength, barbell training, scott and matt, barbell logic, barbells, hambrick, strength training, reynolds, strength program, hardship, home gym, get stronger, voluntary, linear, best strength podcast, unsurprisingly, strength coaches, deadlift, strength community.



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    Latest episodes from Barbell Logic

    Strength Training with Autoimmune Disease - #422

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 60:31

    Matt talks to Nate Garrison about strength training with autoimmune disease. Nate is a videographer and video editor for Barbell Logic that Matt met through Tactical Response. He discusses his journey with autoimmune disease and how barbell training helped his physical and mental health throughout the ongoing process. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease Nate's story begin with his older sister, who struggled with and ultimately died from Crohn's disease. He had seen his sister confront Crohn's. When going through Navy EOD School, he realized that he was seeing symptoms that his older sister has had. Instead of quitting or going to the military medical personnel, he toughed it out and got private medical care as long as he could. He was first diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Later, the doctors diagnosed him with Crohn's disease. He has undergone multiple surgeries, and struggled with excruciating stomach pain, chronic diarrhea, and resultant mental anguish. He had to constantly be aware of where the closest toilet was and bring extra clothes, just in case. He faced obstacles and pain, and could have easily used his disease as an excuse to not further himself and continue to pursue health and excellence. That's not what he did. Weight Lifting with Autoimmune Disease Nate was used to difficult military training, but had never lifted weights. Strength training provided an opportunity to build and better himself in an area he had no experience. He started squatting with 85 pounds, and began his linear progression from there. Strength training with autoimmune disease helped him, but came with voluntary and involuntary hardship. He did his bet to eat food to support his training, and sometimes had to go to the bathrooms multiple times just during the squats. But he completed his workouts and kept training. He worked with Matt as his coach to adjust the stress appropriately and dealing with the Valsalva Maneuver and wearing a belt after a surgery that require cutting through his abdomen. After every surgery he has completed, he has had to reset with a low weight, but he knows it's good for him. In fact, the surgeon asked what he had been doing, as his abdominal wall had grown noticeably thicker after he began squatting and deadlifting heavy.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    MED Programming when PRs are Behind You Pt2 - #421

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 25:02

    Matt and Scott finish their talk discussing the coach-client interaction and being coachable.    If you're paying for coaching, your coach is probably erring on not enough stress, especially if you're a general client trying to get stronger for general health and quality of life reasons. You're not training for the Olympics.   If you decide to do 2, 3, 4 more reps than programmed because it's there, especially if you're older, you may have wrecked yourself for a week or more, and then the coach has to completely change the programming. If you do what is prescribed and you have 3 more reps, then it's easy for the coach to increase the stress the next week.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    MED Programming When PRs are Behind You - Pt1 - #420

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:04

    Matt & Scott developed the concept of Minimum Effective Dose programming (MED programming) through conversations on the podcast. Today, Matt and Scott discuss how to apply the principles of MED programming when PRs are behind you.    Listen to Scott's podcasts: Online Great Books, Music & Ideas, or Growing Resilience. This typically occurs for older clients with high-compliance (though even younger clients who have trained consistently for a long enough time run into this problem). If you're a lifter who regularly takes vacations and misses training, you'll continue to return to linear progression, so this doesn't happen.  Eventually, you can't recover from the stress it takes to hits bigger PRs. Older people tend to sleep less well and they cannot eat as many calories without adding bodyfat. Plus, the reality is simply that the body doesn't react as well to things as it ages - it's just a fact of life.  This also applies to those who find themselves suddenly facing a huge amount more stress. Scott, for example, besides being a bit older, is doing manual labor on his farmstead. This stress matters when it comes to his recovery and ability to stress himself in the gym.  Practically, what does this mean? It often means pulling slots - less frequent training and less volume. You may see 5s become 4s become 3s after awhile. More days of rest between training are needed. Eventually, weight will have to come off the bar, though. Scott has also found that he doesn't program cycles longer than 4 weeks for post-advanced clients.  A disclaimer, though - if you're an officer worker who has never done intelligent training, you need to do this, you need to chase numbers, and you need to get big and strong.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Catching Up with Hambrick Part 2 - #419

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:19

    Enjoy the rest of Matt catching up with Scott for this 2-part episode. Matt & Scott discuss some of what Scott has been doing on his homestead, and just chat about things.  Listen to Scott's podcasts: Online Great Books, Music & Ideas, or Growing Resilience. Learn how Scott's reading the book the Restoration of Christian Culture caused Scott to move his family out to the country and start a homestead operation, growing food, planting trees, raising chickens, and living more simply (simple, hard, effective?). Training has changed for him, because he performs much more physical labor in a normal day than he ever did as the CEO of a data storage company.  Training occurs for injury prevention and bone density, mostly. Enjoy this wide-ranging conversation.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Catching Up with Hambrick Part 1 - #418

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 32:45

    Enjoy the return of Scott for this 2-part episode, where Matt & Scott catch up, discuss some of what Scott has been doing on his homestead, and just chat about things.  Learn how Scott's reading the book the Restoration of Christian Culture caused Scott to move his family out to the country and start a homestead operation, growing food, planting trees, raising chickens, and living more simply (simple, hard, effective?). Training has changed for him, because he performs much more physical labor in a normal day than he ever did as the CEO of a data storage company.  Training occurs for injury prevention and bone density, mostly. Enjoy this wide-ranging conversation.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Are Fitness Certifications Worth It? - #417

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 28:57

    Are fitness certifications worth it, worthless, or does it depend? Niki & CJ walk you through how to consider the value of a fitness certifications as a barbell coach or personal trainer. Are Fitness Certifications Worth It? Personal trainers and barbell coaches have proliferated as the health and fitness industry grows. Fitness certifications also abound, and you can probably find a personal training certification for any niche or skill you would want to learn. Are they worth it? It depends. Thinking about certifications practically and personally, ask yourself "Do I need this certification?" This shifts the focus to YOU, your needs, and your situation. This question also tends to relate to two other questions that new coaches tend to think (even in subconsciously). Am I ready to coach, and do I have permission to coach? If you can provide value to a lifter, you can coach, and we've talked and written about coaching spouses and friends first, what that might look like, and how to not suck as a coach. Regarding permission, the personal training industry does not require a legal certification. You may coach our of your garage. If you're looking to coach at a gym, you may need a certain certification. Many fall into the trap of trying to collect certifications but failing to coach. We love and encourage academic study and are not anti-certification, but if you want to coach you must coach.   Furthermore, your appreciate and the value of the certification becomes clear when you begin to coach (do I need to know this? does this help me)? As you learn the academic side, you have more to bring to the platform. Which Personal Training Certification Should I Get? We return to "Do I need this certification," with stress on the word need. Will this certification get you clients? Will this certification improve your coaching? Is an employer or potential employers requiring this certification? You might not know the answers to this. Consider getting one of the study guides or books meant to help prepare you for one of the more common certifications. Start reading it as you coach people. Does the information provide you useful information? Examine what type of information you're finding valuable - maybe there is a certification that focuses more on those areas. Are Fitness Certifications Worthless? The incentive of a credential can help motivate one to study and learn. Furthermore, a certification can provide a standard from which employers - gyms and online coaching companies - can evaluate coaches. Similar to the personal training industry in general, you have to sort through much chafe to get to the wheat. Fitness certifications signal to employers and potential clients you have a baseline level of knowledge. They may be required to get personal training insurance. Lastly, some may get you clients (or prevent you from getting clients). This is rare in either case, but if a certain brand is well-known and that certification is considered valuable and hard-to-get, you may get clients looking for a coach with that certification.  Oppositely, if a brand gets associated with something such as getting clients injured, you may find yourself having to defend that brand or dealing with similar questions about the brand's approach. Are fitness certifications worth it? It depends, and this episode helps you weigh the costs and value of certifications to decide which fitness certification is right for you.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Visual Cues for Lifting #416

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 36:55

    Matt & Niki discuss visual cues for lifting: how to best use them in-person & online, common mistakes to avoid, & some helpful examples.  Visual Cues for Lifting When used properly, visual cues can reduce the time & words needed to get the lifter squatting or deadlifting or pressing with proper form. Used incorrectly, they can confuse and get lifters trying to mimic something inappropriate for them.   Visual cues help with stationary, simple technique elements that can often be difficult to explain. For example, "take a shoulder width stance" actually requires a bit of thought. If you take the stance and toe angle they need, however, you've probably saved time and confusion.   Similarly, showing the proper wrist, and elbow position for the squat helps the lifter see the "straight wrist, close grip, elbows forward."   These visual cues, of course, don't occur in isolation. Combining different means of communication (verbal, tactile, visual) hammers home important points, allowing multiple senses to receive and comprehend the technique information. Visual cues for lifting can thus simplify and quicken the learning process. Visual Cues for Online Coaching In-person coaching typically uses visual communication during the teaching progression, when the coach shows the lifter what he's looking for. When the lifter is lifting, you have to be in the lifter's vision or peripheral vision to communicate with the lifter (necessary for coaching a deaf lifter, which Matt has done). In online coaching where the coach breaks down the video, the lifter gets to watch her own lifts and hear the coach's commentary. Additionally, the coach can pause or slow down the video. The coach can draw and many coaches include video of themselves, where they can use their upper body or arms to add a visual cue. Thus, the best online coaching provides verbal & visual cues, combining the auditory and visual senses.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Bad Strength Coach!? Bad Coaching & How NOT To Be Bad

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 37:58

    Niki & CJ discuss what makes a bad strength coach and how to avoid the pitfalls of bad coaching. Being not bad, a very good place to start.  Bad Strength Coaching Let's face it, we've all experienced a bad professional at one time or another. Whether they were unprofessional, rude, incompetent, sleezy, inattentive, we can all relate to the experience of knowing we're dealing with a bad professional.   So what makes a bad strength coach?   Bad barbell coaches fall short in at least one area of coaching. professionalism competence integrity client-centeredness Professionalism, Integrity, Competence You can be professional and have integrity on day one as you coach your friend. Take what you're doing seriously and commit to learning. Show up on time. Wear appropriate clothing. Honest and integrity go toward professionalism, but as a coach people are trusting you with their time, body, goals, and money. Respect these. Furthermore, tell the truth about your current experience & competency level. If someone asks you a question about something outside your expertise, be honest that you've never dealt with that but you can look into it. If it's completely outside your scope or something you don't want to deal with, you might look up some sources or professionals they can look to to learn more. For competence, of course, tell the truth about your competence, but if you've never lifted and have no direction to provide for a lifter, you probably shouldn't coach. Learn some teaching progressions and cues, have some understanding of common programming adjustments and problems you'll encounter, and commit to learning. Client-Centeredness You can't coach without clients, and you're ultimately working to accomplish your clients' goals. It may be true that more well-known coaches can be selective about who they coach and can say "my way or the highway." If this is you and you're doing okay for yourself, then great, but more than likely you haven't developed "a way" and you need to understand and appreciate your clients' needs and goals. If you never examine your coaching and always blame the client, you're not improving. Don't do this. When a client asks a question or suggests they're not quite happy with how things are going, don't dive into defensiveness. Embrace the discomfort, and consider what you could have done better. What can you learn? Take it as an opportunity. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Tactile Cues for Correct Technique - #414

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:33

    Matt & Niki explore tactile cues: different types, how & when to use them for in-person and online coaching. Oh, and how do you pronounce tactile? Is it like "tactical?" Tactile Cues vs Verbal & Visual Cues Tactile cues, as you may have guessed, involve you as the coach or an object touching the lifter. Visual cues show the lifter how to properly lift. Visual cues explain (hopefully clearly) how the client should move. Tactile cues use the sensation of touch to deliver information to the lifter.   You as the coach may physically move the lifter into the correct position. This avoids the lifter having to understand your verbal or visual directions, and allows the lifter to feel proper form. An example is bringing the lifters elbows up & forward in the press set up.   Similarly, you may pace your hand or finger on a body part you want the client to focus in on. For example, you may touch the lifters low back to get the lifter to extend her lumbar spine.   Lastly, you may have an object impose a physical indicator that limits the range of motion. Examples of this include using a foam roller or 4x4 (often called terribly useful block of wood (TUBOW) to prevent knee slide in the squat or setting up a band so the lifter knows proper depth in the squat.   Some carryover exists between verbal and tactile cues. You may give your lifter a verbal cue for her to feel a physical sensation. "Pressure on midfoot" is a great example where you're trying to create tactile feedback for the lifter through a verbal cue. Tactile Cue Challenges You need to build trust with your lifter, so ask if it's okay to touch the lifter to correct their technique, and touch them professionally. There are some situations where you may simply want to avoid touching lifters. Matt, for example, used to coach junior high females. What physical cues can you use in online coaching? Adjusting the lifter into correct technique is impossible. You may recommend the lifter gets an in-person session with a coach if you trust. There are ways, however, to bring attention to a body part or impose a physical limitation. The lifter or person close to the lifter may touch the lifter to bring attention to a body part. You don't have to be a coach to touch someone's low back or mid-sternum. Setting up a band or TUBOW, as well, can be done with online coaching. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Making the Coaching Transition - #413

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 38:40

    The coaching transition can be hard, as you have to budget time, money, or both with a steep learning curve & avoid potential pitfalls. Niki & CJ help you learn how to make the coaching transition to become a good coach. Also, learn the correct pronunciation of CJ's last name! Coaching Transition - Let's Go So, you want to be a coach!? Awesome. You'll have to move from your current non-coaching state & bring coaching into actuality. Of course, there's the leap of faith method, where you quit everything, metaphorically burn all your ships, and decide you'll be a coach one way or another. Let's try another path, a more deliberate path, where you learn from the wisdom and mistakes of others. Even if coaching become your primary means of income - you find yourself coaching at a big box gym or CrossFit gym, you have to ensure you coach, learn, and avoid burnout. If you're in this position, we can't recommend enough our (completely free) Coaching Kickstarter eBook. Check it out! Avoiding Pitfalls During Your Coaching Transition Whatever path you follow, you must coach. Coach your spouse, your friends, your mom, your kids. Just coach. You need the reps, just as someone who wants to lift needs to get started - even if they have a 1" bar with concrete plates, no lifting shoes or belt, and are searching correct form during the workout. Begin. You need a deliberate learning method. This not only includes the basic academic knowledge - anatomy, physiology, principles of programming, physics - but also a way to reflect on and learn from every coaching session. Just as a novice may not be all that strong but can enjoy the rapid growth of a linear progression, a beginner coach can similar improve quickly through deliberate practice. Ensure your business model is sustainable - and sustainability primarily means in terms of money and time. CJ, for example, knew he had four months of runway before he or his wife would have to begin to earn additional money outside coaching. Similarly, someone who keeps their main job and coaches in their free time will either need to put a time-limit on this practice or ensure that their combined main job and coaching job does not lead to burn out (too much time) or resentment (not charging clients enough). A major pitfall is going professional too early. Example include buying or renting a huge gym space, getting a professionally-designed website, or purchasing some administrative or backend support when you only have a couple paying clients. As you grow as a coach, a more professional website, a bigger space, and other marks of an established, professional coach will come - but don't do the coaching equivalent of buying a treadmill when you've never run a day in your life. Start today, keep learning, know your coaching VIP, and - seriously - download that Coaching Kickstarter eBook. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Verbal Communication (Let's Talk) - #412

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 40:26

    Today, Matt & Niki delve into verbal communication - our primary means of communication as a coach, both in-person & online. While this may seem straightforward, many steps occur to correctly communicate to our clients & get them to move correctly. This begins & 3-part series of sorts where Matt & Niki will explore communication, beginning with verbal & touching on tactile & visual (and the differences between in-person and online). No video this week for YouTube viewers. We tried a new recording platform & lost the video. Bear with us while we try to improve our logistical & technological systems. Thanks! Verbal Communication on the Platform What has to occur for effective communication to occur on the platform? The coach must first see the lift, process that information, and compare what he sees to the model in his head (which may be imperfect). Following this, he must understand any deviations from the model, prioritize them, understand how to correct them, and deliver information to the lifter in the form of a cue (e.g. "knees out"). That's a lot. But communication involves two people and is a two-way street. Hearing the cue, the lifter must then understand it (each word and the words together). The lifter takes that information and use it to attempt to change her movement in light of that new information. Then the lifter moves. The coach returns to the picture, and the process is repeated. Did the lifter fix the error (and potentially additional errors)? Was there an overcorrection? Did nothing change at all? Don't worry, though, while much is involved, we can simplify this process and accelerate your effectiveness as a coach. Teaching Versus Cueing Typically, a coach takes in information regarding new lifters, to understand those lifters' backgrounds. This helps the coach determine his approach with their first interaction. Coaches may perform a teaching progression, which both gets the lifter moving correctly while including certain words & phrases that will likely inform cues that the coach may use during the lifter's sets. It can be a good idea to walk lifters through the teaching progression, especially if you're a newer coach. For online coaching, teaching may involve some how to videos demonstrating proper form. Articles and podcasts that address lifting basics may begin to deepen the lifter's understanding. Understand that in order for a cue to be effective, it must be understood. Teaching should first focus on the "how"s. Teaching enables better understanding of cueing and coaching during the sets. As teaching progresses - as the lifter & coaching relationship lengthens and deepens - the focus of teaching moves from the "how"s to the "why"s, and this is often why good coaches are born as clients, because as they improve as lifters and learn the "why"s from a good coach, they consider coaching themselves. Practical & Effective Verbal Cues Let's move past the theoretical and come to the practical. What should you do on the platform? Some basic principles of good cueing can help steer you in the right direction. Cues should be: Brief - keep cues short *Confident - don't portray doubt *Loud - cues must be heard Clear - avoid big words Positive when appropriate - a "good" communicates that the lifter is correctly performing the movement *Note: loud & confident does not mean yelling (necessarily) - deliver appropriate cue for environment & lifter Cues must be understood, and more words means more words that can misunderstood or not heard. Keep cues short and use short words. If you're a new coach and not 100% sure about the cue, act like you are. Don't deliver a cue with doubt or like it's a question. Give the cue and evaluate and re-evaluate based on the lifter's movement. Lastly, seminars and powerlifting meets can skew cue volume. Cues must be heard, but they don't have to be yelled. Furthermore, increasing the volume tends to increase the confusion. If you deliver a cue, nothing changes, and deliver it again more loudly, okay. But it needs to end there. A typical bad interaction goes something like this: lifter lifts incorrectly, coach delivers cue, lifter repeats the error, coach gets louder, lifter repeats error, coach delivers the cue again, this time yelling and getting frustrated and angry, lifter is beginning to tune the coach out. If you find yourself in this situation, stop. Shift your angle. Think about a different cue. Don't get frustrated. It's possible that this set gets away from you. That's okay. Keep observing, thinking, and coaching as best you can. Control the Platform, Control the Emotions Controlling the platform doesn't mean channeling your inner drill sergeant. You might feel frustrated and be terrified that Matt Reynolds is 5 feet behind you observing the lifter (which, if he's 5 feet behind you, you might take that as a suggestion to move 5 feet back, FWIW). Pay attention to how your lifter is responding to you and your cues on the platform. If you're frustrated, the lifter is likely frustrated and confused. Breathe. Slow things down. Encourage. Teach between sets. Think. This is how you'll become a better coach. The only way you can fail is to give up. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Nerding Out on Pain Science - #411

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 46:08

    Nerd out on pain science, what it's like doing scientific research, getting papers published, and what we understand about pain interventions for humans. Jayson Ball, staff coach & PhD student, rejoins the podcast with CJ Gotcher. The Pain of Scientific Research What does science look like from the trenches of laboratories, where experiments are designed and executed, papers are submitted and defended, and knowledge is furthered? Jayson is mid-way through a PhD program. He has transitioned from spending most time in the classroom to now spending more time in the laboratory. Research takes much time, and some studies end with apparent dead ends (though knowledge & benefits to those involved can always be gleaned). He enjoys the process, and conducts as much research as possible to learn as much as possible. Nerding Out On Pain Science Jayson & his colleagues focus their research on rats. Rats enables some methods & interventions that are not possible with humans, but how much can be gleaned from experimenting with rats is always an issue. Rats love exercise. Put a running wheel in a container with a rat, and you will get high compliance. Put a treadmill in someone's house, and the same result does not follow. Pain and exercise research focuses on mechanisms, not interventions. Psychosocial interventions best serve humans (at least for now). Biological interventions (e.g. pain killers) come with serious side effects. Psychosocial interventions such as not catastrophizing  help people deal with pain and recover from injuries. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    End Your Cooking Rut to Overcome Food Boredom - #410

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 32:59

    How do you end your cooking rut? What do you do when your go-to foods bore you? Niki Sims & Nikki Burman have tips & tricks to re-energize your cooking & meal preparation, so you don't turn to unhealthy, convenience foods that take you away from your goals. End Your Cooking Rut It's easy to grow sick of the same meals, get burnt out by cooking, meal preparation, grocery shopping, and all the other steps (including eating) that go into healthy, sustainable nutrition. Tackle this thorny issue from both sides: remember your goals & enliven the steps to crush your goals. Remember Your Goals – Know Your Why What are your nutrition goals and why do they matter to you? Reminding yourself of why you're cooking, preparing meals, and eating healthy foods matters. Ruts happen. Don't forget why you're doing this in the first place. Nikki enjoys seeing her family happy & healthy. The physical manifestation of her goals is her family, so she not only looks toward her personal goals but her loved ones for motivation. Taking time to write your goals, post them, and investigate why they matter helps. Now, on to reenergizing meal preparation. Find New Recipes Finding new recipes can reenergize your nutrition, but doing this requires work (find the recipe, purchase the food, try it out, see if people like it). Unless you absolutely love trying new recipes, look for simpler recipes. Look at the ingredient list and the number of steps. Double-check that you're comfortable with the cooking options (if it requires an air fryer and you don't have one, move on). Beyond finding all new recipes, you can tweak go-to recipes to make them fresh and prevent boredom. Try cooking vegetables or meat, for example, with a different method (if you typically roast, try the air fryer or grill them). Change out meats and vegetables to find a different flavor profile. The basics of the recipe will remain, but the result will taste much different. Vary the spices and see what works and what you like. Make Cooking Fun If you're cooking for your family, make it a family event. Have your family join you, so you don't feel like you're sacrificing family time for food time. This is also a great way to teach your family how to cook and what is involved in making healthy food. If you're meal prepping for yourself, listen to music or your favorite podcast. Have it be – like training time – a time away from work and that is all about you and moving toward your goals. Preparation & Planning Have healthy meats & veggies frozen & on-hand. Maintain a well-stocked spice cabinet. Keep necessary & go-to sauces in your refrigerator. If you made too much of something, freeze part of it so you have a ready-to-go meal. Schedule your grocery shopping. This might mean having it delivered to your house, delivered to the car, or going in yourself, but ensure you have your grocery list complete & ensure the time works for you and your family. Don't Fear Failure You might make something that doesn't go over well. That's okay. You'll make more food that is tasty and healthy, and you'll occasionally find a new favorite dish that you'll want to make for and share with others. Experiment and try new things. If you're sick of eggs, try overnight oats, recipes with greek yogurt, or cottage cheese and fruit. Try breakfast for dinner (or dinner for breakfast). Ultimately, if you're dreading eating your prepared food, lower compliance is likely to arise. Lower compliance means moving away from your goals. Notice this early and try some new recipes or new ways of cooking now before you're noticing metrics shifting in an undesired direction. Let us know if you have some other ideas to end your cooking rut and reenergize meal preparation! GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Find Clients & Provide Value as a Coach - 409

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 37:04

    Are there too many coaches!? Learn how to stand out, find clients & provide value as a coach in a seemingly flooded coaching market. The Flooded Fitness Market Are there too many coaches!? Learn how to stand out, find clients & provide value as a coach in a seemingly flooded coaching market. With social media & the internet, it's easy to be overwhelmed by the quantity of personal trainers, content creators, and coaches trying to find a piece of the fitness market. Niki & CJ can help. Think about your Values, Identities, & Priorities (VIP) & consider the market. Ideally, these two circles are aligned perfectly. They won't be, and you're not looking to coach everyone in the fitness market. You are not in the same pool as the expert, online coach who has been doing this for decades. While you may look up to this coach and learn from him or her, comparing yourself to him or her is ultimately counterproductive. Plus, these people didn't begin with huge social media followings or large online coaching companies. Finding Clients as a Coach What comparative advantage do you have over a Matt Reynolds, Louie Simmons, or whatever coach you look up to? You know your co-workers, friends, and family and can help them meet their goals with a relatively low knowledge level and for much cheaper than a professional barbell coach. The people around you should know that you lift and coach. Like any other hobby, talk about it in person and on social media. Start coaching friends, family, & co-workers. Do it now. Start coaching. Don't worry about finding a niche. Don't worry about marketing, having a website, starting a podcast, getting a certification, or getting articles published. These are all great. They don't help you coach. Providing Value as a Coach It doesn't take much experience or knowledge to be able to help those around you. Having some teaching progressions, knowing some cues, and understanding the basics of programming a novice means you can people meet their goals. It is not a big gap between posting videos of your friends and family hitting PRs on social media and posting videos of your clients hitting personal bests on social media. You don't need to know how to program DUP or Conjugate programming to help someone get stronger. You don't need to have 10k followers on Instagram to double someone's squat. You don't have to have a personal training certification to teach someone how to deadlift. Find Clients & Provide Value as a Coach The low barrier to entry should not discourage you but encourage you. To find clients & provide value as a coach does not require intensive study and years of experience. You can start now. This also means there are many bad coaches and personal trainers out there. You can quickly surpass them by acting professionally now, by developing and maintaining an academy study habit, and by coaching now. Certifications, content creation, and finding social media followers are great. Do these along the way. Like you shouldn't feel like a failure because you can't squat 315 on day 1, don't feel bad that as a newbie coach your skills and knowledge reflect that. Just as two months on a novice linear progression can make a big different, two months of study, coaching, and posting on social media can make a big difference. Accomplishing your goals as a professional barbell coach requires consistency over a long period of time. Start now - there is no better day or time to begin. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Online Coaching is Better Than In-Person Coaching - #408

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 51:01

    Online coaching is better than in-person coaching. It provides more value to the coach and client, enabling greater flexibility, personalization, and effectiveness. Online Coaching is Better Since Barbell Logic began providing online coaching, we have offered it almost apologetically, only as a backup if you lacked in-person access to a great professional barbell coach. We have changed are thinking on online coaching's value. Online coaching is better than in-person coaching for most people most of the time. Online coaching provides greater flexibility, personalization, consistency, and effectiveness for coaches and clients. We still love in-person coaching, and most of our coaches offer both online and in-person coaching. Effectiveness of Online Coaching We used to believe in the extreme importance of the first few sessions and first few months for novice lifters. Coaches correct technique errors in the initial sessions, getting lifters moving in the most biomechanically efficient way possible (with proper form). Clients needed to get as strong as possible in those first few months. While we still value correct technique and getting clients stronger in the beginning months, these are rather the initial steps in a longer transformative process of building strength to improve quality of life. Numbers on the bar increase drastically in the initial months of training, but the true value comes from how strength training and health habits become a part of their life, which ultimately creates the effectiveness, value, and lifechanging changes the clients are looking for. Flexibility of Online Coaching Online Coaching provides flexibility to coaches and clients that in-person coaching cannot compete with. Clients train when and where they want, and coaches coach when and where they want. This flexibility has led to greater consistency and higher consistency to more effectiveness. If you have an in-person session and something comes up so you can't make it, the chances that your coach has the flexibility to modify his schedule are slim. Whereas if you typically train before work and something arises where you have to train after work, it's not a problem with online coaching. This also leads to greater compliance. As a client, you can maintain your training habit through a gym closure or a vacation while still receiving coaching from your coach. As a coach, you can continue to retain your clients as they move. If you want to live in small town USA or in sunny southern California, you can and coach people around the world. This also enables better coach-client pairing. Clients with specialized needs such as postpartum or pregnancy training, training for military requirements, or training around injuries can find coaches with that knowledge. Coaches can be paired with more clients who they are better-equipped to coach. Value of Online Coaching Online coaches earn more money per hour and can have more clients than the limitations of a daily or weekly schedule allow. Beyond this, the pathways to higher-paying coaching are limiting. Personal training wages are low, and not all people want to open their own gym (plus, with business closures, this is riskier than ever before). Clients pay less money for online coaching while typically getting more or as much feedback from their coach as they would from their in-person coach. In-person coaching from an excellent professional barbell coach is extremely expensive. Most people typically get occasional technique tune ups or follow a group coaching model to make in-person coaching more affordable. Online Coaching Delivery Differences Online coaching enables coaches to video themselves while watching their clients videos and provide video feedback. While online coaching has some limitations (especially tactile cues) its capabilities enable some different coaching methods. Through either moving your body in the video or drawing on the screen, visual cues are easier to deliver to clients than when in-person. Online coaching enables more long coach-client relationships. Although long relationships certainly exist with in-person clients, oftentimes the coach or the client moves and though both would like to continue the relationship it must end. Online coaching can sustain these coach-client relationships. Online coaching excels at programming. Not only is delivering workout programming (coach) and receiving programming (client) easier, but the coach can explain strength programming decisions and adjustments easily. Metrics can be automated and tracked for all lifts and all rep ranges. While this may seem like a small benefit, if seeing different PRs go up over time motivates clients, then this again increases compliance while ultimately leads to greater effectiveness. Online coaching enables automatic storage of not only metrics and PRs but also information. Whatever cue the coach wants to think about next time, you can automatically remember. You don't have to write down programming or cues or anything else in your notebook in order to remember it. The App logs it. Client Education & Empowerment Lastly, online coaching naturally leads to greater client education. In-person coaching the coach can do more in terms of immediate technique cueing and load changing. As clients learn and coaches better understand their clients, developing guiderails in case of bad training days (or awesome training days) involves the coach enabling the client to make those decisions for themselves. The clients, too, are not on their own with these decisions, but the coach can provide feedback as to the decision the client made. For example, if a client has a tendency to make decisions that take it easier on themselves, the coach can both adjust the guiderails and let the client understand this tendency they have.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Avoiding Coach Burnout - #407

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:24

    Burnout can occur in any pursuit or career path, but can be particularly noxious for careers coming from passion. Coaching fits that bill certainly, as no one comes to coaching to make billions. So, acknowledging that burnout exists and can happen, how do we avoid it (or stop it if we find ourselves burnt out). What is Coaching Burnout? Burnout isn't being tired. Maybe the analogy in training is that it's not the soreness or exhaustion that one hard workout can create, but rather the buildup of stress unrecovered from (overtraining). Coaching burnout will feel like emotional exhaustion, and symptoms may include: not training not attending nutrition dreading work feeling like you're putting on a show resentment Burnout is a signal that something or many things are wrong. This is an opportunity to right those wrongs and grow as a person and professional barbell coach. Causes of Coaching Burnout What causes burnout? The reasons to feel exhausted differ, but it likely comes from a violated boundaries or a lack of priorities. It ultimately comes down to not knowing and pursuing what you want. You may not know what you want as you begin to coach. That is okay. Those desires may change, and probably will. You may begin to say yes to every coaching opportunity that presents itself, as you want coaching experience. As you gain experience and expertise, you will likely need to know how to choose opportunities, which means saying no to things that do not bring you closer to your goals. If you allow your in-person sessions to regularly bleed over their allocated time, you are not only providing more than you agreed to but you are likely stepping on your training time, family time, personal time, or lunch time. Similarly, if you retain old clients that are paying lower rates when you were a less-skilled coach, you likely need to tell those clients that your rate has increased and be prepared to justify why. You'll likely be surprised at their response. Avoiding or Ending Coaching Burnout Know your boundaries. You may not know them as you begin as a coach, but identifying them and communicating them to your clients and other clearly sets expectations up front. You may (and likely will) have to defend them at some point. Identify what you want and work toward your goals. This will require checking in, as your desires and goals will change. Keeping your goals in mind helps you evaluate opportunities and know which to follow and which to avoid. Know your scope of practice. You cannot be all things for your client. It can be helpful to have other resources or experts you can refer your clients to, but you are not and should not be a therapist or other professional. Take the time to check-in with how you feel. How do you feel after a call with a client, an in-person coaching session, or how are you feeling in general? Just as slower bar speed and lower desire to train can indicate you're heading toward overtraining, seeing repeated negative emotions can help you identify you need to change something in your coaching practice. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Knowledge: How to Set Yourself Apart - #406

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:59

    How do you set yourself apart as a coach? One way is knowledge. Understanding the fundamentals that underlie anatomy, physiology, programming, technique, and platform coaching will differentiate you from the typical personal trainer. Set yourself apart with knowledge.  It's easy to get a personal training certification. Even earning a degree in exercise science offers no guarantee of competence as a coach.  Have a basic understanding of science. Anatomy & physiology are key here. Get a high school textbook on anatomy and physiology and read it and understand it. If you acquire this level of understanding, you stand head and shoulders above the vast majority of personal trainers.  The real goal of education is to learn how to learn effectively. There are an endless number of educational pursuits, so learning HOW to learn is more important than WHAT you learn. By learning how to learn you enable yourself to continue your pursuit of knowledge to whatever you want or need to learn. Learning should be a lifelong pursuit, no matter your career, and if you want to be an excellent coach, you have to be a lifelong learner. Continue to improve and learn and get better. The Academy Principles Course is targeted at barbell enthusiasts who love to learn more and geek out on barbell & barbell-related topics and those coaches looking to master the fundamentals (or principles).    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Overcoming Imposter Syndrome - #405

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 35:01

    Niki & CJ discuss overcoming imposter syndrome as a coach. The address what it is, why it's normal, when you may be beyond your abilities, and practical tips to deal with it. Learn more about overcoming imposter syndrome as a coach. Doubt, fear, and anxiety is normal. With coaching, or really any venture, you will likely experience internal self-doubt but may also have a fear of being discovered or exposed as a fraud or imposter. This appears and persists despite evidence to the contrary. Regardless of accomplishments, success, credentials, you still have a feeling of not being qualified. You're in good company, as this feeling is nearly universal. This is a sign you care, and literature suggests that those who face these feelings are less likely to cheat and more likely to work harder to improve. These feelings have become so prevalent that an entire industry has arisen to overcome imposter syndrome. These feelings appear or heighten especially around 2 phenomena: challenging obstacles & stress accumulation. When a client quits, you get a client who is a bit outside your comfort zone, or you're asked to do something novel but generally within the realm of your skill set, these feelings will likely arise. Obstacles are opportunities for growth. If you successfully overcome a novel challenge--heck, even if you fail but try your hardest--you will learn and improve as a coach. It is true, of course, that there are challenges that are truly beyond your abilities. How can you think about these? You can ask yourself: Am I as qualified and ready as I can reasonably be? You could also add a "...yet." For example, "I'm not qualified to coach professional powerlifters...yet." This allows for the possibility for growth. Stress can accumulate, create heightened negative emotions, and leave us with feelings of being a fraud or imposter at work. You may feel like you're in a "trough of despair." What can you do? First, think about the immediate stressors. You the helpful HALT acronym. Are you any of the following: Hungry Angry Lonely Tired As Niki says, you can deal with these through lunch with a friend and a nap. You can think about conditions generally in your life. CJ discusses how as an early coach he took on too much work, which prevented him from addressing his own nutrition and training. He felt worse physically, and that carried over to how he saw himself (plus, he actually didn't look the part of a physical trainer or coach). Lastly, there may be actual medical issues like anxiety or depression, outside of coaching or your professional pursuit, that can be addressed and improve this element of your coaching. This is hard to discuss. You can't and really shouldn't address this with your client. That being said, you should admit when you don't know something and look it up. You can admit to not feeling great and that you're not 100%. Consider your coaching more of a collaboration than a mechanic working on a car. Explain your thought process. This can help get buy-in. Discussing this with colleagues can come with the fear of them denying any feelings of fraud. Talking to someone in another career field can leave you with the easy excuse that "it's different for that professional field." Lastly, while the fake-it-til-you-make-it mentality isn't wrong, it can go too far. You shouldn't necessarily take on every client. You may be honest with clients you're on the fence on and develop a 3-month test run. This enables you to see if you're up to the challenge while being upfront and honest with the potential client. Because, if you truly fake it--not simply fake some confidence, but lie about your abilities and credentials, you'll likely come to believe the lie yourself. The uncomfortable feelings of imposter syndrome should result in growth or--if grounded in lies and deceit--will enable you to overcome these feelings through buying your own lies. Overcoming imposter syndrome as a coach or overcoming imposter syndrome at work can be challenging. Try some of these tips and approaches out. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Find Your Coaching VIP (Values, Identity, Priorities) - #404

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 48:03

    Niki & CJ Gotcher discuss how to determine your values, identities, and priorities (VIP). These underlie WHY, HOW, WHAT, and FOR WHOM you coach. Learn about what these are and how you can more consciously develop and refine these over time (they aren't set in stone). Whether we do so consciously or not, we have some notion of our coaching VIP. Something brought us to coaching our friends or family or diving a bit more deeply into why we might train a certain way or how training can be more effective. Approaching these more systematically and really thinking through them can help us better understand ourselves, potentially reinvigorate our coaching practice, and help us know what to say no to.  What we say no to can tell us much about what we value and what our priorities are. Why? Well, it's easy to say yes to things. Early on as a coach, you'll probably say yes to every possible opportunity to coach someone. You need the experience, and a priority early on might be simply get as much experience as possible.  As you progress as a coach, however, you'll start to prefer certain types of clients or gravitate toward certain types of activities. Some may love the challenges of programming for competitive athletes, who constantly try to squeeze the most our of their performance. Others may like hybrid athletes, who try to elevate multiple physical attributes. Some may simply find joy from helping older clients regain capabilities they thought they had lost forever.  Beyond finding a niche, the stakes go up for us as coaches when we transition from hobbyist to professionals. We're asking for money and ultimately making a promise that we can provide more value to the client than the money they paid us. More responsibility can often lead to more introspection and why we're doing coaching at all.      GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    How to Never Miss Training - #403

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 45:41

    Consistency leads to PRs and meeting your goals, more than any other factor (form, programming). Nikki Burman, Director or Client Experience & Exclusive Coach at BLOC, discusses how as a coach she helps others and how a lifter she personally achieves consistency. Learn how to never miss a workout.    Nikki often talks to clients who are considering quitting training and online coaching with BLOC, and her approach is "let's find a way to make this work." What this means if not forcing the way on the client, but rather examining and looking to improve two main things. The first item she considers is the lifter's support system. Not, as a coach, she cannot necessarily improve the support system BUT she can help be a support system of sorts by encouragement and accountability. She can also see if there are some sources of support that might not be underused or unused in the coach's life. Secondly, she asks "is the plan realistic?"  Missing workouts can lead to a accumulation of discouragement and a sense of failure. The lifter is often following an unrealistic plan.  Programs can be unrealistic for many reasons. A lifter may begin a block program that is realistic, but a life event occurs that makes that program no longer realistic. A client may feel burned out, get injured, get bored, or reprioritize activities in her life.  How can lifters more easily accumulate workouts? Shorter workouts, potentially with optional exercises, can make it easier to get in the gym, and on those days where the motivation is there, you can do the extra work, on the other days just get the meat and potatoes done.  Shifting how the workouts feel can help. That might mean getting a pump, getting sweaty, changing exercise selection, or doing things like AMRAPs, myo reps, or other means that can provide quick, different workouts that still enable productive stress.  A misalignment of how important we think an activity is in our life versus how important our effort or time suggests it may be can lead to guilt. Niki suggests the following exercise, which can help you see that misalignment. List important activities and pursuits in your life. Give them an importance from 1-5. Then think about how much time and effort you put toward those activities, and identify the misalignments. Can you make that 5 a 4 and truly live it out as a 4?  Build consistency, ensure your program is realistic, and learn how to never miss a workout.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    The Once & Future Novice - #402

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 35:30

    Lots of people execute novice programming repeatedly, and even in advanced programming a lift is being increased through novice programming. So, how do we think about novice programming, returning to it, and how it really differs from true advanced programming? Following MED programming principles, we follow a simple yet hard program because it is effective. The simplest program is the manipulation of one training variable. For a strength novice, typically, this means increasing intensity in a linear fashion while keeping other variables constant (volume, exercise selection, frequency).  At the point at which you can no longer increase only one variable - when more than one variables have to be manipulated to progress - you are not a novice.  Even on advanced programs, however, the simplicity of increasing the stress for a lift or lifts linearly through univariable manipulation typically makes sense. So, for example, you may have a supplemental squat lift on your deadlift intensity day on a 4-day split, even as part of block programming. You often increase the stress of this lift by simply adding weight to the same volume.  Similarly, on a daily undulating periodization program, which is a type of concurrent programming where you train multiple physical attributes at once (hypertrophy, strength, power), you still add weight to the lifts in their respective slots.  Lastly, a truly advanced lifter may have some advanced lifts but others that need to be progressed with novice programming. This may be because a lifter has focused on one lift while not training other lifts (e.g. someone benched all the time but only ever really did one leg day with machines, so their squats and deadlifts need novice programming). Another situation is post-injury where some lifts were affected but others could continue as normal. For many people, novice programming is simply a somewhat regular thing they accomplish because of life factors (vacations, business travel, sickness).  The thing that brings people to advanced program is consistent training over a long enough period.  If a lifter repeatedly has disruptions to training, linear progression will be something he returns to frequently. We may adjust what LP looks like, we may take bigger jumps and not grind it out as much, but some type of linear progression is the quickest way to return to previous strength levels - and surpass them.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Going Off Script As a Novice - #401

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 57:46

    Training means you have a script or program that you follow, but whether by your choice or life circumstances, you may have to or want to go off script. So, if you're a novice and have to or want to go off script, how do you navigate the potential difficulties and tradeoffs of going off script?   0:00 BL1K! 21:53 RIP Papa Reynolds 24:53 Off Script as a Novice Lifter As a novice, you can progress quickly. For strength, this means that if you graph your progress of the weight on the bar for your lifts it will follow a line. This is a simple, hard, and effective way to train, which lets you build the habit of training, gain confidence, improve your form, and increase strength and quality of life.  You cannot always--or may not always want to--follow the script. Some examples of off script events or activities include: sickness or injury vacation or business travel sports or other physical activities powerlifting or strengthlifting meet unplanned PR Different situations demand different adjustments, and it's better to plan for off script events than (e.g. powerlifting meet) than choose unplanned activities (e.g. unplanned PR) so you can both prepare and recover appropriately for them. Consistent "off script" activities will slow your strength progress, and that's okay. You'll have to adjust your program (so you'll adjust the script) and adjust your expectations.  If you have a coach and participate in physical activities that the coach is not programming, communicate with your coach (to the best of your ability) when, how often, and what those activities are like. If something unexpected happens (e.g. a BJJ session is much rougher than expected), let them know. Vacations and business trips can be planned for, and you'll have to decide whether you'll train during that period or not. You can adjust planning before and after (and potentially during), and may have to take a step back afterwards. Unplanned PRs can be fun, and for advanced lifters you may develop a knack for knowing when it's there and take it. For a novice lifter, you're progressing quickly, so we don't recommend the unplanned PR...but, if you do it, realize you might have to take a step back or at least reduce the stress following the PR. Developing patience can help here. If you're sick, depending on how sick and what it is, you may still be able to get into the gym, but might simply take it easy and have the win being that you got in the gym. If you were really sick, you may not only have taken off training but might have lost some muscle if you mostly laid down. Take a step back, and adjust your mindset--it's a part of life, and you'll get back to (and surpass) where you were before. So, training requires a script, that script may need revisions in advance or on the fly, but to always be off script or revising the script means you're not really following a script or program at all, and then you're not training.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    How Style Affects How You Look & Feel - #400

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 48:51

    Tanner Guzy joins Matt & Niki to talk style & its effects on how you look & feel. Check out Tanner Guzy and his style coaching https://masculine-style.com/    Improving your style isn't about showing off or strutting around. It's about self-respect and adorning your body with clothes that help make you feel and look good.  Tanner points out that when he's looking and feeling good, he's thinking LESS about his appearance and better able to be present and really spend good time with friends and family. When he is unhappy, he often IS focused about wishing or thinking he looked a little more like this or less like that. For Niki, she doesn't feel good when she does not uphold her boundaries. These situations typically involve social interaction, where she might eat or drink a little more than she otherwise would. Let us examine what is often an indicator of someone not looking and feeling good about himself. Baggy clothing is often used to hide our unhappiness with how we look. It has another issue, however, in that form-fitting clothing that enhances how we feel gives us feedback about when we might be gaining a bit too much weight. Our clothing, when dressing in a way that enhances how we look, thus helps provide us a natural metric for what we're doing. A similar situation is the lifter who finally goes through LP and starts putting on muscles and suddenly her clothes don't fit. While she might think that she has gotten bulky and isn't happy with how she looks, investing in a couple new outfits that flatter her new, more muscular body will help show off her work, and help make her feel good about how she looks. For both training & style, people often look to celebrities for "this is how I want to look." Tanner has a concept called "aesthetic synonyms" for this. While the person is pointing to something unachievable (he or she has a different body), Tanner can help that person identify what resonates and how he can move closer to that aspect for his own style (and for training, for his own body & athletic development). Related to this concept of style is authenticity. We don't mean to boast, but we'd like to put our best selves forward. We don't mistake humility for mediocrity, but rather aim high and work to achieve excellence.  Authenticity may be hard to identify, but inauthenticity sticks out like a sore thumb. We undoubtedly have all seen someone who turns us off as inauthentic in promoting themselves, a product or service, or an idea.  If you're a coach, it's important to be authentic and build trust. The client is becoming vulnerable for you, so you cannot betray that trust. Do not belittle or insult the client, but you also try to bring that person's best self forward. Yes, the client has identified something he needs to improve and actuate that improvement. Your job is to move that person closer to the ideal, building him up.  So, consider taking style more seriously, as it is a tool to enhance how you look and feel.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Simple Hard Effective Training - 399

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 37:05

    We return to the foundations of programming before we jump off into more advanced programming discussions in upcoming podcasts. Why are simple, hard programs the most effective? How do we decide what to do out of the countless options. The concept of MED evolved out of the idea that what coaches were doing, as opposed to simply jumping from one program (novice linear progression) to another program (some HLM or Texas Method variant), was making small changes to modify LP that led to the intermediate program.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com Coaches compared notes and realized this is what others were doing, and Matt & Scott explored this on earlier podcasts.  And, when you think about it, this makes a lot of sense. Changing 1 or 2 variables allows you to tinker and better evaluate which changes work in general and which changes a specific lifter responds well to.  With enough consistency over a long enough time, lifters' programming will get complicated. But we don't need to unnecessarily complicate things, and we don't want to throw huge amounts of volume at a lifter because then it's difficult to have anywhere to go from there. This applies to LP with the intensity as well. While you may be able to do 30 more pounds on your squat day 1, if you start with your absolutely 5RM, you really don't have anywhere to go from there.  So, we program simple, hard programming (sorry, but simple & easy doesn't work). We keep things as simple as they can be. We change programming based on the lifter's other life stresses (expected & unexpected). And we build habits & consistency to lead to the changes we want to see.

    Red Flags of Coaching: What to Avoid & Look for When Choosing a Coach - #398

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 34:14

    Choosing a coach can be daunting, but we can help guide you with what to look for and avoid when you're choosing a coach (and how to evaluate a coach once you're being coached).  Andrew provides some helpful frameworks that may be more familiar to listeners: hiring an employee or choosing a contractor or company.  We're essentially outsourcing a part of our life to someone who should be able to help us move toward our goals. Whether we don't have the time, bandwidth, expertise, or detachment to coach and program for ourselves, a coach can enhance our physical fitness. A coach's values and experience matter here. People can spout platitudes, but a person's track record is a better predictor of future behavior. Do your values align with the coaches? What athletic experience does the coach have? What types of people does the coach work with, and toward what goals? Does the coach have high turnover or churn? You may have the ability to do an interview with the coach. If not, you may consider the initial bit of coaching a trial run (and, let's be honest, even if you're all-in on a coach or coaching system, it's probably because you've learned about that system or coach over time, through social media, a podcast, or something like that). Some red flags include: -high churn (not keeping clients for long periods of time) -inflexibility or rigidity (my way or the highway) -not asking about circumstances or situations (e.g. how much time do you have to train, what are your goals?) It's important to listen to your intuition here. You're inevitably being vulnerable to come to a coach, so you should build trust with the coach over time. The coach should not betray that trust. That coach will need to push you into discomfort, but ignoring your feedback, fears, or current abilities is a bad sign.  What should you look for in a coach? Pretty much the reverse of the red flags. A good coach should have a track record of success and longevity with clients and should have principles and beliefs but apply them to a client's circumstances.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Building Healthy Habits - #397

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 46:11

    Matt, Niki, & Andrew discuss building habits to achieve your goals.  You have habits now, and your results (along any potential access: finances, health, deadlift) are the summation of your habits. One isolated act by itself does not effect excellence, but one action as part of a years of actions does.  Continuing your habits is easy. It requires no real energy to continue your habits. Like momentum, it requires energy to change the trajectory of your life. You have to intentionally work to stop or create a habit, and this isn't easy.  Andrew shares the characteristics of good habits (from James Clear's book Atomic Habits) that are likely to succeed: obvious, attractive, easy, and satisfying. What you're doing by following these is increasing the your chance of success in following through.  For example, if you're naturally a morning person, trying to start a lifting routine at 10pm at night doesn't make sense. Set up a habit that aligns with your natural proclivities. This doesn't mean it will be easy, but it will be easier.  You'll have to have some discipline and fake it before it's easy. It's discipline & motivation that leads to your goal achievement. Eventually, your identity should change ("I'm a lifter" or "I'm a meal-prepper").  The longer you follow a habit, the easier it is to follow, the less energy it takes to follow it. When the habits defines you, it is fairly easy to continue.  Some examples may help. Andrew replaced a high calorie snack of nuts and beer after work with yogurt, blueberries, and walnuts. A snack of likely near 1000 calories has been reduced to 350 calories, and Andrew feels better with the new habit.  Matt does something physical every single day, even if it is simply a walk. By doing this, he knows that a certain time of day is the time for physical activity.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Coming to Terms with Cardio - #396

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 52:12

    Cardio, conditioning, energy systems training: what are these, are these the same, and why would you do them? In this episode, we come to terms with cardio. Let's first consider your training and exercise background. This often affects how you think about this. Some come from a more purse powerlifting or bodybuilding background, where the goal is building muscle or improving strength.  A different background may be a cardio-centric, where you ran, did cardio classes, or CrossFit, where conditioning was a regular, dominant part of your program.  Neither extreme--cardio as the be-all, end-all, upon which you attempt to lose weight and build health, nor the activity avoidance, where you eat big, train big, and rest big to maximize gains--leads to the quality of life we're seeking.  So, what role should conditioning play in your training program? Let's first consider the word "cardio." It's a shortening of the word "cardiovascular," which correctly implies that this type of training helps improve the functioning of your lunges and heart. It comes with baggage, however, of being something done for weight loss (e.g. I ate these cookies so I need to "do cardio" to burn the calories I consumed).  Conditioning serves 3 potential purposes: weight loss or calorie-burning, performance, health. There really is one additional bonus reason that is somewhat associated with the third.  The first reason and the purpose many associate with energy systems training is actually probably the worst reason to do cardio. While "cardio" can burn calories, nutrition & building muscle is the best way to improve your bodyfat. While targeted conditioning can & should be part of your program, don't think of it as something to burn calories just as you consume cardio. A second purpose for energy systems is ability to perform for a sport, activity, or life in general. Even sports that don't require a high-level of conditioning perform some conditioning. The example is powerlifting, because elite powerlifters at some point have to perform high volume, and if you're a big powerlifter, performing 7 sets of 5 squats will get you winded and you need the ability to perform this high volume without being so winded that you cannot perform the training to get you stronger. Lastly, one may add conditioning to a program to improve health and quality of life. Cardiovascular training is associated with better health markers and better functioning of lungs, heart, and brain. A program designed to improve quality of health should include conditioning. One additional benefit, related to the above, is the ability to think, reflect, meditate, and unplug. Especially with aerobic exercise (more on that soon), the relatively light and easy, repetitive activity done outside and in nature can allow you to shut off the screen time, get some vitamin D from the sun, and think and process things (both consciously and subconsciously).  Okay, now onto the underlying science. There are 3 energy systems we target with energy systems training: aerobic, glycolytic, and phosphagen. The latter two fall under the umbrella of anaerobic (without oxygen).  Aerobic is low power, long duration. You're probably using it now. It is the typical energy system that provides you energy, and only gets superseded when the energy needs outstrip its ability to provide you energy.  Phosphagen is the extremely short duration but high power output: think Olympic lift, heavy single, vertical jump, 10m sprint. You have the ability to go into the ready reserve of power, but it's extremely limited.  The medium power, medium duration energy system is the glycolytic. This is the energy system targeted with interval training or high intensity interval training (HIIT). Training done with this should be extremely uncomfortable, plus it's long enough that it lasts awhile (compared to phosphagen training). The currency of the body when it comes to energy is adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The reaction that occurs to produce energy breaks down ATP into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and one phosphate group. There's no on or off system, so they're all working to SOME degree all the time, but one is dominant. Just like on a lift where there are transition points where one muscle takes over as the primary moves from another, there are transition points where one begins to level off and another takes over. There's important reasons to include conditioning in your program, but it's not a panacea and the typical reason to perform it (weight loss) it probably doesn't serve all that well. That being said, including cardio makes sense.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Overcoming Doubt & Building Confidence - #395

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 46:48

    Fear, doubt, it's a part of life & certainly a part of self-improvement, strength training, & nutrition. Find some inspiration and practical ideas for how to overcome your fears and doubt. This isn't just for beginners. Doubt is typical as we begin anything new, as the unknown can overwhelm us. There are known unknowns but also unknown unknowns. We might be afraid of embarrassment or looking silly. We might fear getting injured or failing.  Let's acknowledge that change and new things can be intimidating. There's a lot to learn, and you're trying to build confidence and knowledge and capability all at once. It's a lot to handle. Hard is scary. Discomfort can be terrifying. The avoidance of the uncomfortable is a self-defeating pursuit, as discomfort and suffering are a part of life. You have some control over what discomfort you face.  We know you can train. You can get stronger. We've trained all demographics with countless challenges and obstacles. Very few people have the reality that barbell training is contraindicated. YES YOU CAN. If you're overwhelmed, shift your fear to curiosity. Enjoy the process of learning and improving. Start slow, start easy, start with something you know you can do in an environment you feel comfortable in.  If you fear looking stupid, getting made fun of, getting criticized, or embarrassment, this is a real fear. Begin with controlling what you can control. You might begin to lift at home, listening to your favorite music, with exercises you know you can complete. Look to free how to videos to ensure your form is passable. Build the habit and develop the supportive environment.  You can also control your reactions to others. If someone comes up and explains how you SHOULD do something, tell them you have a coach. Maybe lift with headphones. Fake the confidence. A coach or at least a lifting partner you trust who can support you makes a big difference here.    More advanced lifts, or lifters who may have a history of training and are coming back to it may have other fears and concerns. If you've dealt with injury, you may have a very tangible fear of reinjury. Similar to being afraid of driving after a car crash, you fear a reoccurrence.  Similar to a novice, start with something that doesn't scare you. You may adjust exercises to avoid the specific exercise. You also need to address whether you want to push that exercise again, or whether you'd rather work around it (at least for now; priorities change). Again, having a competent coach really helps here.    Similarly, if you see a picture of yourself from an earlier time, how do you react? There's really two considerations here. One is, you may be confronting the reality of who you are, what your body is, and some limitations. For some, stubborn fat seems to always be there, despite intense efforts and even achieving lean bodyfat percentages.  The other thing you're facing is your recent choices. You might realize that you're not happy with what you've done the past 6 months or 6 years or 6 decades. You can't change the past, but you control your decisions now. Don't let this discomfort cause a spiraling downward, but embrace the discomfort and help it motivate you to change.  You can do it. Control what you can control. Begin with a support environment, with things you know you can do, but begin.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Goal Setting #394

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 42:02

    Matt & Niki discuss goal setting: clear goals, digging deep to identify your whys, and how different personalities can effectively develop goals.  If you're trying to lose weight, get stronger, change your nutrition, gain muscle you've at some point identified you'd like to make change the direction of your life. Whether you formally identified your goals or made a quick decision, somehow you identified you didn't like where you were and shifted the trajectory of your life. What can often happen, though, is that as the process of improvement continues, we can forget why we began. When things get tough, we might not be able to latch onto a clear purpose, and we will struggle to continue. Goals guide actions. Actions determine metrics. Clear goals create clear actions and metrics. When you've dug deep into why you want to do something, oftentimes the how becomes almost self-evident. Some perform this process of delving into their whys internally, by themselves and mostly with silent reflection. Others perform it alone but by writing down answers to questions. Others bounce ideas off other people, seeking some feedback and refining what is essentially their rough draft ideas. The 5 whys is a good process, and really highlights how effective goal-setting is finding your deeper purpose. Once you've hit your why, you often have a physical reaction. It's emotional. It resonates. It's not superficial or some cliché or thing you've been told you should care about. A superficial goal is often an unsustainable goal. If you've been floundering on identifying how to achieve your goals, you might not have pinned down your goals. Now, you can get after the hows. Before you start pursuing action, you might try an intermediate step and ask (and then answer as best you can): why haven't I achieved this? This can help you identify obstacles and hurdles, which you should account for in your actions. You develop your actions to achieve the goals. These should be specific and timebound. You should be able to identify with a yes or no answer if you accomplished them. Your metrics inform the actions and the goals. They give your information so you know if you're heading in the right direction. Metrics help you make decisions. So, if you're tracking something and unhappy with your progress, you should change what you're doing. If tracking a metric does not change behaviors, you shouldn't track it. You should be able to clearly express your goals to others (and yourself). To ensure you can do this, write your goals down. If you can't clearly define your goal--or if others don't understand it when you're sharing it--you need to do some more work to ensure you understand what you really want. They end by asking, is getting the goal really the goal? As with strength, the process of undergoing voluntary hardship refines us. We're glad we get stronger, but doing what it takes to get strong makes us a better person, beyond getting stronger. This leads into a cursory discussion of a future but not-too-far-off podcast: habits. Building healthy habits will lead to health. The habits are oftentimes more important than the goal.   GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Equipment to Get Started - #393

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 42:25

    Matt & Niki discuss the tradeoffs of training in a home gym or commercial gym and how to build your home gym. Learn the equipment and gear to prioritize versus the nice-to-haves as well as the minimum amount of space required to have a functional home gym. Not all commercial gyms are created equal. The big box or Globo Gyms may allow you to barbell lift, but deadlifting and chalk may be prohibited. Some gyms are simply not worth your time. Long contracts or the inability to do the four main lifts--squat, press, bench press, and deadlift--make the gym not worth it unless, temporarily, it's your only option. CrossFit gyms tend to have the equipment and space you need, but some may have an issue with you not doing CrossFit. That being said, they could be a valid option for you. Powerlifting gyms or black iron gyms are the best typical option, as a good one will have everything you need and you'll find people with similar goals. The rare but optimal commercial gym solution is one like The Strength Parlor in St. Louis or Next Level Barbell in Portland, where you not only have access to the equipment you need but you get a great community of people who are excited to see you and will cheer you on. You also get access to expert coaching when you need it. If you are close to one of these gyms, you really should take advantage.  Matt's quick go-to rule for evaluating a gym is if they provide chalk. If they provide chalk, it's a good gym. Niki adds an addendum, that if they provide chalk and the floors are clean, it's an excellent gym.  The downsides of a commercial gym can be crowded space and waiting for equipment. You can't pick the music and there you lose time on the commute.  For benefits, you can often begin training with barbells sooner, as it may take time and you may have to budget over months to have enough equipment to barbell train at home (though you can always train TODAY with WHAT YOU HAVE ON HAND).  A home gym is YOUR SPACE that you can design, improve, make your own, fill with the equipment you want. You control the music, the climate (as much as possible). You don't have to wait for equipment. It also provides a space for you to mentally take a break from other aspects of your life--it's not work, it's not family, it's your space for your health and fitness.  Beyond this, the biggest benefit is the time efficiency. You have no commute time, and because no one is waiting on your equipment you can set up equipment to alternate lifts, do circuits, etc. to make preparation, gym time, and recovery as quick as possible.  A last huge benefit is your home gym stays open if the gyms close down again. Lots of people suffered interruptions and an inability to continue to train with barbells because of COVID. Have at least a functional home gym so you can always train.    If you're looking to build a gym, you can design it and put some creativity into it. 4'x8' is Matt's minimum space required for a good gym.  Prioritize the barbell and weight first, as you can begin to do certain lifts without a squat stand (though there are also ways to build your own temporary squat stands out of construction material).  For the space, a power rack that can be bolted into a platform is best. If you can't do that, a squat stand with safety pins and enough weight to keep it grounded works. Also, ensure you have a place to store plates. Many power racks have this built-in, but you can also purchase things like a-frame storage.  For all your gym equipment needs, there is no better place to look into options at all price ranges than Garage Gym Reviews.  Here are some notes on the small things. You need chalk. You can get this anywhere. Liquid chalk can also be good if you travel frequently. Springs collars stink but are cheap. Something like Rogue Oso collars are expensive but great and should last for decades. Having a deadlift jack makes loading and unloading your deadlift more convenient and quick. Get some fractional plates. MicroGainz has well-made yet affordable fractional plates made in America. Lastly, get a flat bench. Rep Fitness has a great one. Shifting to personal gear, you need to get lifting shoes. Lifting shoes are designed for lifting. They have a flat, hard sole (no squishy). Boots or Converse all-stars are okay, but get some lifting shoes, only wear them when you lift, and they're last at least longer than a decade. Running shoes are the worst option. Adidas, Nike, Reebok, and Rogue all have good options, though ensure you don't get some hybrid cross-trainer. You'll need a belt after awhile. You want it to be leather. We recommend Dominion. You can get 3" or 4", though 3" is the safer bet unless you know you have a long torso. Lever and prong also is an option and based on personal preference. Lever requires more work to change holes but it easier and faster to take off during a workout. Prong you can change holes quickly but you lose the convenience of the quick snap to take off.  Lastly, it's always important to start. That might mean walking, doing bodyweight exercises, or picking a gym as you build your home gym. Convenience matters regardless of home gym or commercial gym. A long commute or lots of work to do before a workout is a hurdle. You want to limit the mental, effort, and time commitment it requires to get started each workout.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Why You Should (& How To) Get Strong - #392

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 45:36

    Why do we emphasize strength as opposed to other physical attributes, and if we value strength, how do we achieve it. Niki & Matt explore WHY you should get strong & how to get strong. Strength--and the process of getting strong--produces lasting changes in our body. Our body changes to the stress we impose on it, with denser bones and bigger, more capable muscles. This changes how we interact with the world every day. Like unlocking a new ability for a character in a videogame, strength upgrades your capability, allowing you to do things you could not do before.  When we decide to get stronger, we want to get the most bang for our buck. For strength exercises, this means exercises that move the most joints and involve the most muscle mass. We'd rather do 4 exercises than 14. We're not looking to live in the gym or do as much as we can (and, if you do, that's okay, we can always add more, but remember that there comes a point in time where you HAVE to add more volume and more stress and spend more time in the gym to continue to realize strength gains, so enjoy the simplicity and relatively short workouts novices can execute).  We like exercises that are incrementally loadable. Barbells--more than any other implement--allow small weight jumps and for us to train multiple joints as we overcome gravity and attempt to keep our center of mass over our center of balance.  The term "functional" has been overused and has come to mean almost nothing, but if we understand that the movement we do in the gym resemble and carry over to movements we execute in our life, then we realize the functionality of free weight movements.  Nothing is more natural than bending over and sitting down and then getting back up again, like the squat. The deadlift mimics picking something up off the floor. The press resembles lifting something up over our head.  People who have never undergone a systematic exercise program can increase stress in a linear manner with small enough jumps. While many point to the flattened top of the curve when they reference the law of diminishing returns, as a beginner you can enjoy the steep portion, with quick gains.  For those using barbells, we most often add the same amount of weight each workout in a linear fashion until this stops. If you aren't ready for barbells and are using bodyweight exercises or lightweight objects in your home, we most often add reps (though eventually the resistance must go up).  The great part about this is that you'll feel better quickly--likely within 2 weeks. Furthermore, the improvements last. So, if you have to take a week off, the increased muscle mass and improved strength do not lessen as fast as conditioning changes. So, if you're unsure about strength and how you might get strong, enjoy this. If you know someone this might benefit, be sure to share this with them.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Getting Started with Nutrition - #391

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 56:29

    Gillian Ward joins Matt & Niki to discuss how to get started with nutrition: identifying your goals, understanding where you are now, and implementing sustainable, realistic nutrition plans.  Gillian is a great simplifier of complex information and focuses not on the science of nutrition (though she knows it) but rather behavior changes and how to best modify clients' actions to meet their goals (for the action both to occur and move them toward their goals). A client must first acknowledge a need to make a change, understand why he or she wants to change, and have an idea of what direction he or she wants to head. You don't need to have a SMART goal, but you need to understand WHY you want to make a change. Next, tell the truth with yourself (and maybe your coach), so you can understand your current behaviors. An accurate picture of your actions enable you to identify a plan that will actually work for you. Once you know where you are, think about the things you want to include in your plan. What are the things you DON'T want to give up? This might be a nightly dessert or alcohol, eating out at a restaurant with your family on Saturday evenings, or Sunday morning pancake breakfasts. It doesn't mean you won't modify this at all (if you're eating 5000 calories of pancakes, we might need to reduce that). Still, this helps you identify and maintain things that actually bring you value.  Now you can triage. This is identifying the behaviors that can be addressed to yield results. You're looking for the most-bang-for-your-buck changes. So what can be changed relatively easily while enabling you to work toward your goal. For example, you may identify that eating certain foods triggers a cascade of bad behaviors for the rest of the day.  You next plan & prepare, which does not necessarily mean meal preparation and weighing and measuring. It could be identifying days or meals that will be challenging. How aggressive do you want to be around these? Might you address the meals leading up to or after these meals or attempt to keep this goal fairly healthy? So, if you start implementing a plan and it's working, where do you go next? First, if something is working and you enjoy it, keep doing it. Like MED programming for training, we don't need to diet hop. Small changes to avoid boredom and continuing to triage can work and continue to further you toward your goal.  A more recent idea Gillian has taken from the heavy, light, medium training idea is 1, 2, 3 dieting. These correspond to aggressiveness or difficulty level and the benefit is the quantification can help give you a quasi-objective (like RPE) data point (so if your week is a 21, you expect to see progress; if it's a 7, you don't). 1 is maintenance, in which you're not trying hard. This should be easy. You're at basecamp, walking on level ground. 2 is working toward goals but not aggressively. You're walking up the mountain, but you're picking flowers, you're chatting with others, you're enjoying the view. 3 is all out, aggressively pursuing your goals.  Why not just pursue 3s every meal, every day, every week? It's not sustainable. You don't actually want to live at a 3 all the time. You also likely need a relatively near-term motivator, as (I'd just like to be thinner) probably won't sustain a month of all 3s.  Gillian also addresses why New Year's Resolutions often fail, because it's a false motivator. You feel as if you should ramp up your nutrition, but you might not want to. Beach season is still too far off to motivate. Furthermore, it's a cold, dark time of year for many, and the motivation to clamp down on nutrition is realistically not there. This might be a time to go at a 2 pace and identify a goal you can put on the calendar later in the year that might motivate a 3.    It is critical to understand what keeps you motivated. This isn't as easy as it sounds, because you really have to question yourself and understand your motivations deeply. Once you identify this, identify some ways to measure this as best you can (if you don't care about the scale weight, why is this your primary metric).  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    First Steps for Strength - #390

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 38:15

    You're in a bad place--you're not happy with your health & fitness--and you want to change that. What do you do? Matt & Niki explore your first steps for strength. This time of year New Years Resolutions occur, and there's nothing wrong with them. While they may have a low success rate, it's actually a good time of year to begin working toward a goal.  You just had the holiday period, with--probably--lots of food and fun. It often is a time you can reflect on what you've done the previous year and decide how to change. Also, there are probably no urgent needs to perform (no beach body vacations). This means that you have time to work toward your goals to see the improvement come warmer weather. It will be difficult, and one of the most important things to begin is to be consistent. Doing something every day is a great way to build the consistency. If you're barbell training, you can do this every day, but the days you don't you could walk or do something else active.  Regardless, you need to schedule the time and protect it. This needs to become a habit--like brushing your teeth. You WILL see some benefits early, as doing difficult things makes you feel good, build confidence. It doesn't feel good in the pleasure followed by bad feelings & guild of fast food or lounging watching Netflix, but you just feel better knowing what you did.  Start today, build consistency, do SOMETHING--whatever that something is--and keep going. The small wins will accumulate.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    Experience Strength #389

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:19

    What do we mean when we say "Experience Strength"? Experiencing strength is experiencing the benefits of improved quality of life through strength training and improved nutrition and other health and fitness habits.  When you're strong, you're capable and able to say yes to things. When you're weak--whether you know it or not--you're saying no to things and taking possibilities off the table.  This flies in the face of conventional wisdom and many thoughts about the difficulties and sacrifices that barbell training and improved nutrition practices require. Yes, you spend time in the gym that you cannot spend elsewhere. Yes, you eat more whole foods, more protein and fiber, and do not eat or at least limit foods that do not support your goal.  These sacrifices, however, move us closer to our goals--the states we which to possess, whether they be strength, lower bodyfat, appearance, or confidence. As we move closer to our goals, we gain the ability to say yes to certain things. We can go to the beach and not feel bad about ourselves. We can play with our kids or grandkids without pain and keep up with them. Our physical interaction with the world changes.  So how do we Experience Strength is we're stuck in a rut of weakness? How do we change paths and begin to experience improved quality of life, better health, and increased confidence?  We have to understand our goals and where we want to go. We have to take the first steps and appreciate the small wins along the way. We have to have the discipline to build habits and understand that momentum may help but we cannot expect it nor rely on it to carry us to our goals.  Part of this is differentiating short-term and long-term "feel good." There's the immediate pleasure of sugary, fatty, salty food or lying on the couch watching Netflix. This pales in comparison the the longer-term "feel good" of getting your workouts in, eating healthy, prioritizing sleep, spending quality time with your family.  What does an improved quality of life look like? What does an improved quality of life feel like? It's about Experiencing Strength.    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    When MED isn't Effective: Confronting the Human Element #388

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 34:42

    Matt & Niki discuss when the human element inhibits an MED modification from being the right change for a lifter. This is a re-release of episode 341. Many BLOC coaches have found a pattern where advanced clients get bored with a program, and oftentimes this happens EVEN WHEN THE PROGRAM IS WORKING (i.e. producing PRs & achieving goals).  You have to guard against program hopping or chasing the shiny object here, but if a client has trained a certain way for awhile (e.g. chasing numbers) then it might be time to make a bigger change. This doesn't really apply to novice or early intermediate lifters, as they need to build the base of strength and some small changes can be made if they're looking for a bit of variety (more conditioning or more hypertrophy at the end of the workouts).  Most advanced clients need something to train for--something that focuses their training and provide purpose. Some people can simply bear down and keep going when the goal is as vague as "let's get stronger and healthier," but this is fairly rare. If your client doesn't have a goal on the horizon, discussing one may help.  Changing the goal could mean focusing on volume & hypertrophy instead of weight on the bar, trying to lose weight, focusing on conditioning or another physical activity outside the gym, or trying something new like Olympic weightlifting.  The goal may remain but the means to achieve it may change. EMOMs, AMRAPs, tonnage totals, circuits, and Westside Splits are all great ways that lifters can still train their lifts and work toward their goals but that are different enough than typical sets of 5.  Exercise variation may help as well. Playing with supplemental lifts you normal don't (e.g. front squats or sumo deadlifts) can help provide needed variety. You may still have one heavy lift at the beginning of the workout, but the rest of the workout involves more accessories done in a circuit or to get a pump.  When considering a huge shift, you have to consider the means to achieve the end and the tradeoffs. Matt shares that when one of his client proposes changing the goal for a bit, he often changes his mind after Matt explains what that revised process will look like.  If you're getting sick of what you're doing but don't just want to program hop, consider changing your goal, the exercise selection, or training method. Ensure you weight tradeoffs and how this may affect your long-term goals.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com

    When its fun to Chase Numbers #387

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:51

    Matt & Niki discuss training & programming when you prioritize PRs and chasing numbers in the gym. This is a re-release of episode 347. This really applies to intermediate & advanced lifters, as PRs tend to come with novice & early intermediate training. As you advance as a lifter, life can prevent optimal training, so priorities shift. Sometimes training works primarily toward quality of life. Sometimes training even takes a backseat. Occasionally, though, we prioritize training and decide to chase numbers.  Sometimes this happens at whim, as life seems to provide you the opportunity & desire to prioritize PRs. Other times, though, you might plan this out a bit more, with certain times of year (e.g. fall) where you chase pushing the weight up on the bar.  This may involve a meet, but it doesn't have to. It's fun to have a PR week you can look forward to, where you don't have to beat yourself down with lots of heavy attempts on one day. If you do want to do a mock meet, then know what will motivate you--you might want an audience or fellow lifters.  We're probably looking at a goal--unless you're super advanced--of peaking 6-8 weeks out, which is enough time to prioritize intensity & peak for most people but not so long that you get beat up and burnt out. Consider if you want to prioritize 1 lift, a couple, all 4 of the big lifts, or something else (maybe you're chasing a chin-up PR or some Olympic lift numbers).  If you're chasing numbers, you'll back off volume and drive up intensity. Conditioning will take a back seat, as we're prioritizing training on weight on the bar. This is not the time to lose weight. You don't necessarily have to gain weight, but this can be a fun time to eat in a caloric surplus and bump up your weight (and then, especially if you plan out your training year a bit more in blocks, post PRs might be a good time to transition to weight maintenance or loss while trying to maintain strength). This might be a time to use that "fat hole" on your belt. You can't miss training sessions when you're chasing numbers, and you can't have things like holiday parties wreck a training session. Ensure you're lifting after good sleep and with good food (as much as you can control) and if you have to shift sessions around to avoid bonking during a session, that's fine.  Plus, Matt shares funny stories with internet companies and kids' checklists.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com  

    When Training Becomes a Drag #386

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 42:05

    Niki and Andrew discuss what to do when training becomes a drag. This is a re-release of episode 337.  Different reasons can arise to make training a drag. You might simply get a little burnt out after months and years of training. PRs don't happen as much, and you might not just hit one or two workouts where you lack motivation--and don't just need a deload--but need a larger shift in training to help build the motivation. Injuries could lower motivation, as PRs may seem far away and frustration may grow as you are limited at what you can do.  Also, if you decide to cut and lose weight, this can make things harder in the gym as you have less weight--and muscle mass--to lift the weights, so suddenly your strength may start trending downward. This often happens over time with some rough workouts. You may have to adjust how you approach training mentally. Andrew discusses how he would have an intensive, long process to get himself psyched up, including coffee, a playlist, and visualization. While this did help him on the platform--in the short term--it left him drained and had longer term negative effects.  You may develop a longer term goal that gives you something to look forward to: a meet or competition. This can help focus your training and help increase motivation beyond simply getting stronger.  Acknowledge that off days will happen, so don't equate one or two bad workouts with a need to shift.  Focus on the process of training. Remember your deeper why, that this is your time and you're doing this for yourself. Enjoy the major change from the rest of your day, which--probably--is not physical like your time in the gym.  You may also adjust what you do in the gym. You may add some instant gratification. That might mean some hypertrophy work to end with a pump. If you enjoy getting sweaty, it might be your favorite conditioning work.  Similarly, you might favor some of the exercises you like and not avoid but at least minimize exercises you dislike. If you dislike a main lift, maybe you back off and focus on some supplementals.  Or you could shift the focus. If you've done lots of intensity work, maybe you focus on hypertrophy. If you haven't done AMRAPs or EMOMs or similar schemes, you could do something like that that involves the same lifts but with a different application of stress. Another idea is to put a time cap on the workout. Now--again--don't let yourself abuse this and drag your rest times, but if you're efficient in the gym commit to an hour in the gym and do the most you can--and then call it at an hour.   This is a great time to have a coach--or a workout partner--to help keep you accountable so an adjustment doesn't turn into taking it easy for the sake of taking it easy.    So, when training becomes a drag, appreciate the process, remember your goals, consider adjusting your mental approach to training & refocusing training. Or, you might adjust training to involve more instant gratification or variety. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com  

    Small Wins #385

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:20

    Niki & Gillian discuss the concept of small wins and their value in nutrition (and training).  Big goals can be scary and overwhelming, and--regardless of the enormity of the goal--little actions, small decisions, and changes of habit accumulate to make the goal accomplishment a reality. We have to ensure we have a way of seeing and acknowledging these small wins. If we're moving close to our goals and improving, these wins are happening. It's important to ensure we have a way to see the progress, acknowledge the progress, and celebrate the progress. Having objective, reality-based metrics (and they don't necessarily have to be scale weight) helps provide an easy way to see progress while not allowing subjective feelings to overwhelm us when we feel we have not improved.  This concept becomes especially important during rough patches, when life's difficulties mount and a win might not be "Instagram-worthy," but simply NOT binging or NOT drinking large amounts of alcohol. A win might be not succumbing to self-destructive behavior or even simply limiting this behavior (e.g. we overeat, but not as much as we would have months prior in a similar situation).  Another time this matters is as we age and potentially accumulate aches and injuries, or simply our ability to gain strength diminishes. There comes a day when all of our absolute PRs are historical, so we have to celebrate our capabilities and redefine PRs.  Identifying and enjoying small wins is another way of saying we celebrate PRs. We may have to redefine PRs away from simply weight on the bar (PRs after 40 or 50 or 60) or enjoying new modified lifts (e.g. box squats) and celebrating what we CAN do. Some common small wins Gillian and her clients see include (but are definitely not limited to): food preparation portion control limiting sweets or alcohol trying a new, healthy recipe growing awareness taking the time to think preventing "emergency situations" (e.g. binging) taking control of your eating--and feeling empowered less guilt around food choices (is the guilt improving your decisions & ultimately your health?) how we react after a bad decision or food choice So, find ways to measure and identify, acknowledge and celebrate your small wins toward your big goals.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com  

    Coaching Q&A #384

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 74:39

    Matt & CJ answer your coaching questions, including ACL tears, improving vertical jump, coaching blind lifters, and coaching obese lifters.    0:00 Introduction 2:51 Nutrition Questions from Strength Clients -what is your professional scope? know it, can refer out, and admit if you can't answer the question -if you offer paid nutrition coaching, say that as part of the answer 9:15 Friendships & Clients -need to address issues early on if it's an issue (it will only get worse if you don't) 18:09 ACL Tears -ligaments cannot be healed from physical therapy (require surgery) -seems to have some correlation with hamstring weakness 28:25 Low Bar Squat Pain -high bar not causing an issue, keep doing that -could test low bar occasionally to see it it persists over time 36:15 Building At Home Coaching Clientele -have to establish local connections -need to have your gym look nice -"I take this serious" 44:12 Elbow Tendinitis & Injuries -build trust & have open communication 53:08 Vertical Jump -losing weight can really help -there is a big genetic component -increasing force development helps (strength) -practice the power development 59:00 Training Untrained Obese -meet clients where they are, but assume they can't train--they can -what CAN they do, how can you add stress to that 1:06:05 Coaching Blind Lifters -meet them where they are--they can still hear you -they can feel things better GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com  

    Thanksgiving Message 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:58

    Matt Reynolds, founder & CEO of Barbell Logic, takes a minute to reflect on not only what he is thankful this Thanksgiving but--as Barbell Logic turns 5 years old--he reflects & lays out Barbell Logic's core values and his commitment to them.  We help you improve your quality of life by experiencing strength. We meet you where you are and help you drive progress using Minimum Effective Dose measured by PRs. We deliver programming solutions that are simple, hard, & effective.  Wow you with world-class service and personal, professional coaching. Coach you with models informed by science but applied practically to your real life.  Have a Happy Thanksgiving! GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Improved Recovery for Improved Gains

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:24

    Scott & Matt discuss recovery and how you can improve your recovery, because though most people don't give themselves enough stress others may go too far in the other direction and now recover enough, which ultimately holds them back from the gains they desire. Recovery is the opposite or absence of stress. The top two sources of recovery are rest and food. Let's discuss these. A huge area of rest that people often fall short of ideal is sleep. Here are some sleep tips: 8 hours Same wake & bed time every day (including the weekend) No electronics or light (especially blue light ) right before bed Use your CPAP is you have one If you can't get 8 hours of sleep, try to nap Food and nutrition depends on your goals and bodyfat, but here are some eneral tips: Prioritize protein: 150g for females & 200g for males every day (and there are outliers) Adequate calories (gaining weight--surplus; losing weight, small deficit) Carbohydrates: enough and--if attempting to lose weight--consume before your workout A glass of whole milk can be a good way to add calories to your meal and get in a surplus if you're looking to gain weight In addition to food and sleep, ensure you're resting long enough between sets (depending on available time, at least 5 minutes for lower body exercises). Allow yourself to do smaller weight jumps--at least 2.5lb jumps, especially for the upper body. Lastly, consider your total stress. This might be other exercise or physical activity. This might be life stress (relationships, work, etc.). Your total stress affects your ability to recover from lifting stress, so limit it insofar as you can.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Strength Training & Joint Health with Dr. Sullivan

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 38:09

    Dr. Jonathan Sullivan joins Matt & Scott to discuss what we know about how strength training benefits the joins and how it affects joint health. You can find Sully's YouTube channel here and his Greysteel's website here.  Running actually puts more force on the knee joint than squatting below depth, so the idea that squatting below depth is bad for children (whereas people have no opposition to a child running) does not make sense.  He also discusses the idea of arthritis as a “wear & tear” disease not only being wrong but this concept leading to bad, counterproductive, unhealthy recommendations from much of the medical community.  They also discuss different types of joint replacements.  It is always a good time when Sully joins the podcast! GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Training IRL: How Training Habits Change with Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 26:52

    Scott & Matt discuss their training and nutrition at a specific point of time. Scott is adjusting to having sold Data Storage, and training and nutrition are in flux. Scott has lost some weight from his highest weight ever, but training is not his top priority. Matt has been intermittent fasting in the morning, which he has found complementary to his daily schedule at this point in time.  Both Matt & Scott HATE squatting. Matt has bad hips, and Scott has to bend over until his back is darn-near parallel to the ground because of his anthropometry.  This episode really is a discussion for what happens when life prevent training & nutrition from being your focus, you're not hitting PRs, and you might be having tough workouts regularly--how do you react to maintain the habit.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Build Your Press with Better Programming

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 33:20

    In this re-release, Matt & Scott discuss strategies for programing your press--practical tips as well as the underlying principles. The press typically stalls before the other lifts. Fewer muscles contribute to the press and the smallest deviations from an ideal bar path will cause missing reps. Unlike the other lifts, we also have more choices here in terms of form--strict, hip movement, arm movement, Olympic press, etc. Because the press stalls first, MED changes are used first. Here are the typical MED changes for the press. Microloading (2.5 or potentially even smaller weight jumps) 3x5 to 5x3 Move to 4-day split Intensity day & volume day Change in form: hip throw, Olympic press, bar dip Supplemental lift: for press, especially pin press or press lockouts The press reacts to programming more like an Olympic lift. The press requires practice, especially if a hip throw or Olympic style is used. Heavy triples, doubles, and singles can help.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Involuntary Hardship with Jordan Harbinger #383

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 54:40

    Jordan Harbinger, hugely successful podcaster and fascinating character in his own right, talks to Matt and Niki about his journey through involuntary hardship that he underwent a few years ago.  A few years ago, Jordan was on a different large podcast that was not his own. During his time on the podcast, he matured and over time felt he needed a way to exit from this podcast. He had negotiated an amicable exit, but ultimately booted unceremoniously and had to deal with losing his podcast and--ultimately--his identity, as he had built up an identity as part of the old venture.  Matt and Jordan linked up soon after this, as Brett McKay connected them, knowing that Matt had undergone a similar struggle being kicked out of an organization that he had identified with.  Before this, he had felt like he couldn't leave. As he worked through the process, he found that getting booted was a gift. He had both the freedom and responsibility of his own brand and his own podcast. He found that those around him believed in him more than he did--a weird experience, as entrepreneurs often believe in their ventures more than anyone else.  He had to both mourn the loss of his old project and identity while pushing forward, even when he didn't necessarily believe in his new project.  He decided to focus on his own podcast as opposed to spending money, time, and emotionality of fighting through lawfare. He had to consider what is good for him, his new venture, and those he cared about, and that was NOT with lawsuits and bitterness. Ultimately, he summed up the whole episode with a pithy expression many of us can relate to: "wading through the crap to get to where we are now."  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Seven Steps to Successful Sustainable Nutrition #382

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:21

    Niki & Gillian pick up from Episode 381 Knowing & Remembering Your Whys to address the approach to successful sustainable nutrition with practical steps and actions meet your goals.  Gillian first address her approach to nutrition coaching (and this applies if you're acting as your own coach) with Consequences, Accountability, and Trust (CAT).  Consequences help dictate your motivation and aggressiveness. High consequences usually are time-bound: preparing for a bodybuilding competition, cutting weight to meet a weight class, losing weight for a military bodyweight screening. We understand that some people do react severely to consuming certain foods, whether it be because of autoimmune diseases or allergies.  Who is holding you accountable? Building accountability into your plan matters. Having a coach helps, but also being public with your goals, actions, and progress. Share all your steps along the way with your loved ones and social media. You can have a diet bet.  Lastly, you need to trust in the process, yourself, and your coach. Nutrition progress is not linear, and you'll have to contend with stagnant metrics, setbacks, and a desire to constantly change things up.  Gillian then discusses her Seven Steps to Successful Sustainable Nutrition Tell the Truth Non-Negotiables Triage Plan Ahead Plan Ahead Measure and Celebrate Your Results Mindset Tell the truth to yourself, your coach, those around you. Don't lie. If you pour a half of a bottle of wine into a glass, that's not really "one glass of wine with dinner." If you track using a food-tracking app, don't pick something with substantially fewer calories than what the food probably has. Track everything. Don't hide things. You can't properly create and adjust actions, heck you can't even identify problems, if you're not acknowledging and recording your behaviors accurately. Identify and incorporate your non-negotiables. These change, but they are the things that matter to you, you find value from, and that need to be incorporated into your diet plan. This might be eating out, alcohol, or dessert. This doesn't mean that you get to eat as much of you want, but it means that these need to be included--and you might adjust other behaviors to include them.  One you understand non-negotiables and someone's behaviors (or your own) and know the person's goals, you can identify the biggest obstacles to progress. What are the changes you can make that will result in the biggest returns on investment with the least time, effort, etc. Regardless of your plan, planning ahead matters. Bad decisions occur without planning & preparation. It gives you confidence--you know you have something waiting for you at home, so you don't go through the drive through. It helps prevent you from feeling overwhelmed.  Mastery of the small changes means turning actions into habits through repetition. This means that something that at first was a big change and potentially hard goes on auto-pilot, with minimal effort to sustain.  Measure your results and celebrate them. This not only includes metrics, but also all the recipes, skills, knowledge, and habits you have accumulated through the process.  Lastly, master your mindset--make it positive. Trust matters here. Acknowledging that setbacks, stagnation, and challenges will occur. Be able to come back after you stray from the plan--jump back, without guilt and rumination. Following these actions can help you successfully develop and follow a sustainable approach to nutrition, where you meet your goals and then maintain at a place you are happy with. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    Knowing & Remembering Your Whys #381

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:22

    Niki Sims and Gillian Ward discuss why nutrition compliance trends so much lower than training compliance, why this is, and how you--as someone who has nutrition goals--might combat this and succeed toward or past your goals. Nutrition coaching is quite different than strength or training coaching. With training, you prescribe a certain number of exercises, and the lifter does or does not do them. If the lifter successfully does them with enough compliance, the lifter sees the results. They can hit PRs for every workout, completing the workout in and of itself is success, and the lifter often feels better afterwards--physically and emotionally. With lifting, there is a feeling of deprivation and taking away. You're never done--you not only have however many meals or snacks you take as times you can fail or succeed, but literally at any point of time you are awake you may fail to follow the prescription. You also don't see the benefits of your hard work for a long time, and often progress stalls for long periods of time.   For a nutrition coach, there is less clarity and it can often be less rewarding and more frustrating. You can feel as if you're failing. You have to work to boost compliance and work to modify behavior.  For the nutrition client, it can be hard to continue if you don't see progress, and it can be easy to slide into screw it mode, where you not only fail to follow the plan but you eat and maybe drink with reckless abandon.  It is critical that the nutrition client understand his whys: why did he sign up for coaching, why did he state the goals he stated, why do the goals matter, why is he willing to suffer to meet these goals? Has he dug deep enough and really understood why he is doing this. A good idea is to write down these whys and keep them with you. If you're struggling or think you might stray from the path, look at these whys so you can remember them.  Define and celebrate the small wins. A successful meal, snack, day, or week is a big deal. Also consider the near misses--someone brought in the donuts to work and you almost grabbed one, but you decided to not eat it and stuck to the plan.  Find ways to enjoy the process--daily, weekly, monthly--and increase your awareness of how good you feel when you eat and drink in a way that supports your goals and nourishes your body. Lastly, Niki & Gillian share their whys with the audience, which might help you create yours.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com   

    The Myth of Maintenance - The Dos & Don'ts of Lifting

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:41

    Matt & Scott discuss the myth of maintenance and how this doesn't really apply for people, despite what people often claim. Sometimes life prevents strength training from being a high priority, so you do your best. Work, injuries, vacation, etc. can prevent improvement in the gym. When these things are not preventing improvements in the gym, then do your best to improve in the gym. The day will come when you won't hit any more PRs and you will train to stave off strength and for your health.  People tend to think that they've reached a point where they're strong enough and they don't need to get any stronger. Now, if your goals change--you want to pursue some other athletic endeavors--that's fine, but you still train and training requires at least some attempt to either get stronger or stave off weakness the best you can.  There are also drawbacks and real costs to getting to elite levels of strength. This level of strength does not increase your health. It's not enjoyable. You're putting strength above everything else in your life, and we're not calling for that. That being said, for most people, they're not even close to strong enough. They haven't put in the time, effort, energy to pursue fitness, strength, and health.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com     

    Gym Etiquette - The Dos & Don'ts of Lifting

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:31

    Matt & Scott discuss how to behave properly in a gym, because to many don't respect the equipment or the people around them. Don't be that guy (or gal). Take care of the equipment and put it back where you got it. Treat the equipment with the respect it's due. Wipe down your bench and similar equipment. Put the weights away properly (right location, and lips out on the weight tree).  If you're in a big box gym, don't give others unsolicited advice. If they ask for advice, give it--if you're a coach, this person might become a client. If you receive advice, don't act like you want it. You can be polite, but if that person gives it the second time, that person needs to know you don't want or need your advice. Headphones can be a useful tool in gyms like this to tell people you're not interested in talking to them. If there is a chance of good coaching, however--if you're in a good gym--then don't wear the headphones. Enjoy the fact that you're in a gym where you can receive excellent coaching.  Don't break up the blocks of chalk--they should be block.  Don't use baby powder.  Act like a professional in the gym. You know what you're doing. You know why you're there. Act like it. GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com     

    Saving Time in the Gym - The Dos & Don'ts of Lifting

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:06

    Matt and Scott discuss how you can save time in the gym, because we know (with rare exception) you lift to live not live to lift. LP workouts shouldn't take that long. Early workouts should realistically take about 45 minutes. This will increase to 60 minutes as you rest more and the weights go up. They should NOT take more than 90 minutes.  If you're in a hurry, warm up for your next exercise between work sets. Also, start with short rest periods (2 minutes). This can increase, but upper body exercises require less rest and lower require more, but if you're pressed for time you don't need to rest more than 5 minutes. If you have the time, by all means rest longer, but WHO CARES if you're NOT DOING THE PROGRAM perfectly because you can't rest 12 minutes between squat sets.  If you're even more pressed for time, you can use the 4-day split for LP, with 2 exercises (squat & deadlift one day, press and bench press the other). This results in shorter workouts. You can also do 1 lift a day if you're in a huge rush.  Having a home gym helps as well. This eliminates the commute time.  Lastly, lots of people are “busy” doing BS. Think about how you can reduce or eliminate some of that BS.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com     

    Warm Ups - The Dos & Don'ts of Lifting

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:22

    Matt and Scott discuss why we warm up and how to properly warm up. Warm ups--like much with lifting--can come with lots of confusion and misinformation. First, why do we warm up? We warm up to warm up the tissues, so this is the general purpose of warm up. We also warm up to practice the movement and prepare our neuromuscular system for the work sets, including the fact that as we add weight the center of mass shifts closer to the barbell, so the correct performance of the lift actually qualitatively changes. So, how do we warm up?  Warming up should be done relatively quickly. The heavier the weight, the longer it will take to warm up. You should roughly use 5 warm ups, but if you're in a cold environment you might need more. Also, as you progress through the workout your tissue is warm, so the purpose of the warm up shifts more toward the practice and preparation. Fewer warm ups can be done for exercises later in the workout. You also don't need to be precise with warm up weight. If some app tells you to warm up at 88 pounds, just do 95. For the most part, stick with 25lb and 45lb plates, unless your work set weights might be relatively low. You don't need to warm up between warm ups, especially the early ones. You might rest about 1 minute between the last couple warm ups, and definitely before the work set.  You also can warm up for the next lift in between work sets. Unless you're an exception (extremely small or extremely big and strong) start with 45lbs for the press, bench press, and squat and with 135lbs for the deadlift.  GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE! Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/ Connect with the hosts Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show Barbell Logic on Instagram The Website Barbell Logic on Facebook podcast@barbell-logic.com     

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