Podcasts about Tamil Nadu

State in southern India

  • 601PODCASTS
  • 2,559EPISODES
  • 24mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 5, 2022LATEST
Tamil Nadu

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Tamil Nadu

Show all podcasts related to tamil nadu

Latest podcast episodes about Tamil Nadu

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - தமிழக மாணவரிடையே கஞ்சா பாவனை அதிகரிப்பு

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 6:35


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - தமிழகத்தில் நாளுக்கு நாள் போதைப் பொருட்களின் உபயோகம் அதிகரித்து வருவது அதிர்ச்சியை ஏற்படுத்தி வருகிறது. இளைஞர்கள் மட்டும் அல்லாமல் பள்ளி மாணவர்களும் கஞ்சா பழக்கத்திற்கு அடிமையாகி வருகின்றனர். இதுபற்றிய கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu - தமிழ்நாட்டில் RSS பேரணிக்கு நீதிமன்றம் அனுமதி. சீமான் கடும் எதிர்ப்பு!

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 6:01


Raj, our correspondent in Tamil Nadu, compiled this report. - தமிழ்நாட்டில் ஆர்எஸ்எஸ் இயக்கத்தின் பேரணியை நவம்பர் 6 அன்று நடத்த சென்னை உயர் நீதிமன்றம் அனுமதியளித்துள்ளது. இந்த உத்தரவுக்கு தனது கடுமையான எதிர்ப்பை தெரிவித்துள்ளார் நாம் தமிழர் கட்சியின் தலைமை ஒருங்கிணைப்பாளர் சீமான். ஆர்எஸ்எஸ்ஸின் பேரணிக்கு தமிழக அரசு தடை விதித்துள்ள நிலையில் அதனை ஏற்காது நீதிமன்றம் அனுமதி வழங்கிருப்பதென்பது ஏமாற்றமளிக்கிறது என்று கண்டனம் தெரிவித்துள்ளார் சீமான். கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

Business Standard Podcast
Which states produce India's engineering workforce?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 5:59


The results of the IIT entrance exam JEE-Advanced released on September 11th showed that the IIT Delhi zone had the most number of candidates in the top 500 with 133. Followed closely by IIT Madras zone with 132 candidates and IIT Bombay zone with 126 students. And in the top 10 list, IIT Madras circle was ahead with five candidates followed by IIT Bombay Zone at three and IIT Delhi and Kharagpur zones each claiming one spot each.      Uttar Pradesh emerged as the top state with 3,864 qualifying candidates while Rajasthan, home to tuition hub Kota, took the second spot with 3,339 candidates. Maharashtra is sending 3,036 candidates to IITs whereas coaching hubs of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana ranked fourth and fifth.  Tamil Nadu, which boasts of the highest annual enrolment into various engineering courses, does not feature in the top five. In the 2017-18 academic year, about 1.58 lakh students enrolled in UG and PG courses in the engineering and technology domain in the state. Andhra Pradesh followed it with 1.01 lakh students. Maharashtra comes next with 1 lakh enrolments.  Half of all the engineering seats in India are located in the five southern states namely Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, and Kerala. Rest of the seats are fairly well-distributed across the country.     But the all-India capacity utilisation is as low as 49.2%. While the approved engineering seats in 2017-18 was 16.6 lakh, the number of students who enrolled was 8.18 lakh. This indicates the supply of engineering seats exceeds the demand for the same.  In 2013-14, enrolment was 59% of total capacity. States with the lower number of seats have reported higher enrolment percentages while the states with larger capacity have reported lower percentage of enrolment in engineering, with Karnataka being an exception.  The enrolment percentage in Tamil Nadu, which had 3.02 lakh engineering seats in 2017-18, was just 53% while Karnataka's was 65%. Delhi with about 10,700 seats had an enrolment ratio of 79%. Overall, the number of students who found placement at the end of the academic year was 3.45 lakh or about 42% of the total number of students who enrolled in engineering. This is an increase from 29% of students placed in 2013-14. Now comes the most crucial factor: the employability. A NASSCOM survey in 2019 had revealed that out of about 15 lakh engineering graduates which India churns out every year, only 2.5 lakh land jobs. The National Employability Report for Engineers 2019 by SHL shows that employability of engineers in IT services companies is just 16.25% and 3.4% for IT products. It goes as high as 39% for non-tech roles like ITeS/BPO associate.  This report was based on a sample of more than 170,000 engineering students from 750+ engineering colleges across multiple Indian states. The report indicates that students from Bihar, Jharkhand, Delhi, Haryana and West Bengal have the highest employability in IT services roles. Odisha, Telangana, Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh form the next tier in employability. Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Punjab and Rajasthan fell in the third category. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra were in the bottom 25 percentile bin.  States with the highest number of colleges showed the lowest percent employability.

Life, Death and the Space Between
Indian Palm Leaf Reading with Dr. Q Moayad

Life, Death and the Space Between

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:29 Very Popular


Indian Palm Leaf Reading with Dr. Q Moayad “Dr. Q and the Indian Palm Leaf Reading Institute seem to do a wonderful job supporting and giving back to people who would not necessarily have the financial means. – Dr. Amy Robbins       SUPPORT DR. AMY ROBBINS:   If you're enjoying the podcast and finding value in guest interviews, ghost stories, and the content I share, please consider supporting the show by becoming a Patreon member for as little as $5 a month at Patreon.com/DrAmyRobbins   As a member you'll get more say in the content we cover and exclusive access to behind-the-scenes goodness!   Stay Connected with Dr. Amy Robbins:   Instagram YouTube Website Facebook   EPISODE SUMMARY:   Ever heard of Indian palm leaf readings? We hadn't either!    Today we talk with Dr. Q Moayad whose passion project is to introduce the concept of Indian palm leaf readings – a common occurrence in Southern India – to Westerners.   Part 1: Listen in to hear Dr. Q Moayad, founder of his own Indian Palm Leaf Reading Institute, explain the ancient history and his process.    Part 2: After the interview, Dr. Amy Robbins shares her own personal experience with a palm leaf reading.  Topics We Discuss in Part 1 – The Interview:   [0:02] Dr. Robbins introduces Dr. Q Moayad.   [3:33] Dr. Q describes his wealthy family leaving everything behind, fleeing Iran in the late 1970's, and relocating in Vienna, Austria.    [4:41] Dr. Q's experience developing cancer as a teenager living in the fallout of the 1986 nuclear disaster in Chernobyl, Ukraine (then Ukraine SSR). How his cancer caused a lifetime of health issues; and ultimately caused him to ask both “Why me, god?” and then when he beat the odds, “Why not me, god?”    [9:40] In his spiritual exploration, Dr. Q was exposed to Indian palm leaf readings.    [13:40] The history of how 2-3000 years ago South Indian great sages tapped into the Akashic records to capture symbolic messages on the leaves of palm trees.    [21:50] The Indian Palm Leaf Institutes online process for providing a spiritual seeker a reading: 1) find a bundle, 2) matching to an individual, and 3) the reading.     Topics in Part 2 – Dr. Amy Robbins' Experience:   [33:20] Several months after the interview in Part 1, Amy describes her personal experience with an Indian palm leaf reading.  FOLLOW DR. Q MOAYAD: Find the Indian Palm Leaf Reading Institute here.    Find Dr. Q's coaching website here.     Life, Death and the Space Between is brought to you by: Dr. Amy Robbins | Host, Executive Producer PJ Duke | Executive Producer Andrej | Podcasticize | Sound Editing Mara Stallins | Outreach & Social Media Strategy Claire | Clairperk.com | Podcast Cover Design

Business Standard Podcast
Is Oracle Corporation in trouble in India?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:56


US software maker Oracle on Wednesday agreed to pay $23 million to the Securities and Exchange Commission to settle charges against violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, between 2014 to 2019. During the period, its subsidiaries in India, UAE and Turkey created and used slush funds to bribe foreign officials. In India, the American markets regulator alleged that Oracle paid bribes to officials of a transportation company owned by the Ministry of Railways. Oracle did not admit or deny wrongdoing in agreeing to settle. This is not the first time that Oracle has been charged with violating the US anti-bribery law over India-related payments.  In 2012, it agreed to pay a $2 million fine to settle SEC charges concerning the creation of millions of dollars of unauthorised side funds by Oracle India from 2005 to 2007. The Indian unit allegedly set aside money outside its books that was eventually used to make unathorised payments to phony vendors, creating a risk that those funds could be used for illicit purposes such as bribery. Several multinationals have time and again fallen afoul of the FCPA including retail giant Walmart, medical device company Stryker, advertising group WPP, aerospace manufacturer Embraer, IT services company Cognizant, spirits companies Beam Suntory, AB InBev and Diageo, locomotive developer Wabtec and Cadbury owner Mondelez International. Enacted in 1977 and enforced by SEC and US Department of Justice, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, prohibits the payment of bribes to foreign officials to assist in obtaining or retaining business. It extends to US listed companies and their officers, directors, employees, stockholders, and agents including third party agents, consultants, distributors, joint-venture partners, and others.  It also contains accounting provisions that prohibit individuals and businesses from knowingly falsifying books and records or circumventing or failing to implement a system of internal controls.  Regardless of size, for a gift or other payment to violate the statute, the payer must have corrupt intent. The FCPA resource guide states that bribes are often concealed under the guise of legitimate payments such as consulting fees, commissions, marketing expenses, scientific incentives, travel and entertainment expenses and discounts.  Kunal Gupta, an expert in white-collar crime law, tells us why Indian agencies seldom take up such cases Kunal Gupta, Partner, Trilegal says legal standards in India differ from US. Most FCPA violations are settled, few are tested in court. Transactions involving private officials may violate FCPA not PCA.  Walmart's $282 million payment in 2019 was one of the biggest FCPA settlements involving India-related charges.  US authorities said Walmart's failure to operate a sufficient anti-corruption compliance program led its subsidiaries in Mexico, India, Brazil and China to hire third-party intermediaries and allow these middlemen to make improper payments to government officials to obtain store permits and licenses. In 2019, Cognizant Technology Solutions agreed to pay $25 million to SEC to resolve allegations that it authorised a contractor to pay a $2 million bribe to a senior government official in Tamil Nadu in 2014 to secure planning permits for the construction of its 2.7 million square foot campus in Chennai. Brazilian plane-maker Embraer's $206 million settlement in 2016 to resolve charges of corruption in four foreign contracts is an instance where SEC action has led to investigations in India.  Approximately $5.76 million was allegedly paid to an agent in India in connection with the sale of three highly specialised military aircraft to the Indian Air Force for $208 million. The payments were falsely recorded in Embraer's books and records as part of a consulting agreement that wasn't legitimate.  India's Central Bureau of Investigation is probing the bribery allegations.

Business Drive
Apple Makes New Handset In India In Shift From China

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 0:59


Apple says it has started making it's iPhone 14 in India as it diversifies its supply chains away from China. The company makes most of its phones in China but has shifted some production outside the country as tensions rise between Washington and Beijing. Apple says the new iPhone 14 line-up introduces groundbreaking new technologies and important safety capabilities. They are excited to be manufacturing iPhone 14 in India, Taiwan-based Foxconn, which manufactures the majority of Apple's phones, has had an operation in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu since 2017, where it makes older versions of the handsets.

PGurus
PFI targeting RSS-BJP entities and now training their sights at soft targets

PGurus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 7:00


Is it frustration and anger at being caught that is making PFI cadres attack the residences of several RSS and BJP leaders in Tamil Nadu? What next? Target soft targets that house the elderly, made up mostly of TamBrahms? With the DMK refusing to condemn its own for its vitriolic statements at Brahmins, will the TN Police rise to the occasion? #PFI #PFIArrests #RSS #BJP #PFIRaids

HT Daily News Wrap
Amid tussle over Gehlot's likely successor, loyalist MLAs submit resignations

HT Daily News Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 4:36


Amid tussle over Gehlot's likely successor, loyalist MLAs submit resignations,Centre set to revamp Aarogya Setu, CoWIN,Amid frequent attacks on BJP, RSS premises in Tamil Nadu, cops warn of NSA 
and other top news in this bulletin.

New Music by Karlheinz Essl
F.O.O.D. (Foul Odour Obviously Detected) - BINAURAL

New Music by Karlheinz Essl

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:59


Binaural production - listen with headphones! Generative soundscape based on a two-dimensional random walk between four binaural soundscapes recorded in 2019 and 2022 in different parts of the world: 1) tea ceremony at the Myoshin-ji Zen Temple in Kyoto, Japan 2) eating Sichuan food in an authentic restaurant in Vienna, Austra 3) a walk through Naschmarkt, the famous food market in Vienna, Austria 4) women cooking in the Thanjavur temple in Tamil Nadu, India Released: 26 Sep 2022

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu - தமிழ்நாட்டில் பெட்ரோல் குண்டுகள் வீசி தாக்குதல். பின்னணி என்ன?

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 4:18


Raj, our correspondent in Tamil Nadu, compiled this report. - இந்திய உளவுத்துறை அளித்த தகவலின் அடிப்படையில் தமிழகம், கேரளா மற்றும் கர்நாடக உள்ளிட்ட 15 மாநிலங்களில், சந்தேகத்துக்கு இடமான 93 இடங்களில் இந்திய தேசிய புலனைப்பு அமைப்பான N.I.A. அதிரடி சோதனைகளை நடத்தியது. இந்த சோதனைகளில் பாப்புலர் பிராண்ட் ஆப் இந்தியா எனப்படும் அமைப்பின் நிர்வாகிகள் 106 பேர் கைது செய்யப்பட்டனர். இதே நேரம் தமிழகத்தின் பல்வேறு பகுதிகளில் உள்ள பாஜகவினர் வீடுகள் மற்றும் அலுவலகங்கள் மீது பெட்ரோல் குண்டுகள் வீசி தாக்குதல் நடைபெற்றுள்ளது. இந்த சம்பவங்கள் குறித்த கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

Srijan Foundation Talks
Challenges faced by Hindu Nationalism in Tamil Nadu | Arjun Sampath | #SangamTalks_Tamil SrijanTalks

Srijan Foundation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 48:22


Challenges faced by Hindu Nationalism in Tamil Nadu | Arjun Sampath | #SangamTalks_Tamil SrijanTalks

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
Pitru Dosha Parihara Temples Details

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 3:13


Though it is mandatory to perform Sraddha for the ancestors, many of us do not perform.   Pitru Dosha,, curse of the Pitrus for not being properly when they were alive and no performance of Sraddha may be atoned in some temples.   One is Gaya Sraddha and the performance of Sraddha at Benares. There are some more temples where the Piru dosha parihara Poojas may be performed.   Rameswaram is another.   Some more temples where the Parihara may be performed.   4.Seshampadi near Kumbakonam.   5.Sethalapathy. Swarnavalli sametha Muktheeswarar temple is at Thilatharpanapuri 2.6kms from Koothanur. Koothanoor is near Poonthottam which is on Mayavaram – Tiruvarur Road. The nearest railway station is at Poonthottam. The main deities here are Swarnavalli Thayar and Mukthiswarar. The name Thilatharpanapuri comes from two words thil meaning Gingely and tharpana is the Hindu ritual of performing pithru karmas (ritual of paying tribute to ancestors) to ones ancestors. It is also known as Sethalapathy.   6.Gokarna,Karnataka.   Airport.Dabolim, 91 Km,Goa.Hubli, Karnataka,124 Km.   Trains are available from Major Cities of India.Railway Station Gokarna Road.   7.*Srivanchiyam, near Thiruvarur, Tamil Nadu.   May be reached from Kumbakonam, Tiruvarur.   Buses are available.   Airport.Tiruchi.   Railway Station,Mayiladithurai Triambakeswar.   Trambakeshwar (Trimbakeshwar) is an ancient Hindu temple in the town of Trimbak, in the Nashik District of Maharashtra, India, 28 km from the city of Nashik. It is dedicated to Lord Shiva and is one of the twelve Jyotirlingaas.   9..Thiruvengadu, near Sirgazhi.   Airport.Tiruchi.   Railway Station.Mayiladuthurai.   How to Reach Thiruvengadu by bus. From Sirkali: Busess are available from Sirkali From Mayiladuthurai:Busess are available from Mayiladuthurai Bus No. 12-Ranga – Mayiladuthurai to Mangaimandam Anand – Mayiladuthurai to Perunthottam 28-Ramani- Mayiladuthurai to Nangur 4A-CRC – Mayiladuthurai to Elayamuthukoodam/Mangaimadam 34-CRC – Mayiladuthurai to Perunthottam Bus Stop for Thiruvengadu temple – Thiruvengadu Temple/Thiruvengadu SSD Hr. secondary School. https://ramanisblog.in/2014/09/10/nine-temples-for-pitru-dosha-parihara/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

All Things Policy
Overcoming learning losses- lessons from the Tamil Nadu experiment

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 22:48


Primary education was one of the areas that was affected negatively by the COVID19 pandemic. India saw some of the harshest lockdowns and schools were the first to close and last to open leading to huge learning losses. As with most other disasters, this loss was pronounced in lower SECs and girls. The state of TN has introduced a programme called Illam Thedi Kalvi (ITK) to help recover learning losses. Sarthak Pradhan and Suman Joshi summarize findings of a new working paper titled -COVID-19 Learning Loss and Recovery: Panel Data Evidence from India- Abhijeet Singh, Mauricio Romero, and Karthik Muralidharan and discuss possible implications for policy making You can follow Suman Joshi on twitter: https://twitter.com/sujo2906Check out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featuredDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.https://twitter.com/IVMPodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/ivmpodcasts/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/ivmpodcasts/Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, JioSaavn, Gaana, Amazon MusicDo share the word with you folks!

Desiland Masala
State Masala: Tamil Nadu

Desiland Masala

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 18:15


If you want to know why Desis from Tamil Nadu may be "bothered" when another Desi speaks indi to them, be sure to listen to Episode 20 as Desiland Masala continues its virtual audio tour of India's states with a focus on the state at the southern tip of India.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - திமுக நாடாளுமன்ற உறுப்பினருக்கு எதிராகப் போராட்டம்

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 5:34


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - இந்துக்களுக்கு எதிராக தொடர்ந்து திமுகவின் நாடாளுமன்ற உறுப்பினர் ராஜா பேசி வருவதாக குற்றம்சாட்டி அவருக்கு எதிராக தமிழகம் முழுவதும் இந்து முன்னணி கட்சி பல்வேறு போராட்டங்களில் ஈடுபட்டு வருகிறது. இதுபற்றி கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

Business Standard Podcast
What is the significance of Apple's 'Make in India' push?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 5:43


In May 2016, when Apple CEO Tim Cook met Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, he spoke about the possibilities of manufacturing and retailing in India, in line with the country's ‘Make in India' push. The following year, the $2.5 trillion American tech giant started its manufacturing in India with the budget iPhone SE model via contract manufacturer Wistron when the phone was already more than a year old. Since then, Apple has also enlisted Foxconn and Pegatron to make iPhones locally while reducing the gap between the launch of a new model in India and its manufacture here.  So the iPhone 11 started rolling out of factories here in July 2020, ten months after the launch. The iPhone SE 2020 started coming out within three to four months of its launch while the production of iPhone 12 started within a lag of less than six months. The first batches of the latest iPhone 14, which was announced early this month, will be made in India by late October or November, reducing the gap with China to just two months. China's stringent lockdowns to control the spread of Covid-19 has disrupted electronics manufacturing and global supply chains. Its increasing political tensions with the US is making businesses adopt the ‘China Plus One' strategy of diversifying production away from Asia's biggest economy. Countries like India, Vietnam and Mexico have been the beneficiaries of this move. On September 12th, US publication The Information reported that Google parent Alphabet is considering moving some production of Pixel phones to India. Bloomberg recently reported that Tata Group is in talks with Wistron to establish a joint venture to assemble iPhones in India. If finalised, Tata would be the first Indian company to build iPhones. Pegatron and Foxconn plants are located in Tamil Nadu while Wistron's factory is in Karnataka. Local demand in India, the world's second-biggest smartphone market, has played some role in Apple's decision to expand manufacturing capacity here. This is bolstered by the Production Linked Incentive scheme for smartphone manufacturing. All three Taiwanese Apple suppliers making iPhones in India are covered under the PLI scheme.   While Apple has a negligible share in India's overall smartphone market, it is the top-selling brand with about 60% share in the ultra-premium segment, which includes smartphones priced at Rs 45,000 and above. In the affordable premium segment, i.e phones priced between Rs 30,000 and Rs 45,000, Samsung held the top slot, closely followed by Apple. Overall, Apple had a 3% smartphone market share in the April-June quarter, up from 1% a year ago. In FY22, Wistron and Foxconn helped the company export phones worth over Rs 10,000 crore. This year, Apple's partners in India are expected to export 11-12 million iPhones, up from 7.5 million last year. Its third vendor Pegatron started local assembly in April.  Prachir Vardhan Singh, Senior Research Analyst, Counterpoint Research, says PLI scheme encourages companies to export. Big component names coming to India will be inflection point. With higher local value addition, iPhone Pro, Pro Max models could be made here. Made-in-India units will meet 85% of the local demand for iPhone, touching record highs in 2022, against just 10-15% last year. Further, Indian factories are expected to make 5-7% of all iPhones sold globally this year. In 2021, India's contribution stood at a little over 3% and the number was less than 1.5% in 2020. On the other hand, China's contribution is expected to drop to 93.5% this year, from 95.8% in 2021 and 98.2% in 2020. While the local value addition with respect to iPhones is currently 18-20%, this is set to go up. Tata Electronics, which has a manufacturing facility in Tamil Nadu, has been reportedly working with Apple to design and manufacture mechanical parts for the iPhone for nearly two years. This could help Apple increase the value addition of the

wisdomtalks podcast(tamil)
Tenkasi Caste Issues explained | wisdomtalks podcast | ep: 46 #castediscrimination #tamilnadu #news

wisdomtalks podcast(tamil)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 16:55


Tenkasi Caste Issues explained | wisdomtalks podcast | ep: 46 #castediscrimination #tamilnadu #news

PGurus
FIR registered on 75 assembling in Kapaleeswarar temple I JVC Sreeram I Sriram Seshadri

PGurus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:44


The Tamil Nadu government has registered First Information Reports (FIR) on around 75 people who assembled in Kapaleeswarar Temple to discuss ways and means to engage in Temple activities. Outrageous? Insanity? JVC Sreeram and Sriram Seshadri respectively discuss the political and legal aspects of this move. #FIR #KapaleeswararTemple #MRVenkatesh #UmaAnandan #TamilNadu #MKStalin #DMK #OwnYourTemples

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu - தமிழ்நாட்டில் மீண்டும் தலைதூக்கும் தீண்டாமை

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 6:10


Raj, our correspondent in Tamil Nadu, compiled this report. - தமிழ்நாட்டில் தென்காசி மாவட்டம் பாஞ்சாகுளம் கிராமத்தில் அரசு தொடக்கப்பள்ளி செயல்பட்டு வருகிறது. அந்தப் பள்ளியில் பயிலும் அதே கிராமத்தைச் சேர்ந்த பட்டியல் இன மாணவர்களுக்கு அருகில் இருக்கும் கடையில் தின்பண்டம் கொடுக்க மறுக்கப்பட்டது. இதை கடைக்காரரே வீடியோவாக எடுத்து வெளியிட்டார், பள்ளிக் குழந்தைகளுக்கு தீண்டாமை கொடுமை நடந்த சம்பவத்துக்கு கடும் கண்டனம் எழுந்துள்ள நிலையில், சர்ச்சைக்குரிய கடைக்கு அதிகாரிகள் சீல் வைத்தனர். அத்துடன், கடைக்காரரும் அவரின் நண்பரும் கைதானார்கள். இது குறித்த விவரணம். முன்வைக்கிறார்: நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Periyar's political atheism is impacting on western society - “பெரியாரின் கருத்துக்கள் மேற்கத்திய சமூகங்களிலும் தாக்கத்தை ஏற்படுத

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 12:31


Erode Venkatappa Ramasamy, revered as Periyar or Thanthai Periyar, was a social activist who started the Self-Respect Movement and Dravidar Kazhagam. He is known as the 'Father of the Dravidian movement'. His 144th birth anniversary was observed as ‘Day of Social Justice' in Tamil Nadu yesterday (September 17). - தமிழ்நாட்டில் தந்தை பெரியாரின் 144-வது பிறந்தநாள் (செப்டம்பர் 17 )நேற்று சமூக நீதி நாளாகக் கொண்டாடப்பட்டது. தந்தை பெரியார் அவர்கள் திராவிட அரசியலின் தந்தை என்று பார்க்கப்படுகிறார். பெரியார் அவர்களின் சமூக நீதி சார்ந்த கொள்கை பெரும் அதிர்வுகளை ஏற்படுத்திவரும் அதே வேளையில் அவரின் கொள்கை அவ்வப்போது சர்ச்சைகளையும் ஏற்படுத்துவதுண்டு. இந்த பின்னணியில் Periyar: A Study in Political Atheism எனும் புத்தகத்தின் ஆசிரியர் முனைவர் கார்த்திக் ராம் மனோகரன் அவர்கள் நம்முடன் உரையாடுகிறார். இங்கிலாந்தில் Wolverhampton பல்கலைகழகத்தில் ஆய்வில் ஈடுபட்டிருக்கும் அவரோடு உரையாடுகிறார் றைசெல்.

Money talks from Economist Radio
Money talks: India's moment

Money talks from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 36:50 Very Popular


India's economy recently overtook Britain's to be the world's fifth largest, and it's on track to be the fastest growing big economy this year. Part of what's powering that growth is renewed domestic investment by the country's big conglomerates. Could this be the year that India's promise is realised?On this week's episode, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood examine what's powering India's growth. First, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of India's biggest conglomerate, Tata Sons, explains why the company is investing domestically. Then, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran heads to Pune, where he finds that India's green energy transition is well underway. Finally, our Mumbai bureau chief Tom Easton takes a tour of Tamil Nadu, where he sees factories rapidly being built to help power India's domestic manufacturing transition. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalksFor full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Economist Radio
Money talks: India's moment

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 36:50


India's economy recently overtook Britain's to be the world's fifth largest, and it's on track to be the fastest growing big economy this year. Part of what's powering that growth is renewed domestic investment by the country's big conglomerates. Could this be the year that India's promise is realised?On this week's episode, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood examine what's powering India's growth. First, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of India's biggest conglomerate, Tata Sons, explains why the company is investing domestically. Then, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran heads to Pune, where he finds that India's green energy transition is well underway. Finally, our Mumbai bureau chief Tom Easton takes a tour of Tamil Nadu, where he sees factories rapidly being built to help power India's domestic manufacturing transition. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalksFor full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Democracy in Question?
Neloufer de Mel on the Current Economic, Social and Political Situation in Sri Lanka

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 34:57


Guests featured in this episodeNeloufer de Mel, Senior Professor of English at the University of Colombo in Sri Lanka. Drawing on feminist scholarship, postcolonial and cultural studies, she has published extensively on Sri Lankan society, gender, justice. Neloufer has been awarded numerous prestigious fellowships and grants from the MacArthur Foundation, a Fulbright Scholarship at Yale, and the IWM in Vienna. Some of her books are: Women and the Nation's Narrative: Gender and Nationalism in Twentieth Century Sri Lanka, Gendering the Tsunami: Women's Experiences from Sri Lanka, and Militarizing Sri Lanka: Popular Culture, Memory and Narrative in the Armed Conflict (2007).  GLOSSARY: Who are the Rajapaksa Family?(04:10, p. 1 in the transcript)The Rajapaksa Family: Sri Lankan family, which has dominated the country's politics for much of the past two decades. During Mahinda Rajapaksa's presidency, it was seen as one of the most influential families in the country with many of its members holding senior governmental positions. The Rajapaksas were briefly out of the government after losing in the 2015 elections, but they returned to power with Gotabaya Rajapaksa as their presidential candidate in 2019. He won and soon after brought his elder brother, Mahinda Rajapaksa, back to the government as prime minister and handed key positions to several other members of the family. The popularity of the Rajapaksa family collapsed after their actions caused the economic crisis that started in 2019, resulting in Sri Lanka defaulting on its debt for the first time in its post-independence history. Source What are the 2022 Sri Lankan protests?(04:50, p.2 in the transcript)Spring 2022 Sri Lankan Protests (also known as ‘Aragalaya' – Sinhalese for ‘struggle'): A mainly youth-led mass protest movement over Sri Lanka's worst-ever economic crisis.  During the period, the protesters forced a president and a prime minister to resign, with President Gotabaya Rajapaksa even fleeing the country to escape the uprising. Tens of thousands of people hit the streets in Colombo, occupying important government buildings, including the official residences of the president and the prime minister. Source What was the Sri Lankan Civil War?(05:50, p.2 in transcript)Sri Lankan Civil War: Political unrest, which escalated in the 1980s as groups representing the Tamil minority moved toward organized insurgency. Tamil bases were built up in jungle areas of the northern and eastern parts of the island and increasingly in the southern districts of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, where Tamil groups received official and unofficial support. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) — popularly known as the Tamil Tigers — was the strongest of these, but there were other competing groups, which were sometimes hostile to each other. The Sri Lankan government responded to the unrest by deploying forces to the north and the east, but the eruption of insurgency inflamed communal passions, and in July 1983 there were extensive organized anti-Tamil riots in Colombo and elsewhere. Sinhalese mobs systematically attacked Tamils and destroyed Tamil property, and the riots forced refugees to move within the island and from Sri Lanka to Tamil Nadu. Source   What is the Galle Face Park?(08:10, p.2 in transcript)The Galle Face Green Park: a five-hectare ocean-side urban park, which stretches for a half kilometre along the coast. The area was occupied during the 2022 Sri Lankan Protests with the protesters establishing a ‘village' named ‘Gotagogama', or ‘Gota go village', in Sinhala. Gota-Go-Gama has been set up (similarly to Occupy Wall Street) like a small model village, providing basic necessities, including free food, free water bottles, toilets as well as limited free emergency medical services. Source

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - இலங்கைத் தமிழர்களுக்காக மறுவாழ்வு முகாம்

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 5:39


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - முதல் முறையாக இலங்கைத் தமிழர்களுக்காக அனைத்து வசதிகளுடனான மறுவாழ்வு முகாம் இன்று தொடங்கி வைக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

The Lunar Society
Charles C. Mann - Americas Before Columbus & Scientific Wizardry

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:03


Charles C. Mann is the author of three of my favorite history books: 1491. 1493, and The Wizard and the Prophet. We discuss:why Native American civilizations collapsed and why they failed to make more technological progresswhy he disagrees with Will MacAskill about longtermismwhy there aren't any successful slave revoltshow geoengineering can help us solve climate changewhy Bitcoin is like the Chinese Silver Tradeand much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Some really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy my interviews of Will MacAskill (about longtermism), Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection), and David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.Timestamps(0:00:00) -Epidemically Alternate Realities(0:00:25) -Weak Points in Empires(0:03:28) -Slave Revolts(0:08:43) -Slavery Ban(0:12:46) - Contingency & The Pyramids(0:18:13) - Teotihuacan(0:20:02) - New Book Thesis(0:25:20) - Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley(0:31:15) - Technological Stupidity in the New World(0:41:24) - Religious Demoralization(0:44:00) - Critiques of Civilization Collapse Theories(0:49:05) - Virginia Company + Hubris(0:53:30) - China's Silver Trade(1:03:03) - Wizards vs. Prophets(1:07:55) - In Defense of Regulatory Delays(0:12:26) -Geoengineering(0:16:51) -Finding New Wizards(0:18:46) -Agroforestry is Underrated(1:18:46) -Longtermism & Free MarketsTranscriptDwarkesh Patel   Okay! Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Charles Mann, who is the author of three of my favorite books, including 1491: New Revelations of America before Columbus. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, and The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World. Charles, welcome to the Lunar Society.Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be here.Epidemically Alternate RealitiesDwarkesh Patel   My first question is: How much of the New World was basically baked into the cake? So at some point, people from Eurasia were going to travel to the New World, bringing their diseases. Considering disparities and where they would survive, if the Acemoglu theory that you cited is correct, then some of these places were bound to have good institutions and some of them were bound to have bad institutions. Plus, because of malaria, there were going to be shortages in labor that people would try to fix with African slaves. So how much of all this was just bound to happen? If Columbus hadn't done it, then maybe 50 years down the line, would someone from Italy have done it? What is the contingency here?Charles C. Mann   Well, I think that some of it was baked into the cake. It was pretty clear that at some point, people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere were going to come into contact with each other. I mean, how could that not happen, right? There was a huge epidemiological disparity between the two hemispheres––largely because by a quirk of evolutionary history, there were many more domesticable animals in Eurasia and the Eastern hemisphere. This leads almost inevitably to the creation of zoonotic diseases: diseases that start off in animals and jump the species barrier and become human diseases. Most of the great killers in human history are zoonotic diseases. When people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere meet, there are going to be those kinds of diseases. But if you wanted to, it's possible to imagine alternative histories. There's a wonderful book by Laurent Binet called Civilizations that, in fact, does just that. It's a great alternative history book. He imagines that some of the Vikings came and extended further into North America, bringing all these diseases, and by the time of Columbus and so forth, the epidemiological balance was different. So when Columbus and those guys came, these societies killed him, grabbed his boats, and went and conquered Europe. It's far-fetched, but it does say that this encounter would've happened and that the diseases would've happened, but it didn't have to happen in exactly the way that it did. It's also perfectly possible to imagine that Europeans didn't engage in wholesale slavery. There was a huge debate when this began about whether or not slavery was a good idea. There were a lot of reservations, particularly among the Catholic monarchy asking the Pope “Is it okay that we do this?” You could imagine the penny dropping in a slightly different way. So, I think some of it was bound to happen, but how exactly it happened was really up to chance, contingency, and human agency,Weak Points in EmpiresDwarkesh Patel   When the Spanish first arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries, were the Incas and the Aztecs at a particularly weak point or particularly decadent? Or was this just how well you should have expected this civilization to be functioning at any given time period?Charles C. Mann   Well, typically, empires are much more jumbly and fragile entities than we imagine. There's always fighting at the top. What Hernán Cortés was able to do, for instance, with the Aztecs––who are better called The Triple Alliance (the term “Aztec” is an invention from the 19th century). The Triple Alliance was comprised of three groups of people in central Mexico, the largest of which were the Mexica, who had the great city of Tenochtitlan. The other two guys really resented them and so what Cortes was able to do was foment a civil war within the Aztec empire: taking some enemies of the Aztec, some members of the Aztec empire, and creating an entirely new order. There's a fascinating set of history that hasn't really emerged into the popular consciousness. I didn't include it in 1491 or 1493 because it was so new that I didn't know anything about it; everything was largely from Spanish and Mexican scholars about the conquest within the conquest. The allies of the Spaniards actually sent armies out and conquered big swaths of northern and southern Mexico and Central America. So there's a far more complex picture than we realized even 15 or 20 years ago when I first published 1491. However, the conquest wasn't as complete as we think. I talk a bit about this in 1493 but what happens is Cortes moves in and he marries his lieutenants to these indigenous people, creating this hybrid nobility that then extended on to the Incas. The Incas were a very powerful but unstable empire and Pizarro had the luck to walk in right after a civil war. When he did that right after a civil war and massive epidemic, he got them at a very vulnerable point. Without that, it all would have been impossible. Pizarro cleverly allied with the losing side (or the apparently losing side in this in the Civil War), and was able to create a new rallying point and then attack the winning side. So yes, they came in at weak points, but empires typically have these weak points because of fratricidal stuff going on in the leadership.Dwarkesh Patel   It does also remind me of the East India Trading Company.Charles C. Mann   And the Mughal empire, yeah. Some of those guys in Bengal invited Clive and his people in. In fact, I was struck by this. I had just been reading this book, maybe you've heard of it: The Anarchy by William Dalrymple.Dwarkesh Patel   I've started reading it, yeah but I haven't made much progress.Charles C. Mann   It's an amazing book! It's so oddly similar to what happened. There was this fratricidal stuff going on in the Mughal empire, and one side thought, “Oh, we'll get these foreigners to come in, and we'll use them.” That turned out to be a big mistake.Dwarkesh Patel   Yes. What's also interestingly similar is the efficiency of the bureaucracy. Niall Ferguson has a good book on the British Empire and one thing he points out is that in India, the ratio between an actual English civil servant and the Indian population was about 1: 3,000,000 at the peak of the ratio. Which obviously is only possible if you have the cooperation of at least the elites, right? So it sounds similar to what you were saying about Cortes marrying his underlings to the nobility. Charles C. Mann   Something that isn't stressed enough in history is how often the elites recognize each other. They join up in arrangements that increase both of their power and exploit the poor schmucks down below. It's exactly what happened with the East India Company, and it's exactly what happened with Spain. It's not so much that there was this amazing efficiency, but rather, it was a mutually beneficial arrangement for Xcalack, which is now a Mexican state. It had its rights, and the people kept their integrity, but they weren't really a part of the Spanish Empire. They also weren't really wasn't part of Mexico until around 1857. It was a good deal for them. The same thing was true for the Bengalis, especially the elites who made out like bandits from the British Empire.Slave Revolts Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super interesting. Why was there only one successful slave revolt in the new world in Haiti? In many of these cases, the ratios between slaves and the owners are just huge. So why weren't more of them successful?Charles C. Mann   Well, you would first have to define ‘successful'. Haiti wasn't successful if you meant ‘creating a prosperous state that would last for a long time.' Haiti was and is (to no small extent because of the incredible blockade that was put on it by all the other nations) in terrible shape. Whereas in the case of Paul Maurice, you had people who were self-governing for more than 100 years.. Eventually, they were incorporated into the larger project of Brazil. There's a great Brazilian classic that's equivalent to what Moby Dick or Huck Finn is to us called Os Sertões by a guy named Cunha. And it's good! It's been translated into this amazing translation in English called ​​Rebellion in the Backlands. It's set in the 1880s, and it's about the creation of a hybrid state of runaway slaves, and so forth, and how they had essentially kept their independence and lack of supervision informally, from the time of colonialism. Now the new Brazilian state is trying to take control, and they fight them to the last person. So you have these effectively independent areas in de facto, if not de jure, that existed in the Americas for a very long time. There are some in the US, too, in the great dismal swamp, and you hear about those marooned communities in North Carolina, in Mexico, where everybody just agreed “these places aren't actually under our control, but we're not going to say anything.”  If they don't mess with us too much, we won't mess with them too much. Is that successful or not? I don't know.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, but it seems like these are temporary successes..Charles C. Mann   I mean, how long did nations last? Like Genghis Khan! How long did the Khan age last? But basically, they had overwhelming odds against them. There's an entire colonial system that was threatened by their existence. Similar to the reasons that rebellions in South Asia were suppressed with incredible brutality–– these were seen as so profoundly threatening to this entire colonial order that people exerted a lot more force against them than you would think would be worthwhile.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. It reminds me of James Scott's Against the Grain. He pointed out that if you look at the history of agriculture, there're many examples where people choose to run away as foragers in the forest, and then the state tries to bring them back into the fold.Charles C. Mann   Right. And so this is exactly part of that dynamic. I mean, who wants to be a slave, right? So as many people as possible ended up leaving. It's easier in some places than others.. it's very easy in Brazil. There are 20 million people in the Brazilian Amazon and the great bulk of them are the descendants of people who left slavery. They're still Brazilians and so forth, but, you know, they ended up not being slaves.Slavery BanDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super fascinating. What is the explanation for why slavery went from being historically ever-present to ending at a particular time when it was at its peak in terms of value and usefulness? What's the explanation for why, when Britain banned the slave trade, within 100 or 200 years, there ended up being basically no legal sanction for slavery anywhere in the world?Charles C. Mann   This is a really good question and the real answer is that historians have been arguing about this forever. I mean, not forever, but you know, for decades, and there's a bunch of different explanations. I think the reason it's so hard to pin down is… kind of amazing. I mean, if you think about it, in 1800, if you were to have a black and white map of the world and put red in countries in which slavery was illegal and socially accepted, there would be no red anywhere on the planet. It's the most ancient human institution that there is. The Code of Hammurabi is still the oldest complete legal code that we have, and about a third of it is about rules for when you can buy slaves, when you can sell slaves, how you can mistreat them, and how you can't–– all that stuff. About a third of it is about buying, selling, and working other human beings. So this has been going on for a very, very long time. And then in a century and a half, it suddenly changes. So there's some explanation, and it's that machinery gets better. But the reason to have people is that you have these intelligent autonomous workers, who are like the world's best robots. From the point of view of the owner, they're fantastically good, except they're incredibly obstreperous and when they're caught, you're constantly afraid they're going to kill you. So if you have a chance to replace them with machinery, or to create a wage where you can run wage people, pay wage workers who are kept in bad conditions but somewhat have more legal rights, then maybe that's a better deal for you. Another one is that industrialization produced different kinds of commodities that became more and more valuable, and slavery was typically associated with the agricultural laborer. So as agriculture diminished as a part of the economy, slavery become less and less important and it became easier to get rid of them. Another one has to do with the beginning of the collapse of the colonial order. Part of it has to do with.. (at least in the West, I don't know enough about the East) the rise of a serious abolition movement with people like Wilberforce and various Darwins and so forth. And they're incredibly influential, so to some extent, I think people started saying, “Wow, this is really bad.”  I suspect that if you looked at South Asia and Africa, you might see similar things having to do with a social moment, but I just don't know enough about that. I know there's an anti-slavery movement and anti-caste movement in which we're all tangled up in South Asia, but I just don't know enough about it to say anything intelligent.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, the social aspect of it is really interesting. The things you mentioned about automation, industrialization, and ending slavery… Obviously, with time, that might have actually been why it expanded, but its original inception in Britain happened before the Industrial Revolution took off. So that was purely them just taking a huge loss because this movement took hold. Charles C. Mann   And the same thing is true for Bartolome de Las Casas. I mean, Las Casas, you know, in the 1540s just comes out of nowhere and starts saying, “Hey! This is bad.” He is the predecessor of the modern human rights movement. He's an absolutely extraordinary figure, and he has huge amounts of influence. He causes Spain's king in the 1540s to pass what they call The New Laws which says no more slavery, which is a devastating blow enacted to the colonial economy in Spain because they depended on having slaves to work in the silver mines in the northern half of Mexico and in Bolivia, which was the most important part of not only the Spanish colonial economy but the entire Spanish empire. It was all slave labor. And they actually tried to ban it. Now, you can say they came to their senses and found a workaround in which it wasn't banned. But it's still… this actually happened in the 1540s. Largely because people like Las Casas said, “This is bad! you're going to hell doing this.”Contingency & The Pyramids Dwarkesh Patel   Right. I'm super interested in getting into The Wizard and the Prophet section with you. Discussing how movements like environmentalism, for example, have been hugely effective. Again, even though it probably goes against the naked self-interest of many countries. So I'm very interested in discussing that point about why these movements have been so influential!But let me continue asking you about globalization in the world. I'm really interested in how you think about contingency in history, especially given that you have these two groups of people that have been independently evolving and separated for tens of thousands of years. What things turn out to be contingent? What I find really interesting from the book was how both of them developed pyramids––  who would have thought that structure would be within our extended phenotype or something?Charles C. Mann    It's also geometry! I mean, there's only a certain limited number of ways you can pile up stone blocks in a stable way. And pyramids are certainly one of them. It's harder to have a very long-lasting monument that's a cylinder. Pyramids are also easier to build: if you get a cylinder, you have to have scaffolding around it and it gets harder and harder.With pyramids, you can use each lower step to put the next one, on and on, and so forth. So pyramids seem kind of natural to me. Now the material you make them up of is going to be partly determined by what there is. In Cahokia and in the Mississippi Valley, there isn't a lot of stone. So people are going to make these earthen pyramids and if you want them to stay on for a long time, there's going to be certain things you have to do for the structure which people figured out. For some pyramids, you had all this marble around them so you could make these giant slabs of marble, which seems, from today's perspective, incredibly wasteful. So you're going to have some things that are universal like that, along with the apparently universal, or near-universal idea that people who are really powerful like to identify themselves as supernatural and therefore want to be commemorated. Dwarkesh Patel   Yes, I visited Mexico City recently.Charles C. Mann Beautiful city!TeotihuacanDwarkesh Patel Yeah, the pyramids there… I think I was reading your book at the time or already had read your book. What struck me was that if I remember correctly, they didn't have the wheel and they didn't have domesticated animals. So if you really think about it, that's a really huge amount of human misery and toil it must have taken to put this thing together as basically a vanity project. It's like a huge negative connotation if you think about what it took to construct it.Charles C. Mann   Sure, but there are lots of really interesting things about Teotihuacan. This is just one of those things where you can only say so much in one book. If I was writing the two-thousand-page version of 1491, I would have included this. So Tehuácan pretty much starts out as a standard Imperial project, and they build all these huge castles and temples and so forth. There's no reason to suppose it was anything other than an awful experience (like building the pyramids), but then something happened to Teotihuacan that we don't understand. All these new buildings started springing up during the next couple of 100 years, and they're all very very similar. They're like apartment blocks and there doesn't seem to be a great separation between rich and poor. It's really quite striking how egalitarian the architecture is because that's usually thought to be a reflection of social status. So based on the way it looks, could there have been a political revolution of some sort? Where they created something much more egalitarian, probably with a bunch of good guy kings who weren't interested in elevating themselves so much? There's a whole chapter in the book by David Wingrove and David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything about this, and they make this argument that Tehuácan is an example that we can look at as an ancient society that was much more socially egalitarian than we think. Now, in my view, they go a little overboard–– it was also an aggressive imperial power and it was conquering much of the Maya world at the same time. But it is absolutely true that something that started out one way can start looking very differently quite quickly. You see this lots of times in the Americas in the Southwest–– I don't know if you've ever been to Chaco Canyon or any of those places, but you should absolutely go! Unfortunately, it's hard to get there because of the roads terrible but overall, it's totally worth it. It's an amazing place. Mesa Verde right north of it is incredible, it's just really a fantastic thing to see. There are these enormous structures in Chaco Canyon, that we would call castles if they were anywhere else because they're huge. The biggest one, Pueblo Bonito, is like 800 rooms or some insane number like that. And it's clearly an imperial venture, we know that because it's in this canyon and one side is getting all the good light and good sun–– a whole line of these huge castles. And then on the other side is where the peons lived. We also know that starting around 1100, everybody just left! And then their descendants start the Puebla, who are these sort of intensely socially egalitarian type of people. It looks like a political revolution took place. In fact, in the book I'm now writing, I'm arguing (in a sort of tongue-in-cheek manner but also seriously) that this is the first American Revolution! They got rid of these “kings” and created these very different and much more egalitarian societies in which ordinary people had a much larger voice about what went on.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. I think I got a chance to see the Teotihuacan apartments when I was there, but I wonder if we're just looking at the buildings that survived. Maybe the buildings that survived were better constructed because they were for the elites? The way everybody else lived might have just washed away over the years.Charles C. Mann   So what's happened in the last 20 years is basically much more sophisticated surveys of what is there. I mean, what you're saying is absolutely the right question to ask. Are the rich guys the only people with things that survived while the ordinary people didn't? You can never be absolutely sure, but what they did is they had these ground penetrating radar surveys, and it looks like this egalitarian construction extends for a huge distance. So it's possible that there are more really, really poor people. But at least you'd see an aggressively large “middle class” getting there, which is very, very different from the picture you have of the ancient world where there's the sun priest and then all the peasants around them.New Book ThesisDwarkesh Patel   Yeah. By the way, is the thesis of the new book something you're willing to disclose at this point? It's okay if you're not––Charles C. Mann   Sure sure, it's okay! This is a sort of weird thing, it's like a sequel or offshoot of 1491. That book, I'm embarrassed to say, was supposed to end with another chapter. The chapter was going to be about the American West, which is where I grew up, and I'm very fond of it. And apparently, I had a lot to say because when I outlined the chapter; the outline was way longer than the actual completed chapters of the rest of the book. So I sort of tried to chop it up and so forth, and it just was awful. So I just cut it. If you carefully look at 1491, it doesn't really have an ending. At the end, the author sort of goes, “Hey! I'm ending, look at how great this is!” So this has been bothering me for 15 years. During the pandemic, when I was stuck at home like so many other people, I held out what I had since I've been saving string and tossing articles that I came across into a folder, and I thought, “Okay, I'm gonna write this out more seriously now.” 15 or 20 years later. And then it was pretty long so I thought “Maybe this could be an e-book.” then I showed it to my editor. And he said, “That is not an e-book. That's an actual book.” So I take a chapter and hope I haven't just padded it, and it's about the North American West. My kids like the West, and at various times, they've questioned what it would be like to move out there because I'm in Massachusetts, where they grew up. So I started thinking “What is the West going to be like, tomorrow? When I'm not around 30 or 50 years from now?”It seems to be that you won't know who's president or who's governor or anything, but there are some things we can know. It'd be hotter and drier than it is now or has been in the recent past, like that wouldn't really be a surprise. So I think we can say that it's very likely to be like that. All the projections are that something like 40% of the people in the area between the Mississippi and the Pacific will be of Latino descent–– from the south, so to speak. And there's a whole lot of people from Asia along the Pacific coast, so it's going to be a real ethnic mixing ground. There's going to be an epicenter of energy, sort of no matter what happens. Whether it's solar, whether it's wind, whether it's petroleum, or hydroelectric, the West is going to be economically extremely powerful, because energy is a fundamental industry.And the last thing is (and this is the iffiest of the whole thing), but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the ongoing recuperation of sovereignty by the 294 federally recognized Native nations in the West is going to continue. That's been going in this very jagged way, but definitely for the last 50 or 60 years, as long as I've been around, the overall trend is in a very clear direction. So then you think, okay, this West is going to be wildly ethnically diverse, full of competing sovereignties and overlapping sovereignties. Nature is also going to really be in kind of a terminal. Well, that actually sounds like the 1200s! And the conventional history starts with Lewis and Clark and so forth. There's this breakpoint in history when people who looked like me came in and sort of rolled in from the East and kind of took over everything. And the West disappears! That separate entity, the native people disappear, and nature is tamed. That's pretty much what was in the textbooks when I was a kid. Do you know who Frederick Jackson Turner is? Dwarkesh Patel  No.Charles C. Mann So he's like one of these guys where nobody knows who he is. But he was incredibly influential in setting intellectual ideas. He wrote this article in 1893, called The Significance of the Frontier. It was what established this idea that there's this frontier moving from East to West and on this side was savagery and barbarism, and on this other side of civilization was team nature and wilderness and all that. Then it goes to the Pacific, and that's the end of the West. That's still in the textbooks but in a different form: we don't call native people “lurking savages” as he did. But it's in my kids' textbooks. If you have kids, it'll very likely be in their textbook because it's such a bedrock. What I'm saying is that's actually not a useful way to look at it, given what's coming up. A wonderful Texas writer, Bruce Sterling, says, “To know the past, you first have to understand the future.”It's funny, right? But what he means is that all of us have an idea of where the trajectory of history is going. A whole lot of history is about asking, “How did we get here? How do we get there?” To get that, you have to have an idea of what the “there” is. So I'm saying, I'm writing a history of the West with that West that I talked about in mind. Which gives you a very different picture: a lot more about indigenous fire management, the way the Hohokam survived the drought of the 1200s, and a little bit less about Billy the Kid. Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley Dwarkesh Patel   I love that quote hahaha. Speaking of the frontier, maybe it's a mistaken concept, but I remember that in a chapter of 1493, you talk about these rowdy adventurer men who outnumber the women in the silver mines and the kind of trouble that they cause. I wonder if there's some sort of distant analogy to the technology world or Silicon Valley, where you have the same kind of gender ratio and you have the same kind of frontier spirit? Maybe not the same physical violence––– more sociologically. Is there any similarity there?Charles C. Mann   I think it's funny, I hadn't thought about it. But it's certainly funny to think about. So let me do this off the top of my head. I like the idea that at the end of it, I can say, “wait, wait, that's ridiculous.“ Both of them would attract people who either didn't have much to lose, or were oblivious about what they had to lose, and had a resilience towards failure. I mean, it's amazing, the number of people in Silicon Valley who have completely failed at numbers of things! They just get up and keep‌ trying and have a kind of real obliviousness to social norms. It's pretty clear they are very much interested in making a mark and making their fortunes themselves. So there's at least a sort of shallow comparison, there are some certain similarities. I don't think this is entirely flattering to either group. It's absolutely true that those silver miners in Bolivia, and in northern‌ Mexico, created to a large extent, the modern world. But it's also true that they created these cesspools of violence and exploitation that had consequences we're still living with today. So you have to kind of take the bitter with the sweet. And I think that's true of Silicon Valley and its products *chuckles* I use them every day, and I curse them every day.Dwarkesh Patel   Right.Charles C. Mann   I want to give you an example. The internet has made it possible for me to do something like write a Twitter thread, get millions of people to read it, and have a discussion that's really amazing at the same time. Yet today, The Washington Post has an article about how every book in Texas (it's one of the states) a child checks out of the school library goes into a central state databank. They can see and look for patterns of people taking out “bad books” and this sort of stuff. And I think “whoa, that's really bad! That's not so good.” It's really the same technology that brings this dissemination and collection of vast amounts of information with relative ease. So with all these things, you take the bitter with the sweet. Technological Stupidity in the New WorldDwarkesh Patel   I want to ask you again about contingency because there are so many other examples where things you thought would be universal actually don't turn out to be. I think you talked about how the natives had different forms of metallurgy, with gold and copper, but then they didn't do iron or steel. You would think that given their “warring nature”, iron would be such a huge help. There's a clear incentive to build it. Millions of people living there could have built or developed this technology. Same with the steel, same with the wheel. What's the explanation for why these things you think anybody would have come up with didn't happen?Charles C. Mann   I know. It's just amazing to me! I don't know. This is one of those things I think about all the time. A few weeks ago, it rained, and I went out to walk the dog. I'm always amazed that there are literal glistening drops of water on the crabgrass and when you pick it up, sometimes there are little holes eaten by insects in the crabgrass. Every now and then, if you look carefully, you'll see a drop of water in one of those holes and it forms a lens. And you can look through it! You can see that it's not a very powerful lens by any means, but you can see that things are magnified. So you think “How long has there been crabgrass? Or leaves? And water?”  Just forever! We've had glass forever! So how is it that we had to wait for whoever it was to create lenses? I just don't get it. In book 1491, I mentioned the moldboard plow, which is the one with a curving blade that allows you to go through the soil much more easily. It was invented in China thousands of years ago, but not around in Europe until the 1400s. Like, come on, guys! What was it? And so, you know, there's this mysterious sort of mass stupidity. One of the wonderful things about globalization and trade and contact is that maybe not everybody is as blind as you and you can learn from them. I mean, that's the most wonderful thing about trade. So in the case of the wheel, the more amazing thing is that in Mesoamerica, they had the wheel on child's toys. Why didn't they develop it? The best explanation I can get is they didn't have domestic animals. A cart then would have to be pulled by people. That would imply that to make the cart work, you'd have to cut a really good road. Whereas they had these travois, which are these things that you hold and they have these skids that are shaped kind of like an upside-down V. You can drag them across rough ground, you don't need a road for them. That's what people used in the Great Plains and so forth. So you look at this, and you think “maybe this was the ultimate way to save labor. I mean, this was good enough. And you didn't have to build and maintain these roads to make this work”  so maybe it was rational or just maybe they're just blinkered. I don't know. As for assembly with steel, I think there's some values involved in that. I don't know if you've ever seen one of those things they had in Mesoamerica called Macuahuitl. They're wooden clubs with obsidian blades on them and they are sharp as hell. You don't run your finger along the edge because they just slice it open. An obsidian blade is pretty much sharper than any iron or steel blade and it doesn't rust. Nice. But it's much more brittle. So okay, they're there, and the Spaniards were really afraid of them. Because a single blow from these heavy sharp blades could kill a horse. They saw people whack off the head of a horse carrying a big strong guy with a single blow! So they're really dangerous, but they're not long-lasting. Part of the deal was that the values around conflict were different in the sense that conflict in Mesoamerica wasn't a matter of sending out foot soldiers in grunts, it was a chance for soldiers to get individual glory and prestige. This was associated with having these very elaborately beautiful weapons that you killed people with. So maybe not having steel worked better for their values and what they were trying to do at war. That would've lasted for years and I mean, that's just a guess. But you can imagine a scenario where they're not just blinkered but instead expressive on the basis of their different values. This is hugely speculative. There's a wonderful book by Ross Hassig about old Aztec warfare. It's an amazing book which is about the military history of The Aztecs and it's really quite interesting. He talks about this a little bit but he finally just says we don't know why they didn't develop all these technologies, but this worked for them.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. Yeah, it's kind of similar to China not developing gunpowder into an actual ballistic material––Charles C. Mann   Or Japan giving up the gun! They actually banned guns during the Edo period. The Portuguese introduced guns and the Japanese used them, and they said “Ahhh nope! Don't want them.” and they banned them. This turned out to be a terrible idea when Perry came in the 1860s. But for a long time, supposedly under the Edo period, Japan had the longest period of any nation ever without a foreign war. Dwarkesh Patel   Hmm. Interesting. Yeah, it's concerning when you think the lack of war might make you vulnerable in certain ways. Charles C. Mann   Yeah, that's a depressing thought.Religious DemoralizationDwarkesh Patel   Right. In Fukuyama's The End of History, he's obviously arguing that liberal democracy will be the final form of government everywhere. But there's this point he makes at the end where he's like, “Yeah, but maybe we need a small war every 50 years or so just to make sure people remember how bad it can get and how to deal with it.” Anyway, when the epidemic started in the New World, surely the Indians must have had some story or superstitious explanation–– some way of explaining what was happening. What was it?Charles C. Mann   You have to remember, the germ theory of disease didn't exist at the time. So neither the Spaniards, or the English, or the native people, had a clear idea of what was going on. In fact, both of them thought of it as essentially a spiritual event, a religious event. You went into areas that were bad, and the air was bad. That was malaria, right? That was an example. To them, it was God that was in control of the whole business. There's a line from my distant ancestor––the Governor Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who's my umpteenth, umpteenth grandfather, that's how waspy I am, he's actually my ancestor––about how God saw fit to clear the natives for us. So they see all of this in really religious terms, and more or less native people did too! So they thought over and over again that “we must have done something bad for this to have happened.” And that's a very powerful demoralizing thing. Your God either punished you or failed you. And this was it. This is one of the reasons that Christianity was able to make inroads. People thought “Their god is coming in and they seem to be less harmed by these diseases than people with our God.” Now, both of them are completely misinterpreting what's going on! But if you have that kind of spiritual explanation, it makes sense for you to say, “Well, maybe I should hit up their God.”Critiques of Civilization Collapse TheoriesDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, super fascinating. There's been a lot of books written in the last few decades about why civilizations collapse. There's Joseph Tainter's book, there's Jared Diamond's book. Do you feel like any of them actually do a good job of explaining how these different Indian societies collapsed over time?Charles C. Mann   No. Well not the ones that I've read. And there are two reasons for that. One is that it's not really a mystery. If you have a society that's epidemiologically naive, and smallpox sweeps in and kills 30% of you, measles kills 10% of you, and this all happens in a short period of time, that's really tough! I mean COVID killed one million people in the United States. That's 1/330th of the population. And it wasn't even particularly the most economically vital part of the population. It wasn't kids, it was elderly people like my aunt–– I hope I'm not sounding callous when I'm describing it like a demographer. Because I don't mean it that way. But it caused enormous economic damage and social conflict and so forth. Now, imagine something that's 30 or 40 times worse than that, and you have no explanation for it at all. It's kind of not a surprise to me that this is a super challenge. What's actually amazing is the number of nations that survived and came up with ways to deal with this incredible loss.That relates to the second issue, which is that it's sort of weird to talk about collapse in the ways that they sometimes do. Like both of them talk about the Mayan collapse. But there are 30 million Mayan people still there. They were never really conquered by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were still waging giant wars in Yucatan in the 1590s. In the early 21st century, I went with my son to Chiapas, which is the southernmost exit province. And that is where the Commandante Cero and the rebellions were going on. We were looking at some Mayan ruins, and they were too beautiful, and I stayed too long, and we were driving back through the night on these terrible roads. And we got stopped by some of these guys with guns. I was like, “Oh God, not only have I got myself into this, I got my son into this.” And the guy comes and looks at us and says, “Who are you?” And I say that we're American tourists. And he just gets this disgusted look, and he says, “Go on.” And you know, the journalist in me takes over and I ask, “What do you mean, just go on?” And he says, “We're hunting for Mexicans.” And as I'm driving I'm like “Wait a minute, I'm in Mexico.” And that those were Mayans. All those guys were Maya people still fighting against the Spaniards. So it's kind of funny to say that their society collapsed when there are Mayan radio stations, there are Maya schools, and they're speaking Mayan in their home. It's true, they don't have giant castles anymore. But, it's odd to think of that as collapse. They seem like highly successful people who have dealt pretty well with a lot of foreign incursions. So there's this whole aspect of “What do you mean collapse?” And you see that in Against the Grain, the James Scott book, where you think, “What do you mean barbarians?” If you're an average Maya person, working as a farmer under the purview of these elites in the big cities probably wasn't all that great. So after the collapse, you're probably better off. So all of that I feel is important in this discussion of collapse. I think it's hard to point to collapses that either have very clear exterior causes or are really collapses of the environment. Particularly the environmental sort that are pictured in books like Diamond has, where he talks about Easter Island. The striking thing about that is we know pretty much what happened to all those trees. Easter Island is this little speck of land, in the middle of the ocean, and Dutch guys come there and it's the only wood around for forever, so they cut down all the trees to use it for boat repair, ship repair, and they enslave most of the people who are living there. And we know pretty much what happened. There's no mystery about it.Virginia Company + HubrisDwarkesh Patel   Why did the British government and the king keep subsidizing and giving sanctions to the Virginia Company, even after it was clear that this is not especially profitable and half the people that go die? Why didn't they just stop?Charles C. Mann   That's a really good question. It's a super good question. I don't really know if we have a satisfactory answer, because it was so stupid for them to keep doing that. It was such a loss for so long. So you have to say, they were thinking, not purely economically. Part of it is that the backers of the Virginia Company, in sort of classic VC style, when things were going bad, they lied about it. They're burning through their cash, they did these rosy presentations, and they said, “It's gonna be great! We just need this extra money.” Kind of the way that Uber did. There's this tremendous burn rate and now the company says you're in tremendous trouble because it turns out that it's really expensive to provide all these calves and do all this stuff. The cheaper prices that made people like me really happy about it are vanishing. So, you know, I think future business studies will look at those rosy presentations and see that they have a kind of analogy to the ones that were done with the Virginia Company. A second thing is that there was this dog-headed belief kind of based on the inability to understand longitude and so forth, that the Americas were far narrower than they actually are. I reproduced this in 1493. There were all kinds of maps in Britain at the time showing these little skinny Philippines-like islands. So there's the thought that you just go up the Chesapeake, go a couple 100 miles, and you're gonna get to the Pacific into China. So there's this constant searching for a passage to China through this thought to be very narrow path. Sir Francis Drake and some other people had shown that there was a West Coast so they thought the whole thing was this narrow, Panama-like landform. So there's this geographical confusion. Finally, there's the fact that the Spaniards had found all this gold and silver, which is an ideal commodity, because it's not perishable: it's small, you can put it on your ship and bring it back, and it's just great in every way. It's money, essentially. Basically, you dig up money in the hills and there's this long-standing belief that there's got to be more of that in the Americas, we just need to find out where. So there's always that hope. Lastly, there's the Imperial bragging rights. You know, we can't be the only guys with a colony. You see that later in the 19th century when Germany became a nation and one of the first things the Dutch said was “Let's look for pieces of Africa that the rest of Europe hasn't claimed,” and they set up their own mini colonial empire. So there's this kind of “Keeping Up with the Joneses” aspect, it just seems to be sort of deep in the European ruling class. So then you got to have an empire that in this weird way, seems very culturally part of it. I guess it's the same for many other places. As soon as you feel like you have a state together, you want to index other things. You see that over and over again, all over the world. So that's part of it. All those things, I think, contributed to this. Outright lying, this delusion, other various delusions, plus hubris.Dwarkesh Patel   It seems that colonial envy has today probably spread to China. I don't know too much about it, but I hear that the Silk Road stuff they're doing is not especially economically wise. Is this kind of like when you have the impulse where if you're a nation trying to rise, you have that “I gotta go here, I gotta go over there––Charles C. Mann   Yeah and “Show what a big guy I am. Yeah,––China's Silver TradeDwarkesh Patel   Exactly. So speaking of China, I want to ask you about the silver trade. Excuse another tortured analogy, but when I was reading that chapter where you're describing how the Spanish silver was ending up with China and how the Ming Dynasty caused too much inflation. They needed more reliable mediums of exchange, so they had to give up real goods from China, just in order to get silver, which is just a medium of exchange––but it's not creating more apples, right? I was thinking about how this sounds a bit like Bitcoin today, (obviously to a much smaller magnitude) but in the sense that you're using up goods. It's a small amount of electricity, all things considered, but you're having to use up real energy in order to construct this medium of exchange. Maybe somebody can claim that this is necessary because of inflation or some other policy mistake and you can compare it to the Ming Dynasty. But what do you think about this analogy? Is there a similar situation where real goods are being exchanged for just a medium of exchange?Charles C. Mann   That's really interesting. I mean, on some level, that's the way money works, right? I go into a store, like a Starbucks and I buy a coffee, then I hand them a piece of paper with some drawings on it, and they hand me an actual coffee in return for a piece of paper. So the mysteriousness of money is kind of amazing. History is of course replete with examples of things that people took very seriously as money. Things that to us seem very silly like the cowry shell or in the island of Yap where they had giant stones! Those were money and nobody ever carried them around. You transferred the ownership of the stone from one person to another person to buy something. I would get some coconuts or gourds or whatever, and now you own that stone on the hill. So there's a tremendous sort of mysteriousness about the human willingness to assign value to arbitrary things such as (in Bitcoin's case) strings of zeros and ones. That part of it makes sense to me. What's extraordinary is when the effort to create a medium of exchange ends up costing you significantly–– which is what you're talking about in China where people had a medium of exchange, but they had to work hugely to get that money. I don't have to work hugely to get a $1 bill, right? It's not like I'm cutting down a tree and smashing the papers to pulp and printing. But you're right, that's what they're kind of doing in China. And that's, to a lesser extent, what you're doing in Bitcoin. So I hadn't thought about this, but Bitcoin in this case is using computer cycles and energy. To me, it's absolutely extraordinary the degree to which people who are Bitcoin miners are willing to upend their lives to get cheap energy. A guy I know is talking about setting up small nuclear plants as part of his idea for climate change and he wants to set them up in really weird remote areas. And I was asking “Well who would be your customers?” and he says Bitcoin people would move to these nowhere places so they could have these pocket nukes to privately supply their Bitcoin habits. And that's really crazy! To completely upend your life to create something that you hope is a medium of exchange that will allow you to buy the things that you're giving up. So there's a kind of funny aspect to this. That was partly what was happening in China. Unfortunately, China's very large, so they were able to send off all this stuff to Mexico so that they could get the silver to pay their taxes, but it definitely weakened the country.Wizards vs. ProphetsDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, and that story you were talking about, El Salvador actually tried it. They were trying to set up a Bitcoin city next to this volcano and use the geothermal energy from the volcano to incentivize people to come there and mine cheap Bitcoin. Staying on the theme of China, do you think the prophets were more correct, or the wizards were more correct for that given time period? Because we have the introduction of potato, corn, maize, sweet potatoes, and this drastically increases the population until it reaches a carrying capacity. Obviously, what follows is the other kinds of ecological problems this causes and you describe these in the book. Is this evidence of the wizard worldview that potatoes appear and populations balloon? Or are the prophets like “No, no, carrying capacity will catch up to us eventually.”Charles C. Mann   Okay, so let me interject here. For those members of your audience who don't know what we're talking about. I wrote this book, The Wizard and the Prophet. And it's about these two camps that have been around for a long time who have differing views regarding how we think about energy resources, the environment, and all those issues. The wizards, that's my name for them––Stuart Brand called them druids and, in fact, originally, the title was going to involve the word druid but my editor said, “Nobody knows what a Druid is” so I changed it into wizards–– and anyway the wizards would say that science and technology properly applied can allow you to produce your way out of these environmental dilemmas. You turn on the science machine, essentially, and then we can escape these kinds of dilemmas. The prophets say “No. Natural systems are governed by laws and there's an inherent carrying capacity or limit or planetary boundary.” there are a bunch of different names for them that say you can't do more than so much.So what happened in China is that European crops came over. One of China's basic geographical conditions is that it's 20% of the Earth's habitable surface area, or it has 20% of the world's population, but only has seven or 8% of the world's above-ground freshwater. There are no big giant lakes like we have in the Great Lakes. And there are only a couple of big rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River. The main staple crop in China has to be grown in swimming pools, and that's you know, rice. So there's this paradox, which is “How do you keep people fed with rice in a country that has very little water?” If you want a shorthand history of China, that's it. So prophets believe that there are these planetary boundaries. In history, these are typically called Malthusian Limits after Malthus and the question is: With the available technology at a certain time, how many people can you feed before there's misery?The great thing about history is it provides evidence for both sides. Because in the short run, what happened when American crops came in is that the potato, sweet potato, and maize corn were the first staple crops that were dryland crops that could be grown in the western half of China, which is very, very dry and hot and mountainous with very little water. Population soars immediately afterward, but so does social unrest, misery, and so forth. In the long run, that becomes adaptable when China becomes a wealthy and powerful nation. In the short run, which is not so short (it's a couple of centuries), it really causes tremendous chaos and suffering. So, this provides evidence for both sides. One increases human capacity, and the second unquestionably increases human numbers and that leads to tremendous erosion, land degradation, and human suffering.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's a thick coin with two sides. By the way, I realized I haven't gotten to all the Wizard and Prophet questions, and there are a lot of them. So I––Charles C. Mann   I certainly have time! I'm enjoying the conversation. One of the weird things about podcasts is that, as far as I can tell, the average podcast interviewer is far more knowledgeable and thoughtful than the average sort of mainstream journalist interviewer and I just find that amazing. I don't understand it. So I think you guys should be hired. You know, they should make you switch roles or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, maybe. Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be asked these interesting questions about subjects I find fascinating.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, it's my pleasure to get to talk to you and to get to ask these questions. So let me ask about the Wizard and the Prophet. I just interviewed WIll McCaskill, and we were talking about what ends up mattering most in history. I asked him about Norman Borlaug and said that he's saved a billion lives. But then McCaskill pointed out, “Well, that's an exceptional result” and he doesn't think the technology is that contingent. So if Borlaug hadn't existed, somebody else would have discovered what he discovered about short wheat stalks anyways. So counterfactually, in a world where Ebola doesn't exist, it's not like a billion people die, maybe a couple million more die until the next guy comes around. That was his view. Do you agree? What is your response?Charles C. Mann   To some extent, I agree. It's very likely that in the absence of one scientist, some other scientist would have discovered this, and I mentioned in the book, in fact, that there's a guy named Swaminathan, a remarkable Indian scientist, who's a step behind him and did much of the same work. At the same time, the individual qualities of Borlaug are really quite remarkable. The insane amount of work and dedication that he did.. it's really hard to imagine. The fact is that he was going against many of the breeding plant breeding dogmas of his day, that all matters! His insistence on feeding the poor… he did remarkable things. Yes, I think some of those same things would have been discovered but it would have been a huge deal if it had taken 20 years later. I mean, that would have been a lot of people who would have been hurt in the interim! Because at the same time, things like the end of colonialism, the discovery of antibiotics, and so forth, were leading to a real population rise, and the amount of human misery that would have occurred, it's really frightening to think about. So, in some sense, I think he's (Will McCaskill) right. But I wouldn't be so glib about those couple of million people.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And another thing you might be concerned about is that given the hostile attitude that people had towards the green revolution right after, if the actual implementation of these different strains of biochar sent in India, if that hadn't been delayed, it's not that weird to imagine a scenario where the governments there are just totally won over by the prophets and they decide to not implant this technology at all. If you think about what happened to nuclear power in the 70s, in many different countries, maybe something similar could have happened to the Green Revolution. So it's important to beat the Prophet. Maybe that's not the correct way to say it. But one way you could put it is: It's important to beat the prophets before the policies are passed. You have to get a good bit of technology in there.Charles C. Mann   This is just my personal opinion, but you want to listen to the prophets about what the problems are. They're incredible at diagnosing problems, and very frequently, they're right about those things. The social issues about the Green Revolution… they were dead right, they were completely right. I don't know if you then adopt their solutions. It's a little bit like how I feel about my editors–– my editors will often point out problems and I almost never agree with their solutions. The fact is that Borlaug did develop this wheat that came into India, but it probably wouldn't have been nearly as successful if Swaminathan hadn't changed that wheat to make it more acceptable to the culture of India. That was one of the most important parts for me in this book. When I went to Tamil Nadu, I listened to this and I thought, “Oh! I never heard about this part where they took Mexican wheat, and they made it into Indian wheat.” You know, I don't even know if Borlaug ever knew or really grasped that they really had done that! By the way, a person for you to interview is Marci Baranski–– she's got a forthcoming book about the history of the Green Revolution and she sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it. So here's a plug for her.In Defense of Regulatory DelaysDwarkesh Patel   So if we applied that particular story to today, let's say that we had regulatory agencies like the FDA back then that were as powerful back then as they are now. Do you think it's possible that these new advances would have just dithered in some approval process that took years or decades to complete? If you just backtest our current process for implementing technological solutions, are you concerned that something like the green revolution could not have happened or that it would have taken way too long or something?Charles C. Mann   It's possible. Bureaucracies can always go rogue, and the government is faced with this kind of impossible problem. There's a current big political argument about whether former President Trump should have taken these top-secret documents to his house in Florida and done whatever he wanted to? Just for the moment, let's accept the argument that these were like super secret toxic documents and should not have been in a basement. Let's just say that's true. Whatever the President says is declassified is declassified. Let us say that's true.  Obviously, that would be bad. You would not want to have that kind of informal process because you can imagine all kinds of things–– you wouldn't want to have that kind of informal process in place. But nobody has ever imagined that you would do that because it's sort of nutty in that scenario.Now say you write a law and you create a bureaucracy for declassification and immediately add more delay, you make things harder, you add in the problems of the bureaucrats getting too much power, you know–– all the things that you do. So you have this problem with the government, which is that people occasionally do things that you would never imagine. It's completely screwy. So you put in regulatory mechanisms to stop them from doing that and that impedes everybody else. In the case of the FDA, it was founded in the 30 when some person produced this thing called elixir sulfonamides. They killed hundreds of people! It was a flat-out poison! And, you know, hundreds of people died. You think like who would do that? But somebody did that. So they created this entire review mechanism to make sure it never happened again, which introduced delay, and then something was solidified. Which they did start here because the people who invented that didn't even do the most cursory kind of check. So you have this constant problem. I'm sympathetic to the dilemma faced by the government here in which you either let through really bad things done by occasional people, or you screw up everything for everybody else. I was tracing it crudely, but I think you see the trade-off. So the question is, how well can you manage this trade-off? I would argue that sometimes it's well managed. It's kind of remarkable that we got vaccines produced by an entirely new mechanism, in record time, and they passed pretty rigorous safety reviews and were given to millions and millions and millions of people with very, very few negative effects. I mean, that's a real regulatory triumph there, right?So that would be the counter-example: you have this new thing that you can feed people and so forth. They let it through very quickly. On the other hand, you have things like genetically modified salmon and trees, which as far as I can tell, especially for the chestnuts, they've made extraordinary efforts to test. I'm sure that those are going to be in regulatory hell for years to come. *chuckles* You know, I just feel that there's this great problem. These flaws that you identified, I would like to back off and say that this is a problem sort of inherent to government. They're always protecting us against the edge case. The edge case sets the rules, and that ends up, unless you're very careful, making it very difficult for everybody else.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And the vaccines are an interesting example here. Because one of the things you talked about in the book–– one of the possible solutions to climate change is that you can have some kind of geoengineering. Right? I think you mentioned in the book that as long as even one country tries this, then they can effectively (for relatively modest amounts of money), change the atmosphere. But then I look at the failure of every government to approve human challenge trials. This is something that seems like an obvious thing to do and we would have potentially saved hundreds of thousands of lives during COVID by speeding up the vaccine approval. So I wonder, maybe the international collaboration is strong enough that something like geoengineering actually couldn't happen because something like human challenge trials didn't happen.Geoengineering Charles C. Mann   So let me give a plug here for a fun novel by my friend, Neal Stephenson, called Termination Shock. Which is about some rich person just doing it. Just doing geoengineering. The fact is that it's actually not actually against the law to fire off rockets into the stratosphere. In his case, it's a giant gun that shoots shells full of sulfur into the upper atmosphere. So I guess the question is, what timescale do you think is appropriate for all this? I feel quite confident that there will be geoengineering trials within the next 10 years. Is that fast enough? That's a real judgment call. I think people like David Keith and the other advocates for geoengineering would have said it should have happened already and that it's way, way too slow. People who are super anxious about moral hazard and precautionary principles say that that's way, way too fast. So you have these different constituencies. It's hard for me to think off the top of my head of an example where these regulatory agencies have actually totally throttled something in a long-lasting way as opposed to delaying it for 10 years. I don't mean to imply that 10 years is nothing. But it's really killing off something. Is there an example you can think of?Dwarkesh Patel   Well, it's very dependent on where you think it would have been otherwise, like people say maybe it was just bound to be the state. Charles C. Mann   I think that was a very successful case of regulatory capture, in which the proponents of the technology successfully created this crazy…. One of the weird things I really wanted to explain about nuclear stuff is not actually in the book.

covid-19 god united states america american spotify texas history president world donald trump english china europe earth japan water mexico british speaking west germany food africa ai christianity nature european italy japanese spanish north carolina ireland north america spain staying brazil african irish uber east indian bitcoin mexican massachusetts natural code silicon valley britain catholic washington post helps starbucks mississippi civil war millions dutch philippines native americans columbus prophet west coast pleasure wizard pacific vikings haiti fda diamond brazilian americas rebellions latino native prophets edinburgh new world excuse significance nuclear vc wizards similar indians khan portuguese scientific panama underrated el salvador mexico city population bolivia uncovering anarchy central america west africa grain ebola frontier imperial keeping up american revolution empires great lakes mayan south asia cort british empire clive pyramids cortes industrial revolution american west moby dick silk road adam smith puebla aztec joneses oh god cunha bengal druid critiques bureaucracy largely aztecs edo eurasia chiapas c4 undo in defense mayans civilizations chesapeake western hemisphere wizardry brazilians great plains tamil nadu yap geoengineering pizarro new laws easter island incas yucatan spaniards david graeber your god neal stephenson jared diamond niall ferguson green revolution outright new revelations las casas mesoamerica mughal east india company teotihuacan agriculture organization hammurabi tenochtitlan huck finn paul maurice james scott mexica mccaskill malthus wilberforce william powell agroforestry brazilian amazon yangtze sir francis drake ming dynasty spanish empire darwins mesa verde david keith david deutsch william dalrymple northern mexico yellow river plymouth colony bartolome norman borlaug chaco canyon bruce sterling charles c mann laurent binet charles mann mississippi valley bengalis acemoglu borlaug triple alliance americas before columbus will macaskill virginia company frederick jackson turner joseph tainter east india trading company murray gell mann north american west hohokam shape tomorrow prophet two remarkable scientists
Tamil Dawah
Sadaqathullah Umari – Rain – A Blessing, a Tribulation, or a Punishment?

Tamil Dawah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 25:21


மழை – அருளும் வேதனையும் மவ்லவி சதக்கத்துல்லாஹ் உமரீ | Sadaqathullah Umari 09-09-2022, Jumma Salafi Masjid, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu The post Sadaqathullah Umari – Rain – A Blessing, a Tribulation, or a Punishment? appeared first on Tamil Dawah.

Tamil Dawah
Sadaqathullah Umari – Who are those who purify themselves?

Tamil Dawah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 28:05


யார் பரிசுத்தவான்கள்? மவ்லவி சதக்கத்துல்லாஹ் உமரீ | Sadaqathullah Umari 26-08-2022, Jumma Salafi Masjid, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu The post Sadaqathullah Umari – Who are those who purify themselves? appeared first on Tamil Dawah.

PGurus
JVC Sreeram I Did the Waqf board swallow an entire village in Tamil Nadu

PGurus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 10:38


In what appears to be a brazen act of land grab, the Tamil Nadu Wakf Board has swallowed an entire village, consisting of several temples and established homes. How did this happen? Another mischief on part of the DMK government? #Wakfboard #TamilNadu #Trichy #encroachment Reference: https://www.scribd.com/document/593737616/Wakf-Board-Has-Taken-Over-a-Whole-Village

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu - 'மாமனிதன் வைகோ' ஆவணப்பட வெளியீடு

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 6:24


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - மதிமுக பொதுச் செயலாளர் வைகோவின் நீண்ட நெடிய அரசியல் பயணத்தை விவரிக்கும் வகையில் 'மாமனிதன் வைகோ' என்ற ஆவணப்படத்தை தமிழக முதலமைச்சர் மு.க. ஸ்டாலின் நேற்று வெளியிட்டார். வைகோவின் மகனான துரை இந்த ஆவணப்படத்தை தயாரித்துள்ளார். கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்!

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
Thiruvananthapuram City, Padmanabha Swamy Temple 20,000 Years Old, Study

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 6:10


There are quite a few ancient temples of India which are in good shape. Some of them have been assigned dates before Christ,BC,though reluctantly despite strong evidence that they belong to much earlier times. Please check my articles on 5000 years old temples of India. The Thiruvannamalai temple,Tamil Nadu is dated 3.94 Billion years,Tirupati 2100 million years and Jwalapuram, Cuddapah,Telengana, India is 74,000 years old, There are some more ancient temples like the Pundarikaksha Temple,Thiruvellarai, near Sriranagam, Tamil Nadu. There are many more and I shall be writing about them. The Ananta Padmanabhaswamy temple at Thiruvananthapuram,Kerala is one such ancient temple where the presiding deity is Lord Vishnu in his form as the Infinite one in yoga Nidra.The temple has also been one of the richest temple in India, where billions worth of gold and ornaments have been found sealed in an underground vault and the court had appointed a committee to evaluate the riches. This temple is referred to in the Puranas and Tamil Classics of the Sangam era. What is now Kerala was a part of Tamil Chera Kingdom. Chera kings also enriched the temple and this dynasty goes back to thousands of years.However the temple and the city has been dated to around late first century BC. This is way off the mark. The Tamil epic Silappadikaram, written by Ilangao Adigal, brother of the Chera king, mentions this temple and also details the Thiruvananthapuram temple . Silappadikaram describes the city as golden city and the temple as one which was made of gold. Same descriptionis found in the Puranas. Poompuhar,Tamil Nadu where most of the action of Silappadikaram takes place has been found off the sea and it has been proved that the people of Poompuhar had extensive trade with the Greeks, among others. And now Poompuhar has been dated some 20,000 years back! As Silappadikaram speaks of Thiruvananthapuram and Anantha Padmanabhaswamy temple, these two should have existed before the events narrated in Silapadikaram. As Poompuhar is dated 20,000 years ago, it is reasonable to state that Thiruvananthapuram and Padmanabhaswamy temple date back to 20,000 years.Silappadikaram has been dated to likely belong to the beginning of Common era. The incidence of Kovalan Madhavi and Kannagi took place in the same period as the poet who wrote the Tamil Epic was the brother of the Chera King Cheran Senguttuvan. However the recent finding placed these dates to 11000 years back!So it is logical to arrive at the conclusion that the Silappadikaram Town was in existence around 11000 CE and for a rich language as Tamil to develop, from a dialect, colloquial form and then to literary ,it requires minimum 5000 Years. And Tamil quotes Ithihasas ,Ramayana and Mahabharata and the Vedas. That should place these Ithihasas earlier . Hence based on this evidence available now, Tamil should be at least 16000 years old and the Sanskrit Puranas earlier. Please read my Post Million Year Old Tamil quotes Vedas and they quote Tamil. But we are assigning Tamil Sangam at 5 BC and Rig veda at 5000 BC!The date of Poompuhar artifact was arrived at and verified by Glenn Milne Sea Level changes. The place is called Poompuhar. It lies on southeast India's Coromandel coast facing the Bay of Bengal between modern Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka. Its immediate offshore area has been the subject of marine archaeological investigations by India's National Institute of Oceanography since the 1980's — and numerous non-controversial finds of man-made structures dated between the third century AD and the third century BC have been made in the “inter-tidal zone” close to shore at depths down to 6 feet (approximately 2 metres). These finds of structures in shallow water (some so shallow that they are exposed at low tide) have been quite widely written-up in the archaeological literature. More @ Ramanisblog --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
Mahabali Founded Bali ,Discovered Americas ,Polynesia South East Asia?

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:22


The Vamana Avatar of Vishnu ,comparatively speaking,is less dicussed about and the temples for Vamana and Vishnu revealing himself as Trivikrama are limited. Vamana's famius temple from where He took His step to measure the world given to Him by Mahabali is in Kerala and there is a Temple for Trivikrama ,when Vishnu measured the world is in Kanchipuram,Tamil Nadu. The incident narrated about Vamana Avatar is this. King Mahabali ,Grandson of Prahlada and son of Virochana was found harassing the Dhanavas and Lord Vishnu took the Avatar as Vamana,Dwarf to discipline him. Mahabali,because of his pious nature and the boons he had received,was difficult to vanquish by any done by warfare. So,when Mahabali performed a Yagnya,Lord Vishnu,in the form of a Dwarf,Vamana took part in the Yagnya. It is mandatory to gift Brahmins,the Realized ones,at the end of the Yagnya. When Vamana,the Dwarf,asked for Three Feet of Land measured by his feet,Mahabali gave him the gift despite the warning by his Guru Sukracharya. Vamana,it is interpreted,measured the Earth with his first step,the sky with the second and as there was nothing else was available to measure for the third step,Mahabali offered his head as the third step and Vamana pushed Mahabali to Patala Loka and gran.ted him the boon to visit his people once a year. This visitation by Mahabali is celebrated as Onam Festival in Kerala every year even today. Now,Indian texts have three meanings,at least. One is the word to word textual meaning, The second the philosophical interpretation and the third, Historical/esoteric/tantric interpretation. In this incident word by word interpretation narrates the story and conveys that,however mighty one may be,if he is overwhelmed by power and resorts to unrighteous conduct he will be ruined. If he has bee pious,Divine Grace shall prevent total ruin. At the philosophical level,one who is steeped in Ahankaara ,the feeling of ‘I' and attachments to power and riches would be blessed by Divine Grace to remember his Sattivic Swabhava or nature and realize the Reality. I am providing the historical interpretation below. Kerala was a part of Tamil kingdom in Lemuria and Lemurians were referred to as the Southerners,Dravida and were reported to be in Patala,down the earth. The territories we call as south east Asia Australia were in the south. One must remember that the landmass of the earth was different then. Lemuria and MU territories encompassed these areas. Ramayana and Sumerian texts state that Lemurians lived there. Shiva,who predates Sanatana Dharma was in the south. Shiva's trishul marks are found as Nazca lines in Peru. The Incas,Mayas were the descendants of the Tamils. https://ramanan50.wordpress.com/2015/02/01/incas-of-peru-ancestors-tamils-celebrate-makara-sankaranti/ You may read more articles on these subjects by following the related articles in the link provided above. Indra and Virochana( father of Bali) are found in Bali. Vedas are called Catur Veda Sira in Bali Ancient Brahmin Village is in Bali Moving to Patala Loka by Bali means that Bali moved further south or down to the areas we now know as SouthEast Asia,Asia-Pacific. The Tolltechs,Incas,Mayas have a close link with Tamils/Keralites. Spanish has affinity to Tamil. ‘Prahlada's son was Virochana and his son was Bali (Mahabali). When Bali was performing Yagna under supervision of his guru Sukracharya, Vishnu came as Vamana(dwarf or kid) and asked for donation of ‘three pada Bhoomi.' This is wrongly interpreted as 3 foot land. Infact it is 3 quarters of Land (pada here is similar to nakshatra pada in vedic astrology, where each nakshatra is divided into 4 padas [quarters]). At that time, Bali was ruling over Asia, Europe and Africa. So he donated these 3 human inhabitated lands to Vamana and decided to leave. Vamana was satisfied with Bali and gave him a boon of https://ramanisblog.in/2016/12/26/mahabali-founded-bali-discovered-americas-polynesia-south-eas --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
To Siva ' Parvathi Awaits You' Temple

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 2:04


I have been writing this blog for the past nine years on Hinduism, Indian philosophy , it's traditions, literature, diversity,advanced scientific concepts in ancient times, it's presence throughout the world and architecture. And I have traveled widely in India, especially Temples. But I was awestruck by a book written by a foreigner in the eighteenth century on the Great temples of India. I have provided the Link to the book towards the close of the article. I am humbled at my ignorance of my own Culture and Religion. I have been under the impression that temples abound in South India when compared to North India. And Kancheepuram,Tamil Nadu is called the City of temples. And Kumbakonam. But the city that had over one thousand temples is, Bhubaneswar/Cuttack. Most of the temples have been demolished by the Mughals. What remains is only a miniscule. To point,I have been able to find a list of about 54 Temples in Bhubaneswar now. What happened to the others? Will someone from Odisha enlighten me with a List of Temples? I plan to write on each of them. One must remember that Kalinga was a region dating back to 25,000 years. I have written on this. Some points o found in the Book I mentioned are quite new to me. 1.Bhubaneswar has more Shiva temples. 2.There is a temple for Yama and for Parasirameshwar. 3. The Bisveswara temple used twenty two ceremonies a day to the Deity. 4. In this temple, Shiva is informed at night before closing the Garbhagruha, ‘Parvati Awaits you' I recall about temple accounts being read to Madurai Meenakshi Every night. Information about temples requested. We do not seem to know even the existing temples. Less said about the demolished temples, the better. Those who have information,photos of temples that were destroyed, I will be grateful. It is our duty to keep our. Younger generation informed about our glorious heritage. https://ramanisblog.in/2019/01/09/parvati-awaits-you-bhubaneswar-city-of-thousand-temples/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - 'புதுமைப் பெண்' திட்டம் பெண் பிள்ளைகளைக் கையேந்த வைக்கிறதா?

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 3:24


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - சமூக நலன் மற்றும் மகளிர் உரிமைத் துறை சார்பில், அரசுப் பள்ளிகளில் 6 முதல் 12ஆம் வகுப்பு வரை பயின்று உயர்கல்வி பயிலும் மாணவிகளுக்கு மாதம் ரூ.1000 வீதம் உதவித் தொகை வழங்கும் ‘புதுமைப் பெண்' என்ற திட்டத்தை தமிழக அரசு தொடங்கியுள்ளது. இத் திட்டத்தை நாம் தமிழர் கட்சியின் தலைமை ஒருங்கிணைப்பாளர் சீமான் கடுமையாக எதிர்த்துள்ளார். கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

Daily Dose
Daily Dose Ep 1144: Congress' Bharat Jodo Yatra, CBI raids West Bengal law minister

Daily Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 12:41


Anwiti Singh brings you the news from West Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, the Supreme Court, Russia, and Brazil. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - நாத்திகம் பேசும் திமுக தலைவரின் மனைவி கோவில் விழாவைத் தொடக்கினார்!

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 3:30


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - மயிலாடுதுறையில் உள்ள அங்காள பரமேஸ்வரி அம்மன் கோயில் கும்பாபிஷேகத்தை தமிழக முதலமைச்சரின் மனைவி துர்கா ஸ்டாலின், கொடியசைத்துத் தொடங்கி வைத்தார். கும்பாபிஷேக நிகழ்ச்சியில், முதல்வரின் குடும்பத்தினரும் பங்கேற்றனர். நாத்திகம் பேசும் திமுக தலைவர் ஸ்டாலினின் மனைவி ஒரு கோவில் விழாவில் கலந்து கொண்டது தமிழகத்தில் விமர்சனங்களை ஏற்படுத்தி வருகிறது. கூடுதல் விவரங்களுடன் இணைகிறார் நமது தமிழக செய்தியாளர் ராஜ்.

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
Rain Stopping Mantras Procedure

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 1:59


Nature behaves as has been. We assume that,while the going is good,it would always be so. Not so. There is a saying in Tamil that there is none who has prospered continuously for ten years,nor one who has suffered for ten years. Life ,which includes Nature,is a Cycle. Every thing occurs in a Cycle. So are droughts,Astronomical phenomenon and Natural calamities. Few seconds of Earthquakes or Volcanic eruption inflict damage for thousands of years . Man ,in his arrogance,not realising that he can not even be identified as Cosmic speck in the universe, believes ,with his pet toy,Science,he can prevent calamities and Nature. There is something we do not know. Hinduism understands this limitation and devised its religious systems. There are mantras to cure diseases,to bring rainfall. Conversely there are mantras to induce diseases and to prevent natural calamities, like flood,costing lives. I am furnishing mantras to prevent calamities ,limit damages from rain,flood. Tantric system. Basma,ashes are to be taken from the burning ghat. Two bricks are needed. Place one brick on the ground. Draw four vertical lines on it. Then place the other brick on it,after chanting the following mantra, 108 Times, in the image.. Krishna Krishna Mahabaaho Thvan nam Gokulam Prabho, Dhraathumarhasi Devaana Kubhithaath Bhakthavatsala. -Govardhana Uttaranam,Narayaneeyam. Chant for 108 times. 3.For those who know Tamil,following Hymn may be chanted 108 times. It is by Sundarar port by Nayanar,sung at Thirupungur Temple, Tamil Nadu to stop rains. Mantra to prevent Natural calamities. Chant the manta in the image 108 times. Mantras are provided as images in Ramanisblog. Please Google Mantras to Stop Rains Ramanisblog image credit Times of India --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

ThePrint
ThePrintPod : Tamil Nadu police has an Idol Wing that's kinder, gentler and hunts old Bibles, Chola bronzes

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 11:50


Last week, the Idol Wing traced two antique idols of Hindu deities Devi and Ganesha to museums in the US stolen 40 years ago from a temple in Nagapattinam.

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
2000-ல் நடந்த குண்டுவெடிப்புக்கு RSS & BJP காரணமா?|The ImperfectShow 05/09/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 21:27


* புதுமைப்பெண் திட்டம்... தொடக்கவிழா Highlights! * பன்னீருக்கு செக் வைத்த எடப்பாடி... எப்படித் தெரியுமா?* குளிர்பானத்தில் விஷம் கலந்து கொடுத்ததில் மாணவன் சாவு!* ரஜினி மீண்டும் அரசியலுக்கு வருவாரா... அவர் சகோதரர் சொல்வது என்ன?A 13-year-old boy was allegedly killed by a woman who spiked his soft drink as she did not want him to perform better than her daughter at school, said the police in Puducherry Monday.Based on the complaint lodged by the boy's parents, the accused identified as Sahayarani Victoria from Karaikal was arrested by the police Sunday and later remanded in judicial custody.The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & Cibi Chakaravarthy | Script - Vikatan team | Podcast channel manager- Prabhu venkat

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
Stalin பழைய வழக்கை தூசுதட்டும் ADMK & BJP! |The ImperfectShow 06/09/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 18:42


* DMK-வில் ம.செ-கள் மாற்றப்படுகிறார்களா... உண்மை என்ன?* Rahul Gandhi பாதயாத்திரை... மீளுமா காங்கிரஸ்?!* DMDK தலைவராகிறாரா பிரேமலதா?* சிறையில் இருப்போர் எல்லோரும் கிரிமினல்கள் அல்ல! - அமித் ஷா!* England புதிய பிரதமர் லிஸ் டிரஸ்!The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & Cibi Chakaravarthy | Script - Vikatan team | Podcast channel manager - Prabhu venkat

Brown Pundits
All Things Tamil Cinema

Brown Pundits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 152:57


Maneesh talks to Sai and Arun on all things Tamil Cinema- its history, its unique relationship with the political milieu of Tamil Nadu, its evolution over the years and the cults of personalities that it has spawned.  

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
Nirmala Sitharaman Vs TRS Party: மோடி படம் வைத்து எழுந்த சர்ச்சை! |The ImperfectShow 03 / 09/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 25:38


* Annamalai புஸ்ஸ்... JV-யில் வந்த விரிவான கட்டுரை!* மோடி பற்றிப் பேசினால் சிறையில் தள்ளிவிடுவார்கள்... புலம்பும் முன்னாள் உச்ச நீதிமன்ற நீதிபதி! * அமித் ஷா தலைமையில் தென் மாநில முதல்வர்கள் கூட்டத்தில் நடந்தது என்ன?* அமைச்சர் செந்தில் பாலாஜிக்கு எதிரான வழக்கின் தீர்ப்பு ஒத்திவைப்பு!* தஞ்சம் கேட்டு இலங்கை அதிபருக்குக் கடிதம் எழுதிய நித்தியானந்தா!Self-proclaimed spiritual leader and accused of rape, Nithyananda is reportedly seeking political asylum in Sri Lanka. Citing a deterioration in his health, the fugitive godman penned a letter to the president of the island nation on August 7 and flagged an 'urgent' need for medical attention. The letter mentioned the scarcity of medical infrastructure in the Sovereign State of Shrikailasa, an island established and named by the spiritual leader.The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & Cibi Chakaravarthy | Script - Vikatan team | Podcast channel manager- Prabhu venkat

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
EPS-க்குச் சாதகமாகத் தீர்ப்பு... ADMK-வில் அடுத்து நடக்கப்போவது என்ன? |The ImperfectShow 02/ 09/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 22:09


* Annamalai Vs PTR: அரசியல் நாகரிகத்தை இழந்துவிட்டதா தமிழகம்?* OPS... அடுத்த மூவ் என்ன?* அண்ணாமலையுடன் செல்ஃபி எடுத்த கார்த்தி சிதம்பரம்! * பிரதமர் மோடியின் பிறந்தநாளைக் கொண்டாடத் தயாராகும் பாஜக! * தினகரன் திடீர் உடல்நலக் குறைவு காரணம் என்ன?On party leadership dispute, the Madras High Court on Friday allowed AIADMK leader K Palaniswami's appeal, setting aside an order in favour of O Panneerselvam.A division bench, comprising Justices M Duraiswamy and Sundar Mohan, set aside the order of a single judge, which nullified the July 11 General Council (GC) meeting of the AIADMK.The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & Cibi Chakaravarthy | Script - Vikatan team | Podcast channel manager- Prabhu venkat

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Focus: Tamil Nadu/India - திருச்சியிலுள்ள இலங்கை அகதிகள் சிறப்பு முகாமில் காவல்துறையினர் குவிக்கப்பட்டுள்ள

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 6:08


Raj, our correspondent in India, compiled a report focusing on major events/news in Tamil Nadu / India. - திருச்சி மத்திய சிறை வளாகத்திலுள்ள அகதிகள் சிறப்பு முகாமில் 300-க்கும் மேற்பட்ட காவல்துறையினர் குவிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளதாக தமிழக செய்திகள் தெரிவிக்கின்றன. மேலும் அகதிகள் சிறப்பு முகாமில் காவல்துறையினர் அதிரடி சோதனை மேற்கொண்டு வருவதாக கூறப்படுகிறது.

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
தரம் தாழ்ந்தாரா அண்ணாமலை?Annamalai Vs PTR பஞ்சாயத்து! |The ImperfectShow 01/ 09/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 22:20


*மாவீரன் பூலித்தேவன் பிறந்தநாள். Modi Twitter வாழ்த்து!* தமிழகத்தில் சட்டம் ஒழுங்கு சீர் குலைந்து விட்டது! - எல்.முருகன்*வணிக பயன்பாட்டுக்கான Cylinder விலை குறைப்பு!*அமலுக்கு வந்தது சுங்கச்சாவடி கட்டண உயர்வு!*Arumugasamy Report: விசாரணை அறிக்கையில் பிரச்னை இருக்கு- Stalin* கள்ளக்குறிச்சி கலவரம்: மேலும் 3 பேரைக் கைது செய்தது Police!*கனல் கண்ணனுக்கு நிபந்தனை ஜாமீன்!A war of words erupted between Tamil Nadu finance minister Palanivel Thiaga Rajan (PTR) and the Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) state chief Annamalai, who on Wednesday, August 31, were slamming each other on Twitter.The finance minister took to Twitter and stated that he wouldn't even address Annamalai by his name. He further called the state BJP chief “vile and a curse on Tamil society.”The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & venkatesh | Script - Vikatan team | Podacst channel manager- Prabhu venkat

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan
DMK எதிராக வாள் சுழற்றத் தயாராகும் Congress? |The ImperfectShow 31/ 08/2022

The Imperfect show - Hello Vikatan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 17:25


* ரத்து செய்யப்படும் ரயில் டிக்கெட்டுகளுக்கு 5% ஜிஎஸ்டி? * மகாத்மா காந்திக்குப் பிறகு பிரதமர் மோடி மட்டுமே... புகழ்ந்து தள்ளிய Rajnath Singh!* ADMK Office வழக்கு: CBCID விசாரணை அதிகாரி நியமனம்! * R.B.Udhayakumar-ஐ மிரட்டிய OPS ஆதரவாளர் கைது!The Imperfect Show is a 2018 Tamil language political satire show that deals with politics and news in Tamil Nadu. The political situation in Tamil Nadu - current affairs show by Vikatan, appearing on VikatanWebTV, which educates us on the happenings of the day in Tamil Nadu, India (often talking of Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and international (occasionally Donald Trump). A show with a daily episode presented by Saran, Cibi Chakravarthy. The show produced by Vikatan Group is uploaded daily including Sunday on VIKATANTV at 7:00 PM. Tune in for your daily dose of politics and current affairs, delivered humorously. Here is today's latest video of #TheImperfectShowVikatan விகடன் யூட்யூப் சேனலில் சிபி, சரண் நகைச்சுவையாக தொகுத்து வழங்கும் நிகழ்ச்சி ” தி இம்பர்ஃபெக்ட் ஷோ”. சில முக்கிய அன்றாட அரசியல் மற்றும் பொது நிகழ்வுகளை அறியவும், வெளி வராத சில ரகசியங்களை தெரிந்துகொள்ளவும், அரசியல் தெளிவு பெறவும் இந்த நிகழ்ச்சி உதவும்! #TheImperfectShowCREDITS: Host - Saran & Cibi Chakravarthy | Script - Vikatan team | Podcast channel manager- Prabhu venkat