Podcasts about Sainsbury

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Best podcasts about Sainsbury

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Latest podcast episodes about Sainsbury

0800YOFAM - WHTVRINNIT
WHTVRINNIT - Ep.081: I'm not moaning I swear

0800YOFAM - WHTVRINNIT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 12:45


A respectful lament about the time someone asking for money threw away my charitable goodwill donation outside Sainsbury's in Brixton and the lack of communal and societal etiquette adherance in the modern world. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/0800yofamwhateverinnit/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/0800yofamwhateverinnit/support

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life
215: Setting intentions with Susan from Hola Sober & introducing Smashed - Drynks

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 32:39


Great to team up with this cool brand!  Competition coming soon! The Smashed range includes Lager, Pale ale, Shandy, Apple and Berry ciders.  Smashed is available in selected Sainsbury's stores Smashed Pale Ale 4 pack box and the full range is in all Booths & selected Coop supermarkets in the Midlands. Online at www.drynks.store, Wisebartender, The Alcohol Free Drinks Company, Amazon, and a range of local independent retailers, pubs & restaurant venues across the UK. @drynkssocial How is your New Year going? Don't forget to set intentions, Janey chats to Susan from Hola Sober on using ritual to set intentions If you are doing Dry January connection is key, join us at www.thesoberclub.com for motivation, inspiration, connection et al Events Susan speaks about our ancestors - join us for Family Constellations Sun 22 Jan in Herts  More info here The day before Sat 21st there is a heart centered biz day in Herts also Join us for Champneys Self care in Sobriety at Tring Herts Sat-Sun 11-12 Feb Info Here If you want to do a day of motivation and creating a vision board join us for Sober by the Sea Southend Sat Feb 18 https://www.thesoberclub.com/events/ Follow Janey on social media @janeyleegrace

The Simply Vegan Podcast
Ep133. What's next for veganism? With Wicked Kitchen's Derek Sarno

The Simply Vegan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 50:47


The Simply Vegan podcast is bought to you by the team at Vegan Food & Living – the UK's best-selling vegan magazine and number 1 content site!In part 1 of today's episode, Holly and Molly share their tips for how to go vegan this Veganuary, discuss what to do if you miss cheese and provide you with some delicious meal ideas for when you're stuck for what to cook.And in part 2, don't miss the one and only DEREK SARNO! Derek is the co-founder of the popular Wicked Kitchen brand and Executive Chef and Director of Plant Based Innovation at Tesco. Find out what he's been up to, his ideas for growing the vegan movement and why he doesn't think plant-based meat has had its day. Derek also shares his advice for new vegans and discusses his life-long love of mushrooms. This episode is sponsored by our friends at White Rabbit. White Rabbit – the Italian food brand with a twist – have been creating truly authentic Italian dishes for years. From Lasagne Al Forno and Aubergine Parmigiana Ravioli to Pennette Carbonara and Arrabbiata Pizza, they know a thing or two about replicating those traditional Italian dishes with a vegan flare! Head to Sainsbury's, Waitrose, Ocado and Co-op today. Support your favourite podcast and help us to keep going!• Become a patron at patreon.com/simplyvegan and access exclusive episodes, live chats and free downloads• Visit veganfoodandliving.com and try our delicious recipes• Tag us in your social posts, @veganfoodandliving• Share this episode with a friend• Try an issue of Vegan Food and Living magazine for just 99pMusic by Purple Planet

Prick With A Fork
Sausages

Prick With A Fork

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 27:09


Duncan rants about Veganuary 2023 and tries Sainsbury's Taste The Difference Toulouse Inspired Sausages 'The Garlicy One'. 

RNZ: The Panel
The Pre-Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 14:36


Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll open the Friday Mailbag and respond to your messages from throughout the week. Plus, our panellists tell us what is on their mind this week.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll (Part 1)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 25:29


Today on The Panel Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll discuss how realistic the Road to Zero goal is and bad haircuts. Also, we return to the great Christmas cake debate.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll (Part 2)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 22:51


Today on The Panel Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Jo McCarroll discuss Inland Revenue's plan to keep a sharper eye on the "appropriateness" of tax deductions claimed by self-employed people, food myths and a surprising final entry into our coverage of the auction for the 'arrogant prick' transcript signed by Jacinda Ardern and David Seymour.

Wednesdays We Drink Wine
88: Answering your festival dilemmas & Melissa's Christmas Party Fantasy

Wednesdays We Drink Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 25:25


Inviting your ex to xmas?! To spend NYE with best friend or boyfriend? Today we're answering your festival dilemmas!We're drinking a Sainsbury's Prosecco!https://www.vivino.com/GB/en/sainsbury-s-conegliano-prosecco-superiore-brut/w/1616310?year=2021 Sophie Rating: 6Melissa Rating: 6 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Holiday Breakfast
Tom Sainsbury: Comedian on his Snapchat content and TV projects

Holiday Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 9:18


Comedian Tom Sainsbury gained national fame five years ago through his daily Snapchat videos. These included parodies of real people such as Simon Bridges, Paula Bennett, Jacinda Ardern and Judith Collins, and made-up characters like Skeet the Subantarctic Skua, foul-mouthed cat Gingerbread and audience favourite Fiona the wine critic. He also writes and stars in multiple TV projects, plays, stand-up and featured on TVNZ's Give Us A Clue.  Tom Sainsbury talked about his creative process here today. LISTEN ABOVE  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Panel Borders – Panel Borders and other podcasts
Panel Borders: Local And Locas Stories – Jaime Hernandez and Susan Sainsbury

Panel Borders – Panel Borders and other podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022


Local And Locas Stories: In this ‘feature length’ podcast, Alex Fitch talks to a pair of comics creators whose work is based around representation of marginalised people and cultures in specific times and places. Graphic novelist Susan Sainsbury discusses her Worthing based titles Kitty and Cheery Cak, about female lives lived on the South Coast […]

Wellington Mornings with Nick Mills
Friday Faceoff: Mark Sainsbury and Kerry Prendergast

Wellington Mornings with Nick Mills

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 31:18


Broadcaster Mark Sainsbury and former Wellington Mayor Dame Kerry Prendergast join Nick Mills for the final Friday Faceoff of 2022. To take out the year they debate what kind of Prime Minister Grant Robertson would make, whether private landlords should be regulated, Jacinda Ardern calling David Seymour 'such an arrogant prick', how they'd confront a burglar and which kind of Christmas tree is best.  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

News Talk 920 KVEC
Hometown Radio 12/13/22 5p: Dr. Steve Sainsbury discusses the power of forgiveness

News Talk 920 KVEC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 44:59


Hometown Radio 12/13/22 5p: Dr. Steve Sainsbury discusses the power of forgiveness

SWN Podcast
Scottish Podcast Collaboration presents The Culture Swally

SWN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 95:00


The Scottish Podcast Collaboration is a group of like-minded creators with Scottish content that everyone should hear about, brought to you by Glasgower and Scottish Murders, in association with Discover Scotland Magazine. Celebrating the best of Scottish film and TV shows. Each episode we will take a look at some bizarre and funny news stories from Scotland and review one of our favourite Scottish films and TV shows. We're putting on our finest wolf-man and clown masks this week on The Culture Swally as we take a look at the 1985 classic ‘Restless Natives'. Directed by Michael Hoffman and starring Vincent Friel and Joe Mullaney it follows the adventures of two Scottish youths from Edinburgh, who in rebellion of their drab lives, become modern day highwaymen! In the news this week we meet a woman who was appalled with the man next to her at a football match, discover the scourge of Sainsbury's in Aberdeen, find the slowest sleeper train in Scotland and hear about a girl who shares a lot on common with a packet of crisps. So join us for a Swally, on The Culture Swally Hustle Gym Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/hustle_gymlife/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/HustleGymLife Website - https://www.hustle-life.co.uk/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scotwresnet/message

Outliers
Outliers Episode 14: Emma Garnett

Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 31:33


https://www.linkedin.com/in/emma-garnett-3a3b438a/ I am working on understanding and increasing the sustainability of supermarket food products, funded by Sainsbury's. I am interested in understanding how we overcome economic, social and political barriers to reaching net zero greenhouse gas emissions and conserving nature. My latest papers on reducing meat consumption and increasing vegetarian sales in cafeterias: Garnett et al (2021) J Env Psychology. https://tinyurl.com/yeg64v67 Free to read: https://tinyurl.com/yfa2e7w4 Garnett et al (2020) Nature Food. https://rdcu.be/b6fbF ; https://www.nature.com/articles/s43016-020-0132-8 Garnett et al (2019) PNAS. tinyurl.com/y5f6qug3 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pencilsandpistons/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pencilsandpistons/support

Crime Divers
Scottish Collaboration Episode - The Culture Swally Podcast

Crime Divers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 94:16


We're putting on our finest wolf-man and clown masks this week on The Culture Swally as we take a look at the 1985 classic ‘Restless Natives'. Directed by Michael Hoffman and starring Vincent Friel and Joe Mullaney it follows the adventures of two Scottish youths from Edinburgh, who in rebellion of their drab lives, become modern day highwaymen! In the news this week we meet a woman who was appalled with the man next to her at a football match, discover the scourge of Sainsbury's in Aberdeen, find the slowest sleeper train in Scotland and hear about a girl who shares a lot on common with a packet of crisps. So join us for a Swally, on The Culture Swally. Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/cultureswallypod/ Twitter https://twitter.com/SwallyPod Or get in touch at cultureswally@gmail.com Music from Darry 2 Vance: Royalty Free Music from https://darry2vance.com

Table Manners with Jessie Ware
Bonus Episode: Alison Hammond

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 44:44


It's December! Christmas is right round the corner, so we thought we'd give you an extra festive offering this week… a special bonus episode with the wonderful, hysterical Alison Hammond! Thanks to our friends at @Sainsbury's we tucked into a delicious Taste the Difference Crimbo feast, sipped cocktails and laughed A LOT. We discuss Christmas Eve takeaways, the joys of an air fryer, her mum's ‘Jamlish' food, Barbie Girl - and whether to pud or not pud!If you're looking for some food inspo this Christmas, we tried and can confirm that @Sainsbury's Taste the Difference range has it all there for you! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

This Week In Location Based Marketing
Location Weekly - Episode 597

This Week In Location Based Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 25:13


On this week of #LocationWeekly we talk about H&M going experiential in Brooklyn NYC, SuperGPS means positioning with 10cm accuracy, Wain app brings location-based experiences to fans in Qatar & Sainsbury's partnering with Checkout.com to remove the till at stores. Listen in now!

Having a GAS...
Having a GAS with... Sophie Lewis

Having a GAS...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 53:49


Sophie Lewis is the Chief Strategy Officer at M&C Saatchi London, having recently joined from DentsuMB.  Lewis' previous work includes planning on Mother's original “Here come the girls” work for Boots in 2007 and on Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO's “Live well for less” positioning for Sainsbury's in the early 2010s. She was also CSO at VMLY&R and is a member of the APG committee.

CFA UK
Episode 11 Part 1: Fiduciary duty and the role of lobbying in climate change

CFA UK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 27:49


In part one of our latest Climate Change podcast episode, Tom Gosling, Executive Fellow, London Business School and John Teahan, CFA discuss Tom's work assessing evidence underpinning sustainability research. They consider non-financial issues, within the context of our fiduciary duty, as stewards of our client's capital. Tom has researched and written extensively on subjects such as pay, corporate governance, sustainable investing, stakeholder capitalism, and climate. His curiosity in these issues grew from a personal commitment to reduce his own carbon footprint by 50% by 2025. In this podcast, Tom explores how the corporate governance system and the interaction between investors and companies either support or inhibit the wider societal changes we need to make. Discover whether there is pressure to only focus on the positives of ESG, and consider examples of impact from companies like Sainsbury's. Listen to Tom's story and his findings to learn more about these issues.

RNZ: The Panel
The Pre-Panel with Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 13:33


Wallace and panellists Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury open up the mailbag with correspondence from the past week of news and discuss what's inside. Plus, our panellists tell us what has been on their mind this week.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury (Part 1)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 24:17


Today on The Panel Wallace and panellists Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury discuss whether the OCR hike from this past week has caused people to view Black Friday as a chance to save rather than spend. Also, they discuss whether income insurance is a necessary safety net for New Zealanders, and whether chewing gum during an interview is acceptable.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury (Part 2)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 24:54


Today on The Panel Wallace and panellists Sarah Sparks and Mark Sainsbury discuss White Ribbon Day and the continual work to prevent domestic violence. Plus, they discuss Christmas spirit and what it takes to organise the country's biggest Christmas Parade, and the history of the Waterbed in Aotearoa.

Campaign podcast
107. Campaign podcast: Christmas ads special with Vicki Maguire and Alex Grieve

Campaign podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 43:56


Christmas ads have been dropping faster than santa's gift deliveries so in this week's podcast Campaign has talked to two creative powerhouses to find out what they thought of some of the biggest campaigns.In the first of two special episodes on Christmas ads, Havas London's chief creative officer Vicki Maguire and Bartle Bogle Hegarty's chief creative officer Alex Grieve offer up their views, while also explaining how they pulled together their own festive spots, for Asda and Tesco.They are joined by Campaign's creativity and culture editor Gurjit Degan and premium content editor Nicola Merrifield to talk about ads from John Lewis, Aldi, Boots, Sainsbury's and O2.Further reading: Asda calls on Buddy the Elf to spread Christmas cheerTesco is on a mission to spread joy this ChristmasJohn Lewis uses 2022 Christmas ad to ignite conversations about children in careAldi Christmas ad parodies Home Alone as Kevin the Carrot gets left behindBoots continues to spread ‘joy' while offering ‘most affordable' Christmas everPudding is the problem in Sainsbury's latest Christmas spotO2 highlights data poverty in Christmas ad featuring a snowgran Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

U.S. National Privacy Legislation Podcast
81 | Looking at Cyber Leadership & Costly Mistakes

U.S. National Privacy Legislation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 44:05


This week we are joined by Rachel Briggs and Richard Brinson from Savanti, a UK-based cybersecurity consulting entity. Richard Brinson is CEO of Savanti, has been CISO at several large corporations, including Unilever and Sainsbury's. He was named one of the top CISOs in the world and has over 20 years of experience in the field. Rachel Briggs is an Executive Adviser to Savanti and a leading expert on security and regularly advises large multinationals and governments. She is an Associate Fellow and Chatam House and was awarded the OBE in 2014. Richard and Rachel have just authored The Future of Cyber Security Leadership Series and their first publication is “Cyber Security Leadership is Broken: Here's how to fix it.”

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast
The Weekly Listen: Early Changes at Twitter, Stores Within Stores, and a Drone Candy Crush Ad | Nov 10, 2022

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 45:41


On today's episode, we discuss what to make of the early changes at Twitter, whether stores within stores really work, what to expect now that Netflix Basic With Ads is here, a drone Candy Crush ad in the sky, Sainsbury's playing the loyalty long game, an explanation of the ways US consumers cut costs, how much Americans love cheese, and more. Tune in to the discussion with our director of reports editing Rahul Chadha and analysts Suzy Davidkhanian and Max Willens.   For sponsorship opportunities contact us: advertising@insiderintelligence.com For more information visit: https://www.insiderintelligence.com/contact/advertise/ Have questions or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at podcast@emarketer.com    © 2022 Insider Intelligence   Connected TV makes television advertising a whole lot easier. With precision targeting and accurate measurement, brands can drive performance and tap into TV's impact and prestige. MNTN makes it even easier—and more effective—with a self-serve, performance-driven marketing solution.   Get started today.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam wolf joker britain catholic beatles mothers lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge birmingham wright iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot james joyce gnome syd pollock jenner abbey road rock music gog brian wilson cautionary tales elektra lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill jeff beck arthurian groupies marquee sainsbury willows etta james freak out i ching opel dick clark gilmour howlin edwardian coasters walk like gk chesterton john lee hooker bo diddley wish you were here labour mp tennyson richard wright sgt pepper penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston syd barrett new left john peel allemande manfred mann nick mason free school amm jimi hendrix experience klose sdp johnny b goode pretty things shine on rubber soul girl guides liberal mps american bandstand oar chubby checker notting hill carnival ray davies psychedelic experiences harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records frith bacharach roky erickson steptoe tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rick wright rhymer lodgers radio london distributism entranced ewan maccoll fred frith crazy diamond quaalude incredible string band belloc pete anderson partita no rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young cloudberry interstellar overdrive dave gilmour grimble nick kent norman smith ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman arnold layne malcolm jones dodder smokestack lightnin tilt araiza
Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast
Euro Market Open: Wall St. pressure reverberated into APAC post-Powell; BoE & ISM services ahead

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 6:55


US stocks ultimately suffered notable losses after markets saw a dovish reaction to the Fed statement but a hawkish one during Powell's presserFOMC hiked rates by 75bps as expected and noted the Fed will take into account "the cumulative tightening of monetary policy, the lags with which monetary policy affects economic activity and inflation, and economic and financial developments"Fed Chair Powell during the presser suggested they still have some ways to go and data suggests the ultimate level of rates will be higher than previously expectedAPAC stocks were mostly lower; US equity futures eked mild gains overnight but with the recovery insignificant compared to the sell-off triggered by Fed Chair PowellOvernight, DXY retreated beneath the 112.00 level following the tumultuous post-FOMC fluctuations, 10yr UST futures were stuck around the prior day's lowsLooking ahead, highlights include Swiss CPI, EZ Unemployment, US IJC, Composite/Services PMI (Final), Factory Orders & ISM Services, Norges Bank & BoE Policy Announcements, Speeches from BoE's Bailey & Mann, ECB's Lagarde, de Cos, Panetta & Elderson, Supply from Spain & FranceEarnings from Rolls-Royce, Sainsbury's, ING, BNP, Stellantis, Euronext, ConocoPhillips, Starbucks, PayPal & ModernaClick here for the Week Ahead previewRead the full report covering Equities, Forex, Fixed Income, Commodites and more on Newsquawk

In Touch
The Court Hearing About Access Services in Supermarkets; Parliamentary Eye Health Event; Swimming

In Touch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 18:53


Access services in supermarkets are, for some blind and visually impaired people, an essential service to gather the exact groceries you need. Services like assisted shopping, where a member of staff takes you around the store gathering items for you, are offered by a lot of supermarkets but some were suspended during the pandemic. Auriol Britton decided to take Sainsbury's Supermarkets to court when she had a problem with her local store in Bristol, primarily based on the suspension of their assisted shopping service. We invited Auriol onto the program to outline the problem she had and what happened in court. Demand for eye services is rising rapidly and the NHS is struggling to keep up. Well, The Eyes Have It is a partnership between the Macular Society, Fight for Sight, The Royal College of Ophthalmologists and other sight loss organisations and they held a parliamentary a drop-in event at Westminster last week. They are calling for a national eye care plan to tackle the problems patients are facing. Our reporter Fern Lulham provides the details. (NB - Dr Peter Hampson is from the Association of Optometrists.) And swimming can be a great form of exercise for blind and visually impaired people but keen swimmer Aletea Sellers contacted us when she had a problem in getting access provisions put in place at her local swimming pools. She tells us the responses she got, good and bad. Presenter: Peter White Producer: Beth Hemmings Production Coordinator: Liz Poole Website image description: Peter White sits smiling in the centre of the image. He is wearing a dark green jumper with the collar of a check shirt peeking at the top. Above Peter's head is the BBC logo, Across Peter's chest reads "In Touch" and beneath that is the Radio 4 logo. The background is a series of squares that are different shades of blue.

Every Nation Rosebank
The Naked Truth - Healthy Sexual Boundaries - CJ Sainsbury

Every Nation Rosebank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 44:19


The Naked Truth - Healthy Sexual Boundaries - CJ Sainsbury by Every Nation Rosebank

Stationery Freaks
The power of mind maps and how to create them using stationery

Stationery Freaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 22:24


In this episode: We explain what mind maps are, how they work and what we use them for.For more details on different mind maps we recommend this post. We also introduce our new newsletter! Helen introduces her new learning of choice - Arabic. And how she is using brush pens and a new notebook for it. Rob steals Helen stationery. Video of that here. Rob talks about his new Academic planner that makes him look all sophisticated. Helen talks about NaNoWriMo and how she's only ever made it to day 3. Helen talks about fine liners Rob buys some stationery from Sainsbury's but is less than impressed with their shop display. And Helen adds that TKMaxx isn't much better for their displays. https://www.stationeryfreaks.com/episodes/mindmaps

Right2Food
The State of the Nation

Right2Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 29:16


Accompanying the publication this week of the Food Foundation's annual State of the Nation report, we look at how the Out of Home sector is woefully behind in setting health targets, and providing healthier food options for the vast number of people - including children - who eat out regularly.Presented by Food Foundation young food ambassador, Saf, we hear from Sainsbury's, Eating Better and the Soil Association about why mandatory reporting on access to healthy and affordable food when we're out and about is so important.For full details of the report, click here Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Sustainable Squad
S5: Ep10 Beer, brewing and the sober curious with Freestar

Sustainable Squad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 42:10


Alcohol is everywhere, it's almost impossible to get away from and it can cause some real scenes if you're the one NOT drinking at a party. However, younger generations are drinking less, the health implications of booze is better known and finally there are brands making tasty alcohol free options - like Freestar. For this bonus episiode, I'm joined by one of the co-founders of Freestar, Eddy. It was super interesting to hear how their beer's brewed, why it tastes so good, the sober curious, the part time drinkers, the waste in the beer brewing industry and some great causes Freestar work for. We are big fans of this 0.5% beer in our house and I'm delighted to confirm you can now buy this beer in both Sainsbury's and Tesco. Cheers!

Goal Camp
Episode 74 - Phyllis Johnson, Defying The Odds

Goal Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 27:38


As an African-American little girl born in Alabama in the 60's, there weren't any expectations for her future. However, a supportive family taught her that she could accomplish anything she set her mind to. And she did! As Group Director, Business Development Retail at Catalina, Phyllis Johnson is responsible for leading a team that manages the needs of retail clients by demonstrating Catalina's value in the marketplace. She also participates in advancing Catalina's Diversity Equity & Inclusion (DE&I) initiatives. Phyllis measures her success as a leader in terms of how she is helping others. Helping others is her primary purpose in her workplace and personal life. Phyllis has over 25+ years of retail expertise and experience. During her career, she has worked with numerous US retailers such as Ahold, Southeastern Grocers, Giant Eagle and Price Chopper assisting them with private brand strategy development which included: Private Brand Portfolio Optimization, New Brand(s) Creation, and Private Brand Sales and Penetration Growth. Phyllis also spent time in London, England working with Sainsbury and their private brand supplier community. She led a team of 45 associates who covered Sainsbury's total footprint to enhance private brands on-shelf positioning/merchandising and to drive expert bakery training for in-store associates. Phyllis is known throughout the industry as a true professional who strives for results without compromising her integrity. She is a proven leader who leads by example and puts service to her team first and foremost. In 2021, Phyllis was awarded the Store Brand 2021 Game Changers Award by StoreBrands Magazine. The award recognizes people, private brands and company innovations that are taking store brands to the next level. In addition, she was named one of WISE's 2020 Top Women in Store Brands. She now sits on the WISE Board of Directors and mentors the WISE Junior Board. She is also sought after as a speaker/panelist for various industry conferences, such as the Velocity Diversity Conference on August 4, 2020. Her topic was “A Seat at the Table: Why Diversity Matters”. It explored issues relating to both black industry professionals and consumers and how retailers and their brands can create more diverse and inclusive organizations, experiences, brands, and products. Prior to joining Catalina, Phyllis worked with various celebrity chefs, TV personalities and their agencies assisting them in bringing their brands and products to the retail marketplace. Phyllis loves giving back to the community and supports various nonprofit organizations by volunteering her time to teach and mentor young and upcoming business professionals. She is also a fitness and health enthusiast. Contact @: LinkedIn: Phyllis Johnson (She/Her), Instagram: phyllisjohn77, TikTok: phyllisj1963

I'll Try That Podcast
115 - Sainsbury's | Depot No 90 Bitter

I'll Try That Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


This week, the boys review a new take on a tried classic, a 2% bitter, by none other than the supermarket Sainsbury's. Let's see how this compares to the other Bitters they've tried. In the Hop Topic, Rich brings us slightly left field news about the latest in celebrity moves within the alcohol sector.Be sure to follow I'll Try That Podcast

British Murders Podcast
S07E04 | Colin Campbell | The Murders of Claire Woolterton and Deirdre Sainsbury

British Murders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 30:13


In the fourth episode of British Murders Season 7, I tell the story of Colin Campbell. On August 28, 1981, Colin Campbell murdered 17-year-old Claire Woolterton and dumped her body by the River Thames. Three years later, in December 1984, he murdered 29-year-old Deidre Sainsbury. Campbell was convicted of murder in the case of Deidre in July 1985, but it was later reduced to a manslaughter conviction. He wasn't arrested on suspicion of Claire's murder until November 2012. He was finally handed a life sentence for murdering Claire Woolterton on December 4, 2013, with a minimum term of 24 years. ⁣⁣For all things British Murders, please visit my website:⁣ https://www.britishmurders.com/⁣ Intro music:⁣ David John Brady - 'Throw Down the Gauntlet'⁣ https://linktr.ee/davidjohnbradymusic⁣ My recording equipment:⁣ Shure SM7B Vocal Microphone Cloud Microphone Cloudlifter CL1 Focusrite Scarlett Solo USB Audio Interface Rode PSA-1 Professional Studio Boom Arm Recorded and Edited in:⁣ Hindenberg PRO References:⁣ www.britishmurders.com/colincampbell/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury (Pt 2)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 21:35


Today on the second half of The Panel, Wallace and panellists Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury talk about the life of legendary country singer Loretta Lynn and what the Chief Ombudsman has called the entirely preventable death of a five year old Tauranga boy. Plus they discuss tiny homes and the call of the kookaburra in Aotearoa.

RNZ: The Panel
The Pre-Panel with Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 15:00


Wallace and panellists Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury discuss the amazing amount of rubbish one man has been collecting from the country's beaches Plus, our panellists tell us what has been on their mind this week.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury (Pt 1)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 24:28


Today on the Panel Wallace and panellists Lynda Hallinan and Mark Sainsbury discuss the unseasonable icy blast moving up the country and the OCR hike. Also they discuss the pros and cons of streaming in schools and the controversy over TVNZ's new show FBoy Island.

The Trust Doctor: Restoring Trust & Enriching Significant Relationships
Sustainably Scale Your Business For Growth Through Partnerships And Innovation With Simon Duffy

The Trust Doctor: Restoring Trust & Enriching Significant Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 58:43


Scaling your business is more often than not, a team effort. In this episode, Simon Duffy, the Founder of Waken Mouthcare and Bulldog Skincare, shares his experience navigating business partnerships that ultimately lead to the globalization of his brand. Joining Dr. Patty Ann Tublin, Simon shares business advice on what makes a healthy working relationship and explains why they can be necessary to build and scale your business. He also discusses how they're branching out and innovating their products sustainably and what they're doing to meet hybrid workplace needs of employees. Don't miss out on business advice that can fuel your growth by tuning in. Bullets:· From Accounting to blue-chip companies to inventor of 1 of the UK's largest men's skincare brands· Founder of Bulldog Skin Care and Waken Mouth Care· Bulldog makes $105M+ globally in retail sales per year· 2016 Bulldog sold to Edgewell Personal Care, expanding into 31 countries· Started creative innovation career at Saatchi and Saatchi for P&D & Diageo· 2019 developed Waken Mouthcare, launching in Boots & Sainsbury's nationwide· Waken has earned 4 beauty industry awards for sustainability· Previously: Developed curriculum for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at New College of the Humanities· Currently: Investor, mentor and coach for a number of UK start ups· Mission: To continue inventing and developing sustainable products and ingredients· Sustainable examples: World's first razor made from recyclable bamboo & each Waken mouthwash is CarbonNeutral®Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review & share! https://www.drpattyann.com/podcast

START UP. START NOW.
#40: Meatless Farm: UK's fastest growing plant-based meat alternative company with Morten Toft Bech (Founder)

START UP. START NOW.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 67:35


Morten Toft Bech is an entrepreneur and investor who started Meatless Farm in 2016 to help reduce the world's dependency on intensively farmed meat. He and his family had struggled to find a meat replacement that the whole family enjoyed and that wasn't too expensive.In 2018, the company launched its original fresh mince in UK retailer, Sainsbury's. It is now one of the UK's fastest growing plant-based brands, available in over 20 countries with major retail and foodservice partners. Morten has a finance background and is a serial entrepreneur within the technology sector. He has combined his passion for plant-based eating, entrepreneurial spirit and business acumen to help create a brand ripe for global growth. Listen in to find out more about Morten's first venture, Meatless Farm's journey and how to scale your business globally .Find out more about Morten Toft Bech via: LinkedIn. Find out more about Meatless Farm via: website, Instagram and LinkedIn. A new episode EVERY WEEK, showcasing the journeys of inspirational entrepreneurs, side hustlers and their mentors. We discuss their successes, challenges and how they overcame setbacks. Focusing mainly on what they wish they had known when starting out. The podcast aims to give aspiring entrepreneurs the confidence to START UP and START NOW by showcasing real and relatable entrepreneurs. After all, seeing is believing!Join the conversation using #startupstartnow and tagging us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Don't forget to leave a review as it really helps us reach those who need it and allows us to get the best guests for you!Connect with START UP. START NOW. and to nominate a guest please visit: www.startupstartnow.co.uk.  To connect with Sharena Shiv please visit: www.sharena.co.uk.

RNZ: The Panel
The Pre-Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:32


Today on The Panel, Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter discuss the pros and cons of bring your pets to work. Plus, our panellists tell us what has been on their minds this week.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter (Part One)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 22:36


Today on The Panel, Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter discuss the results of the independant investigation into Tauranga MP Sam Uffindell's alleged bullying and The Queen's funeral.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter (Part Two)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 25:41


Today on The Panel, Wallace and panellists Mark Sainsbury and Amy Carter discuss the spike in Kiwis taking out mortgages over $1,000,000 and why chronic fatigue syndrome should be recognised as a disability. Plus, they speak to a Brit who queued for 12 hours to catch a glimpse of The Queen.

Revue de presse française
À la Une: le dernier adieu à la reine

Revue de presse française

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:13


« Les funérailles du siècle », s'exclament Le Télégramme ou encore L'Ardennais. « Funérailles planétaires », renchérit L'Union. « Adieu royal pour Elizabeth II », insiste Le Républicain Lorrain. « Dernier hommage », pointe L'Est Républicain. « L'adieu du monde à la reine Elizabeth », lance La Dépêche. « Le monde entier réuni en mémoire d'Elizabeth II », constate Le Figaro. « Du monde, il y en aura ce lundi à Londres », martèle le journal. Et du beau monde… « La planète entière se presse devant le cercueil de cette monarque hors norme, pointeLe Figaro. On attend quelque 500 invités de marque, dont plus de 200 chefs d'État et de gouvernement, dignitaires étrangers de haut rang ou autres têtes couronnées. » Et « on attend des centaines de milliers - peut-être plus d'un million - de personnes dans les rues de Londres. Sur le trajet de la procession, des admirateurs de la reine campent depuis déjà quarante-huit heures. » Thermomètre des relations internationales Alors, commente Le Figaro, « le monde va s'afficher ce lundi lors des funérailles de la souveraine tel qu'il est : concurrentiel, divisé, sporadiquement en guerre et tout juste bon à sauver les apparences le temps d'une cérémonie en mondovision. » Et « on cherchera les absents. Plus de mille invitations ont été postées, mais le Russe Vladimir Poutine n'en a pas reçu, se trouvant relégué en compagnie de parias de l'acabit des talibans afghans, du boucher syrien Assad et de la junte birmane. Alors que le Chinois Xi Jinping sera représenté "à haut niveau", même les Iraniens et les Nord-Coréens pourront envoyer un ambassadeur. (…) Ainsi, poursuit Le Figaro, même ceux qui jugent archaïque cet objet de curiosité qu'est la monarchie britannique peuvent s'y référer comme à un thermomètre des relations internationales. Une dernière fois ce lundi, Elizabeth II va tenir en respect les adversaires des valeurs de démocratie, de pluralisme et de paix. Ceux qui entoureront son cercueil s'y rallieront, au moins par la posture. Leurs "sujets" pourront les en tenir comptables. » Un pays figé… Ce matin, le royaume « se réveille à l'arrêt », remarqueLibération. Ce lundi a été décrété jour férié national. « Pas question de faire un saut au supermarché pour aller chercher de quoi petit-déjeuner : Tesco, Sainsbury's, Lidl et Aldi n'ouvrent pas, les enseignes McDonald's sont fermées, les postiers restent chez eux et même Amazon mettra ses livraisons en suspens le temps des funérailles de la reine, qui commencent à 11 heures (12 heures, heure de Paris). » Qui plus est, pointe encore Libération, « la célèbre grande roue de Londres est immobile, les musées fermés. Impossible d'aller voir la réplique de cire d'Elizabeth II au musée de Madame Tussaud à Londres ou de faire un tour au parc d'attractions de Blackpool. Le gouvernement a assuré que ce jour férié s'appliquerait "à la discrétion des employeurs", qui ont rivalisé d'empressement pour libérer leurs salariés. » Mais « qu'on se rassure, conclut le journal : les pubs seront ouverts pour ceux qui veulent communier autour d'un verre. » Des obsèques préparées depuis plus de… 60 ans ! Le Parisien pour sa part nous dévoile « les secrets » de cette cérémonie… Une cérémonie millimétrée, « préparée depuis plus de soixante ans, nous apprend le journal, dans le plus grand secret. » En effet, « quelques années à peine après le couronnement de la reine Elizabeth II, en 1953, les autorités ont commencé à planifier l'événement qui ne manquerait pas de se produire un jour. Une opération secrète appelée London Bridge. La reine est jeune, certes, mais personne ne peut deviner la longévité des Windsor. (…) Dans les années 2000, la reine a passé les 70 ans, les réunions à Buckingham Palace ont lieu deux à trois fois par an, et elle est régulièrement consultée sur le déroulé de ses futures obsèques. » Elizabeth II a donc été associée de près au déroulé de ce dernier hommage, pointeLe Parisien. « La reine a choisi les prières et les chants de cette cérémonie religieuse. (…) La reine a aussi exprimé le vœu d'être accompagnée tout au long de la journée par son joueur de cornemuse personnel. (…) Et elle a choisi elle-même son corbillard : un modèle Jaguar, doté de larges vitres afin que le public puisse apercevoir de loin son cercueil tout au long de l'ultime parcours, de l'arche de Wellington à Londres jusqu'au château de Windsor. »

Every Nation Rosebank
Healthy Living - Permission to Heal - CJ Sainsbury

Every Nation Rosebank

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 40:50


Healthy Living - Permission to Heal - CJ Sainsbury by Every Nation Rosebank

Call To Action
94: Tom Roach

Call To Action

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 61:44


This week all it took was a tasty tipple of classic TV ads to trap tenor turned top strategist, and alliteration aficionado, Tom Roach.  Currently VP of Brand Planning at Jellyfish, Tom has worked at some brilliant acronyms agencies like AMV BBDO, Leo Burnett, BBH, and adam&eveDDB, creating pitch-perfect campaigns for McDonald's, Sainsbury's, and the BBC to name a few.  He gets vocal on a ton of topics, including his early days as a choral scholar, his first agency job, what account people and snow ploughs have in common, The Guardian Points of View ad, why funnels getting flack is unfair, whether advertising will ever die, freedom within a framework, why media, strategy and creative shouldn't be siloed, a dedication to Les Binet, and more.  ///// Follow Tom on Twitter and LinkedIn  Here's his blog Make sure to read:  Most marketing is bad because it ignores the most basic data Why advertising will never die The sales funnel is wrong but it's here to stay, so let's fix it. And his Marketing Week column  Check out Jeremy Bullmore on Plonk and Placebos   If you enjoyed this episode, please do share and review the pod and help more marketers feel better about marketing. Tom also asks that you check out the brilliant work of Dr. Grace Kite (who'll be on Call to Action very soon) and CTA alumni Professor Karen Nelson-Field.  Here's your starting point:  The wrong and the real of marketing effectiveness by Dr. Grace and Tom And here's a thread from Tom on Professor Karen's research  Timestamps (01:59) - Quick fire questions  (04:23) - His beginnings as a choral singer (07:19) - First proper job in an agency (09:41) - Why account people are often unsung heroes  (17:51) - What makes Jellyfish different from other agencies? (20:41) - His adapted sales funnel and adopting freedom within a framework (23:29) - Why media, strategy and creative shouldn't be siloed  (32:40) - Advertising will never die  (36:49) - Incredible value of brands  (38:20) - Listener Questions from Jonny McGrath-Smith, Nick Ellis and Will Humphrey (48:55) - 4 Pertinent Posers Tom's book recommendation is: The Anatomy of Humbug by Paul Feldwick /////

LuAnna: The Podcast
'She's had a really rough time!'

LuAnna: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 49:03


BE WARNED: It's LuAnna, and this podcast contains honest, upfront opinions, rants, bants and general explicit content. But you know you love it!On this week's LuAnna the Podcast: house rules, the pool cover, visiting the Palladium, Anna pied in Sainsbury's, Luisa is a grandmother, some birth coaching, a new wife regretting her choices and shitting in someone's flat by mistake. Plus, the Britney saga continues, Lauren Goodger's sadly attacked following the funeral of her child, a Nana weirdo and getting off to your sister shagging. Remember, if you want to get in touch you can:Email us at luannathepodcast@gmail.com OR drop us a WhatsApp on 07745 266947

Business of Apps
#116: An App Launch: Expectations vs. Reality with Amrick Chauhan, Lead Product Manager at Which?

Business of Apps

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 26:45


Expectations versus reality. This theme is as old as this world. In so many walks of life, we set our expectations high, we're driven by optimism, which on itself is a great quality but sometimes it may lead you to a very frustrating experience. Mobile app development and marketing can be one of the brightest examples, especially when venture capital is involved and the expectations that app projects will deliver quick returns are high.  Today we have Amrick to tell us the story of expectations versus the reality of developing and launching the app called Which?. Today's Topics Include: Amrick’s career spans Financial Times, Sainsbury, KFC, Guardian, and now Which? – the UK’s consumer champion, the non-profit organization that protects consumers. Which? app development key

Somebody Knows
E35 - The Murder Of Alan Wood

Somebody Knows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 25:39


 When a few days had passed in October 2009, without anybody seeing 50-year-old Alan Wood at work or sitting at his favourite pub, his friends and colleagues began to worry. It was not like Alan to disappear like that, and so a friend and colleague drove to his house in Lound, Lincolnshire, to check on him. What they discovered inside Alan's bungalow was like a still from a slasher movie.  Anyone having information concerning the murder of Alan Wood should contact Lincolnshire Police on 101, quoting Operation Magnesium, or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 I would love for you to consider supporting this show on Patreon, where, as a huge Thank You, you'll receive early access to new episodes, a weekly bonus episodes, an invitation to our private Facebook group, exclusive voting powers, and more! Click here to learn more.Operation MagnesiumAlan Wood MurderGoogle Maps - Alan's houseAlan Wood death: 'New leads' in 2009 'disturbing murder'Police investigating the murder of Alan Wood say their 10-year-on appeal resulted innew calls from the publicAlan Wood murder: Police launch new appeal 10 years after Sainsbury's worker wasbrutally tortured and killedTortured and murdered: 10 years after brutal killing, police won't give up on AlanWood10 years on from brutal Lincolnshire murder of Alan Wood from Gillingham policerenew appeal to find killerDNA found at murder victim Alan Wood's Lound home will be reworked under newforensic tests to help bring killer to justiceKellogg's Global PoliticsHusband and wife team, Dr. Anita and Ryan Kellogg, take on the latest international...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Newshour
British Olympian ‘trafficked' as a child

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 49:24


Sir Mo Farah has revealed he was brought to the UK illegally as a child and forced to work as a domestic servant. He was given the name Mohamed Farah by those who flew him over from Djibouti. Also on the programme, a BBC investigation finds British Special Forces - the SAS – allegedly executed detainees in Afghanistan. And, the James Webb telescope, the largest ever space telescope, has peered through cosmic dust and clouds and brought back its first images of the earliest stars. (Photo: Mo Farah celebrates winning the Men's 3000m Final at the Sainsbury's Anniversary Games, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London. Credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire)