Podcasts about unsurprisingly

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Best podcasts about unsurprisingly

Latest podcast episodes about unsurprisingly

The Cinematography Podcast
Autumn Durald Arkapaw, ASC on Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, Loki, and more

The Cinematography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 58:10


Unsurprisingly, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever has been a huge hit, and cinematographer Autumn Durald Arkapaw was excited to join the crew. She had worked with Marvel on the Disney+ series Loki and felt her creative vision on the show was really supported there. Autumn felt ready to step into a huge movie like Black Panther: Wakanda Forever after she spoke with original Black Panther DP Rachel Morrison and meeting with director Ryan Coogler. Rachel and Autumn were friends from AFI, and Rachel was not available to shoot the sequel as she has been transitioning into directing. Director Ryan Coogler had Autumn join the Black Panther team early for storyboarding and previs for the movie. She and Coogler had lots of time to discuss the images and were on the same page visually. Even though the movie has a huge scope and a massive amount of people making the film, Autumn felt like her ideas were supported and her images were well represented on screen. Early in her career, Autumn worked on many projects for free both during and after film school, so that anyone could find her and see who she was through her visual approach. She approaches each film with passion, putting all of her creative energy into her work. Autumn's breakout early work was on director Gia Coppola's indie film, Palo Alto. The two bonded and worked together on more projects, and Autumn met director Spike Jonze through her. She worked with Jonze on Aziz Ansari: Right Now, a Netflix standup special, and Beastie Boys Story, a 2020 documentary about the band. Autumn enjoys framing her shots with symmetry and low angles, with a lower eyeline, pointing towards the ceiling rather than the floor. For the series Loki on Disney+, she shot a lot of scenes from below, but the production designer Kasra Farahani embraced it, creating visually interesting ceilings that could be rigged with controlled lighting. They worked together to create a space in the Time Variance Authority (TVA) that felt full, with motivated light. Building practical ceilings was a big part of their design discussions during production meetings. Normally on a set, the ceiling is not built and isn't ever seen, so adding it to the set design always adds to the cost. Autumn knew that shooting low in those spaces would create the desired effect of something looming over you. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever is currently playing in theaters Sponsored by Hot Rod Cameras: www.hotrodcameras.com The Cinematography Podcast website: www.camnoir.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCinematographyPodcast Facebook: @cinepod Instagram: @thecinepod Twitter: @ShortEndz

ABV Chicago Craft Beer Podcast
Episode 460 - FoBAB 2022 Winners

ABV Chicago Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 113:19


We kick off Barrel-Aged December a little early with a six pack of mostly locals who took home medals at this year's Festival of Wood and Barrel-Aged Beers. Unsurprisingly, this lineup is all killer with no filler, but there are a few style surprises from some familiar breweries that steal the show. We stumble into covering a whole category's winners while running through an updated FoBAB “by the numbers.” Also, we consider how much wood a beer must touch to qualify for an entry; Craig is gonna get so yelled at during rankings; and we implore someone at ICBG to let Randy Mosher check his coat.  Medal-Winning Beers Reviewed Off Color Brewing - Tequila Barrel-Aged Beer for Tacos (Gose style beer aged in oak tequila barrels with lime juice and salt added) - Bronze in Other Pale Beer Forbidden Root Brewery [Columbus ] & Derive Brewing Company - Well Positioned (Oak-fermented Saison) - Silver in Other Pale Beer Ravinia Brewing Company - Spanish Cedar-Aged Steep Ravine (IPA aged w/ Spanish Cedar) - Gold in Other Pale Beer Around the Bend Beer Co. - 1825 (Barrel-aged Raspberry Ale w/ Brett) - Silver in Wild Beer/Brett More Brewing Company - Lucky Bamboo (Rum barrel-aged Tiki Sour w/ pineapple, passionfruit, lemon, lime, and bitters) - Silver in Fruit Beer Mikerphone Brewing & Goose Island Beer Co. - Double LP: Side B (English Barleywine aged in bourbon barrels) - Gold in Barleywine/Wheatwine

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
What St. Joseph Can Teach Us This Advent With Sr. Colleen Gibson, SSJ

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:04


Saint Joseph is the most mysterious character from the Advent story. He doesn't say anything and we know pretty much nothing about him, yet there are few figures more central to the story of our faith community. So host Mike Jordan Laskey asked his friend, Sister Colleen Gibson, SSJ, if she could help shed some light on this shadowy member of the Holy Family. Sr. Colleen is a Sister of Saint Joseph of Philadelphia and has spent a lot of time praying and reflecting on her community's patron. Unsurprisingly, given Sr. Colleen's intelligence and creative gifts, she brought multiple perspectives on St. Joseph you might have never considered before. Sr. Colleen also talks about her own vocation story of becoming a millennial religious sister, plus a bit of the history of the Sisters of Saint Joseph, which were founded in France by a Jesuit in 1650. Sr. Colleen also tells us about her own new podcast project, which she's co-hosting with another sister of Saint Joseph. It's called Beyond the Habit and they've just released their first few episodes. If you'd like some more Advent content from us here at the Jesuit Conference, you can sign up for daily email reflections on faith heroes formed in the Ignatian tradition at Jesuits.org/advent22 and register for a free evening of reflection on Zoom at Jesuits.org/adventprayer, which is being hosted by iconographer Kelly Latimore and writer Cameron Bellm (Wednesday, December 14, 7:30pm ET). Listen to Beyond the Habit on Spotify or wherever you get podcasts: https://open.spotify.com/show/3dcsfiK6IQJvWFvgAbZUuR Follow Sr. Colleen on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yoitssistercoll/ AMDG is a production of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States.

The News & Why It Matters
COLORADO SPRINGS SHOOTING: Leftist Narratives DEBUNKED | 11/21/22

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 46:02


Over the weekend, a tragic shooting took place at Club Q in Colorado Springs. Unsurprisingly, the Left immediately weaponized it against Republicans. Plus, Donald Trump had his Twitter account restored after Elon Musk held a poll on the issue. And is Arizona's gubernatorial election still up in the air? Joined by Alex Stein and Stu Burguiere. Today's Sponsor: This Black Friday, skip the crowds and stock up on comfort. Cozy up with Tommy John's Black Friday sale RIGHT NOW. Go to https://TommyJohn.com/WHY to get 30% off sitewide. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Holy Donors
S9E4 The Baroness | Return to Canada

Holy Donors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 29:53


Welcome back to Holy Donors as we continue our story about Catherine Doherty's life and legacy. In this episode, our hosts, Rhen, Thaddeus, and Matt, share about the later years in Catherine's life, and they wrap up the episode with Thaddeus sharing that Catherine is one of the most “amazing public Catholics that I've never heard of.” We return to Catherine's story as she and her new husband Eddie are pushed out of the Harlem Friendship House. Looking for a change in scenery, the couple moved to a small, rural town in Canada called Combermere. As they did in Harlem, Catherine and Eddie lived in relative poverty and begged for their necessities. They wrote letters to friends and acquaintances around the world asking for both funds and goods, for themselves and for their new ministry. Catherine and Eddie started Madonna House in Combermere, and thus, Catherine established the final of her three main apostolates. Catherine still directly served those in need in her community, and she and Eddie also opened Madonna House as a retreat for people needing a quiet place to pray and listen to God. Catherine served her community with passion and diligence until her death in 1985. To close the episode, our hosts share their thoughts on whether or not Catherine Doherty deserves to make their list of holy donors. Unsurprisingly, Rhen, Matt, and Thaddeus all agree that Catherine absolutely meets their metrics of holiness as based on faithfulness, humility and radical generosity.---Recommended reading: "Fragments of my Life" by Catherine Doherty---Holy Donors is brought to you by Petrus Development (petrusdevelopment.com) in cooperation with RED-C Catholic Radio (redcradio.org).For more about Holy Donors please visit our website at holydonors.com or find us @HolyDonors on Instagram and Facebook.Holy Donors: Bringing you inspiring stories of radical generosity that have changed the world.

History Cafe
#26 Why blow up Parliament anyway? - Ep 3 Blowing up the Gunpowder Plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 30:27


The parliament of 1604 refuses to grant the king money. They're still paying for the effects of the last plague. But this is Cecil's job. What to do? On 5 November 1605 the assembled MPs and peers are calmly informed that there has been a devilish Catholic plot to blow the lot of them up. A plot that their king and Cecil have brilliantly foiled. Unsurprisingly, this time, they vote the king the money he so badly needs. Job done.

Third Gear Scratch
Episode 144 - Kendall Wind

Third Gear Scratch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 57:29


Growing up in upstate New York, young Kendall Wind took piano lessons before migrating to bass guitar and leaning into The Rock Academy founded by School of Rock's Paul Greene. Her piano knowledge would later inform her bass and guitar playing in the band she put together at Rock Academy with singer Sam Quartin called The Bobby Lees, now on it's 3rd LP Bellevue out now on Mike Patton's Ipecac Records. She's working with Jon Spencer regularly now who also produced the bands 2nd record before working with Vance Powell on Bellevue. It's been a whiplash ride for Kendall and The Bobby Lees, touring heavily since their inception. Unsurprisingly they were a bit relieved when the pandemic offered them time to make new music and refuel the machine. 

Knowing Animals
Episode 204: Civet Coffee with Jes Hooper

Knowing Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 32:22


Today's guest is Jes Hooper. Jes is a PhD candidate in Anthrozoology at the University of Exeter and the Campaigns and Research Manager for Badger Trust, a British animal protection organisation. The working title of her PhD thesis is Civets in Society: Understanding the Human-Animal Interactions Within Civet Trades. She is also the founder of The Civet Project, an organisation devoted to better understanding human/civet interactions. Unsurprisingly, we're talking about civets! In particular, we're discuss Jes's paper ‘Cat-Poo-Chino and Captive Wildlife: Tourist Perceptions of Balinese Kopi Luwak Agrotourism', which was published open access in the journal Society & Animals in 2022, as well as her developing research on human-civet interaction. This episode is brought to you by AASA (the Australasian Animal Studies Association), which you can join today. It's also brought to you by the Animal Publics book series, which is published by Sydney University Press.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. Bill Russell's Second Wind Part 8 #UniversityOfKentucky #AdolphRupp

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022


The Katherine Massey Book Club @ The C.O.W.S. hosts the 8th study session on the late Bill Russell's 1979 publication, Second Wind: The Memoirs of an Opinionated Man. Russell passed away on July 31st of this year at the age of 88. The NBA titan is the first black head coach in US professional sports history. This includes being the only person in basketball history to win an NBA championship as a player/coach. Last week, Russell detailed the camaraderie he maintained with his black contemporaries like Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robinson and Elgin Baylor. Unsurprisingly, White sports writers described ball games between Chamberlain and Russell as though they were mortal enemies. Once again, Russell acknowledges that he always recognized that playing a ball game was substantially less important than the business of Replacing White Supremacy With Justice. He also shared notable comments about the importance of concentration and courage - as especially in the face of opposition and difficulty. #CounterViolence #BlackSelfRespect #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

SciFi TV Rewatch
Episode 486 The Peripheral S01E04 Jackpot

SciFi TV Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 56:32


Join Dave and Wayne for genre television show news, a glimpse into what the hosts are currently watching, and commentary and analysis of the Prime Video series  The Peripheral. This week on the SciFi TV Rewatch podcast we discuss Flynne's decision to accept the physical risks to continue to travel to the future and promises her brother and Conner bodies so they might join her in 2100.  In our What We're Watching segment, Dave rewatches S1 of Warrior Nun and S2 of Barbarians. Unsurprisingly, Wayne decides to rewatch S1 of Barbarians before tackling the new season. In Listener Feedback, Fred from the Netherlands wonders how Lev's crew immediately knew that someone other than Flynne jumped into the 2100 peripheral. Remember to join the genre television and film discussion on the SciFi TV Rewatch Facebook group for the latest genre television show news and podcast releases. Episode Grade: A-

Just Matt and CJ
Sick New World | 11.08.2022

Just Matt and CJ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 57:51


CJ and Spenny go through the list of 90s and early 2000s bands that have been added to a new festival lineup taking place in Las Vegas. The fest is called Sick New World, and it features the likes of System of a Down, Incubus, Deftones, Korn, and many more acts that got their start during that era. Plus several other acts that seem out of place. Who are CJ and Spenny's top five bands they'd choose to see if they attended? LISTEN. FIND OUT.  We talk periods today on Social Cues, so if that freaks you out, then here's your warning, you blood-averse person, you. Emily brings to our attention a woman who went around interviewing average men on what they know about the menstrual cycle. Unsurprisingly, many men have no idea how a vagina works, let alone what a period is.  And Matt comes in to discuss parental stuff again on today's Parent Pickup. Today's topic? Letting your kid get frustrated. Just let it happen! They need to know how to cope with these emotions in order to be better prepared for the real world after childhood.  Okay, bye.Support the show: https://www.101x.com/justmattandcj/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dead America
Amelia Starr

Dead America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 40:47


Amelia Starr is much more than what meets your eyes when you just see her. Unsurprisingly, her appearance is quite beguiling, and her beautifully demure exterior has probably saved her from situations, people, and experiences that could have been detrimental. Amelia is a wife, mother, health professional, entrepreneur, and published author! Her life is a testament to the adage, “Life is a concoction of tribulation and triumph, but if you get up more times than you fall… YOU will always be triumphant!” Although life takes us by surprise, it doesn't have to shock us into the pits of despair. Amelia incessantly strives to be the best version of who she is destined to be! Unapologetically, she lives a fulfilling and happy life. With a name like Starr, she is destined to illuminate the world! When she is not serving her family and caring for patients, she serves as a star advocate for those who've been victimized by domestic violence. Additionally, she enjoys serene walks on the beach, meditation, and cozying up with a good book!  www.facetsofastarr.com @facetsofastarr on IG and FB Purifying Truths https://open.spotify.com/show/385FWtWVHKdFpakS1NDDpr     

Town Hall Seattle Arts & Culture Series
Jonathan Franzen with Tom Nissley Crossroads: A Vivid Take on Contemporary America

Town Hall Seattle Arts & Culture Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 68:30


Jonathan Franzen is known for being, well, a little bit of everything: cantankerous and compelling, celebrated and controversial. Known for his vivid character development, his six novels have provoked commentary of all sorts from each end of the spectrum and everywhere in-between. Unsurprisingly, when Franzen — dubbed by TIME as “The Great American Novelist”— releases a new book, people pay attention; his latest novel, Crossroads, is no exception. In Crossroads, it's December 23, 1971, and heavy weather is forecast for Chicago. Russ Hildebrandt, the associate pastor of a liberal suburban church, is on the brink of breaking free from a joyless marriage — unless his wife, Marion, who has her own secret life, beats him to it. Their eldest child, Clem, is coming home from college on fire with moral absolutism, having taken an action that will shatter his father. Clem's sister, Becky, long the social queen of her high-school class, has sharply veered into the counterculture, while their brilliant younger brother Perry, who's been selling drugs to seventh graders, has resolved to be a better person. Each of the Hildebrandts seeks a freedom that each of the others threatens to complicate. The story of a Midwestern family at a pivotal moment of moral crisis, Crossroads explores the history of two generations with humor and complexity that resonates with our contemporary times. Jonathan Franzen is the author of six novels, most recently Crossroads and Purity, and five works of nonfiction, including The Discomfort Zone, Farther Away, and The End of the End of the Earth. Among his honors are the National Book Award, the James Tait Black Memorial Award, the Heartland Prize, Die Welt Literature Prize, the Budapest Grand Prize, and the first Carlos Fuentes Medal awarded at the Guadalajara International Book Fair. Franzen is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the German Akademie der Künste, and the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. An ardent bird-watcher, he has served on the board of the American Bird Conservancy since 2008, and has received the EuroNatur Award for his work in bird conservation. Tom Nissley is the owner of Phinney Books and Madison Books in Seattle, and the author of A Reader's Book of Days. He has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington and in 2010 won eight games on Jeopardy!. Crossroads: A Novel (Paperback) Third Place Books

The Unspeakable Podcast
Gain Confidence By Losing Certainty. Ilana Redstone on Breaking Free from the Certainty Trap

The Unspeakable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 59:11


Ilana Redstone is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also the faculty director and a co-founder of the Mill Institute, an organization aimed at helping educators learn how to foster productive, respectful discussions that make room for a variety of viewpoints in the classroom. In this conversation, Ilana talks about her work around a concept she's coined “the certainty trap.” The idea is that being "absolutely sure" about a particular position or opinion may actually be a sign of underlying doubt. Unsurprisingly, this  kind of unconscious cognitive dissonance may in fact have a lot to do with our current troubles as a society when it comes to public discourse. In this conversation, Ilana talks with Meghan about how the word “truth” can often throw people off course and explains how she works with her students to challenge their assumptions and biases. In the second part of the interview, Ilana walks Meghan through a couple of positions about which Meghan feels “certain.” In so doing, she floats a potentially mind-blowing concept: if you replace feeling “certain” with feeling “confident,” your entire worldview can shift in a more productive direction. And you might even be better able to change the minds of others.    Guest Bio: Ilana Redstone is an Associate Professor of sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Faculty Director of The Mill Institute at UATX. In May of 2022 she published her seminal essay, The Certainty Trap, in Tablet. She is also the co-author of Unassailable Ideas: How Unwritten Rules and Social Media Shape Discourse in American Higher Education, the creator of the Beyond Bigots and Snowflakes video series and the founder of Diverse Perspectives Consulting.

Room to Grow - a Math Podcast
Ensuring Access to Mathematics for ALL Students

Room to Grow - a Math Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 32:14


In this episode of Room to Grow, Joanie and Curtis build the conversation from NCTM's description of access, described as "ensuring that all students routinely have opportunities to experience high-quality mathematics instruction, learn challenging mathematics content, and receive the support necessary to be successful."Our hosts tackle this challenging topic by considering some important high-leverage components, particularly those that are within a classroom teachers' locus of control. Ensuring that all students have high-quality instruction from an excellent teacher supports the learning of challenging mathematics content. Joanie and Curtis consider that “support for success” extends beyond academic support, and spills over into the importance of classroom culture in access for all students. Teachers can, with intention, ensure that all students know they are viewed as doers of mathematics with ideas that are valuable for the learning of the entire class.The conversation then shifts to discussing how the Standards for Mathematical Practice can help teachers not only understand what access looks like, but also helps students realize the relevance of the mathematics they are learning. Unsurprisingly, our hosts circle back to the importance of relationships with our students for their successful learning.We encourage you to explore the resources below, referenced in this episode:NCTM's Statement on Access and Equity in Mathematics Education https://www.nctm.org/Standards-and-Positions/Position-Statements/Access-and-Equity-in-Mathematics-Education/Supporting students' identity and agency in mathematics https://www.nctm.org/Store/Products/The-Impact-of-Identity-in-K-8-Mathematics--Rethinking--Equity-Based-Practices/ Blog about Minimizing the “Matthew Effect” https://buildingmathematicians.wordpress.com/2018/01/15/minimizing-the-matthew-effect/ Skew the Script AP Statistics resources for relevant mathematics https://skewthescript.org/ Implementing the Standards for Mathematical Practice https://achievethecore.org/peersandpedagogy/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Implementing-Standards-for-Mathematical-Practices-Updated-2016.pdf Instagrammer with Bachelor and Bachelorette data: https://www.instagram.com/bachelordata/?hl=enDid you enjoy this episode of Room to Grow? Please leave a review and share the episode with others. Share your feedback, comments, and suggestions for future episode topics by emailing roomtogrowmath@gmail.com . Be sure to connect with your hosts on Twitter and Instagram: @JoanieFun and @cbmathguy. 

H2TechTalk
Power-to-X and green fuels: Fruit from the decision tree

H2TechTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 9:37


There is no doubt that green hydrogen (H2) is a crucial element on the path to decarbonization. Unsurprisingly, green H2 and Power-to-X have gained much popularity and public attention. These technologies will not be a flash in the pan.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. Bill Russell's Second Wind Part 7 #MISSISSIPPI #Jackson #MedgarEvers

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


The Katherine Massey Book Club @ The C.O.W.S. hosts the 7th study session on the late Bill Russell's 1979 publication, Second Wind: The Memoirs of an Opinionated Man. Russell passed away on July 31st of this year at the age of 88. The NBA titan is the first black head coach in US professional sports history. This includes being the only person in basketball history to win an NBA championship as a player/coach. Last week, Russell detailed the camaraderie he maintained with his black contemporaries like Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robinson and Elgin Baylor. Unsurprisingly, White sports writers described ball games between Chamberlain and Russell as though they were mortal enemies. Once again, Russell acknowledges that he always recognized that playing a ball game was substantially less important than the business of Replacing White Supremacy With Justice. He also shared notable comments about the importance of concentration and courage - as especially in the face of opposition and difficulty. #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

Nation Real Life
Ryan Reynolds' interest in the Sens, Oilers are rolling, and falling for deep fakes

Nation Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 52:09


We've landed on another Thursday and that means the boys from the Real Life Podcast are back with a whole lot to talk about after the Oilers rebounded from their slow(ish) start with five straight wins. On today's show, the guys looked at Ryan Reynolds' interest in the Senators, the Oilers are stacking up wins, and a whole more.Kicking off today's podcast, the guys got started with a conversation about how everyone on the podcast is sick. Whether it's Baggedmilk's leaky head or Tyler's scratchy throat, this podcast had huge potential to go off the rails before even getting started. Changing gears, the guys actually got to business with a chat about Ryan Reynolds' interest in buying the Ottawa Senators and how everyone on the show thought it was a fantastic idea. Next up, Wanye wondered if Drake might be the next Canadian celebrity in line to be a team owner, which led to Baggedmilk finding out he got bamboozled by the rapper with a deep fake video. Turning back to the Oilers, the guys looked at the Hall of Fame ceremony that's happening at Rogers Place tonight and how the extended pre-game ceremony is a real concern for the Oilers. Unsurprisingly, the conversation about the Oilers last about three seconds before the show fell off the rails yet again. Lastly, the guys wrapped up the episode with a quick chat about Halloween as both Jay and Wanye had their first dad experiences on candy day. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Clown Parade
Katinka Presents: The Me in Mysticism; Past Lives & Reincarnation (Episode 3)

Clown Parade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:29


Who was Katinka in other lives? Who was Claire in other lives? And where the heck do aliens fit into the cycle of reincarnation? Unsurprisingly, Katinka has all the answers in her juiciest episode yet. Guest Jaya Astrodar, anti-CEO CEO, chats with Katinka about spiritual entrepreneurship and her favorite companies from her past lives. Lastly, Katinka tries to read the birth chart (*tries*) of a listener curious about past life regression and then someone leaves the studio… in HANDCUFFS. In the spirit of narcissism, all characters in this episode are played by Desi Domo. About Desi: Desi is a comedian, actor, and writer in Brooklyn, NY. Credits include: UCB Theatre Maude Night, UCB Theatre Characters Welcome, Blank! The Musical, Netflix's Inventing Anna, and The Conjuring. See more of her characters and impressions at desidomo.com and Instagram.com/desidomo. Desi also reads tarot professionally (better than Katinka). Book a reading with her at starchaeologytarot.com.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Adventures in Movies!
Episode 195: 'H4Z4RD' & 'V/H/S/99'

Adventures in Movies!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 54:19


We start this week's show with a talk about The Conjuring 4. At least that was the plan. Instead, we try to remember which movies were a part of the Conjuring universe and which case was really the Warrens' biggest. We also talk about the connection between a DCEU movie.Genre of the Future returns and we talk about some of the most exciting gerne films of the year. We also go over another exorcism movie, dating apps, and the a latest release from Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson. Plus, a discussion of Southern California and its place in genre cinema.We have covered some interesting films from Europe on this show. The one thing they all seem to have in common is their unique take on European culture. There is a creativity to them that is daring, exciting, and fun to watch. They are something of a throwback to the American indie film scene of the 1990s.H4Z4RD is a great example . The premise sounds simple enough. Noah loves his girlfriend and daughter. He wants to make sure to take care of them while also doing a favor for his brother. Unsurprisingly, things do not go as planned. Noah's day ends up involving drugs. wolves, and security guards who really like his car. We talk about the movie's pacing, music, and unique sense of humor.We close the show with one of the biggest horror releases of the month. Shudder recently announced that V/H/S/99 set the record for most watched movie premiere. We helped them set that record, so we decided we have a right to say whatever we want about it. We talk about surprise endings, feeling uncomfortable, and new contenders for best horror director.Adventures in Movies! is a part of the Morbidly Beautiful Podcast Network. Morbidly Beautiful is your one stop shop for all your horror needs. From the latest news and reviews to interviews and old favorites, it can be found at Morbidly Beautiful.Adventures in Movies! is hosted by Nathaniel and Blake. You can find Nathaniel on Instagram at nathaninpoortaste. Blake can be found on Twitter @foureyedhorror and on Instagram at foureyedhorror. You can reach us personally or on Twitter @AdventuresinMo1.We are now on YouTube!Music in the background from https://www.FesliyanStudios.com 

Scarytales
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow & The Murder of Pearl Bryan

Scarytales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 50:53


The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is an American classic that often resurfaces around Halloween. While it is considered one of America's first ghost stories, Washington Irving didn't invent the idea of a headless rider. Unsurprisingly, this character has sinister origins that can be traced all the way back to The Middle Ages. Speaking of headless beings, we also discuss the gruesome murder of Pearl Bryan and how eerily similar her story is to the legend. Sources: -Dullahan -legend-sleepy-hollow-headless-horseman -https://allthatsinteresting.com/the-legend-of-sleepy-hollow -https://westchestermagazine.com/life-style/history/irving-legend-sleepy-hollow/ -https://heathermonroe.medium.com/the-gruesome-murder-of-pearl-bryan-492eb83a859e

A More Civilized Age: A Clone Wars Podcast
47: "Announcement" (Andor 07)

A More Civilized Age: A Clone Wars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 151:14 Very Popular


After a nail-biting heist, what could follow for Andor? Unsurprisingly, a talky episode all about the Empire's response to the fledgling rebellion, filled with juicy details about galactic policy decisions, intelligence agency maneuvering, and a bunch of difficult emotional conversations. And, of course... Space Miami. NEXT TIME: Andor Episode 08 Show Notes Hosted by Rob Zacny (@RobZacny) Featuring Alicia Acampora (@ali_west), Austin Walker (@austin_walker), and Natalie Watson (@nataliewatson) Produced by Austin Walker Music by Jack de Quidt (@notquitereal) Cover art by Xeecee (@xeeceevevo)

Drinks Adventures
Indian single malt whisky comes of age

Drinks Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 25:28


Did you know that India is the largest consumer of whisky in the world? There is a caveat on that though. It's not all whisky as you know it. Mostly it's what is known as IMFL, or Indian Made Foreign Liquor. In India, there's very little regulation about what can be put in a bottle and labelled ‘whisky', particularly for blended whiskies. IMFL is essentially a neutral spirit tinted with caramel colouring and supplemented with something like two to 40 per cent single malt, depending on the price tag.  Unsurprisingly, Indian whisky hasn't been held in the highest regard. But that's starting to change, thanks two distilleries in particular: Amrut, and Goa-based Paul John. Launched in 2012, Paul John produces close to 1.2 million litres a year of single malt whisky, which would place it comfortably in Australia's top five producers in volume terms. Paul John master distiller Michael D'Souza was in Sydney recently. We sat down for this interview about the exciting evolution of Indian whisky. Click https://link.chtbl.com/7_mZcsbi (here) to open episode in your podcast player.

The New Chitlin Circuit
Kindred (2020)

The New Chitlin Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 51:33


Syd & Lex review psychological thriller 'Kindred' starring Tamara Lawrence. Unsurprisingly, Syd is quite spooked. But Lex isn't too haunted by this unsettling plot to get off some critiques. Tune in to hear Syd's "British" accent. Follow The New Chitlin Circuit www.tiktok.com/@newchitlincircuit instagram.com/newchitlincircuit www.thenewchitlincircuit.com The New Chitlin Circuit is the only podcast dedicated solely to highlighting Black, independent film. Every Monday, Syd and Lex review a Black indie, low-budget, or direct-to-tv movie.

Adventures in Movies!
Episode 194: Fantastic French Thrillers w/ Not Your Final Girl

Adventures in Movies!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 37:50


Deep Fear is a French-Belgium co-production about three friends who are spending one last day together. One of them is going into the military the next day, so they want this day to be a special one. They decide to take a trip through the Paris catacombs. What is an exciting idea on the surface turns into their worst nightmares.Unsurprisingly, there are lots of tight moments that give a feeling of claustrophobia. While Aril enjoys cave horror, Blake does not like the feeling of getting caught in closed quarters. But did Deep Fear do enough to make either of them feel anything? We also talk about whether the horror aspects worked and the surprising lack of a sense of urgency.Despite its flaws, Deep Fear does a lot of things right. The setting is great and the film does a great job with lighting and shadows. The characters are well-written and there is great attention to detail. Do the pros outweigh the cons or were we all left to disappointed by the narrative?Some Like it Rare also struck a chord with two of us. Nathaniel cannot stand cannibal movies (Thanks, Cannibal Holocaust) while Candance really enjoys them. But what happens when a cannibal movie subverts expectations and becomes more about people staying together than eating each other?The four of us also debate the film's dark humor, discuss why it is an anti-message movie, and talk about the decision-making of the characters. Since it is a cannibal movie, we also wonder if human flesh tastes good. Plus, a conversation on actually being grossed out versus thinking about it.Adventures in Movies! is a part of the Morbidly Beautiful Podcast Network. Morbidly Beautiful is your one stop shop for all your horror needs. From the latest news and reviews to interviews and old favorites, it can be found at Morbidly Beautiful.Adventures in Movies! is hosted by Nathaniel and Blake. You can find Nathaniel on Instagram at nathaninpoortaste. Blake can be found on Twitter @foureyedhorror and on Instagram at foureyedhorror. You can reach us personally or on Twitter @AdventuresinMo1.Music in the background from https://www.FesliyanStudios.comNot Your Final Girl is a podcast hosted by two women (Ariel Dyer and Candace Sluder) just trying to make it to the end of the movie. Join us bi-weekly for deep dives into horror with a fresh take on the genre we love! We're @NYFGpod on Letterboxd if you want to check out all the movies we've talked about on the pod. You can also follow Candace at @crammpuss if you want to peek at what movies might be coming up next. 

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Caribbean Citizenship vs. Turkey Citizenship by Investment

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 17:53


Join Our Email List and be the First to Hear about Breaking News and Exciting Offers https://nomadcapitalist.com/email Get on the waiting list and join us for the next Nomad Capitalist Live: www.nomadcapitalist.com/live/ If you tell someone that you have Caribbean citizenship by investment (CBI), they might scoff at you. Many people call passports from places like Dominica or Antigua fake or illegitimate because you can get them rather quickly by making a simple investment in the country. I did “buy a Caribbean Citizenship” from St. Lucia and now hold a passport. We can tell you that they're perfectly legitimate and that all Nomad Capitalists should consider them as a part of their diversification strategy. Three years ago, we didn't think that Turkish citizenship by investment was going to amount to much. They had just launched it in January 2017 and with an entry cost of at least $1 million. Unsurprisingly, there weren't many takers. The Turkish government realized that they grossly overvalued their passport and dropped the investment needed to $250,000 in mid-2019. This instantly made it the hottest passport in the RCBI (Residence and Citizenship by Investment) world. Which one is better? In this video, Andrew will tell you. Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Mr. Henderson: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://nomadcapitalist.com/book/ DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.  

Infinite Loops
David Senra — Pick The Right Heroes (EP.127)

Infinite Loops

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 114:21


“To get me stop, they're going to have to pry the microphone out of my cold dead hand”. Hot on the heels of his hugely popular appearance on ‘Invest Like The Best', David Senra joins a marathon episode of Infinite Loops to discuss obsession, education, optimism, podcasting, and so much more. Unsurprisingly, this one is not to be missed. Important Links: Founders Podcast Founders on Colossus David's Twitter David's Substack Runnin' Down a Dream - Bill Gurley Show Notes: David's grandfather, refugees, and risk-taking Why reading history raises our ambition Obsession and genetics Why founders are the most important people in the world Our failing education system “To get me to stop, they're going to have to pry the microphone out of my cold dead hand” “Don't do anything that somebody else can do” Societal responses to change, predicting the future The benefits of small teams “Plan B should be to make plan A work” Optimism, risk and the bridge of nihilism Why you need to start a podcast “History doesn't repeat, human nature does” AI and art The internet is the greatest variance amplifier in history “You can't fake passion” Infinite networks Luck, burnout, learning and excuses “Don't be surprised if your best idea comes 30 to 40 years into your career” The blueprint for a great day Pick the right heroes Books Mentioned: Am I Being Too Subtle?: Straight Talk From a Business Rebel; by Sam Zell The Sugar King of Havana: The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon; by John Paul Rathbone The Hypomaniac Edge: The Link Between (A Little) Craziness and (A Lot of) Success in America; by John D. Gartner One Summer: America, 1927; by Bill Bryson Reluctant Genius: The Passionate Life and Inventive Mind of Alexander Graham Bell; by Charlotte Gray Born of this land : my life story; by Chung Ju-yung Shoe Dog; by Phil Knight Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power; by James McGrath Morris Only the Paranoid Survive: How to Exploit the Crisis Points That Challenge Every Company; by Andrew S. Grove Time to Make the Donuts: The Founder of Dunkin Donuts Shares an American Journey; by William Rosenberg Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration; by Ed Catmull The Tao Te Ching; by Laozi My Life & Work - An Autobiography of Henry Ford; by Henry Ford One from Many: VISA and the Rise of Chaordic Organization; by Dee Hock Zanies: The world's greatest eccentrics; by Jay Robert Nash

Wheel to Wheel: A Formula One Podcast
Japanese Grand Prix Summary: Lewis Is A Nugget Of Love

Wheel to Wheel: A Formula One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 45:40


Unsurprisingly the closing stages of the 2022 Driver's Championship ended without much fanfare. Max took the championship with 4 races remaining on the calendar, dashing any hopes for Ferrari hopeful, Charles Leclerc. Follow us on Tik Tok. Follow us on Twitter. Follow us on Instagram.

Book Retorts
The Fall of Hyperion - Part 1

Book Retorts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 75:53


This week Sam kicks-off Spook Retorts by bringing Danielle's greatest fear: more Hyperion! Get ready to dive in to the 1990 Dan Simmons novel The Fall of Hyperion. The Hegemony is going to war. At a party to see the armada off, we meet a man who claims to be Joseph Severn, the one-time friend of John Keats. He has a meeting after the party with CEO Meina Gladstone, where it's revealed that he's not only another cybrid persona retrieval project of John Keats, but also has been dreaming the events of the Shrike pilgrims through his psychic link to the other Keats persona currently residing in the Schrön loop embedded in Brawne Lamia. If that sentence made no sense to you, you should really listen to the first Hyperion book; it won't help this make any more sense, but you'll at least know who those people are. Anyway, Gladstone wants Severn (née Keats) to report to her the progress of the pilgrims through his dreams. The pilgrims haven't really done much since the last book, having been unable to find the Shrike they set up camp and squabble about what to do. Eventually they go to bed, but Brawne wakes up to find Father Hoyt has wandered off to the now glowing Time Tombs, which can only mean one thing: DJ Shrike is in the house! Back in the Hegemony, Gladstone has bafflingly brought Severn to all her war briefings and given him the highest clearance. The Hegemony is supremely confident they can defeat the Ousters and defend Hyperion, though Severn thinks that's hubris given how little the Hegemony actually knows about the Ousters or their capabilities. Unsurprisingly, things start going south in the war fast. Meanwhile, Severn gets himself seduced, kidnapped, and interrogated all by the same person. In his drugged, expository ramblings, Severn helpfully reminds us that the Hegemony orchestrated the war with the Ousters to get to Hyperion, the only variable that the TechnoCore cannot account for, and thus may save humanity from otherwise certain extermination by the AI civilization. Back on Hyperion, we see that Hoyt, mad with pain, has entered the Jade Tomb where Brawne sees him get his throat slit by the Shrike. Will Hoyt survive? Find out next time (maybe) in part two! Be sure to check out the Authorized Novelizations Podcast, especially The Starlight Barking episode featuring Danielle and Sam. You can find them on Twitter @authorizedpod, Instagram @authorizedpod, and listen wherever you get your podcasts. Also, a shout-out the excellent Dustin Can Read and Watch podcast, you should check it out on Twitter @dustin_holden, Instagram @dustincanread, and listen wherever you get your podcasts.

Chaz & AJ in the Morning
Wednesday, October 12: Waxing A 3-Year-Old's Eyebrows; Chaz Yells About Pizza; The Things That Drive You Crazy

Chaz & AJ in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:32


Dumb Ass News - Leah was on to share her experiencing fighting the entirety of the internet. Chaz and AJ saw a story about her viral TikTok, where she shows how she waxes her 3-year-old daughter's eyebrows. Unsurprisingly, the internet had lots of opinions and even threats for Leah. (0:00) Dumb Ass News - An angry customer filmed his complaints after a lousy experience at a pizza chain, and then worker behind the counter smashed his pizza box because of it. Chaz and AJ were talking about the situation, when suddenly Chaz starting screaming and yelling.. about pizza. (10:16) On the heels of that Dumb Ass News story, Chaz and AJ asked the Tribe to share the things that drive them crazy. (17:58) Brian Foley, formerly with the Hartford Police, was on to talk about latest in the JonBenet Ramsey case, which remains unsolved. (24:51)

Book Expectations
Chapter 53: Animal Jammers | Carrie Soto is Back

Book Expectations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 71:43


Welcome back to another episode! This week, we discuss Taylor Jenkins Reid's most recent release, Carrie Soto is Back. And, indeed, the b**** is back and better than ever. Carrie's story is captivating and all three of us note how pleasantly surprised we were when we became invested in the world of tennis (despite our bad experiences involving it). We also somehow sidetrack to our Animal Jam past and reminisce about our favorite mini-games, feelings of superiority, and bad financial decisions. Unsurprisingly, we also plug the book playlists that we created recently that you can view here: Book Expectations.

The Radical Sex Witches
Bad Bitches of Horror

The Radical Sex Witches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 23:27


This week we are tapping into the bad bitches of horror. You know, the spooky chicks, the villains and demonesses who could bust your skull open with just a glance! Unsurprisingly, the scary realm is yet another place where the patriarchy runs supreme with messages like women are not what they seem, women need to be controlled, and women are emotional, dangerous and lesser creatures. Join us as we spotlight some of Little Leah's fave characters and movies from the world of horror. *Curious about how to liberate your inner witch and experience more pleasure, turn on and a deeper connection to life? Check out these selected links from the podcast!Sex Love & Relationship Coaching with CarlaSex, Love & Relationship Coaching for women and couplesBody of the Goddess Group ProgramFree 30 minute Discovery Call with CarlaTarot Readings with Little LeahDo they love me? Will I get that promotion? What should I do next? Get answers by booking a Tarot reading with Little Leah! Get info & availability by emailing Leah at leahdcoghlan@gmail.com.Have a question or comment about this episode or anything else - let us know by connecting with us on Social!The Radical Sex Witches on InstagramConnect with Carla and Little Leah on InstagramConnect with Carla on FacebookEmail us! radicalsexwitches@gmail.comAND we would love a review on Apple Podcasts, head over and let us know what you think!**Body of the Goddess Group 5 Month Coaching ProgramTuesdays 10-11:30 am PST over Zoom (join anytime!)Explore the five Portals of the Sacred Feminine: Remembrance, Healing, Transformation, Awakening and Essence through ceremony, intention setting, embodiment, group coaching and sex magic. Body of the Goddess is being offered at a self-determined fee. Click the link for details.

Who ARTed
The Radium Girls

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 8:34


Who ARTed: Weekly Art History for All Ages is turning 3 years old on October 31. Please help me celebrate the milestone. Go to www.WhoARTedPodcast.com/Vote to tell me which were your favorite episodes. One voter will win a $25 Amazon gift card. The other day, one of my students asked me what would happen if he drank paint. He was joking, but it reminded me of a story of women who sometimes played around painting selves but regularly ingested microscopic bits of paint with devastating consequences. From 1917 to 1926, there was an advancement in science leading to the creation of new luminous paints. These new paints were particularly helpful with the US military in making watches that would be visible even at night. The company called these watches “Undark” I can only imagine how many hours the marketing department debated before coming up with such a brilliant name. Unfortunately, the watch didn't quite live up to its name. While the paints did glow, the story of these watches and the people who produced them is pretty dark. Starting in 1917, the US Radium Corporation hired a bunch of young women to paint watch faces with radium based paints that would glow in the dark. For these young women, it seemed like a great job. They were paid about 3 times what the average working woman was getting at that time, they got to work with this cool new material that glowed like something from science fiction, and the job was relatively easy. They just had to lip, dip and paint. But that first part, the lip part turned out to be a major problem.  The women were using camel hair brushes to paint tiny details on watch faces and instrument dials. As any painter could tell you, after just a few brush strokes, the bristles start to splay requiring them to point their brush. The women working for the US Radium Corporation, and a few rival companies of that day were all told to use their mouths to point the brush. While they could have achieved similar results with water and rags, it was more efficient for the workers to simply put the brush in their mouth using their lips, teeth and tongues to get the bristles realigned. Listeners today would no doubt be horrified at the prospect of putting radioactive material into their mouths, but for the so called radium girls, it was part of the job and for many of them, it seemed like a fun perk. There are stories of the young women painting their teeth, or their nails with the radioactive paints. Of course, as the old saying goes, it's all fun and games until someone's jaw falls off. Unsurprisingly, it was the dentists who first noticed the health effects of radium ingestion. The radium girls developed a condition referred to as radium jaw or necrosis of the jaw which simply put means the cells in their jaws were dying from radiation poisoning and along with that teeth fell out and bones would become distorted due to tumors or even they might be left with holes in the jawbones.  Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Construction Marketing with Purpose
Hiring In Today's Market with Guest April Lopinot

Construction Marketing with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 36:06


Today’s hiring market is worlds away from where we were even just a few years ago. So we asked our new friend, April Lopinot, Vice President at L. Keeley Construction, how she’s found success hiring in this new landscape. Unsurprisingly, it’s going to require making some changes, but she walks us all through how her company did, and how to implement some of those practices yourself. Episode Highlights Introduction to April Lopinot and Keeley - 1:35Navigating the current hiring market - 5:23Adjusting your business and recruitment practices - 10:00Offering incentives and showing appreciation - 14:15Finding quality candidates - 17:33Treating hiring like running a business - 25:27Testing new hiring practices - 27:00Thinking outside the box - 30:48For a fully-formatted blog post of this episode, visit our website at: https://mayecreate.com/blog/hiring-in-todays-market-with-guest-april-lopinot/

The Sunday Sweat - Fantasy Football Podcast
Hits and Misses + Season Outlook

The Sunday Sweat - Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 144:34


The guys review some of the biggest hits and surprises through the first four weeks of the NFL season. We go position by position (QB, RB, WR, and TE) and give some actionable advice on who we are buying and selling, and who to be patient on, so you can get those fantasy squads in position to make playoffs. You won't want to miss out on this deep dive!Unsurprisingly, and much to Mike's dismay,  Andrew advises holding the line on Juju Smith-Schuster. To be continued...If you enjoyed please be sure to subscribe, leave feedback, and hit us up on socials @MikePlaysDFS and @DrewNoIes

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition
Humaans raises $15M to simplify HR tasks like onboarding

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 5:30


The role of HR professionals grew in scope during the pandemic as companies were forced to navigate major workplace changes, like working from home. Unsurprisingly, those professionals have had some of the highest burnout rates over the past two years, particularly as HR departments remain under-resourced. According to an August survey from Workvivo, an employee […] Humaans raises $15M to simplify HR tasks like onboarding by Kyle Wiggers originally published on TechCrunch

Why Did Peter Sink?
Unmoderning (part 4)

Why Did Peter Sink?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 23:46


So in hindsight, I most certainly did have a religion. When I thought I had none, I had one. A religion is defined by your actions, not your words. Although I thought I was a member of something called “no religion,” it was actually secular humanism. But this is not surprising because the entire public school system was geared toward the religion of humanism and actively steered American children toward it throughout the 1980s and 1990s. What's strange is that we banned “God” from public schools because it was a religion. But we brought in humanism which is a religion. This religion is one that pretends that it isn't a religion. The Supreme Court even named it as a religion in 1961 (Torcasso v. Watkins), which is just stating the obvious. There were even humanist churches that sprang up and withered away. Few object to humanism being taught in schools because we pretend it's not a religion, but it has a manifesto with fifteen principles that sound a lot like commandments that defines the origin of the universe as it's first item of business. FIRST: Religious humanists regard the universe as self-existing and not created. This is literally the direct inversion of the three major world religions of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism. If you start with this premise, your worldview flips completely to a pre-Christian, pre-Hebrew mindset. I spent many hours yammering about this in the About Uranus series. If you remove God as the first cause of the universe, who created the universe “out of nothing” (ex nihilo), then you have a lot of explaining to do. In fact, if you start with this first point of humanist manifesto, you are already in the pagan world of Zeus, you just use different terms for it. The idea of a creator God never came up in public school. In a subtle way, the tenets of humanism are stamped on every American child. Unsurprisingly, I learned much later, after soaking in the bath of this humanist water for some thirty years, that one of the signers of this declaration of independence from religion, this humanist manifesto, was none other than the founder of modern public schools, John Dewey. Like Freud, the father of psychology, Dewey hated religion. Both of these founders saw their purpose as replacing religion with something else. From the book Atheism for Dummies, Dewey is a described as a kind of hero for doing a bait-and-switch on religion:Few people can claim a greater influence on American culture than the philosopher John Dewey (1859–1952). In the course of a long career, Dewey practically reinvented the American system of education from the bottom up.Dewey was also a key figure in the rebirth of modern humanism. But his approach was controversial, even among humanists — partly because he wanted to keep using the word God, even though he didn't believe such a being existed.Today we are living in a period of time where everyone is scratching their head and wondering why our world and nation is slipping into disarray. The fragility of nations and institutions is being felt across domains. Once you get out of the tub that you have been soaking in and look at the water, it's no longer confusing to see what has happened. The water is filthy. A billion people are soaking in that tub and not realizing how soggy they've become. They can't understand why they feel like dirty dishwater. They wonder how they can be in a tub and yet not feel clean. We don't feel clean because we are living a lie. Thus we have the “strange rites” that occupy so much of our modern life, particularly in sports, entertainment, health, fitness, technology. To quote the blurb from Tara Isabella's book on this subject, Americans are “embracing a kaleidoscopic panoply of spiritual traditions, rituals, and subcultures -- from astrology and witchcraft to SoulCycle and the alt-right.”It's all a substitute for God. All of it. For me it was the pursuit of experiences. Alcohol, woodworking, triathlons, sports, skydiving, military service, career - you name it, I probably tried it. A quote from Joshua Mitchell sums up the state of this constant seeking of meaning through the self:Homo sapiens is devolving into Selfie Man; and it is therefore to the manner of his falling into illness that we must attend, and to his experience of illness that we must appeal. I cannot prove it, but I suspect this is the path Selfie Man must take to recover an understanding of human nature. The Prodigal Son returns home only after he realizes the husks of corn on which he has been feasting nourish him not (Luke 15:11–32). The story of our times is one of spiritual crisis, because not only has the word God become taboo, but most people who say the word don't truly believe in it. How can I be so bold? We need to merely look at where the faithful spend their time. Drive by any gym or baseball field on a Sunday morning, or simply look at how empty the churches are. Their pajama shirts say “Faith” or “Jesus and coffee” and then they turn on Netflix and blithely violate the third Commandment to keep the Lord's day holy. How can these faithful be so bold? Easily. It's because we don't really believe in the idea of “sacred”. They have been programmed. When nothing is sacred, everything is sacred. When everything is sacred, nothing is sacred. This is why we can believe that laying on a couch and thinking about God for a split second is as good as going to church and spending one hour with God. This is the great flattening that has occurred. This bait-and-switch that occurred is exactly as Dewey wanted. We say “God” but smirk inside. The pioneers of America who lacked internal combustion engines and lacked Netflix and youth sports, somehow found the energy to saddle up or walk to church. The test of our time - a test that appears to have been failed - is that we have incredible ease in getting to church, yet we choose not to. The number one reason people hate Christianity today is because of hypocritical Christians. And so do I. What a scandal it is to see a believer who speaks the language of devotion and piety but whose actions suggest otherwise. This is why people roll their eyes at Catholics that sin on Saturday night and go to confession on Sunday morning (actually, few Catholics go to confession now, and therefore should not even be receiving the Eucharist, but that's for another episode). The hypocrisy scandalizes and drives people away. We all hate a hypocrite. So did Jesus. The problem is that we are all hypocrites, no matter how holy, perceived or otherwise. The hypocrites once drove me away, but I will never let that happen again. Why? Because I'm one of them. And as I frequently like to quote: “The church is a hospital for sinners, not a museum of saints.” The church and its doctrine and sacraments and liturgy provide the path to remembering this. If I am confused about this, then righteousness or despair will begin to seep into my thoughts and action, and that is precisely when I've fallen into the trap, where God is on my lips, but not in my heart. This was the goal of John Dewey. To keep God in our mouth, but not in our heart. Once you awaken to this fact, you can get out of the soggy tub and pull the plug to let the dirt drain away. Then you can take action, and get God out of storage once and for all. The great achievement of Dewey and the humanists is the flattening of the sacred. They managed to make all things the same, to make all things sacred, and therefore making nothing sacred. This is the outcome of Unitarianism, which places all religions into the same the psychological basket. There is nothing set apart, nothing sacred, yet we still have the word God on our lips, just as Dewey wanted. And then you live in no-man's-land, the wasteland of T.S. Eliot, because you are saying the word God but living like a humanist. You speak as if you have ultimate meaning, but you don't live it out - hence the emptiness of our modern age. You must make your own meaning then, and this manifests out in a thousand ways, and all of them are dead ends. What is lost with God is ultimate meaning, and the vacuum is felt, the void, the onslaught of meaninglessness that drives the pursuit of self-destruction and self-salvation. Why? Because if we cannot find meaning we must either escape the problem or solve the problem. You can go toward nihilism like the French philosophers or you can go toward the will-to-power like the German philosophers. A third option, compliments of Karl Marx, is that you get to become the savior of the world. In all three of these outcomes, you can still say the word “God” and the word can mean absolutely nothing to you while you speak it. That's the state we are in today. God is everywhere in our speech and nowhere in our actions. By design, most of us live out lives that have nothing to do with Christ. Only when we come close to the edge of a cliff and look down do we look up. With God put into storage, we will go dust the idea off when feeling nostalgic or lost. When we are in a period of adjustment, between pursuits, we will look to God. But the moment a new distraction or experience or partner or job arrives, God goes back into storage. We only want God when we recognize the need for a real savior. We only want Jesus on the cross when we need forgiveness. Christ is treated like a 401K fund, where we look at the cross like a number of dollars that will save us in our old age, after we are done sinning. The penitent thief on the cross, who is promised entrance to paradise, is our secret wish for ourselves. It's the get-out-of-jail free card on our death bed, and the card that allows us to live as we wish today, so that we can ignore everything Christ said before that moment on the cross. Most interesting, however, is that I hear self-professed Christians saying, “That doesn't sit well with me,” regarding the penitent thief's late change of heart in Luke 22. In reality, those of us with the name of God on our lips but whose actions lack follow-through should be begging and hoping that the salvation of the “Good Thief,” St. Dismas, will be a possibility for us, too. We rack and stack up mortal sin after mortal sin and ignore the sacrament of Confession, and at the same time cast our eyes down at others for their sins. We should be lucky if the same mercy is shown for our own hypocrisy that we ignore.Any encroachment of traditional religion into the public sphere bothered me. I was wary of any form of Christianity creeping back into my life. In my mind, I thought, “Christians just can't leave anything alone. They just have to shove it down our throats at every opportunity.” I felt like the Grateful Dead's song Truckin', where Jerry Garcia sings about getting busted on Bourbon Street, ratted out by nosey do-gooders who called the police: “They just can't let you be.” The irony is how the flip has happened, where modernism is shoved down our throats. The old religion of hearing a one-hour Sunday message (plus maybe an hour on Wednesday nights) stood no chance against the full blast 40 hours a week of public schools preaching mainline humanism. We have been indoctrinated, without a doubt. We have been indoctrinated to modernism. If you want to be free, you have to take the first step in opposition of the current. The new rebel is not the person that embraces sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll. It's the person who embraces chastity, temperance, and silence. The new rebel is the one who un-moderns himself. I suspect as the result of a century of humanist education comes to an end, the next Abraham will be called out of California, the next St. Anthony of Egypt will find his way to the desert, and a new St. Benedict will find his way to a cave, and we will rediscover all that has been lost and lied about. This is the way it happens. It always has happened this way. The world tries to crush God, to remove him from all public spaces, and God seems to go away, and then he returns. Jesus also went to the desert. He also went to a tomb. But he returned. He is returned now. He is as alive as ever, and will once again be the healer that we are looking for. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.whydidpetersink.com

Mads World
Diaries of a Broken Vagina: Female Sexual Dysfunction with Fran Bushe

Mads World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 45:21


Hellooooo! Welcome to Season 7 of Mads World, kicking off with Episode 1: Diaries of a Broken Vagina, Female Sexual Dysfunction with Fran Bushe!This episode of Mads World is sponsored by Beducated. CLICK HERE to check them out for a 24 hour free trial and use the code MADS for 40% off their yearly subscription.Fran Bushe is an award-winning comedian, writer and performer who has had sold-out runs at ​Soho Theatre​ and The Roundhouse. She's written features for The Guardian, Cosmopolitan, Metro and been a guest on BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour. I invited Fran to chat on the pod about her book: My Broken Vagina. The book follows her funny, moving, and sometimes awkward quest to fix her sex life. It mirrors the story of millions of women everywhere - with half of all women having felt pain during sex.During Fran's journey towards a better relationship with her genitals, doctors advised her to have a glass of wine to loosen up, and male friends suggested she simply hadn't 'tried' the right penis yet. Unsurprisingly, neither worked.After a visit to Sex Camp and many attempts to fix her 'broken' vagina, Fran decided to share her own hilarious, excruciating, and sometimes upsetting experiences. With the help of her 16 year old self's diary, expert advice, candid and enlightening interviews with others about sex, and some self-care exercises, Fran sets about trying to make herself, and other people, feel like they're not being gaslit by their own vaginas.In this episode, we chat about female sexual dysfunction and the variations, vaginismus, self esteem and mental health, staying present and much more!Submit your dating questions through madsworld.mp3, and my guests and I will answer them on the show! You will remain anonymous.All names within stories have been changed unless explicity said so within the show.Click here to support the show for the price of a coffee.Cover Art: VeredienMusic: The.Jones.Project_93 Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/mads-world. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

On The Market
40: Property Product-Market Fit: The Most Important Metric You've Never Heard Of

On The Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 51:39 Very Popular


Housing demand has caused home prices to explode over the past two years. But, even as interest rates rise, the Fed tries to curb inflation, and would-be-homebuyers enter back into the renter's market, there still isn't enough land to go around. For developers like Tommy Beadel, this is a good problem to have. On one hand, tailor-made homes for new homebuyers sell out quickly, but without a ton of deals to go around, where do you go to find good dirt?Tommy is the CEO of Thomas James Homes, rebuilding experts in the Seattle, SoCal, Silicon Valley, Denver, and Phoenix markets. They do what most flippers won't—buying old, often outdated homes, tearing them down, and rebuilding them to fit today's standard. Doing this allows them to sell at the highest price to a consumer that only wants the best and latest home to buy. They skirt the line between new development and renovating/rehabbing homes, but this niche has paid off.Unsurprisingly, Tommy came from a background like most of us. He attended a real estate seminar, surprisingly didn't get scammed, and house hacked right out of college. His passion for real estate grew from there, taking him from the mortgage industry to investing and now building. But Tommy is convinced that his niche isn't a cyclical one. Instead, it's something he can rely on that will stand the test of time. He's got the data to back it up, and you'll hear all of it in this episode.In This Episode We CoverThe “tear down, build up” style of new construction and why there's so much demand for itThe property product-market fit and how today's trends show what a homebuyer wantsScalability vs. predictability and the most crucial aspect of growing a real estate businessWhat predicts a profitable housing market and the data you need to know before you investMaterial and labor costs and some good news for builders/rehabbers Entering back into a “middle-ground housing market” as sellers and buyers reach a stalemateAnd So Much More!Links from the ShowBiggerPockets ForumsBiggerPockets AgentJoin BiggerPockets for FREEOn The MarketJoin the Future of Real Estate Investing with FundriseConnect with Other Investors in the “On The Market” ForumsSubscribe to The “On The Market” YouTube ChannelFind an Investor Friendly Agent in Your AreaDave's BiggerPockets ProfileDave's InstagramJames' BiggerPockets ProfileJames' InstagramWhere Does Housing Demand Exceed Supply?Use NeighborhoodScout to Find Market Data in Your AreaConnect with Tommy:Tommy 's LinkedInThomas James HomesCheck the full show notes here: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/on-the-market-40Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Triad Podcast Network
Triad Dads with a Drink - This is the Waze

Triad Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 79:59


The guys, while enjoying more delicious beer from Fiddlin' Fish, discuss their Waze habits. Unsurprisingly, Dave is the most active... Also, our funny dad fails, rainy day activities and dad moments from the past month! The Triad Podcast Network is presented by The Ginther Group Real Estate, Ashley McKenzie-Sharpe with NEO Home Loans, ICON Custom Builders and Three Magnolias Financial AdvisorsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Now I Get It
Google unsurprisingly folds their Gaming Service

Now I Get It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 4:14


Evelyn discusses this week's news about Google folding their video game streaming platform Stadia and how this is more of the same pattern we're seeing of tech companies stretching beyond their core product, and failing in the process.Since it's Friday, Evelyn shares what she's been watching and will be bingeing this weekend

Habits and Hustle
Episode 186: Cassie Holmes – Award-Winning Teacher and Researcher of Time and Happiness

Habits and Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 54:38


Cassie Holmes is an Award-Winning Teacher and Researcher of Time and Happiness. Cassie literally created her own class that she teaches about understanding and achieving happiness. She references a lot of her researched material here and explains some of the assignments she has her students do that seem genuinely thought-provoking, and at times, bittersweet in their presentation. Simple little tricks like combining your favorite tasks, calculating the time you have left with the people you care most about, and the "2 to 5 rule", which you'll be to listen to the episode to understand. Unsurprisingly, she's extremely cheerful and sweet, so if you're looking for a pleasant listen, or are just really in need of evaluation on your time and happiness, check this one out!Youtube Link to This EpisodeCassie Holmes' Website - https://www.cassiemholmes.com/

the 206geek
sept 20th 2022 - Jamal's trip to Houston - the Nyquil chicken challange

the 206geek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 134:44


Attendees Jamal Harrington, Co-Host Marianne Reilly, Co-Host Cousin Todd Sellers, Co-Host, Tech Guy Guest: Chris Shaw #3 Topic Outline Jamal's Trip To Houston Jamal discusses his trip to Houston Marianne's Review on The Woman King FDA warns against potentially deadly ‘NyQuil Chicken Challenge' Called the “NyQuil Chicken Challenge,” users on social media are covering their meat in the over-the-counter medication, which is used to treat flu symptoms, colds and allergies. Unsurprisingly, the FDA warned it could have very dangerous outcomes — not just if it's ingested but from the cooking process. “Boiling a medication can make it much more concentrated and change its properties in other ways,” the FDA explained in a warning, adding that even inhaling the medication's vapors while cooking could cause high levels of the drugs to enter your body. “It could also hurt your lungs,” the warning continued. “Put simply: Someone could take a dangerously high amount of the cough and cold medicine without even realizing it.” Overdosing on NyQuil can cause symptoms such as seizures, severe dizziness, liver problems and breathing problems, just to name a few and can be potentially fatal. Kansas man sentenced to more than 5 years for performing illegal autopsies A Kansas man has been sentenced to five years and nine months after pleading guilty to one count of wire fraud connected to performing an illegal autopsy, the US Department of Justice said. Shawn Lynn Parcells, 42, of Topeka, used his business National Autopsy Services LLC to "obtain fees from more than 350 clients for a total amount of $1,166,000," according to court documents, the DOJ said in a release Monday. "In many cases, the defendant failed to provide an authentic completed report." In the case he pleaded guilty to in May, Parcells used false credentials to convince a client he was qualified to conduct an autopsy, the DOJ said in a release. Parcells received $5,000 and gave the client an emailed copy of a final report that appeared to be written by Parcells, but no pathologist took part in the exam or report, the release said. https://www.cnn.com/2022/09/20/us/shawn-parcells-sentenced-illegal-autopsies/index.html Garbage People #26 Lazy People Shout Outs / Todd's(21st of sept) and Marianne's(25th of sept) Birthdays this week What Are We Binging? Todd Talks about Quantum Leap (2022) What old tv show should get a revival or reboot? Marianne says M.A.S.H. Jamal says Golden Girls with a diverse cast Todd says Dukes of Hazzard but they are in the north so the car is Gen Grant F-Troop reboot

Good Day for a Movie Podcast
Ep 071 // The Fifth Element

Good Day for a Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 58:39


For Sage's pick, we review an over-the-top Sci-Fi movie, The Fifth Element starring Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, Milla Jovovich, and Chris Tucker. Unsurprisingly, Star Wars was brought up many times, we talked about the performances, the technology, and we attempt to answer the question, was it so bad and over the top that it was good? This movie was directed by Luc Besson. GD4AM: 71/100 IMDb: 7.6/10 Metacritic: 52/100 RT: 71% In the colorful future, a cab driver unwittingly becomes the central figure in the search for a legendary cosmic weapon to keep Evil and Mr. Zorg at bay. This movie is currently streaming on Showtime. NEXT MOVIE REVIEW: Romancing the Stone - currently streaming on HBOMAX.

CrossPolitic Studios
TCND: Polygamy and Mental Health (Love Means Underwear) [The Comedian Next Door]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:01


Welcome to the Kitchen Table of the Comedian Next Door! The Peaches has been feeling more like her old self--which means plenty of things to complain about from the hellish world of social media... First, one of the Sister Wives divorced her husband. Word on the street is, this particular Sister Wife thinks it's "ridiculous" that her husband's attraction to her is affected by the way she treats other members of the family... (Unsurprisingly, the Internet agrees.) Next, women have been expecting their husbands to read their minds for a long time. Now--they are beginning to judge their other friends and relatives by the same standard. Love means just KNOWING what to do WITHOUT HAVING TO ASK! Finally, here are two articles for your consideration. "Hurts So Good"--about the sudden rise in invisible illnesses. Are mental illnesses contagious? "A New Way to be Mad"--first published in 2000, about the link between Transgenderism and people who want to remove healthy limbs/digits. Join us at the Fight, Laugh, Feast Conference in Knoxville, October 6th-8th. John will be glad to see you, even if The Peaches isn't. Want to know what it would be like to go vacation with a bunch of comedians? Visit johnbranyan.com for information about VACAY WITH COMICS!

Radio Menea
Ep 192: Melancholy

Radio Menea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 37:23


A deep abiding sadness. Existential dread. How would you describe melancholy? In this week's episode we dive into the expressions of melancholy in Latine music. Unsurprisingly, hay mucho que escoger. Get ready to romanticize your melancholic solitude. Featuring music by Los Diablitos, La India, Goyo, Twin Shadow, Antony Santos, La Lupe, Sonora Siguaray, Carlos y Alejandra. Show notes: bit.ly/3S5zXpw Follow us: instagram.com/RadioMenea twitter.com/RadioMenea tinyletter.com/RadioMenea

The Mark Struczewski Podcast
A Refreshingly Honest Conversation About LinkedIn - Andy Foote

The Mark Struczewski Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 47:14


Andy Foote trained to be a lawyer to please his Mother. Unsurprisingly, that didn't work out. He drifted from one job to another, frequently bored, never quite fulfilling his waning potential. Until he discovered LinkedIn in 2008. Andy on LinkedIn Overwhelmed? Snag the free guide, 10 Quick Ways to Conquer Overwhelm! It's my gift to you. http://OverwhelmSucks.com WHO IS MARK STRUCZEWSKI? Mark “Ski” Struczewski (also known as Mister Productivity) is a productivity expert that is obsessed with helping 100 million solopreneurs bust through overwhelm by 2032.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

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