Podcasts about dragging

  • 719PODCASTS
  • 815EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 27, 2022LATEST
dragging

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about dragging

Latest podcast episodes about dragging

The Detroiter
This Weekend Sucked

The Detroiter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 72:44


Lions. MSU. . . and they played. Aaaaand it just is hard, man. Life is hard. Dragging yourself out of bed every day when you know that your bitch ass cares about sports. Life has never been for the weak, has it? My teams certainly love to remind me of it, although I have no interest in being the most mentally fortified human who's ever watched football. We talk about the games. Oh, and Michigan won (but we do actually spend a good 18 mins on Michigan, was a good game). Enjoy. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Andrew Carter Podcast
Toonie Tuesday: this is what is dragging the Canadian dollar lower

The Andrew Carter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:19


Patti Lovett-Reid and Toonie Tuesday can be heard every Tuesday morning at 8:20 on The Andrew Carter Morning Show.​

Meet & Greet
Season Finale- ANSWERING SOME OF YOUR QUESTIONS (S5 EP10)

Meet & Greet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:42


Its the End of The Season! We Can't Believe It! We've Had Nollywood Legends, Rappers, Anti Bullying activists, cross fit enthusiasts, music lawyers, Comedy Royalty and a host of others. To round up the season 5 we have decided to answered 5 Fan questions! Unfiltered, Uncensored and with its fair share of DRAGGING all around. You don't want to miss it! You can catchup on previous episodes and seasons on our YouTube Channel   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1tY_z1AaJFLAteiJPj85og Be nice, say hi! img@ink-blot.tv Inkblot Productions https://youtube.com/c/InkblotProducti... Follow Naz: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nazonuzo/?h... Twitter: https://twitter.com/IamSnazz?ref_src=... Follow Zulu: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zvlv/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/zvlv_o Follow Damola: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/damola555/?... Twitter: https://twitter.com/damola5 Follow Inkblot productions: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/inkblotpres... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InkblotPrese... Twitter: https://twitter.com/InkblotPresents?r... @inkblotpresents Please rate and leave us a review on Apple ; https://podcasts.apple.com/ng/podcast... SHOW LESS  

Call of Cthulhu: Mythos Mysteries
S2E8: The Temple Of Bast

Call of Cthulhu: Mythos Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 40:21


Our investigators enter the temple.  Welcome To Call of Cthulhu: Mythos Mysteries, Join us as we delve into the mystery and madness of the Call Of Cthulhu! So many amazing stories to share. Come Chat with us and keep up to date on all our content at: Twitter: @CallMythos Discord: https://discord.gg/UTaaFQ7C6q  Email: Allmightycrit@Gmail.com National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Check Out Our Merch: https://www.fumbling4store.com/ All sound effects and BGM were created and belong to the respective parties below: Sonniss.com Monument Studios Check them out at: https://www.monumentstudios.net/ Song: Endgame Artist: DOCTOR VOX Direct Download: http://bit.ly/Endgame_Download  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Running sound effect:Juandamb https://freesound.org/people/Juandamb/sounds/430708/ Dragging a body across a concrete floor by: PostProdDog https://freesound.org/people/PostProdDog/sounds/578492/ https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stoney Baloney | A Narrated Cannabis Column

Dragon ass should not be confused with dragging ass. Dragging ass is something we all do when our energy is low, especially in the moments upon waking before the requisite black brewed stimulant sparks the body's motor that consumes fuel and burps exhaust.  We all know that feeling of lethargy. For so many of us, the first thirty minutes of the day is like boot camp. And if you happen to find yourself in a bizarre situation where that previously mentioned human gasoline called coffee is not available, motivating your brain toward a direction of productivity is like tugging cement through water. You are a recoil starter on the lawn mower with an empty tank. Regardless of how many times you tug on that sucker, the engine ain't turning over until it gets some gas.  It's not dissimilar for stoners, you know. Different kind of gas, of course. Anyway, dragon ass is something completely separate. Although they have been known to be unapologetically lazy when perched atop their spoils of plunder enjoying a good snore. At least that's what we learned from the Lord of the Rings. That they're kinda like cats when the belly is full, and the comfort is spa-day level. They will aimlessly drift into a back nap with the loins exposed-- dreaming colorful fantasies of torching small village rooftops while blissfully unaware of the dribble of drool leaking through the muzzle's lower incisors.  But then the interruption can be so very abrupt when the scent of hairy feet fouls the nostrils, alarming the defenses of little pint-sized thieves called Hobbitses. And nothing pisses a dragon off more than getting his favorite hood ornament jacked from his booty. So, with a burst of smoke and a toss of the tail, he boldly rises with awesome drama, and devours him in one swallow.  And then he sniffs for a mate. Preferably one with a nice booty. 

Screen Cares
Whiplash: Are We Rushing or Dragging to Miss The Point About Achievement Culture?

Screen Cares

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 66:20 Transcription Available


Whiplash (2014) R 1h 46m 5: Whiplash: Are We Rushing or Dragging to Miss The Point About Achievement Culture? Episode Transcript   Episode Page with Pictures Episode Host: Sarah Woolverton-Mohler Co-Host: Jennie Ziverk Carr Screen Cares co-host, Sarah, leads listeners through a discussion about how watching the movie, Whiplash offers a cautionary tale about achievement culture and the price of success. As a culture, we admire those who come from modest means and through a rare recipe of natural talent and dedicated training, become the best in their fields. We love success. We want success. We want our children to achieve success. Yet, what is success? Over the last few years, more and more research has offered cautionary tales about the dangers of living in a culture that values high achievement, of pushing our children to reach the top.  Many fields, like academia, athletics, and the arts promote a competitive atmosphere. Sarah discusses how she's experienced a competitive atmosphere in the world of music and how seeing and discussing the film, Whiplash, has created a lasting impact as she and her husband work to raise their children. A special HUGE thank you to Brooks Milgate! He is an incredibly talented professional musician who composed and created our Screen Cares theme music. He plays shows all over the country and is a consummate professional and stand-up guy. For bookings or for more information, message him on Instagram @brakesmilgate      Screen Shares Rating:  Little Screen* *Please note, while Screen Cares encourages you to share this movie as a reference point to start important conversations with older adolescents, teens or the young adults in your life, it was rated “R” by the MPAA. This movie has strong language, offensive homophobic and other slurs, verbal abuse from a teacher, and intense moments, including a serious car accident. Screen Cares does not condone the use of hate speech in any form, for any reason. We believe that words matter, and no one, ever deserves to have any aspect of their personhood denigrated or belittled.  We feel that there is value in having in-depth conversations about the content of the movie and that the presence of strong language and verbal slurs offer an opportunity for parents/guardians/trusted adults to discuss the importance of word choice. Screen Cares also believes that talking about the theme of high-achievement culture-especially with those who may struggle with perfectionism or who are interested in a creative field-is valuable.    Screen Sparks: Is trauma and sacrifice required for greatness? Do you think that being “good” is sufficient, or do we need to be the best? If you have a creative yearning, what is stopping you from pursuing your art/craft?   Bonus Material-Links and Info Referenced during the show: Official Whiplash website: https://www.sonyclassics.com/whiplash/ The oft-referenced “rushing or dragging scene” can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/VnuImW1dWAk What is the musical method that Sarah referenced?  Visit the Suzuki Association of America's article to learn more about this wonderful method: https://suzukiassociation.org/about/suzuki-method/ Interested in diving deeper into the dark-side of pushing children to success? Check out this link for Race to Nowhere, a documentary film co-directed by Vicki Abeles and Jessica Congdon:   https://beyondtheracetonowhere.org/race-to-nowhere/ Charlie Parker is referenced many times in Whiplash. Learn more about this incredible musician: https://charlieparkermusic.com https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/charlie-parker-about-charlie-parker/678/ While this feels contrary to theme of this episode about the danger of striving for success at all costs, Whiplash received many awards and commendations. Here is a list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_accolades_received_by_Whiplash Behind the Scenes-  One of the awards Sarah received. While proud of these accomplishments, Sarah wonders if there are better ways to foster a love of music excellence and enjoyment in young music students. Sarah getting her first violin, and spending time with her paternal grandmother. The hats surely helped with the musical learning.  Sarah, along with her friends and co-musicians in the Booker High School Tornadoes Marching Band in a public performance.  Liam and Violet, after a holiday concert. There may have been rushing and dragging in the concert, but definitely many more smiles. A cd capturing the fruit of the labor of many young musicians, including Sarah, in the 1998 All-State Band performances.   

The Blaire White Project
Dragging The Fat Acceptance Movement w/ HRH Collection

The Blaire White Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 52:19


Viral Youtuber HRH Collection joins Blaire to discuss her skinny tips, the fat acceptance movement, and wokeness ruining California. Follow Blaire on IG: @msblairewhite More about the show: Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or using this link: https://bit.ly/TheBlaireWhiteProject. If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: https://bit.ly/TheBlaireWhiteProject Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Washington State Farm Bureau Report
U.S. - U.K. Free Trade Agreement

Washington State Farm Bureau Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022


Iowa Ag Senator Chuck Grassley says the reason a free trade agreement with the U.K. isn't getting done is not the fault of new Prime Minister Liz Truss, but instead lies in the White House.

The VegaBlu Show
Why Is Dave Chappell and Chris Rock Still Dragging Will Smith ?!

The VegaBlu Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 5:26


Listen as Blu discusses The Latest On Dave Chappell and Chris Rock UK tour. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thehollywooddeli/message

Cracks in Postmodernity
Dragging the neolibs

Cracks in Postmodernity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 48:16


Zach Langley Chi Chi joins the pod to discuss the cosmic symbolism of Drag, the drag of Drag Queen Story Hour, why Paglia enjoys drag shows more than Judith Butler, Japanese vs. American vs. Mediterranean male psyches, the REAL Mishima, the annihilation of masculinity under technocratic industrialism, thirst traps, virtue signaling, unironic influencers, and how Tik Tok demons are possessing us. Stay tuned for part 2. Check out Zach's I'M SO POPULAR podcast and follow him on Twitter @asukahomo.

Cracks in Postmodernity
Dragging the neolibs

Cracks in Postmodernity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 48:16


Zach Langley Chi Chi joins the pod to discuss the cosmic symbolism of Drag, the drag of Drag Queen Story Hour, why Paglia enjoys drag shows more than Judith Butler, Japanese vs. American vs. Mediterranean male psyches, the REAL Mishima, the annihilation of masculinity under technocratic industrialism, thirst traps, virtue signaling, unironic influencers, and how Tik Tok demons are possessing us. Stay tuned for part 2. Check out Zach's I'M SO POPULAR podcast and follow him on Twitter @asukahomo.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Byron York Show: Biden Is Still Dragging His Party Down

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022


There has been a surge of optimism among Democrats lately when it comes to November’s midterm elections. The short version of the thinking is: Maybe we’re not going to get clobbered after all! But much of their hope is still likely in vain. For one reason: President Joe Biden.

The Byron York Show
Biden Is Still Dragging His Party Down

The Byron York Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 18:47


There has been a surge of optimism among Democrats lately when it comes to November's midterm elections. The short version of the thinking is: Maybe we're not going to get clobbered after all! But much of their hope is still likely in vain. For one reason: President Joe Biden.

The Epic Narrative Podcast
S2 Ep 33 - Dragging Lot to Safety

The Epic Narrative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:30


Scripture Reference: Genesis 19:12-29

THE GEEK OUT SHOW
What Did i Order? Dragging Dragon Daddy

THE GEEK OUT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 38:51


FortniteXDBZ, too much Batman but not a single Batman, bad ideas for starting line action figures. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tgos/message

TheGeekOutShow
What Did i Order? Dragging Dragon Daddy

TheGeekOutShow

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 38:51


FortniteXDBZ, too much Batman but not a single Batman, bad ideas for starting line action figures. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tgos/message

The People’s Court Podcast

The plaintiff's son was convicted of murder in 1995. She says she hired the defendant to obtain a sworn affidavit from someone who initially testified against her son, but later admitted he lied. She's suing for a refund. The defendant argues he tried to interview the witness, but the witness was murdered before the affidavit could be taken. He says his retainer for services is non-refundable. Then, the plaintiff says she hired the defendant, a contractor, to remodel her bathroom, but he didn't know what he was doing. She claims he left a mess, so she's suing him for what it will cost to fix all the issues. The defendant says the plaintiff's landlord wouldn't let him in to finish the job, so he owes nothing.  Plus, the plaintiffs say they bought a BMW 6 series from the defendant's dealership with no title. They claim it's a scam, so they're suing for some of their money back. The defendant says she got the title from the DMV, sent it to the plaintiffs via courier, and the co-plaintiff signed for it, so she doesn't understand why they're suing Don't forget to rate and subscribe so you never miss an episode.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zimmerman in Space
#223 - Frame dragging

Zimmerman in Space

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 15:06


Weer eens een vrolijk fenomeen uit de hoge hoed van Albert Einstein: frame dragging. Het is bijna te vreemd voor woorden, maar het effect is meetbaar en inmiddels door diverse instrumenten aangetoond. Hoe dit nou weer zit hoort u in deze aflevering van "Zimmerman in Space". Het LIGO observatorium: https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/ (https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/) Gravity Probe B: https://www.nasa.gov/pdf/162789main_gpb_fs.pdf Sally Ride: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Ride A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and Space Geodesy: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1910.13818.pdf

The Manila Times Podcasts
OPINION: The wrongs dragging 'rightsizing' efforts | Aug. 14, 2022

The Manila Times Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 6:26


https://www.manilatimes.net/2022/08/14/opinion/columns/the-wrongs-dragging-rightsizing-efforts/1854514Subscribe to The Manila Times Channel - https://tmt.ph/YTSubscribe Visit our website at https://www.manilatimes.net Follow us: Facebook - https://tmt.ph/facebook Instagram - https://tmt.ph/instagram Twitter - https://tmt.ph/twitter DailyMotion - https://tmt.ph/dailymotion Subscribe to our Digital Edition - https://tmt.ph/digital Check out our Podcasts: Spotify - https://tmt.ph/spotify Apple Podcasts - https://tmt.ph/applepodcasts Amazon Music - https://tmt.ph/amazonmusic Deezer: https://tmt.ph/deezer Stitcher: https://tmt.ph/stitcherTune In: https://tmt.ph/tuneinSoundcloud: https://tmt.ph/soundcloud #TheManilaTimes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Locked On Browns - Daily Podcast On The Cleveland Browns
The NFL Needs To Stop Dragging Their Feet On The Deshaun Watson Suspension!

Locked On Browns - Daily Podcast On The Cleveland Browns

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 35:55


Garrett Bush of the Ultimate Cleveland Sports Show and Jeff Lloyd of the Locked On Browns Podcast discuss the latest Cleveland Browns News, Rumors, and Analysis. Garrett and Jeff believe that The NFL Needs To Stop Dragging Their Feet On The Deshaun Watson Suspension! Commissioner Roger Goodell broke his silence yesterday and confirmed that NFL Breaking News | Roger Goodell Confirms That The NFL Is Seeking 1 Year Ban Of Deshaun Watson! The Browns are one month from the start of the season and need to know what the status of their quarternack is so they can either prep Jacoby Brisset for the season or seek an alternative option. #Goodell #NFL #Browns #DeshaunWatson Dave Download the Dave app from the App store right now for an Extra Cash account and get up to 500 dollars instantly. For terms and conditions go to dave.com/legal. Instant transfer fees apply. Banking provided by Evolve. Member FDIC. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Browns Plainly Podcast
The NFL Needs To Stop Dragging Their Feet On The Deshaun Watson Suspension!

Browns Plainly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022


Garrett Bush of the Ultimate Cleveland Sports Show and Jeff Lloyd of the Locked On Browns Podcast discuss the latest Cleveland Browns News, Rumors, and Analysis. Garrett and Jeff believe that The NFL Needs To Stop Dragging Their Feet On The Deshaun Watson Suspension! Commissioner Roger Goodell broke his silence yesterday and confirmed that NFL Breaking News | Roger Goodell Confirms That The NFL Is Seeking 1 Year Ban Of Deshaun Watson! The Browns are one month from the start of the season and need to know what the status of their quarternack is so they can either prep Jacoby Brisset for the season or seek an alternative option. #Goodell #NFL #Browns #DeshaunWatson Dave Download the Dave app from the App store right now for an Extra Cash account and get up to 500 dollars instantly. For terms and conditions go to dave.com/legal. Instant transfer fees apply. Banking provided by Evolve. Member FDIC. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Source Daily
Regulators' foot-dragging on public records hides the full story behind Ohio's utility corruption scandal; MOAC welcomes back Highland; Remembering Dino DeNero

Source Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 8:05


Regulators' foot-dragging on public records hides the full story behind Ohio's utility corruption scandal: https://www.richlandsource.com/news/regulators-foot-dragging-on-public-records-hides-the-full-story-behind-ohio-s-utility-corruption/article_867f78c6-14df-11ed-85e0-6b9eb83f26d0.html MOAC welcomes back Highland: https://www.richlandsource.com/sports/football/moac-welcomes-back-highland/article_66d2cc4a-1736-11ed-9e33-735890860fbd.html?block_id=1098581 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine knew critics questioned whether the former FirstEnergy nuclear plants really needed House Bill 6's $1.1 billion bailout. But Sam Randazzo, chair of the state's regulatory commission at the time, assured DeWine the plants couldn't cover their costs. So DeWine signed the nuclear and coal bailout bill into law in July 2019.Support the show: https://www.sourcemembers.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nerd heaven
Batman Begins - Detailed Analysis & Review

Nerd heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 67:21


Batman Begins is my favourite standalone Batman movie. It set a precedent for the kind of grounded serious superhero movie that I would love going forward. So let's dig in an talk about it. Over the next three episodes, I'll be covering the Dark Knight Trilogy, but it all begins here with Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins. ----more---- (Player control to listen to this podcast at bottom of page) Transcript Welcome to Nerd Heaven. I'm Adam David Collings The author of Jewel of The Stars. And I am a nerd. This is episode 92 of the podcast.   Today, we're talking about the movie Batman Begins.   The description on IMDB reads After training with his mentor, Batman begins his fight to free crime-ridden Gotham City from corruption.   The story for this movie was written by David S. Goyer The screenplay was written by Christopher Nolan. It was directed by Christopher Nolan And it first released in June 2005  In order to share my thoughts and reactions to Batman Begins, I need to very briefly talk about my past experience with Batman. Much like Superman, Batman has always been a part of my consciousness. I can't remember a time in my life before I knew about Batman. He was just always there.   The first version of the character that I actively remember engaging with was the 60s TV series, although I'm sure there was awareness before that. I wasn't alive in the 60s, of course, but I saw the show on repeats. Remember Saturday morning cartoons in the 80s? Our local TV station did their own Saturday morning show, and amongst all the cartoons, they always showed one live action show. At one point they showed the Beverly Hillbillies. At another point, it was Adam West Batman.   I enjoyed the show, but I think even at the time, I was aware that it was incredibly cheesy and silly. But to me, Superheroes were not silly. I took them very seriously.   When news of the 1989 Tim Burton movie came out, my ears pricked up. I didn't see the movie at the cinema. We just didn't really go to the cinema much when I was a kid. We watched everything on Video. And that's how I eventually saw this movie. But I remember seeing the marketing. And I had a hardcover book about the making of the movie. I remember looking at the darker aesthetic and thinking, wow. This is a gritter, more serious take on Batman. I was VERY interested. Would this movie take the character as seriously as I did?   When I finally saw the movie, I enjoyed it. It was more grounded. I liked how they explained the Joker's smile. He had to have his skin stretched after his accident, so he used makeup to make it less weird. At least, that's how I interpreted it. It wasn't until a few years ago that I realised that the normal skin tone was actually the makeup, and the white skin was real.   This movie was much closer to the kind of Batman I wanted, but it still had more campiness than I expected. Most of that came from the Joker. Seeing him prance about with his goons spray painting the museum, it felt like I was right back in Adam West land. But it was more than that. There was a thick veneer of un-realness over them, especially the second. It was the architecture, the people, the 1930s cameras, Penguin's father's monocle.   And the movies in that series got progressively more and more silly. I don't want to speak too disparagingly about that series, because there's lots of good stuff to like.   But when they announced that the Batman movies were getting rebooted, I was very interested once again.   And this time, they really were taking it seriously. Batman Begins was a more serious grounded Batman. This was a movie that took the character as seriously as I did. It treated him like a person and really fleshed out Bruce Wayne as much as it did Batman. This was EXACTLY what I'd been looking for. And to this day, Batman Begins is still my favourite stand-alone Batman movie. It'll be interesting to see if that still holds after I re-watch The Dark Knight, which I've only ever seen once. I say standalone because Batman V Superman was a multi-hero movie. But Batman Begins primed me for Zack Snyder's work. Batman Begins made me fall in love with the grounded serious Superhero movie. And I've never looked back.   So let's dig in and talk about it.   So the movie begins with a shot of the sky with bats flying everywhere, and Batman's logo revealed in the background. That logo is so recognisable that you really don't need any text. That's something the marketers knew even back in 1989.   Bruce is running around his garden as a child. Most Batman stories begin with Bruce walking through the alley with his parents at night, but this is a different take. This is Bruce before the tragedy. It's all bright colours and sunny. Bruce has a big smile on his face as he plays with his childhood friend Rachel. But he's a bit of a little ratbag. Rachel has found something cool, it's an old arrowhead, and he snatches it from her. It seems that child Bruce has developed a sense of, I can have what I want, because I'm rich. Not exactly the lesson his parents would want him to pick up, we'll see later that they're really good people. But this is an attitude that could easily develop in a child raised in an environment like this, unless much care was taken to help him unlearn that kind of stuff.   As Rachel chases him, Bruce falls through a hole into an old boarded up well. rachel runs to get help from her Mum, who is in Wayne Manor, which looks really cool. I'm surprised they didn't take more care to fence it off or something. This well connects to a cave system underground, and it is filled with bats. Young Bruce freaks out as they flap around his face, giving him a life-time fear of bats. This is an important element that will come back later in a way that I thought was really cool.   That's when we cut to Bruce waking up as an adult.   Now I've heard from some sources, some criticisms of this movie and it's realistic take. Pointing out that there are things in it that are far from realistic. Bruce's fall without apparent injury could be classed as one. Although we'll later learn that he did break his leg, but a bit more visible pain on his face would have helped.   For me, when I say I love this movie for its realistic take, it's not about every little moment being perfectly realistic. It's about the realistic take on the characters. It's about the world feeling like ours, rather than having that thick veneer of fakeness plastered over it like the previous movie series. As I said before, it's about this movie taking itself seriously.   This is a Bruce Wayne we've never seen. He's got a beard. He's lying in a foreign prison. Okay, What is going on here?   Most Batman stories do the parents' death and then cut straight to Batman fully costumed and operating in Gotham. But there's a big jump between those. How do you get from one to the other? That was the big promise of this movie. They were going to delve more deeply into Batman's origin story, a story that had never really been told on screen before. We see how Bruce as a young man goes off in search of his destiny, and finally finds it. Finds a way to deal with the pain of his parent's death, and ultimately, becomes the Batman we know. This was a story that was completely new to me, and I loved it.   We don't yet know what Bruce is in here for, but another of the prisoners has it out for him. Is bullying him. I quite like it when the bully refers to himself as the devil, and Bruce says, “you're not the devil. You're practice.”  That tells you so much about Bruce's mindset here. He's using everything around him, every experience, to learn and develop. To become what he wants to become. And that's very Batman.   We get to see a nicely done fight scene. It's fierce and brutal. When the guards drag Bruce away “for protection” and then reveal it's not for him, it's for all the thugs he beat up, I audibly laughed. A little humour, but not the kind of humour that pulls you out of the seriousness of the scene.   Somebody is waiting for him in his cell. A well-dressed Liam Neeson calling himself Ducard. He says something very interesting. “Are you so desperate to fight criminals that you get yourself locked up so you can take them on one at a time.” This gives us a lot of insight into who Bruce is at the moment, and what's going on in his head. Did he deliberately get himself locked up in here? I wouldn't put it past this version of Bruce Wayne.   Of course, Ducard has figured out exactly who Bruce is. And he says he works for Ra's al Ghul, a name I hadn't heard before I watched this movie the first time.   Bruce has been exploring the criminal underworld, but in the process, he's become lost. Rotting in a foreign prison. He may be learning about criminals here, but he's certainly not going to do anybody any good.   Ra's al Ghul can offer him a path. Something he needs but isn't yet convinced about. The path of the League of Shadows.   Ra's al Ghul shared Bruce's hatred of evil. He can provide a way to serve true justice. So a vigilante. Bruce isn't sure that's what he wants to be.   But Ducard sees al Ghul differently. A vigilante is just a man lost in the scramble for his own gratification. He can be destroyed or locked up. Kinda like Bruce right now. But if you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, and if they can't stop you, then you become something else entirely. A legend. There's some good dialog in this film.   And now he's got Bruce's attention. Because he's offering a concrete way to become what Bruce really wants. A way to truly make a difference against the kind of evil, so rampant in his home city, that destroyed his life.   This is as good a time as any to talk about a theory I have. You see, the whole idea of a man dressing up as a bat to fight crime is absurd. It's ridiculous. You might even say, it's pretty stupid. So why does it work? How do you make it work?   When you're adapting a comic book to a movie, and you come across something in the comics that's silly, there's two main ways you can deal with it.   The first is to basically hang a lantern on it. This has become quite popular in recent time, but has been for a long while. The MCU did this when Hawkeye says “I'm fighting robots with a bow and arrow. None of this makes any sense.” I really don't like this approach. It's the acknowledgement, of, this is silly, we know it's silly, but let's just go with it, yeah?   Even Zack Snyder's Justice League does this a little bit, when Aquaman derides Bruce for “dressing up like a bat” and later says “I dig it.”   At the other extreme, you've got the approach that Batman Begins takes. When you find something that's silly, you either find a way to make it work, to make it less silly, or you eject it.   An example of this is the penguin. I believe Christopher Nolan has been quited as saying that The Penguin would never have worked in his trilogy because the character just wouldn't fit with the more realistic take he'd developed.   But right here, in this scene, we're seeing that Batman Begins is going to try to explain why an orphaned boy grows into a man who eventually wears a bat costume, in a way that doesn't feel silly. And for me, personally, it works really well.   Ducard has arranged for Bruce to be released from prison tomorrow. He's instructed to find a rare flower that grows on the mountain. If he can pick one, and bring it to the top of the mountain, he may find what he's been looking for all this time.   I'm liking the character development they're already doing with Bruce. He knows he's looking for something, and he's been stumbling around the world trying to find it, but so far he's failed. This is exactly the kind of person that Ra'as al Ghul would try to recruit. And yes, Bruce may have finally found what he's been searching for.   The scenery in this next sequence is quite beautiful. The grassy plains and the snowy mountains.   He makes his way up the mountain, past villages. They warn him to turn back. I guess there are stories about the questionable people who live up at the top.   Bruce is being put through a physical challenge to reach his destination. It's one thing to want to fight injustice, but it's another to have the strength of body and will to do so. Bruce first has to prove himself capable. Which he does.   Bruce finds an old asian man sitting in a chair when he finally reaches his destination. “Ra'as al Ghul?” he asks. And you'll notice the man doesn't answer. He speaks in another language, and Duard translates. I'm not sure exactly what country this is. I get the impression it's somewhere like Tibet or maybe Nepal.   Bruce is asked “What are you seeking?” “A means to fight injustice. To turn fear against those who prey on the fearful.” Bruce sounds like somebody who has already given a great deal of thought to the answer to that question. We know he's been seeking this for some time.   He presents the flower to Ducard.   “To manipulate fears in others, you must first learn to control your own.” Which seems to make sense.   Bruce can barely stand after his climb, but is still expected to defend himself. Ducard is testing him. He learns that Bruce is afraid, but not of him. Bruce has been in fights with thugs so many times before. He used to that. When Ducard asks him what he fears, we cut back to that childhood memory. Being rescued from that cave full of bats.   We learn here but Bruce did indeed break a bone, so points back for the realism thing. We also see that Rachel's mother works for Wayne as a maid. Importantly, we see Bruce hand the rock back to Rachel as they go past. It seems he's learned a lesson of sorts through this experience. Maybe life isn't all about having everything you want, and taking the things you desire from others.   His father is trying to impart an important lesson to Bruce. “Why do we fall? So we can pick ourselves back up.” That's a lesson that adult Bruce has really taken to heart, which is how he's survived so long in this lifestyle. But he'll have to re-learn it later.   In this scene, we get our first glimpse of Michael Caine as Alfred. Superhero movies are usually cast with unknowns. That makes a lot of sense, especially for the titular heroes. But Christopher Nolan deliberately cast a lot of big name stars in this movie. Michael Caine, Liam Neeson, Morgan Freeman, Katie Holmes.  Nolan's thinking was, why shouldn't a superhero movie deserve to have the very best actors available. Of ourse, star power isn't always directly equal to acting ability, but these actors all do amazing jobs in their roles in this movie.   I was a little sceptical about someone as famous as Michael Cain playing Alfred. Would I really be able to see the character through the famous face? But it absolutely worked for me. All these actors sold me on their characters, and after this, I couldn't imagine anybody else ever playing Alfred. Who could possibly top Michael Cain? Of course, then Jeremy Irons blew me away in Batman V Superman, but that's another story.   Bruce is having recurring nightmares about the bats. They've really scared him. His father explains that they attacked him because they were afraid of him. All creatures feel fear - especially the scary ones. This conversation will really shape who and what Bruce will become.   And then his father shows him a pearl necklace he plans to give Bruce's mother. That's ominous. We know what those pearls mean. Right?   The next scnene gives us some great insight into who Thomas Wayne is. He's not only a good father, he's a good man. The people of Gotham have been going through hard times. He's used his money to provide cheap transport for the city, and he's not above using it himself, by the way. He owns Wayne Enterprises, a big successfully company, but he doesn't take an active role in running it. Instead, he chooses to spend his time working in a hospital as a doctor. In his own way, Thomas Wayne is a hero. He instilled a lot of values into his son.   There's been one or two interpretations of Thomas Wayne where he's a corrupt businessman. Not a nice guy at all. And while I appreciate the grittiness of that approach, I prefer this version of Thomas. The idealistic nice guy who established a legacy for Bruce to follow.   And notice that Thomas is wearing a tuxedo, and Martha is wearing the pearls. We know what's coming.   The actors in the opera seem to be dressed as bats. It's freaking poor Bruce out. There's a little exchange between father and son. First of all, he says “Can we go?” And that just comes across as any restless child who is bored and wants to leave. My response to that would be a quiet firm “No.” But his face shifts and he says “please” in a pleading kind of way. And Thomas sees what's really going on inside Bruce. And being the good father he is, Thomas leaves the show, something he probably spent good money on, something he was probably enjoying himself. But for the sake of his child, there's no question.   Martha hasn't picked up on it the way Thomas did. She asks what is wrong, and Thomas covers for him. I'm not sure exactly why he felt the need to do that. Maybe so as not to embarrass Bruce over his fears. I got another chuckle when Thomas said “A little opera goes a long way, right Bruce.”   So they've left early and are walking through the alley, and that's when it happens. The inevitable moment that defines Bruce's life.   When the mugger appears, Thomas is calm. He's willing to hand over whatever this guy wants. Again this shows the man's values. He cares about his family far more than money. And he's trying to calm the mugger.   But when the wallet drops, the mugger gets jumpy. The mugger wants the jewelly as well. He raises his gun toward Martha. And suddenly it all happens so fast. The previously calm Thomas reacts on instinct. It's not about the pearls. Somebody is pointing a gun at my wife. I must protect her. He stands in front of her. The sudden movement spooks the mugger and he fires. It's all so tragic. They were so close to getting out of this without anybody getting hurt.   Somewhere along the way Martha is shot as well.   And the poor kid is left there in an ally all alone, next to the dead bodies of his parents.   And it's all because they left early. It's all because Bruce was afraid of the bats. That's got to hurt. This is a good addition to the mythology because it drives that knife even deeper into Bruce's heart. And it's that pain that pushes him to become Batman.    The death scene is done pretty well here, but I have to say, after seeing the version Zack Snyder did in Batman V Superman, well, this just can't compare to that. That haunting music! And the lack of blood seems to detract from the realism somewhat.   We get our first look at Commissioner Gordon, although he won't be a commissioner at all during this movie. Right now, he's just a uniform cop. Probably a constable. I don't know exactly how police ranks work in America. You can tell right away he's a good cop. He shows a lot of compassion and empathy for Bruce.   The detective delivers the good news. They got the guy who did this. But that's got to be very little comfort to a child who has just lost his parents.   One of the Wayne Enterprise executives promises they'll be watching over the empire until he's ready. Again, that's the last thing that Bruce cares about.   Bruce breaks down and admits the guilt he's feeling to Alfred. And we see the beginnings of the father figure that Alfred will be from now on. That's a dynamic that I really like.   Back in the present, Ducard asks Bruce if he still blames himself for his parent's death. He says that his anger outweighs his guilt. Honestly, I'm not sure which is healthier.   Bruce has buried his guilt with that anger, but Ducard is going to help him confront it and face the truth.   Next we get something of a training montage. Not quite a montage because there's snippets of dialogue through it.   Bruce has come a long way with his own training, but Ducard will take what he can do and take it to new levels. There are a lot of similarities between Batman, the way he operates, and a ninja. Both use stealth. This movie digs into that and outright makes ninja training a part of Batman's background. I imagine a lot of this is drawn from comics, but I'm not familiar enough to know exactly what. I'm still pretty early the comics-reading journey I recently started.   But it's all good stuff.   One little detail that I love is that during their sword fight, Ducard is wearing armoured spikes on his arms, these are a famous part of Batman's costume.    There is an emphasis on theatricality and deception. These also lead very naturally into what Batman will be and lend believability to the whole thing that I really appreciate.   When Bruce is shown a criminal in a cage, we get some insight into the zero-tolerance that the league of shadows have for crime. Ducard says “criminals thrive in the indulgence of society's understanding.” We'll see shortly the kind of justice that they believe in.   The next conversation explores this idea of guilt and blame.   Ducards says “Your parents' death was not your fault. It was your father's. He failed to act.” Bruce defends his father. “The man had a gun.” “Would that stop you?” “I've had training.” “The training is nothing. Will is everything. The will to act.”   So Ducard is placing the blame firmly on Thomas, for not having the strength of body and will to stop the mugger. This is a very interesting perspective.   The truth is, there are a thousand different things that contributed to them being there at that moment. Bruce's desire to leave early, their decision to go to the opera, Thomas's gift of jewellery to his wife, probably many factors that lead the mugger to choose that particular night, that particular alley.   But ultimately, the blame for his crime, in my opinion, has to fall on the mugger. He made the moral choice to steal from these people, and he made the moral choice to kill them. The responsibility for that crime rests on him.   There's another nice quiet character scene with Bruce and Ducard around a campfire. Ducard displays a keen insight into the kind of pain Bruce has at the centre of his life. The anger he has wrapped around the guilt. The way it has affected him. He shares a little of his own story. He knows Bruce's pain because he shares it, because of the death of his wife.   Then he says something important. “Your anger gives you power, but if you let it, it will destroy you.” And isn't that the truth!   When Bruce asks what helped Ducard, he says vengeance. And I'm going to have to dispute that one. From what I've observed, Vengeance rarely makes people feel better. It doesn't take away the pain. We talked about this in Stargate Universe when Rush took revenge on Simeon for killing Amanda Perry and Ginn.   Bruce says vengeance is no help to him. He asks why Bruce never took revence for his parents.   And that leads us to another flashback. Bruce is now a young man, probably just out of his teens. He's been attending Princeton, which I believe is a pretty high profile university, but he's back home with Alfred for a hearing. Related to the man who killed his parents. Justice works very slowly. But that's probably a good thing. If there's one thing where you don't want to risk making a mistake, it's the justice system. Sadly, of course, no matter how slow and careful they are, there are still mistakes made.    Bruce is not returning to Princeton. Apparently, he hasn't ingratiated himself to the staff there. But he can't see Wayne Manor as his home either. This is his father's house. A mausoleum. Alfred doesn't see it that way. This house has been home to six generations of the Wayne family. Many times, it has passed from parent to child. The child becoming the new master of the home. Moving into the master bedroom is symbolic of that. The only difference is, Thomas's death happened so young, and so tragically.   Bruce doesn't understand why Alfred cares so much. But Alfred cares very much about this family, and thinks of it as his own. We see the same thing with Jeremy Irons' Alfred too. Thomas made Alfred responsible for that which was most precious to him. Bruce. Alfred takes that responsibility very seriously.   And then we find out why Bruce has little regard for his future. We see what Bruce plans to do. He has a hand gun.   But there's a lot more to it than just wanting revenge for killing his parents. We learn that Rachel works for the DA, and the DA is letting the mugger, Chill, go free. He shared a cell with Carmine Falcone. He's testifying against that crime boss in exchange for early parole. So this isn't the sentencing after all. I Guess justice doesn't move THAT slowly.   This is hard one. I understand why the justice system needs to make deals like this. You reward the small fish for helping you catch the big fish. The truth is, Carmine Falcone is a much greater threat to the safety of the people of Gotham than Chill is. If they can bring down Falcone, then a lot of lives can be saved. A lot of crime can be prevented.   But what about Bruce? What about his parents? Where is the justice for them? That's why Bruce feels somebody should be there to represent his parents at this hearing. To remind the world that Chill's crime had consequences. That his crime broke Bruce's life in a way that can never be repaired.   And this is also why he's planning to take justice into his own hands with that gun.   I'm not sure I noticed this when the movie first came out, but watching it now, as a 44 year old, Rachel almost looks too young to be a lawyer. Katie Holmes was famous as a teenage actor in the TV show Dawson's Creek. I didn't watch that show at the time, but I saw a little of it with my wife some time later. I'm still very much seeing that teenager in her face here in this movie. Of course, this movie came out in 2005. It feels like it was just yesterday, but that's actually 17 years ago. My first child was born in 2005. Anyway, I guess the moral of that, which I'm trying to say is that Katie Holmes retained her youthful look, so good on her, and … well….I'm getting kind of old.   As the DA, makes his case, he mentions a depression. To my knoweldge, the only depression that has occured in the last few centuries, was the great depression between the two world wars. We've had a number of recessions, but that's a lesser thing, right? And depression isn't something that just affects one city. A depression affects nations. Multiple nations. So that's a departure from real-world history.   Chill speaks of his regret for his crime. Yes, he was desperate, but that doesn't change what he did. I believe his remorse. It comes across as genuine. After 14 years of paying for the crime, how could you not come to regret it?   We all know regret right. I've been torn up by regret over all sorts of things. But none of them close to the severity of what Chill did.   When the judge announces that a member of the Wayne family is present, and invites Bruce to speak, the actor playing Chill does some great stuff with his face, showing the emotion that the character is feeling in that moment. The shame and guilt. The regret. How do you face the living victim of your murder?   But Bruce doesn't speak. He stands and walks out. And gets his gun ready. Bruce walks toward Chill, gun hidden in his sleeve, but he never gets the chance. Somebody else shoots Chill dead. No doubt somebody working for Falcone.   Bruce and Rachel talk about the difference between justice and revenge. Bruce posits that sometimes they are the same thing. Rachel says that justice is about harmony. Revenge is about making you feel better. But Bruce points out her impartial system is broken, which, it is. We talked about that, the imperfection of humans.   So Rachel decides to give him a real lesson. She takes him into the slums. She shows him the people living in poverty. Falcone floods the streets with violence and drugs. He makes these people desperate. The real villain in Bruce's story may not be the man who pulled the trigger. It's Falcone, who made Chill desperate enough to want to steal. (Which obviously doesn't exonerate Chill for his terrible crime). Rachel knows exactly where Falcone hangs out. He's there in that bar every night. But through corruption and threats, he keeps the police at bay. Nobody will touch him. They're all too afraid.   This scene is foundational to Bruce becoming Batman. This movie shows there's so much more to it than just the death of his parents and training to be a ninja. There's some real depth to the story in Batman Begins, and I love it.   Bruce admits to Rachel that he's not one of her good people. Shows her the gun. She gives him the slap he deserves. And she's right. His father would be ashamed of him right now.    So Bruce storms right into Falcone's bar and walks up to the crime boss. I like how the first half of this movie uses Falcone as its primary antagonist. In the grand scheme of things, he turns out to be a minor foe for Batman, but at this point in his life, Falcone is an untouchable, insurmountable foe to Bruce.   The conversation between Falcone and Bruce is fantastic. More great dialog. Falcone has the kind of power where he wouldn't hesitate to shoot Bruce in the head, right here, in front of cops and judges. That's power. The power of fear.   In a few quick sentences, he reminds Bruce how much he actually does have to lose. Rachel, his butler. He thinks he knows pain, but he knows nothing of desperation. It's ironic that Falcone is the cause of so much desperation in this city, but he understands it. He lives amongst it. Bruce doesn't yet comprehend that type of desperation.   But as we've seen earlier in the movie - he will.  This encounter with Falcone is the impetus he needs to go and start learning about desperation and fear. To begin his long training toward becoming Batman. So he can be one of Rachel's good people. A good person who won't just do nothing.   I don't know if Bruce will ever think of himself as good. He's too morally gray. But he's going to stand against the evil that has infested his city. Like his father did before him, in a very different way.   As soon as he's thrown out of the bar, Bruce begins to shed the trappings of his privileged life. His wallet, his cards. His fancy clothes. He sells his nice coat to a homeless man, exchanging it for a ratty old one. His journey has begun.   During this training, he lost a lot of assumptions about the simple nature of right and wrong. But he never fully gave in to it all. He didn't become one of them. He stole, but technically, the things he stole belonged to his company anyway. He still had a moral line.   So back in the present, Ducard is using drugs to teach Bruce a lesson. He must become more than a man. He must become an idea. He must use fear against his enemies. The drug is from that purple flower that grows on the mountain. It has hallucinogenic properties.   Ra's Al Ghul is satisfied that Bruce has overcome his fear. He's ready to join the league of Shadows and lead these men. But first, he has to prove his commitment to justice.   He has to behead a criminal in front of them all. But this is one of those lines Bruce has set. He's not an executioner. He won't kill this man. That's not justice. That's what Rachel tried to teach him.   This is where he differs from the League of Shadows. He'll fight men like this in Gotham. But he won't kill them. Ducard brings up a classic objection. “You compassion is a weakness your enemies will not share.” And Bruce has a good comeback. “That's why it's so important. It separates us from them.”   Ducard makes a point that Bruce knows well. Legal systems are corrupt. They are often not fit to dispense true justice. Bruce has seen this first hand in Gotham. The League has turned their sights on Gotham. That city has become so corrupt, it's time for it to die. And Bruce, as their “Prince” as Falcone called him, “is the perfect one to deliver that justice.” They plan to destroy the entire city. As they believe, this is necessary.   And so is born this Batman's no-kill rule.    I have no problem with this Batman having a no-kill rule. I quite like it. This Bruce still has some idealism left. I like idealism. I also have no issue with Ben Affleck's Batman having no such rule. That's Bruce at a very different time of his life, in a very different situation. Batman has certainly killed before, in comics, and in other movies. Remember that time when Michael Keaton's Batman casually murdered a minor goon and then cracked a joke over his corpse?   Bruce attacks the league to make his escape, burning the temple, and saving Ducard's life. Because he's still a good person.   Now Bruce is ready to be Batman. It's time to go home. Alfred is very happy to see him as he arrives in a private jet. People need a powerful symbol to shake them up. He can't do that as Bruce Wayne. As a man, he can be ignored and destroyed, but as a symbol, he can be indestructible.   We get a nice little moment of humour as Alfred expresses some concern over his safety with Bruce's new endeavour. We also learn that Bruce was declared legally dead by the Wayne Enterprise shareholders. They wanted his majority share, but luckily, he left everything to Alfred, who is now a wealthy man in his own right. The overhead view of the Gotham skyline shows us a very realistic looking city. A place we can well believe exists. A far cry from the gothic cartoonish Gotham we've seen in previous Batman movies. This was a breath of fresh air to me. I could never really connect with the setting of the previous movies. The city just felt so overwhelmingly fake and non-real.   Now, before we see the birth of Batman, we need to meet a new character, One who will be an important villain in this movie going forward. Doctor Crane. The psychologist that gets all of Falcone's thugs declared insane, and transferred to his care, rather than facing criminal justice.   Rachel is onto him, of course, as probably everyone else is. But she's the only one with the courage to do something about it. Interestingly, Rachel seems to be taking on something of the role that Jim Gordon generally fills in the comics. The one brave good person who is willing to stand up when everyone else just looks away, either for money, or out of fear.   Of course, we see Jim Gordon doing that as well in this movie, but so far, he's been largely absent.   Rachel is warned to back off by one of her colleagues. You can't take on somebody like that. You just have to pretend it's not happening.   Bruce's first step is research. And that's a very Batman quality. Preparation. He needs to know if he'll have any allies out there. He finds some newspaper clippings about Gordon.   And that's when he sees the bat. And after all that Ducard taught him, he has an idea. He goes down the well that he fell into as a child, and finds the cave.   The cave is very rustic. It's not a habitable place, as caves generally aren't. I love the waterfall. As Bruce stands up, allowing the bats to flap all around him, he finds that he has overcome his fear of them. Now that he has it under control, it's time to share that fear with his enemies.   Despite his bravado, Rachel actually has Crane a little spooked. He has a deal with Falcone. He gets his thugs off the hook, and Falcone brings in a shipment of something for Crane. Falcone is more interested in favours than money, and for somebody like him, that makes a lot of sense. Falcone has plenty of money, but it's the favours, the connections, that make him who he is. That's the basis of his power. Other people doing what he wants so he remains untouchable. Anyway, Falcone is gonna take care of Rachel for him.   We see in the board meeting, that they are wrestling with the idea of going against the kinds of business practices that Thomas Wayne believed in. One of them argues that after 20 years they should be able to stop thinking about what Thomas Wayne would have done. And …. In part….. I think he does have a point. Thomas is no longer alive and hasn't been involved in this company for two decades.  They're the ones running this business. They need the freedom to take it in their own direction.   But, in terms of values, that's a little different. Thomas Wayne clearly set precedent for the kinds of moral and ethical values that Wayne Enterprises stands for. And those values are something that perhaps should endure. Especially when you're carrying on the legacy of your founder.   Bruce says he's not here to interfere with the company. He just wants a job to get to know the company his father built. He's interested in the applied science division. Of course, he has something of an ulterior motive here.   And this is where we get to meet Lucias Fox. Now as I understand it, this character was created for the movie, and he became so beloved, that they actually added him into the comics. This kind of thing has happened before. Batgirl was first created by the Adam West TV show, and later became part of the comics. Harley Quinn, as well. I think it was an animated series for her.   Anyway, I like Lucias Fox, and it's hard not to when he's played so warmly by the one and only Morgan Freeman.    Fox is surprised Bruce would want to be here. This division is a dead end, to keep Fox from causing any trouble for the board. A whole bunch of prototype technologies, not in production. Exactly what a young Billionaire needs when he wants to come a superhero vigilante.   This scene is great because it legitimises all of Batman gadgets. His suit is an advanced body armour, not used in active duty by the military because it's too expensive. But perfect for a vigilante who only needs one or two.   I've often heard the criticism that Batman can't have body armour any more advanced than what the US Military use in real life because they always have the best that has been invented. I think this scene goes some way to help address that.   This is what I was talking about earlier. You find something that's kind of silly in a superhero's story. In a movie like this, you either make it feel believable, or you dump it.   And that's the key. Making it feel believable, even if it's not strictly 100% realistic. That's not the point. It needs to feel sensible, not silly. It needs to give you enough to help you suspend your disbelief.   And for me, Batman Begins does that perfectly.   I love how Fox sees completely through Bruce's excuse. But all this stuff belongs to him. If he wants to use it, why not?   Alfred gives us another nice little bit of texture. Back in the civil war, Bruce's great-great-grandfather was involved in the secret railroad, helping free slaves. The caves under the mansion came in handy. There is already a passage down into them. Another nice touch that adds an extra veneer of believability to this whole thing.   Bruce is now making his suit. Painting the body armour and adding the arm spikes he learned about with Ducard. Alfred helps him figure out the logistics of ordering the materials he needs to assemble everything without raising suspicion.   We check back in with Jim Gordon. He's in an interesting situation. He's not that courageous good man standing against corruption yet. He refuses to take bribes himself, but he does sit idly by while his partner Flass collects his money. He even assures Flass that he's no rat. He won't tell anyone about the bribes. He's resigned to the fact that there's nobody to rat to.   Gordon is in a small way still part of the problem. He's definitely not yet a part of the solution.   But Bruce pays him a little visit.   I like how on Bruce's first time out, he doesn't have the full cowl. He's just wearing a balaclava. I kind of like it when origin stories do that. The slow build-up to the real suit.   Jim needs a little push. It's not until Bruce tells him about Rachel that he really considers taking a stand himself. Bruce wants to take Falcone down for the drug shipments he brings in each week. The shipments that nobody does anything about.   Bruce definitely lacks the elegance we'll come to expect from Batman as he clumsily falls and crashes around the city. He's gonna need more stuff from Fox.   The memory cloth that will form the basis for Batman's cape is pure science fiction. But couching it in science fiction terms once again gives it that sensible believability to me.   I like the exchange between Bruce and Fox. Fox is happy with the plausible deniability of it all. He knows Bruce is up to something. Bruce knows he knows. They don't have to keep pretending otherwise.   And that's when Bruce notices the tumbler.   I love the tumbler.   Designed as a bridging vehicle. They could never get the bridge to work, but the vehicle itself is fine. Perfect for Bruce's needs. I love how they introduce the batmobile in this way. I love how you first see it in Army cammo colours, but Bruce asks if it comes in black. I love everything about the tumbler. The batmobile is one of the silliest things about batman. That name especially. Thank goodness that term is never spoken aloud in this movie, or in the Synder movies. You don't need to call it that on screen, it just needs to be present. I always thought the idea of Batman driving around in a car was pretty silly. But this thing? Now you're talking!   Now, there are some issues with the tumbler in the second movie, which we'll get to. But just looking at Batman Begins in isolation, this is absolutely perfect.   You can see a defined difference between the way Bruce is approaching Falcone now, as opposed to how he did it as a young man. Back then, he was hot-headed. He burst into Falcone's bar armed with nothing but anger and emotion. And he was humiliated. Now, he's taking his time. Doing surveillance. No longer a child, Bruce has become a man. There's still a lot of emotion driving him, of course, but that emotion is no longer in the driver's seat. Bruce has learned to control it.   In reality, this isn't just a drug shipment. There are drugs, but there's also something special for Crane. Flass is actively helping Falcone protect the shipment. And he's all but offered to kill Rachel. And this is where we first see Batman in action. I love this scene. It takes all the tropes of a horror movie and inverts them. It's the bad guys that are being terrorised, and Batman is the monster. In a lot of ways, this scene defined for me, who and what Batman is. I remember playing the Arkham Asylum game. This scene was in my mind as I played that. It impacted how I played the game.   The crooks are vanishing one by one. Being taken by something in the shadows. It's creepy and it's cool. Possibly the best scene in the movie. I love when the crook screams “where are you you?” And then we hear that gravelling voice behind him, as an upside-down Batman says “here.”   They actually use the “hide the monster” trope here, but in the way I like, not in the way I hate. Because the crooks don't get a good glimpse of Batman. Not until right at the end, we finally see Batman in all his glory, as he pulls Falcone out of the car.   Bruce saves Rachel's life, and gives her the leverage she needs to get the judge to do the right thing.   It seems everything is all wrapped up. In one night, Batman has taken down Carmine Falcone, something the police in Gotham haven't been able to do in 20 years.   So Falcone is strapped to a massive floodlight. Making the image of a bat on the clouds. It's this movie's take on the bat signal.   This is a moment that gets criticism. Those floodlights get extremely hot. In reality, Falcone would be burned to a very dead crisp. And I can't argue against that. First of all, I'll point out that this light is hardly at full strength. You can tell just by looking at it that the light is pretty dim. But then, there's no way it'd be able to project that image up into the sky to be visible like that. This scene is a cheat. I'll admit that.   I always found the bat signal pretty silly. I never liked the idea that Gotham police had Batman on speed dial. Gordon, sure. But he needs a much more subtle way of getting in touch with him.   I'll admit this moment doesn't quite work, but given the overall tone of the rest of this movie, I kinda don't care.   The point is, we've established just how powerful Bruce has become, in his new persona. Up until this point, Falcone has been the big bad of the movie. He was the primary villain. And he seemed a very powerful, very intimidating villain. How can one man bring down somebody like that?   But Batman has done what that young Bruce could never have conceived of. He's brought down Falcone, and it feels kind of effortless.   Bruce Wayne has come of age.  But they've already laid the seeds of a greater challenge that Batman will face. This movie actually has an escalating scale of villains, three different levels. Bruce has just cleared level 1.   And the way the movie has done it, taking all of this time to establish Bruce's journey, it convinces me. The idea of a man dressing up as a bat and running around with a cape at night no longer feels ridiculous and preposterous. The journey has sold it. That's really important to me.   I've always been primarily a Superman fan, but looking back, while I'd always liked Batman, I think it was this movie that really made me love Batman. This movie gave me a version I could believe in. This movie finally delivered on the promise that I first saw when they started advertising the 1989 movie on TV.   Rachel has a rock-solid case. Batman has given her everything she needs.   But the police chief wants Batman off the streets. This is the tension I like. Batman is doing the right thing, he's getting the job done, and Gordon sees the value in that, but officially speaking, Batman is a criminal, pursued by the police just as much as any of his rogues are. That's what Batman was designed to be.   Alfred has some good advice for Bruce. If he's going to live this double life, he's going to have to put some effort into his Bruce Wayne persona as well. Just as Supermam cultivates an akward nerdy Clark Kent, Batman needs to cultivate a frivolous playboy Bruce Wayne to throw people off his scent. Now we introduce a new but important element. A microwave generator has been stolen from Wayne Enterprises. Designed for desert warfare, it vaporises an enemy's water supply. This is more science fiction. But again, I'm okay with science fiction. This is still a superhero movie, after all. And that's what this movie does so right. You establish the silly elements of the story in a believable sensible way, and then you have room to suspect disbelief over things like this. I don't mind a little science fiction, in fact, I welcome it. What I don't want is silliness and cheese. That's why when people criticise the realism of elements like this, I think they're missing the point.   Bruce's appearance at the hotel, with the weird skinny-dipping ladies goes a good way to establishing Bruce as a frivolous playboy, the last person you'd expect to be Batman. Why those women decided to get naked and hop in the water feature I'll never comprehend. Maybe Bruce paid them to do so.   Bruce is willing to be seen in this light in order to protect his true self. But there's one person whose good opinion he doesn't want to lose. Rachel. He tries to tell her, without telling her. “Inside, I am more.” But she's not buying it. “It's not what you are underneath, it's what you do that defines you.” And this is a very thematic statement for the whole movie. I partially agree with what Rachel says here. While, I think we are defined by more than just what we do, What she's getting at is the whole idea of putting your money where your mouth is. You can have the best of intentions inside, but if your actions don't match your intentions, then those intentions aren't worth much, are they? It actually reminds me of James chapter 2 in the Bible. Faith without actions is dead.   Falcone wants Crane to get him off on the insanity plea, just as he has with his goons. But more than that. He wants in one whatever Crane and his mysterious boss are up to.   But this is the moment that Crane replaces Falcone as the primary villain. Crane gases Falcone and Falcone goes genuinely insane from whatever is in that gas.   It's obvious at this point, that Crane is the Batman villain Scarecrow.   And this is the moment it really becomes a comic book movie. Weird gas that makes people go crazy? But because everything has been established in such a grounded sensible way up until now, I'm willing to buy it, I mean fully buy into it.   We won't be seeing Falcone again. He's done with. But we've learned how sinister Crane is. He's doing experiments with his patients, using whatever was in that shipment Falcone brought him.   Bruce already knows some of the shipments went elsewhere. He wants to know where. He'll get it out of Flass. Which he does. Batman is a pretty effective interrogator. And Flass is a coward.   So he tracks the shipment to Crane. The shipment is what he uses to make that gas, not to mention the microwave generator. We see that the gas amplifies people's fears. Makes them see what they're afraid of.   Bruce jumps out of a window many stories up, while on fire. And miraculously survives the fall without even a broken bone. That's not realistic. I call valid criticisms on this moment. But the funny thing is, they have their explanation for that. The memory cloth can turn his cape into a glider. Why didn't this scene use that device?   Under the influence of the gas, Bruce becomes that scared helpless little boy again. He cries out to Alfred for help. And of course, Alfred is there for him.   Bruce recognises the hallucinogen. He's felt it before, but this is more concentrated. Weaponised.   Fox has invented an antidote.   Bruce is supposed to have a birthday party tonight, but Rachel is heading to Arkham Asylum to figure out what's going on with Falcone. And she's gonna need backup from Batman to keep her safe.   Why does Crane show Rachel the truth of his whole operation? I know he drugs her afterwards, but why show her what he's doing? He's pouring that hallucinogen into the city water supply.   Batman crashes the party and uses Crane's own gas on him. I love how he sees Batman as a weird human/bat hybrid creature. The gas allows this movie to do some crazy sci-fi/fantasy looking stuff that would otherwise not fit in a movie like this at all. And we learn that Crane's mysterious boss is none other than Ra's Al Ghul. But isn't he dead? Didn't he die when that temple turned?   Bruce calls in the bats presumably using pheremons to attract them, so he can get away wtih Racel, to give her the antidote. Not sure the bats would smell the pheromones from that distance, though.   This is when we first get to see the Tumbler in action. Bruce uses the bridging vehicle's ability to jump to his advantage.   There are a couple of moments of humour that work for me in the chase. It's a pretty cool action scene. Anyway, he gets Rachel to the cave in time to the cave, where Fox has left the antidote waiting.   Crane has dumped his entire supply of this stuff into the water supply. Been doing it for weeks. But it hasn't affected anyone because it needs to be absorbed through the lungs. So why dump it in the water?   Crane is in custody. Bruce uses Rachel to get the antidote to Gordon so he can protect himself and mass produce it.   Level 2 cleared. The final ultimate villain will soon be fully revealed.   Alfred is concerned that Bruce is losing himself in this monster. Bruce argues he's using the monster to help others. But this can't be personal or else he's just a vigilante.   The mansion is full of guests. Bruce wants to get rid of them. There's too much going on right now. Alfred doesn't want Bruce to destroy his father's name. It's all that's left of him. The playboy persona is one thing. But Thomas's legacy is important and shouldn't be tarnished. And, Bruce agrees, for now.   Fox figures it out. The microwave emitter would allow somebody to disperse the toxin into the air supply. He's just been fired for asking too many questions about it.   And now we meet the final boss. The true villain of this entire movie. Bruce is introduced to a Mr. Ra's Al Ghul. It's Ducard. He was Ra's all along. The man Bruce watched die was just a decoy.   Bruce wants Ra's to let the guests go. They're innocent. His only reply “You can explain the situation to them.” And so, in order to save their lives, he must offend them. Dragging his father's name through the mud. They'll never know what he sacrificed to save their lives.   Crane's toxin was derived from the blue flowers on the mountain. He wasn't a member of the league of shadows, just a pawn. Ra's plans to vaporise the toxin and watch Gotham tear itself apart. He said near the start of the movie that he planned to destroy Gotham. He was serious. The League of Shadows has been a check against human corruption for thousands of years. They sacked rome, released plague rats, and burned London to the ground. When a civilisation reaches the peak of decadence, they come in to return the balance.   But you can't fight evil with evil. They may think they're the good guys, but they've murdered billions of innocent people along the way. Bruce believes Gotham isn't worth saving. He wants more time. Ra's rgues the very fact they've been able to do what they're doing is proof of its corruption.   We're seeing here that everything from the start of the movie is coming full circle. It's almost poetic. I love it.   As his goons burn the mansion to the ground, Ra's drops another bombshell. They tried to destroy Gotham in the past, through economics. Create so much hunger that everyone becomes a criminal. See them rip themselves apart.   But Bruce's parents got in the way of that plan, by helping alleviate the poverty where they could. It was Ra's al Ghul who created the circumstances that lead to his parent's death. Falcone was only a piece of that.   We see here how alike Bruce and his father are. Both, in Ra's opinion, are misguided idealists trying to save the city that deserves to be destroyed. There's a lot of symmetry in this movie, and I love it.   Alfred saves Bruce from the burning house. Bruce feels he's destroyed everything his father left behind, but Alred reminds us what we've just learned. The Wayne legacy isn't bricks and mortar. It's that idealism that tries to save Gotham. Ultimately, Thomas failed, and now so has Bruce. And then that line from his childhood returns. “Why do we fall?”  “So that we can learn to pick ourselves up.”   I think Thomas would be proud to see what a fine father figure Alfred has become.   Ra's activates the microwave generator and the gas bursts out of the ground. Right under the narrows - the worst part of Gotham.   Fortunately, Gordon has the antidote.   Everything has gone to hell. All the riot cops are on the island already, and they've been affected by the gas. There's nobody left to send. And just as Commissioner Loeb says that, the tumbler bursts through the air behind him. That's a very effective shot. Love it.   The monorail follows the path of the water mains. They're gonna load the generator on the train and infect the entire city.   Batman is going into battle. He may die. Rachel at least wants to know his name. He replies with that same line “It's not what I am underneath, but what I do that defines me.” And this, of course, has a double meaning. In one sense, it means, it doesn't matter what my identity is under this suit. It only matters that I'm trying to help. But, of course, by using that phrase, he's letting her know exactly who he is.   The shot of Batman gliding in like a giant bat and landing is awesome.   A lot of people are getting infected while Bruce struggles to catch the train. More with every metre. This brings us to the climactic fight scene. It's suitably tense. I like it. Gordon uses the tumbler to take out part of the monorail. It's interesting that ultimately he's the one that saves the day. Bruce is there to make sure Ra's doesn't go on to cause havoc another day.   And now we reach that controversial moment. Has Bruce finally learned to let go of his compassion? Ra's asks. “I won't kill you, but I don't have to save you.” Many people feel this is a betrayal of the “no-kill” rule that Bruce established for himself early in the movie. And strictly speaking, it is. Bruce is cutting that moral hair mighty thin.   But I don't see this as a negative to the movie. Bruce is a morally gray character. This is when he really steps into that. This is why he and Superman never get on, because they are different. Yes, Batman may be an idealist compared to the likes of Ra's al ghul, but he's not as cut and dry as Superman. And even Superman is forced into some of those gray areas, which I'm also fine with.   The train is stopped, and Ra's al ghul is finally dead. But there's still a lot of people out there who will need that antidote. A lot are gonna get hurt and killed before they get it. It's Batman. It's messy.   The next scene is very satisfying. The company went public, but Bruce bought up most of the shares through various charities and trusts. He's placed Lucious Fox in charge as the new CEO, the previous one, who fired Fox, is out.   Rachel comes to see Bruce, who she has newfound respect for. Bruce thanks her for giving him that first lesson that started him on his journey of transformation.   Now that she knows the type of man Bruce truly is, she's started to hope. They grew up as childhood friends, but there's a lot more between them than just friendship. They've loved each other for years, in some form. The movie probably could have done a better job of portraying that romantic undercurrent of their relationship, though. But there's a problem. Bruce has changed. He's a good man, but the real Bruce that she remembered is gone. Maybe he'll come back someday when Gotham no longer needs the Batman. And that line perfectly sets up the primary conflict of the next movie.   Bruce is going to rebuild his father's house, but it might be a good opportunity to do some work on the foundations.   The bat signal re-appears at the end. Gordon is going to use it when he wants to summon Batman. There's a lot of trouble still out there.  Gordon teases the villain of the next movie by mentioning a thief and murdurer who leaves a calling card - a joker.   And the credits roll.   This movie changed everything. It created a new era for DC comics movies, and started the journey that would eventually lead us to the Snyder Cut.   Without Batman Begins, there would be no Man of Steel. No Batman V Superman.   This movie presented a new way of portraying superheroes. They were no longer something to laugh at or make fun of. They were something to take seriously.   This movie made realistic, those things it could, which made the speculative elements all the more easy to accept. It was a perfect balance.   It's like Christpher Nolan reached into my soul and said “Let's create the perfect Batman movie for Adam Collings.”   There was a lot in this movie. Heaps to talk about. And there'll be plenty more to talk about next time, in a movie I've actually only ever seen once. The Dark Knight.   Have a great two weeks, Live long and prosper, Make it so.  

Wylde In Bed: Erotic Audio Stories at Bedtime
Paranormal Strangers to Lovers Erotic Story Part 1

Wylde In Bed: Erotic Audio Stories at Bedtime

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 24:01


"I am extremely horny after listening to it."Paranormal Strangers to lovers erotic fantasy part 1Desperate to escape a past that has tormented her for far too long, Alice risks everything driving toward the storm. Determined to start her new life, travelling toward the torrent of rain and thunder.There is a moment when it all changes. Her world turns up-side down A moment that leaves her bloodied and vulnerable.A moment she knows she now has to fight to survive. Dragging herself through the muddied dirt tracks, she finds the one sanctuary she can, an old hay barn she remembers from her childhood. Hiding in the shadows, away from the persecution of her life. From those shadows arises a man. A man whose strength invades every cell of her body. A man she cannot refuse.Is he her savior or her ruin?Can she survive the dark of the night and hope that dawn's warm caress might provide the salvation she so desperately needs?Why not visit me at the VIP cub, where you can enjoy even more pleasure? Just come to https://wyldeinbed.com/VIP/

KLRNRadio
07-28-22 Dragging Asses

KLRNRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 93:53


Hood Politics with Prop
Dragging Rights

Hood Politics with Prop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 39:03


I don't care how much your little brother annoys you, you will beat the crap out of someone if they ever say anything bad about him. It's not even about whether the statement is right or wrong its that THEY don't have the authority to say it and it's that "authority" to say it is really what the supreme court does. Decides who can call the shot. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Failure Guy
Dragging it Through the Garden - Jordan Goldmeier

Failure Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 107:11


Are you a data head? Jordan Goldmeier is! We have a fantastic conversation that dips into everything from pushing Excel to the limit, failing in business, and becoming a digital nomad! He's a three-time author as well as a fellow Microsoft MVP. We also deep dive into Jordan's interesting tattoo of a hot dog which leads us to: What is the proper Chicago-style hot dog? Is Big Ketchup out to get Jordan? Are hot dogs a sandwich? Are hot dogs a taco? Are tacos a sandwich..? All these questions and more will be answered right here!!!

PGurus
Savio Rodrigues on Congress dragging Smriti Irani's 18-year-old daughter

PGurus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 18:11


Savio Rodrigues on Congress dragging Smriti Irani's 18-year-old daughter Zoish Irani #SmritiIrani #SmritiIraniDaughter #Congress #Politics #ZoishIrani

The VegaBlu Show
Did Kanye West Set Kid Cudi Up at Rolling Loud Miami ?!

The VegaBlu Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 9:47


Listen as Blu and Kris discusses Rolling Loud Kanye Exit, Kim K surrogacy Plans, Khole K Surrogate Baby, and Kylie Jenner Flex to Dragging. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thehollywooddeli/message

Harford County Living
Dragging Queens And Kings Through The Paranormal With Zenobia Darling

Harford County Living

Play Episode Play 51 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 83:41


In this episode, Rich and cohost Colleen Curran have a conversation with Robert Buden and Derek Pentz. Robert is the Owner/Curator of Artists Emporium where Derek has been featured. Derek is also known as the Drag Rockstar Zenobia Darling, is a famed performing artist and painter known for blurring the lines between visual and performing art.Derek is a graduate of Towson University's theater program, where he studied reality television's theatrical and societal relevance, writing his undergraduate theater thesis on two of Bravo's reality tv theater masterpieces, Vanderpump Rules and The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, titled "Would Oscar Wilde be a Nineteenth-Century PumpHead? The Wilde Aspirational Comedy of Vanderpump Rules."  Read more about Derek here.Thank you to Robert Buden and Derek Pentz for the conversation. Here are some links for Robert and Derek:Gallery | artistsemporiumhdgArtists Emporium | Facebookhttps://www.instagram.com/artistsemporiumhdg/Derek Pentz - Portfolio of Works (zenobiadarlingcreative.com)https://www.facebook.com/derek.pentzhttps://twitter.com/zenobiadarlinghttps://www.instagram.com/zenobia_darling/Zenobia Darling - YouTubehttps://www.amazon.com/RockStarLife-Diary-Zenobia-Darling-Superstar-ebook/dp/B08XZXHVGC Sponsored by Great Escapes Harford - Thank you Katie and Chris Cole for your support throughout the yearsRecommended podcast - Wigging Out PodcastFollow the podcast on Social Media:Facebook - Conversations with Rich Bennett & Harford County LivingTwitter - Conversations with INTRODUCING... 4X THE REWARDS ON GASWith gas prices higher than ever, we wanted a way to help reduce your pain at the pump.That's why Freedom's Platinum Rewards Visa Credit Card is proud to introduce 4X the rewards on fuel.2Use your Platinum Rewards Visa when filling up your vehicle and earn 4x the rewards points. Redeem points for a wide selection of premium merchandise, gift cards to Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEFreedom Federal Credit Union HELPING YOU REACH YOUR FINANCIAL DREAMSGreat Escapes Harford Great Escapes Harford is an escape room, an entertainment venue with themed games designed for ageDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

Recover Your Soul: A Spiritual Path to a Happy and Healthy Life
Releasing Guilt for Ourselves and Others and not Dragging Around the Pain of the Past

Recover Your Soul: A Spiritual Path to a Happy and Healthy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 24:19


Guilt, shame and blame are what keep us from connection to our Higher Power and following our spiritual path to a happy and healthy life.  Saying 'let it go' is easy, actually allowing ourselves to stop feeling guilty about our past, and punishing others for their past is Soul Recovery.  When we can recognize how much of our energy is tied up in experiences and feelings in our past, we can do the work to forgive ourselves and those who have hurt us and use that energy to create a life free from those painful bonds.  We can move past the pain, connect with our Higher Power and be our True  and happy selves. For more information about Rev. Rachel Harrison and Recover Your Soul- visit the website www.recoveryoursoul.net  use the code TRYASESSION for 40% off your first Spiritual Coaching session when you book on the website.  Make a donation to support the Recover Your Soul Podcast on the home page, follow us on Instagram, TikTok, and Facebook and join the private Facebook group  to be part of the RYS community.   Support this podcast  and have access to bonus content by becoming a Patreon  Member  or subscribing on Apple Podcasts and have access to an EXTRA episode each Friday.   Thank  you for your support!!  Soul Recovery Support Group on Zoom -The 1st Monday of the Month, 6PM Mountain Time. This is a drop in support group where we can come together to explore, connect and support each other on our Soul Recovery journey.  Visit the website to register and receive the meeting invite.  Free to attend- donations appreciated.Together we can do the work that will recover your soul.To access a transcript of this episode visit https://recoveryoursoul.buzzsprout.com/Support the showEveryone is welcome to attend the Soul Recovery Support group - it is free and open to anyone wanting support on their Soul Recovery Journey. Usually on the 1st Monday of the month, we are pushing it back due to Labor Day, and it will be on the 12th instead. Register on the website to get the zoom link. Support the show

Blunt Talk
1499. Ass-dragging.

Blunt Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 18:53


Episode 1499. Ass-dragging. Visit on Instagram to watch the video. Blunt Talk Podcast is guaranteed TO LIFT. X Fitness is committed to lifting in body, mind, and soul. There is enough depressing news. We won't add to it. Good Inspirational News Only. Free, permanently-archived downloads compliments of X Fitness. Blessings & all good things. #peace

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
07-06-22 Segment 1 Dragging Justin Timberlake

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 78:22 Transcription Available


The Cardinals are coming? Doug disagrees. We talk Redbirds for about 3 minutes before getting into butt snot. The concert at Busch Stadium last eve. Bands don't always age well. Joan Jett. Iggy was topless at a party with the Koch brothers. Iggy had a chance to sleep with rock stars. Index cards. Trivia Night could be like a key party. An article about Justin Timberlake being old and cringe. The dais struggles through the article. Iggy requests a Timberlake song. American Century Championship. Brian Baumgartner's golf game. Doug and Plowsy debate about who would win if a PGA player played a LPGA player from their respective tees. Wellington calls in to give his thoughts.

The Detroit Dadcast
#12. A Wild Adoption Journey, Sleeping in Your In-Laws' Bedroom, and How Child-Rearing Prepares You For Dealing with Politicians (with Senator Jim Ananich)

The Detroit Dadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 55:41


For Episode #13, I sat down with Michigan State Senator Jim Ananich, a friend of nearly three decades. Our relationship had been characterized by tennis and basketball, using my 50% discount at Bennigan's when we weren't hungry, and spontaneous explosions of Dayton Family rap sessions in public. Somehow we've become responsible adults with children, and Jim is now the highest ranking democrat in the Michigan Senate. Thankfully he has not lost his integrity or his sense of humor.  In this chat we cover a lot: his harrowing adoption journey; losing both parents at a young age; and fatherhood as a catalyst for growth. Sit back, get ready to learn and to laugh.  Also: When your kid doesn't care that the governor is calling Peabo Bryson;  Why dumb people shouldn't form education policy;  Raising a biracial son Dragging days, flying weeks. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rory-hughes/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rory-hughes/support

Conscious Speaks Radio!
Self-love Sunday: Dragging my feet or asleep?

Conscious Speaks Radio!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 26:51


Self-love Sunday: Dragging my feet or asleep? Today at Self-love Sunday on Conscious Speaks I share about 1. We can only see as far as we know? 2. Your personal 360 degrees. 3. Are you going to learn what you came to learn? 4. No Fear = No war, hatred, or judgment. 5. How to become The Golden Rule. How to plant a garden of understanding to thrive and bloom peace within your personal 360 degrees footpath. 6. How I became saved and why I will share about it and not copy and paste myself into something or someone else. Love & Namaste, Kellie J. Wright Author of The Book Internal Journeys A Spiritual Transformation Host of Self-Love Sunday on Conscious Speaks podcast! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kellie-j-wright/support

C4 and Bryan Nehman
June 30th, 2022: 19 Time Repeat Offender Arrested For Dragging a Police Officer, Former F.O.P. President Gary McLhinney

C4 and Bryan Nehman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 90:25


Join C4 and Bryan as they discuss the astonishing fact that in the case of a police officer who was hit and dragged for two blocks, the person arrested for the crime is a 19-time repeat offender! Is our justice system beyond repairable now? Former F.O.P. President Gary McLhinney joins us to talk about this further and what is the general feeling among police officers today. Also, is this day of the extreme right and extreme left, is there still room for political moderates? C4 and Bryan Nehman are live weekdays from 5:30-10:00am ET on WBAL Newsradio 1090, FM101.5, and the WBAL Radio App.

Geopolitics Decanted by Silverado
How Putin is dragging Belarus into the war: Analysis of the war in Ukraine (June 26, 2022)

Geopolitics Decanted by Silverado

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:34


June 26, 2022: Dmitri Alperovitch talks with Michael Kofman (Research Program Director in the Russia Studies Program at the Center for Naval Analysis) and Henry Schlottman (OSINT war analyst, US army veteran) about the new developments in the war in Ukraine on Twitter Spaces. Topics covered:Is Belarus getting dragged into this war?Who is running Russia's war? Why are commanders being replaced?How best can Ukraine use the new HIMARS artillery systems that are now arriving? What difference are they likely to make on the battlefield?Is Russia in danger of running out of ammunition?Is Russian advance stalling in the Donbas?Can Ukraine target the Crimean Bridge bridge and what are the implications of their strikes on energy and rail infrastructure in Russia and Crimea?Is Russia still having logistics issues in the Donbas offensive?How is Wagner performing in the fight and why did Prigozhin get a Hero of Russia medal?Can Western defense industrial base keep up with Ukrainian ammo and weaponry needs and expenditures?Follow the speakers on Twitter: @DAlperovitch, @KofmanMichael, @HN_Schlottman

BIG Life Devotional | Daily Devotional for Women

Have you ever felt like you're trying so freaking hard, but not really making the progress worthy of your effort? Like dang, why am I not further along than I am? Why is this taking so long? Why am I so tired? Why isn't what I'm doing working? Well, have you stopped to see what […]

The Bert Show
People Are Dragging Normani For Being In A Chris Brown Video?!

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:36 Very Popular


People Are Dragging Normani For Being In A Chris Brown Video?! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

SWEET VILLAIN
Reasons Gay Pride Month is CRINGE (I'm Gay) + STOP DRAGging your kids to *Sluty* Drag Queen Shows

SWEET VILLAIN

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:04


In this weeks episode of Sweet Villain Podcast slayer, Billy Kearney discusses Gay pride month and why it is so fake... He's had ENOUGH as he continues to tell his untold truth after being silenced by the gay community his whole life... Billy also touches on why kids shouldn't go to sluty drag queen shows.SWEET VILLAIN VIDEO PODCAST available:https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfqK_XmsCmphZ8ohkgq2edoCEeYpOwUQh Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ms Underestimated Podcast
Connor McDavid Dragging Us Back In Like A Random Girl In Texas

Ms Underestimated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 76:06


Connor McDavid Dragging Us Back In Like A Random Girl In Texas by msunderestimated

The Gamer Hole
Dragging our viewers in to the hole - Ep. 79

The Gamer Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 59:03


The Gamer Hole Episode 79 Ft. one of our valued viewers The High Commander - https://www.twitch.tv/the_high_commander Get 20% OFF @MANSCAPED + Free Shipping with promo code GAMERHOLE at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscaped #podcast The boys discuss their special guest's old job as a prison guard, prison escapes, how to stream, and youtube view farms. AquaFPS: https://Twitch.tv/AquaFPS Sterdekie: https://Twitch.tv/Sterdekie Kings: CreatorsClub.net ZChum: https://Twitch.tv/ZChum #Podcast #GamerHole #TalkShow

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 38 – INSATIABLE UNSTOPPABLE CURIOSITY

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 80:30


How often do we hear something and then say, “that simply can't be”. Why are we always so certain? Why do we tend to be so locked into a position that we close our minds to exploring alternatives? Meet our podcast guest David Zimbeck. David grew up with an incredible imagination, a thirst for knowledge and the drive to learn. He is mostly a self-taught person whose desire to learn, think and grow are unstoppable. Among other things, he has been a major force in software developments that help shape our emerging crypto currency world. However, David goes much further than software development. Listen to this episode to learn all about this fascinating man. What David has to say is well worth your time and may cause you to open your own curious mind and mindset. Thanks for listening and I hope you will let me know your thoughts about our episode and the Unstoppable Mindset podcast by emailing me at michaelhi@accessibe.com.   About the Guest:  David Zimbeck, our lead developer, is unlike most people you will ever meet. His resilient work ethic, diverse project experience, and deep knowledge of cryptography has led to the creation of BitHalo, the world's first unbreakable smart contracting system. These decentralized contracts are the fundamental backbone of BitBay. Born in Ohio and having lived all over the world, he has acquired the vast perspective needed to create truly disruptive software. David is completely self-taught, and intimately knows a hard-day's work. He developed BitHalo's first 50,000 lines of Python code single-handedly from scratch... all while working long, grueling shifts on the oil rigs of North Dakota. It was here that he executed his idea of double deposit escrow, bringing unbreakable peer-to-peer contracts into real-life agreements. As a former world chess master, he also possesses a truly analytical mind. David has a keen understanding of cause and effect, and sees the importance of early decisions in any situation. This mentality, in addition to his innate honesty, perseverance, and self-discipline has driven him to position BitBay well beyond most other blockchain projects in terms of both development and security. “Chess has helped me visualize code. It has helped me plan, memorize and problem solve. It has helped me anticipate problems well in advance.” David now resides in Mexico, and continues to work round-the-clock to help keep BitBay on the forefront of blockchain development. About the Host:  Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/  https://twitter.com/mhingson  https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson  https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links  https://accessibe.com/  https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe  https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening!  Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast  If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review  Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us. Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, Hi, and welcome to another edition of unstoppable mindset, the podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet, How's that for an opening? I want to thank you for joining us today, wherever you are, hope you're having a good day and hope that we can add a little bit to your your life and give you some things to think about today. And we have a person as our guest today, Davidson Beck, who has given me a lot to think about, and I hope that he will contribute to your thought processes as well. David, welcome to unstoppable mindset. David Zimbeck  01:56 Thank you. Thank you, sir. pleasure, sir. Honor, honor Me and on here and nice meeting you and everything. Looking forward to it? Well, let's start like I tend to do a lot. Michael Hingson  02:08 You You obviously grew up tell me a little bit about you as a as a as a child, and kind of what what you had going on growing up and where that led to, because it's you, you have quite a an interesting life. And you've done some very remarkable things. And let's talk about it. So just kind of wondering, what was it like being a kid for you? And where did it go? David Zimbeck  02:32 Well, I'm actually I've had a, I guess, cuz I know, we talked earlier, and I've had a pretty diverse background. So people kind of get surprised when they see that I've done various various things with moderate moderate levels of success. And, and mostly, you know, I was always encouraged to be creative growing up. So you know, my parents never really, you know, inhibited me I'd gone to different schools, public, private schools, as well as homeschooling, I was a little disobedient. So I didn't really, I can't say I was like, the model student or anything. But it's possible that that worked in my advantage, because what it also taught me was to think outside the box, you know, and to try to understand exactly what it is that we're being taught and why. And, you know, I also had a drive ever since I was younger, to make the world a better place that was even, even since I was like, 10 years old. And my attitude was just, well, nobody's else do it, nobody else is doing it, somebody's gonna gotta clean all this shit up. So you know, I just decided, I just decided that I would try to do it. And so that that's also something kind of kept me somewhat diverse in my careers. But at the same time, whenever I do something, I like to benchmark myself and do a really good job at it. So So with that, with that in mind, you know, I when I was in, when I when I left high school, I went straight into working, because I didn't want to waste any time. And I worked in the real estate sector as well as acting. And that was like my early. My early work. Oh, yeah. And I was also a chess player. So that was one thing that probably really helped me a lot as a kid because I was considered. Well, I was I was one of the top chess players, or at least one of the top chess puzzle makers in the world. So what I did was I first learned how to play chess when I was like 11, or 12. And then after that, I knew I didn't want to play too competitively. Even though I had gotten my master title and master rank. And I could have played competitively, but I preferred the idea to express my, my work as an art form. So because an art form kind of is a lasting thing, if you paint a picture, you know, and you put it on the wall, it's a lasting thing, but if you're competing all the time, they always say you're only as good as your last when, you know, and I didn't want to be like a dog chasing my tail like chasing my own ego. Yeah. So essentially, I just wanted to benchmark my myself, which I did, and I did I did really good work. And that's what he did as a teenager. And then as I got older, that helped me, and a lot of my work because I was able to apply it to things. And I know, I know, you'll be able to appreciate this because it helps you visualize things. So I was able to visualize things in my head, you know, because when you're playing a game of chess, you're seeing it on the board, and you're essentially moving, you're moving the pieces with your mind, before you even place your hand on a piece, you have to figure out where they're gonna go, and what the possible things could happen in the future. So you calculate all that in your head. So it's, it's very similar to what you do. And it's almost kind of like, once you crack open your mind, you know, it's it never ends. So. So yeah, actually, I gotten Michael Hingson  05:39 sorry, go ahead. You tell me how to how do you get the ranking of chess master? How does that work? I mean, I understand it, but how do you get that. David Zimbeck  05:50 So what happens is you just play, you just play enough. I mean, when you play in tournaments, or whatever, you end up playing against other players. And if you win, you gain points on your rating. And if you lose, you know, you lose points on your rating. So once you get a rating of over a certain numbers, and while in America, we have like, unfortunately, we have a different rating system. So we're like one of the only countries that does that. There's two, there's basically the US C, F and D Day. So for the United States Chess Federation, I'm like, maybe 23 2400, somewhere around there. So that's, you know, that's my, my rating. And so that's well, that's well above Master, I could have gotten Grandmaster international master titles, but for that I would have had to travel because there's more because they play under the system of the day. So so to get that, you know, I would have had to actually go to Europe, which actually I did for a little while, but I wasn't as focused on chess when I went there. Michael Hingson  06:43 Yeah, I'm sorry. Go ahead. Yeah. So David Zimbeck  06:45 no, no, it's it's a good question. Because a lot of people think it's not like something you can just pull out of a hat and say, oh, yeah, I'm a master at this. No, you actually have to earn it. And Michael Hingson  06:57 I figured that was the case. But I was always just sort of curious as to how the ranking actually was achieved. And, and clearly, you did a lot of it. And then as you as you pointed out, you have to really use your mind because it's chess is really only as an end result on the board. David Zimbeck  07:14 Well, there's something else too, which is, unlike other game, like, if you look at games like poker, or other games, which granted do do have a good amount of skill involved. It's there's also a great deal of luck. Whereas chess, there's no luck at all whatsoever. You know, you play a game of cards, you know, you need to get good cards, you play game of Scrabble, you need to get good tiles, you play a game of chess, you just need to make good moves. And you don't even play the opponent, you play the board. Because the better you move is on the board. There's nothing your opponent can do. So it's really a game of pure skill. I mean, even even you could even argue, argue some sports that Well, I'd say sports are almost pure skill pretty much for the most part, but there's still a little luck involved with you know, you could miss a shot a breeze, a breeze in the wind could knock your golf ball off course, you know, you know, something can happen. But in chess, there's, there's, there's no forces of nature that would interfere with with your performance. So so that's that's what makes it a good game to learn, especially, you know, for kids. But, but yeah, that there was that. And then when I was in, I travelled a little bit. And I was in Los Angeles, actually, with my sister who was pursuing acting, which wasn't really my interest or at at the time, but since I had my family all had like a theater background, I was I was pretty much familiar with with it. And she helped me get like an agent and stuff like that. So actually, I was doing pretty good with that, too. And I was booking like commercials. And in some movies, I booked Pirates of the Caribbean too, which is what I'm the most known for. Where they flew me out to Bahamas and you know, I was on a boat with Johnny Depp and Keira Knightley. And so. So yeah, I mean, I guess it's, I mean, I happen to work in that as well. I was. Michael Hingson  08:58 Actually you're one of the pirates. Did you have a speaking part? David Zimbeck  09:02 Um, no, but it was probably because of my audition, because when when we did the audition, it was a little bit of improv. And so all the pirates who auditioned were older, that was one of the biggest auditions in LA. Or, I think that at the time, because there's maybe like, 10,000 people that went out for it. And they only picked like, 20 of us, you know, so when when we auditioned, there was all these older gentlemen who were, you know, look like pirates. And I'm probably 30 years younger than anybody auditioning. So I said, oh, there's no way I'm gonna get this. And so, I just, I just didn't take it seriously, you know, but I did. I did a little bit, you know, I mean, I walked but I was when I went for the audition. I was like, you know, yar, I'm a pirate already barred Do you have a pretty doctor and I just kind of was just having fun. And I guess that they responded to that exuberance and thought it was funny. And and that's what got me the role actually, interestingly enough for other catalysts. No, unfortunately, There is a possibility I might have ended up having a speaking role thrown at me. It happened to a couple of the core pirates. But what happened is there was a hurricane that hit we were in Freeport, Bahamas. So there was a hurricane that hit. I think it was Hurricane Wilma at the time. And we ended up getting called home and flown home charters. So we only got about like, I would say, like a month, then change maybe out in the Bahamas before you're flown home. But it was still it was still an amazing experience. Unfortunately, I got I got snow from the credits. I don't know if it was because of that. Or because we never properly manage our contract or whatever. But that's okay. That's that's part of life. It was still a great experience. And and and yeah, I mean, it was it was really fun. So yeah, I mean, I think that those things definitely helped give me some some experience out in the field of succeeding and various different professions. But like I said, because my focus was on making, making the world a better place. I never, I never quite could, I guess you could say put like my full passion or, or my heart and into some of those ordeals actually, was one of the reasons I left chess behind as well, which eventually will get to, you know, where I were actually ended up making a name for myself, which was in Bitcoin. But that didn't that didn't come till later. I mean, I'd still work some odd jobs, I'd worked on the oil rigs for a while. And I was doing about like, 100 hour week, you know, it was just crazy. We'd sleep like four hours a night and stuff like that. And and then after that is when I got involved in in Bitcoin, but I'll turn the floor over to you for a moment that you Michael Hingson  11:36 know, that's that's, that's fine, actually. Well, even blackjack Sparrow had ethics. So just Just saying. David Zimbeck  11:46 Oh, pirates do. Yeah, they go by a different code. It's yeah. Well, I've always seen it as the the most important code of ethics to go by as a moral compass, you know, as if you have if you have a true moral compass, and one that's objective, because nowadays, our modern society is a little bit there. They believe the morals are relativistic. Well, if I believe it's okay. It's okay. But that's just not how that's not how the world works. It's not how things truly are because nothing is truly subjective. When you really boil it down to like the truth. The truth is, in fact, objective, it doesn't really matter. If 100% of the society agrees that, you know, killing people is a good thing. If they agree on it doesn't make it a good thing. It's still it's still more moral, morally reprehensible. So I think that the key the key is having a good moral compass. And then from there, and I don't know, maybe, maybe I just always had it. Maybe my parents just just raised me. Well, I don't I don't I don't really know. I mean, I mean, I feel like a lot of it, I kind of carved out on my own, because I saw so many things that bothered me. And I just said, I don't you know, I don't want a world like that would make the world a better somehow. Well, Michael Hingson  13:01 well, here's a question out of curiosity, when you, when you live your life, do you like at night or at some time during the day you you've done things and so on? Do you go back and do self analysis? Did I do that the best I can? What could I have improved on that? Was that a mistake? Do you do you do much analysis of what you do and think about that? David Zimbeck  13:21 Yeah, constantly actually, one of the one I think one of the most important qualities a person can have is introspection. You know, very few people look inside and right. One of the most, one of the most critical things for me is I sit there and I say to myself, actually, to be honest, I don't know how some people can even manage their own lives when they if they've done awful things to others in their life. It's like, how can you wake up in the morning and look in front of the mirror and be really proud, you know, of that person? You know, it's like, it just doesn't make any sense. To me. It's like as if they have no sense of self, you know, and I don't know how that works. I don't know, maybe they're proud of what they do. I have no idea. But to me, it just seems like if you're introspective and you really look inside yourself, you're gonna start caring a lot about, you know, your soul and, and how, you know, how pure how pure and innocent how you can maintain your own innocence and stuff like that. I would think that those things would be very important. Michael Hingson  14:20 That gets back to the moral compass concept again, of course. David Zimbeck  14:24 Yeah, exactly. So I do I do believe that. And you know, introspection also has has to do with casting away pride. Like if, if you make a mistake, you have to be completely honest. With your with yourself about about your mistake. Actually, again, the thing about chess is like, if you're playing chess, you know, it's ironic, you would think that strong players would have an ego, but actually they don't. Some some do. Okay, yeah, some, some are pretty bad. But for the most part to get to a certain point, you have to kind of humiliate yourself quite a lot because you're going to lose a lot, you know, or you're going to sacrifice a lot. You're going to sacrifice a lot of time, you're going to change your ideas about what you think is strong and what you think is weak, there's going to be a great deal of humility that's going to be introduced to you. And if it hasn't been introduced to you, then clearly you're not working hard enough, you know, because once you get to the higher levels, you're going to start realizing all the fantastic and beautiful possible things that could happen. And then even then, and that's only applying to chess, which is like, an eight by eight little board. I mean, imagine life, which is like, you know, it's infinitely times, well, not infinite, it's almost, it's almost endlessly more complicated. And while you could argue a person's potential is literally limitless. I mean, there's nothing. There's nothing really that we can't, that we can't do. But it's it can tends to be like, pride, which would get in the way. So one of the obvious advantages of being introspective, is, is not being afraid of admitting a mistake, not being afraid of, you know, having, you know, being a little upset with yourself over something, but But of course, working towards making yourself better. You know what I mean? Yeah, and I Michael Hingson  16:09 do, one of the things about one of the things about chess is, of course, that, in one sense, it's very unforgiving, you play, and if you make a mistake, you very well could lose. But the other side of that is, and that's why in part, I asked the question about introspection, you can then go back and look at it and say, Why, why did I lose? Or what was the mistake? Or why did I make that mistake? And what can I learn from that for the next time, and I think that's a really good subset of life. And it's something that I advocate, we've talked about it on this podcast before. And something that I think is extremely relevant is that it's important for us to look at what we do, it works better if we do it from the standpoint of a moral compass. But it is important for us individually to go back and look at what we do and what do we know? And how can we best use our knowledge? And where do we go from here? David Zimbeck  17:09 It basically like it'll, it'll help you get better get along better with other people as well, you know what I mean? Because if you're if you're introspective, you know, and somebody points something out to you, you're not really going to be afraid of criticism. And sometimes I have, I have, you know, issues with with friends, if, you know, if they have a hard time accepting criticism, which usually happens when they carry a lot of guilt, by the way, yeah, you know, maybe they've come back for more, they're just traumatized. And, you know, maybe they can even take the slightest shred of critique. And you can almost see it unfolding. It's, it's not that it's personal. It's not like that they're upset with you. It's that they can't take more responsibility, because they've had a hard time accepting the responsibility they've already had to take, you know what I mean? Which is all the more reason why you shouldn't give yourself any, any any, right? Oh, absolutely. Dragging that baggage around. And Michael Hingson  17:58 I agree. And, you know, personally, I believe I'm my own worst critic. And I want to be because I should be able to analyze and look at things, but at the same time, I never mind input from other people. Because if I have such an ego, that I can't listen to what other people say that I don't ever really connect with them. Whereas if somebody is willing to be strong enough to say to me something about what I do a podcast or whatever, and for me to then look at it and decide whether I agree with that or not, then I have a real problem with me. David Zimbeck  18:45 Yeah, totally makes perfect sense. Michael Hingson  18:48 So how did you go into programming and so on? You You obviously did that. And of course, chess certainly gives you a mindset for that. But how did you then go into the whole world of programming and doing software stuff? David Zimbeck  19:04 So so the thing is, is that I learned when I was a little kid, I think my uncle taught me to make like mazes or something in queue basic, and I was like, maybe 1011 years old, but that's about as far as my programming experience had, you know, I was just, you know, just just playing around mostly. And I remember making some cool stuff. But for the most part, you know, I didn't really do much I know in high school I did. I learned C and I think C Plus Plus you know, nothing serious. It wasn't until later when I was working on the on the oil rigs and then I had some downtime actually switched jobs and was doing easements. And then I I've always I was always good with computers because I was around computers because I was doing things like editing and web design because I did some commercial production for a while and stuff like that. So I saw I was familiar with, you know, very familiar with computers. Plus I did a lot Got a research. So from that, you know, I worked with them. And so I automated my job when I was there doing the easements. And because we were having the type of hundreds of legal contracts, which all essentially look the same. So after I audit, after I automated my job, I was able to do like a job, which maybe it would have taken weeks, and I did it in a matter of a day or two, and actually got fired for it for working too efficiently. And and then it was at that exact time where I'd already known about Bitcoin since it started, essentially, around maybe 2011. Yeah, I think it was when I knew about it, maybe like a year after so. And so I always knew about it. And I known about some of the stuff on on on the on the deep web, because I knew that, you know, it was it was interesting, because it was on Deep Web that weren't on the main web. But for the most part, it took me a while to actually have it click, because then when I'd first known about it, I didn't think of it as an investment vehicle, I just thought of it as, like a very cool kind of decentralized banking system. But I always I never really saw how it would gain the traction or the so when it when I saw it later, when I was out in North Dakota, it like it had clicked, I was like, oh my god, I can't believe it, this thing that used to be worth worth, nothing is now actually quite quite valuable at the time, it was maybe 100 bucks or something like that. But you know, it's pretty good. And so I said, Well, I'm not gonna, you know, I'm not gonna miss out on any further. And I'd made an investment. And I remember making an investment in Litecoin, or something, and I turned like $1,000 into like, $50,000 within, I don't know, a week or two is crazy. So I was and then I held on to it a little too long. And then some of that, like went back down. But I started to learn, you know, and I started to get involved in in altcoins. And in them just, you know, for fun. And but it wasn't, it wasn't my primary motive to see it is more just like an investment vehicle, which maybe I should have, because I would probably would have made a lot more money. But I was also kind of interested in what you could do with that coin. See, because the thing was is you understand the concepts of it, you kind of understand that? Well, first of all, it's decentralized, because there's many, many different people who have a copy of the ledger, kind of like if everybody has a copy of the same movie, you know, you can't change a line in the movie without everybody disagreeing. Yeah, oh, hey, that's not what he really said. So if everybody has a copy of the Bank Ledger, it's basically immune to fraud, which is Mungus ly important. And furthermore, it makes it so that nobody can just take money out of thin air and produce it, which is way more than we can say, for the Federal Reserve, because they're just printing money like crazy at their own will. So having something that's kind of like ownerless, that's immune to fraud, and can theoretically replace modern banking is and is safe, and that nobody can freeze your account is awesome. That's, that's amazing. But at the same time, I knew that politically, the government's are always going to be able to kind of plant in the eye, people's minds, beliefs and ideas and quite possibly subvert such a thing. So I wasn't completely convinced that Bitcoin is going to, you know, save the world or make it that much, it'll make it better. But just like the internet, which has allowed us to communicate, it's allowed allowing us to have this call, the internet can also be used as a tool for, for bad, you know, because nowadays, the internet's use for censorship and it's used for, there's so much censorship of information if the information that you're getting from the internet is incorrect. And also, if it makes if they make it very hard to find the correct information, then you can kind of fall into this trap of dogma. And it becomes like a whole brand new religion all over again. So that the pitfalls of technology, including including Bitcoin, by the way, of course, Michael Hingson  23:48 we have a situation right now, for example, where we've got Ukraine going on, and Russia has denied people access to Facebook, and essentially most of the tools of the internet. And so they're subverting fair free flow and relevant information, which is, David Zimbeck  24:08 you know, always a problem. Well, but actually, I would say that Facebook is not a free flow of information. And I would say that neither Michael Hingson  24:17 No, and I just use that as an example. But I'm thinking more of just David Zimbeck  24:21 I know what you mean. I know what you mean, though, but essentially, essentially, what a lot of people don't actually know is that Google controls about something like 90 some percent of all of the internet searches through through like mobile, and then fact that there's only two search engines. I know we're segwaying a little bit but I will get back into what really got me into programming. But this is kind of an important segue to give some context. Essentially, that yeah, they control all the information so so there's only two search engines. A lot of people don't realize this. There's just Google and Bing which is just Microsoft, all your other search engines like DuckDuckGo or Whatever they actually pull from DuckDuckGo, I think pulls from Bing start page. I'm not sure I think Yahoo and Yahoo and start page probably pull from Bing. And so, so a lot of a lot of these search engines actually, they're they're not actually indexing anything, okay? They're just utilizing the results from the other search engines, and which is just all Google, Google and Microsoft, which means that, essentially, a couple companies have control over all the information, and they do censor a lot. And they censor very aggressively and they censor for political reasons all the time. And it's outrageous. It's so bad, like these companies, the world would be better off. They were just shut down, honestly. So in that in that case, yeah. I understand why Russia did that. But they're no better. Okay. Russia has their own search engine, which is Yandex. Okay. And I think China has Baidu. And there might be there's one other there's Gigablast, which is a tiny little company that's been indexing the internet for a long time. And they're one of the very few independent ones. There's a decentralized crawler as well called PAC, but not enough people use it to give it to give it the information that it needs. And then there's the dark web, but they have all their indexes are just private lists of sites. So there's no, there's no way of easily navigating that at all. So yeah, there's there's very little access to free information. Like it was back in the day when Google was uncensored, because when it was uncensored, you could just find everything, which I would argue is a bad thing, because you can find things that are bad. But no, it's more important to for it to be uncensored, because that's exactly why the freedom of speech was protected by the First Amendment. Right. And in fact, even Kennedy, right before he got killed, I think is less less speech that had something to do with that. And that's exactly what he said, he says, This is why the freedom of speech is protected by the First Amendment because if you have censorship of the news, by organizations, then you you essentially lose all access to, to knowledge, you know, which is horrible. And so what we have is a modern day burning down of the Library of Alexandria, essentially, because we, you know, we have companies that are controlling the information and completely destroying it. So with that said, and, you know, I mean, when it comes to situations like Ukraine, and United States and Russia and all that stuff, I have to under you have to understand that these are just large, powerful people who target citizens, whether or not it's United States, the United States started wars for no reason. Okay. Like, and they never got sanctioned. You know, NATO joined in on the war. And in fact, I think, even certain countries like France actually had had sanctions against them for not going to war. What a joke is that in then, so you have, you have these countries that essentially have a carte blanche to like, bomb, whoever they feel like. And then when Russia starts doing it, they turn around and they have this international condemnation, which is fine. I mean, Russia shouldn't be going to war that much. I totally, totally agree, I think was disgusting. But, but at the same time, it just strikes me slightly hypocritical, because United States is engaged in so many wars, I think, I don't even think people have an accurate count of how many countries even bombed at this point. So so I don't know what why isn't everybody sanctioning and boycotting American products, and they should really based on their based on their track record. But it's true across all politicians, essentially, the victims of war are always citizens. They're not pilots. They're not, you know, they're not other politicians. They're not heads of the military. Those people stay happily in their multimillion dollar mansions, while other people go and fight their battles, which is essentially how it's always been. And it's sad, you know, but people should learn to lay down their guns, all of them that every single military member, every single cop, they should do, they should just cut the shit and stop taking orders from from tyrants. But since since we can't guarantee that that'll happen, that's why we've tried to strike at the root of things. So one of the things that I've always identified as the root of the problem is deception. And that's this is what got me excited about Bitcoin, specifically. Okay, so when I realized that because Bitcoin is electronic, an electronic account, which you can do pretty much anything with, unlike a bank, would they have their own rules? I was like, Oh, wow, with Bitcoin, you know, you could make a joint account. And with that, you can make a contract which can't be broken. So what I realized is, is that both parties essentially, make a promise. Like, I promise you, I'm going to do something because these pay you for goods or services, you promised you're going to deliver the goods or services. What happens if both of us put our money in a joint account, and we time that joint account to blow itself up? Nice. That might sound crazy, like why would you blow up money, but it's the equivalent of mean you putting our money in a safe locking the safe I have a key and you have a key and in order to get in? We have to unlock it at the same time. Okay. And then we strap you know, dynamite to it. We walk away and we say okay, we'll be back in a week. You do your part, I do mine and you do your part I pay you. And if either of us are dissatisfied with the deal, we both lose. But I said oh my god, this is the first time in history we've ever had a chance to make a deal an agreement They can be enforced without law. And that was astonishing to me. I was like, oh my, this is so important because now there's a non violent resolution to a contract, you see them saying, All modern contracts are essentially resolved violently. And what I mean by that is, behind every law, whether or not it be a parking ticket, or a walking doesn't matter, or whatever, it's actually enforced violently. Because if you don't pay that ticket, well, maybe they'll put a lien on something, or whatever. And then that lien leads to, if you don't get off your property, then they will actually attempt to take it by force. And if you don't accept the fact that they're going to take it by force, they will shoot you. It's the same thing. If you're, if you're caught, you know, not stopping at a stop sign cop pulls you over, you can't just drive away, okay, because he'll shoot you, you know, so, so actually, all laws are enforced through violence. And we need to be in a society that doesn't enforce law through violence. So essentially, this was a way to have it enforced by the money itself, which allows two people to barter and most importantly, that it's not enforced by an escrow agent. Because most deals in society are enforced by escrow agents, for example, judges lawyers, or just you know, real estate escrow agent doesn't matter, essentially, what they call a non a non biased third party, but there's no such there's literally no such thing. Non biased. Third party doesn't exist, unless it's the heavens or something. Okay, like humans don't have. Most humans do not have the moral capacity to properly judge a situation. And this is seen by our our legal system, which is completely corrupt and wicked, okay, like we see people getting thrown into jail without any evidence whatsoever for things that shouldn't even be crimes, victimless crimes. And it's, it's sad, it's, it's awful. It's the worst thing. So So essentially, the point is, and I guess I give another analogy for this, if you had, if you are accused of something you didn't do, okay, let's say you're accused of murder, but she didn't do it. Okay. Would you trust 100? Judges? Would you trust 1000? How big does the jury have to be? Would you trust a jury of 10? When you trust a jury of 20? If you presented your evidence? Probably the answer would be no. Because why would you trust somebody else? If they weren't there? You know, what, if you were framed? What if the evidence actually doesn't look good for you? But it's actually false? You know, so? Or what if the juries just a bunch of fools? I mean, why would you? Why would you put your fate in the hands of others, especially when the common person that they put on on a jury typically is supposed to be uneducated of the law, actually, and they'll handpick them to be so. So, you know, it's, it's outrageous. And I found the solution, essentially, to a big, big problem in society that had never been proposed before. So that's what caused me to develop bit Halo, which is what I am known for. And probably one of the main reasons people would recognize me on this podcast. Essentially, that was the first contracting platform ever made for Bitcoin. So to answer your question, I got involved into programming because of that. And from there I was. From there, I was all self taught. So from when I was in North Dakota, it took me about, I was very motivated, because I was already doing long hours. So I did about, I would say, the same thing was working almost 100 hour weeks, I was probably working 16 to 18 hours a day, I'd roll out of bed, I try to figure out how to code because I really didn't know how to code well enough yet. So I had to go learn Python. And instead of doing any practice programs, I just went straight and tried to make this program, you know, so at the same time as learning Python, I had to learn cryptography, I had to learn Bitcoin, I had to learn how to work with the transactions, and Bitcoins, very much like old school accounting, working with dollars, it's not like you just add 10 to your account, and then magically, you get 10. Bitcoins not like that, you got to work with each transaction as if it was, you know, digital cash, and work with digital signatures and stuff like that. So it was a lot, it was a lot of learning. And I had to figure out how to do that all on my own, and there wasn't much support material at the time, because the early days of Bitcoin. So that was about maybe 2013. So there wasn't that many resources online and just with enough effort, you know, after about three, four months actually banged up the whole prototype myself. Interestingly enough, the reason why I actually had to do the coding myself and I couldn't pay anybody but aside from the fact that would be expensive. Was I always found to have trouble with outsourcers, specifically programmers. I mean, they they pad their hours, they they lag on their schedules, you know, the you have to kind of trust them almost blindly. I mean, if you think it's hard to find a good mechanic, or a good or a good doctor, good luck finding a good programmer, it's even worse. Okay. So so so to find really good and skilled people for that that'll work, especially within your you know, budget was impossible and that's why My mom told me she said I was asking about I said, I don't know who I could find for this. She says, Well, why don't you just do it yourself? And I sat there and I thought about it. And I said, Okay. Interestingly enough, when I did the work, I was actually in North Dakota, negative 50. Below, you know, with the windchill, I was living in a trailer at the time to save money. And so imagine I'm living in a trailer in that in that weather. And I didn't just pick up and go, I had like, maybe nine space heaters, I had one space heater for my waterline because I didn't park right over it, which was a mistake. And then I had three under the skirting, I had three inside I had and I had one small space heater to keep the ammonia on my fridge from freezing, which I didn't even know that was a thing, which was hilarious, because that actually happened like my fridge froze. But that can happen because they put those on the outside of the trailer. So I actually needed a tiny little space heater for that. And and that's in addition to propane. Now granted, I was living quite comfortably with all that, but I just siphon the electricity off of the lot next to me, luckily, they were giving they were comping us on electricity, which they stopped doing later. But yeah, so I mean, it was brutal. And I had to do all that work was actually so hard, that end up losing some weight, and I had neglected my health. And I realized, oh, I have to I have to, I have to nurse myself back to health. And so I I called my parents and went out and visited them. And I said, Hey, you know, you got to cook for me for like a month and, and I just did whatever I had to put weight on at that point. I just grabbed some ensure whatever and had a bunch of Michael Hingson  36:33 them. So put on my way. So one of the things that comes one of the things that comes to mind is what motivated you to do so much self teaching of yourself. What? What was that that instilled that in you? Because clearly, you're a very curious person. I think you've alluded to some of it, but you're a very curious person. And you are not at all afraid to teach yourself and try things. How did you really get that way? Exactly? Was that from the chess? Or where is that from? David Zimbeck  37:01 Um, yes, it's a good question. I guess it was it. I mean, some of that has to obviously come directly from somebody's soul. They just have to be somebody who, who seeks, you know, who seeks who seeks knowledge who seeks who seeks truth, obviously, that's part of it, then the second part is going to be like, when you seek truth, you're going to question some of the things that you're taught, like, if the school is telling you something, you don't necessarily want to accept it blindly. You know, a student, a student would be in a class, I really can't stand how modern schools are run, for example, kids will just sit in a chair for eight hours a day listening to his teacher just literally lecture to them. And they essentially accept everything at face value, including including the sciences, which is a huge mistake. Because technically, science, the root of science is actually in replication. See, science isn't supposed to be a dictate or a mandate. Science isn't support. We're currently living under a scientific dictatorship, actually, it's totally autocratic and bad. It's no better than that, you know, people are always getting angry about old religious fanaticism when when we lived under religious fanatics, but actually, ironically, Science, Science, Science can become a fanatical cult as well, because especially because people don't actually check it. So we are under this illusion that people check all of our science properly. And in my research, because I wanted to make the world better, I ended up realizing that a lot of that's actually not the case. Most of our sciences is is horribly flawed, in fact, kind of crazy, to be honest. When people believe in you know, relativity, which is essentially time travel, they believe in you no matter bending space, how do you bend space? It's like nothing, there's nothing there. How do you bend it? So I mean, there's people don't even ask, like, fundamental questions. And so when I started to do that I started ended up really cherishing the ability to do research. And, and that's kind of how I got in, I got involved into self teaching, which is I realized, that was actually old adages to this even, even in, you know, for example, in the Bible, they'll say, you know, Prove all things, but it wasn't all it was on all the religions, people understood that in order to properly understand a concept, you have to be able to repeat it. And science is not really effective, unless I can sit down with tools, you know, and check the information, you know what I mean? So, so I think when you have that amount of rigor in your approach to anything, anything, let it be business, you know, of course, a scientific field, could even be programming. Essentially, you have to learn to do it yourself. And if you don't learn to do it yourself, you're gonna rely on somebody else to do it for you. And that's even more dangerous in programming where you're working with other people's money. Like, do I really want to be responsible for other people losing money because somebody that I hired didn't do the job properly? I mean, that's, that's, that's, that's a nightmare. If I don't have the ability to audit my own code, then it's good for nothing. I mean, how How am I gonna be able to put so much of other people's money on the line when you're dealing with financial systems? And that's a huge difference from when you're working in Bitcoin versus any other field. Because, yeah, granted, you're working in another field, like you're, you're flipping burgers, you screw up, okay, nobody's life's on the line, okay, you just, you know, you fix it and you move on. But that's not the case with financial systems with financial systems, if you screw up, you could be looking at people losing millions, if not hundreds of millions, in fact, billions, which has happened many times in the Bitcoin industry, because of absolute negligence, has to do with lack of auditing, lack of self teaching, lack of rigor, lack of discipline to a field, which is actually scientific, people don't see the cryptography industry as a scientific field, because they assume that programs just work, they just assume apps just work you get in the car, and it just goes, but that's not the case, the amount of work that goes into making the cargo that making the app work, in fact, is that requires quite a bit of ingenuity. And there's no end to which a person can self teach, which also would bring us back to humility. Because if you, if you want to be able to actually excel in anything, you have to you have to have that because a lot of the times you're gonna have to take all the notions that you have, tear them down, throw them out, and try to replace them with something better, regardless of what the modern dogma is, you could like I said, you could have the whole world believing things one way, but it but if they don't properly question it, that's their problem. And if one person comes in and starts to question it, true, they might not get the media attention, they might not get the traction, but they still might be right. And that's the thing. Truth is objective, thank God, because Because Because of that, we have the ability to check for ourselves. And so self teaching is absolutely critical. And I think that if anything was to be taught in schools, that should be the first thing, which is teaching children how to research, teaching them how to question teaching them how to be skeptics, and, and, you know, teaching, of course, I think some some some strong spiritual concepts about about how to how to truly care about truth and how to pursue it. Michael Hingson  41:59 So that gets back to something that we have a couple of things that you talked about in comments that you made that I want to want to go back to one, let's talk about science a little bit, you're right, about being able to replicate. So Einstein created the theory of relativity, general and, and specific relativity. But again, I think that with people like him with people who've created scientific theories, they're trying to create explanations for what they see. And they have created theories that explain observations that they've seen, you said, relativity is about time travel well, relativity is more about the speed of light, if it is a constant, which the theory currently says that it is. But it's also about what information you get as you are traveling less than the speed of light, and what happens to you when you travel faster than the speed of light. We also know physicists also will tell you that the expectation is at some time, there will be a theory that will come along that will explain more of what we understand today. It's like classical mechanics moved into quantum mechanics and relativity, which will go into something else. But I think that people are trying to find explanations for the observations that they make. Well, and unfortunately, some of it they can't replicate, you know, because they can only see what they can see. But anyway, go ahead. Well, so. David Zimbeck  43:33 So yeah, this is, if you don't know, I mean, this is a real can of worms. It is a subject and it may be outside of the scope of this podcast, but I'd be happy, I'd be happy to talk about it. Essentially, it's amazing how many assumptions are made in terms of of our scientific rigor in regards to these fields are purely theoretical. Relatively, relativity is not, relativity is not a proven concept at all. Neither is quantum mechanics. They're they're very theoretical. And in fact, I would argue that there are three even potentially lies even malicious ones. And I can explain a little bit as to why. So first of all, quantum mechanics was developed in response to things like the double slit experiment, which essentially debunked the idea of, for example, the electron molecule, because previous beliefs about physics, especially with chemistry, was to consider that like things like light was actually the behavior of a gas or a fluid, which they called the ether. So they felt that how do you have a wave without resistance, you know, you can't you can't have a wave without resistance waves happen because there's, there's there's pressure and pressures trying to equalize. Essentially, if you have a glass of water, you stir it, you get a wave, but how do you have a wave or an oscillating wave of light without it moving through any medium and they constantly abstract these things and they create these Really bizarre abstractions of the mind as if, as if light and gravity are just all in this other world that doesn't exist in our main physical world, but I hate to break it to them. stuff is stuff, you can't have energy without it being something, it's got to be something. So there, Michael Hingson  45:15 which is back to the comment, aspect, right, which gets back to the comment that. And I'm appreciate what you say. But which gets back to the whole point of they're, they're not explaining everything yet. And there is there's a lot more that we don't understand. David Zimbeck  45:36 I'm arguing that it actually is explainable. It's very explainable, and it's actually something can be properly physically modeled. And in fact, we had scientists before a current scientists that already had very good models for this. Not Not perfect, but good. For example, okay, so Tesla Heaviside, Maxwell, doesn't matter who you bring up any of these major scientists, pre you know, Einsteinian stuff, they actually all believed in the ether. So they believe that light was the movement of fluid, which would mean that they did not believe in atomic theory. Okay, so the major flaw in atomic theory is not so much with the proton, the model of a proton, which is fine, you know, you could argue protons, a shell that could fill and release fluid or something along these lines. But an electron, you see, the issue was having one electron for each protons. So they essentially say that the atom is essentially empty, it's completely empty space. And then there's just a single electron that that model should have gone, gone away. Tesla couldn't stand it. He thought it was crazy. He thought it was like, what you call it, you know, the emperor has no clothes. You ever heard that story? Yeah, so there. Yeah. So I mean, kind of like the emperor has no clothes. Essentially, there's all these people believing in these strange theories is actually completely complete nonsense. The idea is, is that how could it how can how can an atom be truly empty, you have the movement of matter, okay. And so you have to have the most subtle matter. So essentially, when you have the movement of electrons, you know, that should be cool. You know, atoms shouldn't be empty, they should be mostly full. And that would better describe like, for example, light behaves like a wave, it doesn't behave like a particle, okay? It never did. And in fact, when you had things like the double slit experiment, it proved that light was a wave, unequivocally completely proved that light is a wave, this debate should have been over. But what happened was, and this has to do with introspection, our modern scientists had so much arrogance, that they couldn't admit that perhaps the model of the electric of the electron and the Taunton, atomic theory was wrong. Because they couldn't admit it, they decided to create whatever math they could, it didn't matter if the electron had to travel through time, like Fineman proposed, it didn't matter if the electrons bumping into possible versions of itself and creating wave like patterns through different timelines. I mean, these people are crazy, they'll do anything to justify the theory of the electron to make it seem like a wave without it being a wave. But if you want it to be a wave, I have a better idea. Next, the idea of the electron and just say that the atom is full, it's filled, it's filled with fluid of subtle, subtle, subtle fluids moving in and out of it, it's just the changing of pressure and stuff like that. And you essentially you get, get a much a much better model for for our modern physics than then what we what we used to have, are what we have currently, sorry, I'm saying what we had prior to this was actually a better model. And in fact, if we had applied it, even today to modern computer models, I think we would find it to be much, much better. I think it explained our physics better, I think it explained our chemistry better. And, yeah, and so so essentially, it's just a misunderstanding of the behavior of solids, liquids and gases, and to the dismissal of the fact that they can be much, much more subtle. And, you know, then the hard then the hard matter, like, you know, the protons, new elements and stuff like that. And essentially, underestimating the fact that, you know, that we have we had it, we had a model, we had an answer for it, we believe that these things will wave because they remember the movement of mediums, they were the movement of fluids, you know, that when you see light, you're essentially looking at the movement of a gaseous kind of fluid almost, because when the when the flu is disturbed, just like, you know, the waves in the ocean, you know, a wave pattern is generated, because there's collision, and there's competing for pore space and pressure. And so then when you have collision, then you have, you know, a wave pattern. And when you have a wave pattern, you know, you can interpret it and all this other stuff. So it makes perfect sense. It fits within our physics, but the modern physics actually, they they literally say that, like light will come from nowhere, the electron produces the light, and then it just vanishes like, like, they just make things up the quantum theories, and I don't and I'll probably get some flack for saying all this. But essentially, the quantum theories rely on things like time travel, but you got to also have to look at it like this, like time travel or adding any type of you know, as you're, for example, as your speed increases, you, you approach the speed of light, you know, then all of a sudden time slows down which is which is just a real sad theory, in my opinion, because what it's basically essentially saying As mathematically, it's saying something mathematically, it's saying, If my experiments don't match the results, then I will travel backwards in time, and I will fix them. Essentially, it's, it's the equivalent of wanting to travel back in time and go ahead and fix errors in your in your results. But you see, science is not about taking theories and trying to force everything into your theory. Science is about measurement. And that's it. You look out, you measure, you report, you measure, you report, you don't start inventing ideas about time travel, just because you know, a certain a certain experiment doesn't quite fit quite fit your model, there's always a very logical explanation as to why these things are the way they are. One easy one would just be that light's not a constant. David Zimbeck  50:45 In light isn't really a constant anyway, because the medium in which in which you see light, if it was dependent upon the movement of a gas, or a fluid, in like the ether than in the in the medium in which you would see it, you know, that would make sense that it would change depending on what it passes through. For example, when you have light passing through water, okay, it slows down because there's increased refraction, when you have light passing through a gas, it may be different, actually, light light doesn't factor very in speed quite a bit based on the medium that is passing through, because it's a misunderstanding, when you look at light that they think light is the movement of photons, when actually lights just simply could be just the medium of a of a gaseous kind of, you know, body kind of like the ether, there was a belief that the ether was actually debunked, but actually, that was false, because there's like I think was a, there was a Mickelson Morley experiment. And there was also the segment, Segment experiment, I believe that the one one of them caused a lot more problems for them than the other, because one of them was just looking for ether drag. But the other one was looking for actually, just in general, this the idea that the ether was there, and I think they had more, don't quote me on this, you might have to double check, but I think it was the sag neck experiments caused them as so many problems. So you can see, even when you look it up all the patch work that they had to do. And then of course, they had to invoke relativity, again, I think in order to deal with these problems, because they couldn't they couldn't fit it into their model, because their model is that week. But ironically, the simpler model is, and I'm sorry, I didn't mean to go so far down this, but it's such an interesting topic. Because no, no about it. But But this model essentially is the movement is basically the behavior of fluid dynamics, which is something we already understand. It makes sense. We can apply it, we can model it, we can use it in computers, we don't have to go with all these fantastical quantum mechanics, you know, type theories. And this is just an example of kind of some of the stuff. You Michael Hingson  52:38 know, let me ask you another question that really, let me ask you another question that I'm really curious about, you made the comment earlier. And I think that there's probably some some merit to it that a lot of people don't grow up or are very moral, and we don't have the moralities, and so on that we really ought to have. If I understood your right, my question is, how do we teach that? How do we get people back into a moral or more ethical and a moral compass kind of a track? David Zimbeck  53:09 Well, you know, they always say a good teacher is a good student. Right. And I mean, I think that once one's parents, and schools and institutions, and people start to understand how far they fallen, I think that'll be a very important moment of redemption, because then they'll realize that things are getting out of hand, which they are already. I mean, we can see all over the world, things are really out of hand, and they've been so for a while, but seems that each generation, it seems to get worse. We've mentioned earlier, you know, about laws, you know, I told you were how we have, you know, millions of potentially millions of laws. But that can't possibly be right, because that can't follow a moral compass. How can you expect somebody to be to be beholden to a million laws? You know, how does even a person know what all the laws actually are? In fact, quite frequently, the judge doesn't even know what the law is. The lawyers have to go to school for 10 years or higher, five, 510 years to just figure out what the law is, heck, even my real estate, when I had to study for my real estate license, I had like 10 books, you know, which were super thick, like four or 500 pages each just to teach me the law. I mean, this is this is crazy, in my opinion, because the truth of the matter is, is actually morality is quite simple. And, you know, you know, you don't kill you don't cheat, right? You don't, you don't lie to people. You don't, you don't do so you don't force anybody to do anything. You know, you don't force them to do your do your bidding. I mean, how hard is it? I mean, there's not that I mean, there's not that many things. Interestingly enough, lying is one of the least criminalized laws. What concepts excuse me, it's criminalized when there's financial loss sometimes, but tends to be a slap on the wrist. When you have large scale fraud in the banking system and stuff that costs people billions of dollars, you don't see the heads of case or Goldman Sachs going to jail, they pay a fine and they move on. If you see pharmaceutical companies, knowingly giving people things that are going to kill them, like drugs that should have been recalled or whatever, you don't see them going to jail, they get a slap on the wrist and then move on. And in fact, they lobby for legal immunity. So this just goes to show you how nonsensical the law is and how immoral the law actually is. And actually, I find that each year, the law moves further and further away from morality becoming completely immoral to where morality ends up being. Breaking the law actually, there's there's a there's a thing that says, when freedom is outlawed, when freedom is outlawed, only outlaws will be free. So it's it's interesting to look at it from that perspective. And of course, I'm what I'm arguing is not to do anything bad. Actually, ironically, I'm arguing to do things that are good. But that's the thing, like just because something is legal. In fact, it could mean that it's actually a bad thing. You know, like there's a lot of legalized forms of atrocities, for example, like I told you the immunities that some of the drug companies get for things that for things that they do to people, knowingly, by the way, so, you know, so yeah, so I mean, I think when you look at it from that perspective, personally, I'm a minimalist, I think that the amount of laws that a government society should have should fit on a few sheets of paper, you know, like, if I can read the law in a single evening, then I, it's probably acceptable. But if it takes me 10 years of schooling, to figure out what the law is, then I think there's a big problem with the law. And I think it has a big problem with the way in which children are taught and raised. And I think that they should be taught to understand basically, the root concepts of what morality actually is all about. Michael Hingson

We're In a Basement
46 - Dragging Our Balls - The History of Drag with Soña Rita

We're In a Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 77:52


Once upon a time, Sierra had a sad, straight life. Then, it all changed when the gayest tornado ever recorded ripped through her life and covered everything in rainbows. That tornado is this episode. This week,  drag queen Soña Rita joins Colin to  discuss the history of drag performance, while Sierra hangs on for dear life. Join us as we discuss what constitutes a hate crime, furries, and the most awful prank to ever exist on this podcast.---Listen to Soña Rita's podcast, "What The Drag"Check out this episode on our blog 

Asking for a Friend
A Positive, Practical Guide for Divorce

Asking for a Friend

Play Episode Play 25 sec Highlight Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 26:50


Dragging herself out of a funk after her first divorce, Sara Jacobs began writing her thoughts down on post-it notes. Little did she know, twenty years and another divorce later, she would have the makings of a much-needed book that fills a void in the self-help category.Better not Broken, a practical, positive guidebook for divorce, is a down-to-earth, common sense approach to ending partnerships. You CAN have control over the process and get on to the next great chapter of your life!In this episode Sara and I discuss:The importance of communicationThe true impact on childrenSelf-careYou are not alone. You are with you!Better not Broken available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, Joseph Beth Book Sellers in Cincinnati and at sales@braughlerbooks.comContact Sara Jacobs on Instagram @betternotbroken_divorceguide or on Facebook at Sara JacobsFollow Asking for a Friend on Facebook or on Instagram @askingforafriend_podPlease rate and review Asking for a Friend on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.#divorce #gooddivorce #smartdivorce #endofmarriage #smarternotyounger #midlife  #midlifewomen #bettersideof50 #agepositive #loveyourage #nevertoolate #ageisjustanumber #Instagram #behealthy #nojudgements #justanswersYour Future in Sales & MarketingA podcast that can help you make great decisions to get the most out of your Sales &...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Pain in the Arsenal Podcast on Arsenal FC
Arteta unhappy with Arsenal hierarchy dragging their feet? Bowen & Raphinha linked! | Press Review

Pain in the Arsenal Podcast on Arsenal FC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 56:01


On today's edition of the podcast, Harry Symeou reacts to reports Mikel Arteta is unhappy with the Arsenal hierarchy who are said to be dragging their feet regarding signings. We also discuss the rumours linking the Gunners with moves for West Ham's Jarrod Bowen and Leeds United's Raphinha. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit www.athleticgreens.com/90MIN. Take ownership over your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance! Head over to Football Prizes: https://footballprizes.co.uk/product/gabriel-martinelli-signed-framed-arsenal-shirt-plus-eleven-instant-win-chances-to-win-additional-prizes/ Sign up to our Fantasy Football League for the coming season by clicking the link below:  https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/t9wizh Code to join the league: t9wizh Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbDo0kye_J-N0TkQoBTPSjA/join   Part of the  @90min Football   network! Twitter: https://twitter.com/chronicles_afc​​​...​ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Chroniclesof...​... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chronicles_...​... SUBSCRIBE | COMMENT | LIKE | SHARE #AFC #Arsenal #PremierLeague Support the show: http://www.chroniclesafc.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dick Show
Episode 311 - Dick on Dragging Children

The Dick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 110:25


Veterans against guns, kid drag shows, Johnny the Audio Engineer is back, more medical misinformation, acid lite, problems with Top Gun, destroying the Mona Lisa, hacking elections, and a bad watermelon salad; all that and more this week on The Dick Show!

Palmetto Family Matters
Dragging America Straight to Pride

Palmetto Family Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 39:26


Tampa Bay pitchers throw the LGBT agenda a curveball, the Panthers show their pride with a new cheerleader and folks in Dallas, Texas are dragging their kids to pride! https://www.dailywire.com/news/gay-pro-baseball-player-loses-it-over-rays-refusing-to-wear-lgbtq-pride-night-logo-trashes-faith-concerns-deems-players-homophobichttps://www.foxnews.com/us/texas-legislator-bill-children-drag-showshttps://www.dailywire.com/news/nfls-panthers-add-transgender-cheerleader-to-roster-cant-wait-to-show-what-this-girl-has-to-bring

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 624 | Dragging Kids Into Depravity | Guest: Tayler Hansen

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 52:42 Very Popular


Today we're talking about the disturbing events that are happening all across the country right now in the name of "Pride Month," namely drag shows targeted at kids. Even red states aren't safe from this depravity, as evidenced by viral videos of one of these shows taking place in Dallas, Texas. To help us understand what's going on and what kind of parent would drag their kid to such an event, we welcome journalist Tayler Hansen to the show. Tayler filmed one of the videos that's going viral right now and also spoke with parents and kids at the Dallas show. --- Timecodes: (0:00) Introduction & re-capping Allie's YWLS weekend (9:02) Bar in Dallas, TX hosts a drag show for kids (18:40) Interview with reporter Taylor Hansen (28:56) Republicans need to call for a ban on drag shows for children! (34:30) How did we get here? (43:55) There is nothing new under the sun --- Today's Sponsors: Good Ranchers is the perfect gift for Father's Day! Plus right now get 2 free 18 oz. prime, center-cut ribeyes when you use promo code 'ALLIE' at checkout at GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE. Bambee — You run your business. Let Bambee run your HR. Get your free HR audit at Bambee.com/ALLIE. Raycon's Everyday Earbuds give you 8 hrs of playtime & a 32-hr battery life! Go to BuyRaycon.com/ALLIE today to save 15% off your Raycon order. Annie's Kit Clubs — get your first subscription month up to 75% off! Month-to-month & you can cancel anytime. Go to AnniesKitClubs.com/ALLIE. --- Previous Episode Mentioned: Ep 622: Pride Month & the Christian Response https://apple.co/3xgNxxM --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise- use promo code 'ALLIE10' for a discount: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices