Podcasts about Mauro

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Venus Podcast
LUCIO MAURO FILHO - Venus Podcast #368

Venus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 232:49


Ator, comediante, roteirista, diretor, dublador e músico. Atualmente está no ar com a sua banda "Lucio Mauro e Filhos" no Caldeirão do Mion.

The Doctor’s Crossing Carpe Diem Podcast
Leaving Surgery For a Career In Medical Devices

The Doctor’s Crossing Carpe Diem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:17


Many physicians transitioning to nonclinical careers are aware of available roles in the pharmaceutical industry, but may be less familiar with career options in the medical device industry. Today's guest, Dr. Christine Mauro, is here to discuss how and why she transitioned into the medical device field after training as a general surgeon. She'll explain the similarities and differences between the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and we'll also dive into her day-to-day work, which physicians might be a good fit for these roles, and how you can get started in the field.  You can find the show notes for this episode and more information by clicking here: www.doctorscrossing.com/106   In this episode we're talking about: How Dr. Mauro realized she needed to change gears in her career Consultant and employed roles in the medical device industry How to find opportunities and the role of networking Christine's day-to-day work and typical hours in her current job Why Dr. Mauro finds her work so fulfilling Which types of physicians might be the best fit for this role Typical compensation for medical device industry jobs   Links for this episode: Check out our Free Resources! Under the Freebie tab on our website, you can find free resource guides on a variety of topics including resumes, interviewing, LinkedIn, medical writing, pharma, chart review, and telemedicine. There is also a starter kit to help you move forward when you're feeling stuck at the crossroads. Please help yourself!

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, November 29th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 13:59


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Tuesday, November 29th, 2022. I hope you guys had an excellent Thanksgiving with you and your loved ones… and that y’all are healthy as we head into the cold and flu season… and ya know, one of our sponsors Armored Republic, may not be able to help with the flu, but they can help with fighting tyranny! Armored Republic The Mission of Armored Republic is to Honor Christ by equipping Free Men with Tools of Liberty necessary to preserve God-given rights. In the Armored Republic there is no King but Christ. We are Free Craftsmen. Body Armor is a Tool of Liberty. We create Tools of Liberty. Free men must remain ever vigilant against tyranny wherever it appears. God has given us the tools of liberty needed to defend the rights He bestowed to us. Armored Republic is honored to offer you those Tools. Visit them, at ar500armor.com Speaking of tyranny… https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/clashes-in-shanghai-as-covid-protests-flare-across-china-2 Clashes in Shanghai as COVID protests flare across China Hundreds of demonstrators and police clashed in Shanghai on Sunday night as protests over China’s stringent COVID restrictions flared for a third day and spread to several cities in the wake of a deadly apartment fire in the country’s far west. The wave of civil disobedience is unprecedented in mainland China since President Xi Jinping assumed power a decade ago, as frustration mounts over his signature zero-COVID policy nearly three years into the pandemic. The COVID measures are also exacting a heavy toll on the world’s second-largest economy. “I’m here because I love my country, but I don’t love my government … I want to be able to go out freely, but I can’t. Our COVID-19 policy is a game and is not based on science or reality,” said a protester in the financial hub named Shaun Xiao. Protesters also took to the streets in the cities of Wuhan and Chengdu on Sunday. In Beijing, small gatherings held peaceful vigils, while students on numerous university campuses around China gathered to demonstrate over the weekend. A fire on Thursday at a residential high-rise building in the city of Urumqi, capital of the Xinjiang region, triggered protests after videos of the incident posted on social media led to accusations that lockdowns were a factor in the blaze that killed 10 people. Urumqi officials abruptly held a news conference in the early hours of Saturday to deny COVID measures had hampered escape and rescue efforts. Many of Urumqi’s 4 million residents have been under some of the country’s longest lockdowns, barred from leaving their homes for as long as 100 days. On Sunday in Shanghai, police kept a heavy presence on Wulumuqi Road, which is named after Urumqi, and where a candlelight vigil the day before turned into protests. “We just want our basic human rights. We can’t leave our homes without getting a test. It was the accident in Xinjiang that pushed people too far,” said a 26-year-old protester in Shanghai who declined to be identified given the sensitivity of the matter. “The people here aren’t violent, but the police are arresting them for no reason. They tried to grab me but the people all around me grabbed my arms so hard and pulled me back so I could escape.” By Sunday evening, hundreds of people gathered in the area. Some jostled with police trying to disperse them. People held up blank sheets of paper as an expression of protest. A Reuters witness saw police escorting people onto a bus which was later driven away through the crowd with a few dozen people on board. On Saturday, the vigil in Shanghai for victims of the apartment fire turned into a protest against COVID curbs, with the crowd chanting calls for lockdowns to be lifted. From one tyrannical government to another: https://www.dailyfetched.com/more-canadians-being-driven-to-euthanasia-to-escape-crippling-poverty/ More Canadians Being Driven to Euthanasia to Escape Crippling Poverty Amir Farsoud was on the verge of being homeless and admitted his health condition would not allow him to survive on the streets. Farsoud said that he did not want to die but could not afford to find another place to live, and instead opted for the country’s assisted suicide laws. City News Reporter Cynthia Mulligan said: “Amir Farsoud has applied for medically assisted dying, known as (MAiD) he lives in constant agony due to a back injury but has started the process for end of life.” “Because his rooming house is up for sale and he can’t find anywhere else to live that he can afford,” Mulligan added. In February, a Canadian woman with a chronic health also chose to end her life under the country’s assisted suicide laws. Meanwhile, another woman, suffering from the same condition, reached the approval to end her life. As the Guardian reported at the time: In February, a 51-year-old Ontario woman known as Sophia was granted physician-assisted death after her chronic condition became intolerable and her meager disability stipend left her little to survive on. “The government sees me as expendable trash, a complainer, useless and a pain in the ass,” she said in a video obtained by the network. For two years, she and friends had pleaded without success for better living conditions, she said. Now a second case has emerged with several parallels: another woman, known as Denise, has also applied to end her life after being unable to find suitable housing and struggling to survive on disability payments. Both were diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivity (MCR), a condition in which common chemicals, such as those in cigarette smoke and laundry detergents, can trigger nausea, blinding headaches and in extreme cases, anaphylactic shock. As Forbes reported earlier this month, Canada is often cited by those concerned about medically assisted dying as evidence of a ‘slippery slope. Its MAID (Medical Assistance in Dying) law was introduced in 2016 for adults with conditions where death is reasonably foreseeable – expected within six months. It was extended to those with severe chronic but not terminal physical ailments in 2021 and will be further made available to those with severe chronic mental conditions in 2023. Currently under consideration is the possibility of advance directives for people falling into conditions like dementia that will remove decision-making ability. For some, this progression is proof of a ‘slippery slope’ – once one element is allowed, others will inevitably follow until almost anything is permitted. For others, it is a careful and considered roll-out of a new set of laws – up to, but not beyond, a logical and morally defensible limit. In truth, Canada is not particularly exceptional in its approach. Everything currently permitted there is also available in a number of other countries. In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada reversed 22 years of its jurisprudence by striking down the country’s ban on assisted suicide as unconstitutional, blithely dismissing fears that the ruling would ‘initiate a descent down a slippery slope into homicide’ against the vulnerable as founded on ‘anecdotal examples. The next year, Parliament duly enacted legislation allowing euthanasia, but only for those who suffer from a terminal illness whose natural death was ‘reasonably foreseeable,’ the spectator reported. And on that note… how about some good news? https://townhall.com/tipsheet/saraharnold/2022/11/27/handgun-owners-carrying-daily-in-us-doubled-in-4-years-poll-finds-n2616399 Handgun Owners Carrying Daily Doubled Thanks to Soft-on-Crime Woke Policies Americans feel less safe under President Joe Biden, and thanks to soft-on-crime woke cities, crime has surged during the last two years. As Biden continues to threaten the Second Amendment, Americans are taking their safety into their hands. According to a new study by the University of Washington, the number of U.S. adult handgun owners carrying daily nearly doubled in four years. The November 16 study found that 6 million adults carried a firearm on themselves in 2019, which is up by 3 million in 2015. Self-protection was cited as the main reason for the uptick in gun holders, with seven out of 10 saying that they carry a gun to protect themselves against other people. In 2015, only 9 million people reported carrying a handgun. Now, at least 16 million people say they carry a loaded weapon on them at least once a month. The total number of Americans owning handguns spiked from 38 million to 53 million in just a few short years. This comes as Biden called to ban assault rifles, claiming that it is “ridiculous” red flag laws are not being enforced throughout the country. He is going to attempt to pass a bill on the matter during Congress’ lame-duck session, right before Republicans take over the House, which they would most likely veto any sort of gun restricting laws. Americans have heard time and time again from Democrats how more gun laws need to be enacted. Calling it “sick” that semi-automatic weapons are still allowed, Biden has zeroed in on trying to “get rid of assault weapons.” Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at fightlaughfeast.com. Now finally today, this one hits close to home here in Moscow Idaho, and we ask for your prayers for the police investigating this case, as well as for the families of those who lost loved ones: https://www.foxnews.com/us/idaho-student-murders-update-police-why-key-details-withheld-from-public Idaho Student murders update: Police say why key details are being withheld from the public Two weeks have passed since authorities first began investigating the brutal murders of four University of Idaho students in Moscow, Idaho and no suspect or person of interest has been identified. Police have also not yet provided key details surrounding the murders of Kaylee Goncalves, 21, Madison Mogen, 21, Xana Kernodle, 20, and Ethan Chapin, 20, but they are doing so intentionally, according to Aaron Snell of the Idaho State Police. During an interview on Fox News’ "Lawrence Jones Cross Country," Snell told host Lawrence Jones that investigators "don't currently have a suspect" but that keeping certain information "from view is going to be critical into trying to develop that." The Idaho police communications director answered: "It will potentially put more fear, more suspicion on a wide variety of people versus if we use that to really refine where we're at in our investigation.” Jones also spoke with former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro, who similarly confirmed that information from criminal profilers and evidence collected at the scene was being withheld. Mauro said Saturday evening that in addition to protecting the integrity of the investigation, the scarcity of key details that have been released to the public could lead investigators to swiftly find a suspect. A murder weapon has also not been found. The four students were found dead at a house just yards from the U of I campus, hours after police say someone attacked them in their sleep. Snell said authorities also believe the attack "was a targeted incident" toward one or more of the three women who lived there. Chapin, the sole male victim did not live at the home and was visiting his girlfriend, Kernodle. As for who was the target, that information is not publicly known. Snell also assured community members that investigators are utilizing the best technology available to get a picture of the series of events of Nov. 13. Another concern Snell addressed is the potential contamination of the crime scene, as two roommates are believed to have been in the home at the time of the murders. They are cooperative and have been ruled out as suspects. Other people were invited into the home between when the bodies were initially found and when law enforcement arrived but Snell said the investigation was not compromised. All individuals who were in the home when police arrived have been cleared.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, November 29th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 13:59


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Tuesday, November 29th, 2022. I hope you guys had an excellent Thanksgiving with you and your loved ones… and that y’all are healthy as we head into the cold and flu season… and ya know, one of our sponsors Armored Republic, may not be able to help with the flu, but they can help with fighting tyranny! Armored Republic The Mission of Armored Republic is to Honor Christ by equipping Free Men with Tools of Liberty necessary to preserve God-given rights. In the Armored Republic there is no King but Christ. We are Free Craftsmen. Body Armor is a Tool of Liberty. We create Tools of Liberty. Free men must remain ever vigilant against tyranny wherever it appears. God has given us the tools of liberty needed to defend the rights He bestowed to us. Armored Republic is honored to offer you those Tools. Visit them, at ar500armor.com Speaking of tyranny… https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/clashes-in-shanghai-as-covid-protests-flare-across-china-2 Clashes in Shanghai as COVID protests flare across China Hundreds of demonstrators and police clashed in Shanghai on Sunday night as protests over China’s stringent COVID restrictions flared for a third day and spread to several cities in the wake of a deadly apartment fire in the country’s far west. The wave of civil disobedience is unprecedented in mainland China since President Xi Jinping assumed power a decade ago, as frustration mounts over his signature zero-COVID policy nearly three years into the pandemic. The COVID measures are also exacting a heavy toll on the world’s second-largest economy. “I’m here because I love my country, but I don’t love my government … I want to be able to go out freely, but I can’t. Our COVID-19 policy is a game and is not based on science or reality,” said a protester in the financial hub named Shaun Xiao. Protesters also took to the streets in the cities of Wuhan and Chengdu on Sunday. In Beijing, small gatherings held peaceful vigils, while students on numerous university campuses around China gathered to demonstrate over the weekend. A fire on Thursday at a residential high-rise building in the city of Urumqi, capital of the Xinjiang region, triggered protests after videos of the incident posted on social media led to accusations that lockdowns were a factor in the blaze that killed 10 people. Urumqi officials abruptly held a news conference in the early hours of Saturday to deny COVID measures had hampered escape and rescue efforts. Many of Urumqi’s 4 million residents have been under some of the country’s longest lockdowns, barred from leaving their homes for as long as 100 days. On Sunday in Shanghai, police kept a heavy presence on Wulumuqi Road, which is named after Urumqi, and where a candlelight vigil the day before turned into protests. “We just want our basic human rights. We can’t leave our homes without getting a test. It was the accident in Xinjiang that pushed people too far,” said a 26-year-old protester in Shanghai who declined to be identified given the sensitivity of the matter. “The people here aren’t violent, but the police are arresting them for no reason. They tried to grab me but the people all around me grabbed my arms so hard and pulled me back so I could escape.” By Sunday evening, hundreds of people gathered in the area. Some jostled with police trying to disperse them. People held up blank sheets of paper as an expression of protest. A Reuters witness saw police escorting people onto a bus which was later driven away through the crowd with a few dozen people on board. On Saturday, the vigil in Shanghai for victims of the apartment fire turned into a protest against COVID curbs, with the crowd chanting calls for lockdowns to be lifted. From one tyrannical government to another: https://www.dailyfetched.com/more-canadians-being-driven-to-euthanasia-to-escape-crippling-poverty/ More Canadians Being Driven to Euthanasia to Escape Crippling Poverty Amir Farsoud was on the verge of being homeless and admitted his health condition would not allow him to survive on the streets. Farsoud said that he did not want to die but could not afford to find another place to live, and instead opted for the country’s assisted suicide laws. City News Reporter Cynthia Mulligan said: “Amir Farsoud has applied for medically assisted dying, known as (MAiD) he lives in constant agony due to a back injury but has started the process for end of life.” “Because his rooming house is up for sale and he can’t find anywhere else to live that he can afford,” Mulligan added. In February, a Canadian woman with a chronic health also chose to end her life under the country’s assisted suicide laws. Meanwhile, another woman, suffering from the same condition, reached the approval to end her life. As the Guardian reported at the time: In February, a 51-year-old Ontario woman known as Sophia was granted physician-assisted death after her chronic condition became intolerable and her meager disability stipend left her little to survive on. “The government sees me as expendable trash, a complainer, useless and a pain in the ass,” she said in a video obtained by the network. For two years, she and friends had pleaded without success for better living conditions, she said. Now a second case has emerged with several parallels: another woman, known as Denise, has also applied to end her life after being unable to find suitable housing and struggling to survive on disability payments. Both were diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivity (MCR), a condition in which common chemicals, such as those in cigarette smoke and laundry detergents, can trigger nausea, blinding headaches and in extreme cases, anaphylactic shock. As Forbes reported earlier this month, Canada is often cited by those concerned about medically assisted dying as evidence of a ‘slippery slope. Its MAID (Medical Assistance in Dying) law was introduced in 2016 for adults with conditions where death is reasonably foreseeable – expected within six months. It was extended to those with severe chronic but not terminal physical ailments in 2021 and will be further made available to those with severe chronic mental conditions in 2023. Currently under consideration is the possibility of advance directives for people falling into conditions like dementia that will remove decision-making ability. For some, this progression is proof of a ‘slippery slope’ – once one element is allowed, others will inevitably follow until almost anything is permitted. For others, it is a careful and considered roll-out of a new set of laws – up to, but not beyond, a logical and morally defensible limit. In truth, Canada is not particularly exceptional in its approach. Everything currently permitted there is also available in a number of other countries. In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada reversed 22 years of its jurisprudence by striking down the country’s ban on assisted suicide as unconstitutional, blithely dismissing fears that the ruling would ‘initiate a descent down a slippery slope into homicide’ against the vulnerable as founded on ‘anecdotal examples. The next year, Parliament duly enacted legislation allowing euthanasia, but only for those who suffer from a terminal illness whose natural death was ‘reasonably foreseeable,’ the spectator reported. And on that note… how about some good news? https://townhall.com/tipsheet/saraharnold/2022/11/27/handgun-owners-carrying-daily-in-us-doubled-in-4-years-poll-finds-n2616399 Handgun Owners Carrying Daily Doubled Thanks to Soft-on-Crime Woke Policies Americans feel less safe under President Joe Biden, and thanks to soft-on-crime woke cities, crime has surged during the last two years. As Biden continues to threaten the Second Amendment, Americans are taking their safety into their hands. According to a new study by the University of Washington, the number of U.S. adult handgun owners carrying daily nearly doubled in four years. The November 16 study found that 6 million adults carried a firearm on themselves in 2019, which is up by 3 million in 2015. Self-protection was cited as the main reason for the uptick in gun holders, with seven out of 10 saying that they carry a gun to protect themselves against other people. In 2015, only 9 million people reported carrying a handgun. Now, at least 16 million people say they carry a loaded weapon on them at least once a month. The total number of Americans owning handguns spiked from 38 million to 53 million in just a few short years. This comes as Biden called to ban assault rifles, claiming that it is “ridiculous” red flag laws are not being enforced throughout the country. He is going to attempt to pass a bill on the matter during Congress’ lame-duck session, right before Republicans take over the House, which they would most likely veto any sort of gun restricting laws. Americans have heard time and time again from Democrats how more gun laws need to be enacted. Calling it “sick” that semi-automatic weapons are still allowed, Biden has zeroed in on trying to “get rid of assault weapons.” Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at fightlaughfeast.com. Now finally today, this one hits close to home here in Moscow Idaho, and we ask for your prayers for the police investigating this case, as well as for the families of those who lost loved ones: https://www.foxnews.com/us/idaho-student-murders-update-police-why-key-details-withheld-from-public Idaho Student murders update: Police say why key details are being withheld from the public Two weeks have passed since authorities first began investigating the brutal murders of four University of Idaho students in Moscow, Idaho and no suspect or person of interest has been identified. Police have also not yet provided key details surrounding the murders of Kaylee Goncalves, 21, Madison Mogen, 21, Xana Kernodle, 20, and Ethan Chapin, 20, but they are doing so intentionally, according to Aaron Snell of the Idaho State Police. During an interview on Fox News’ "Lawrence Jones Cross Country," Snell told host Lawrence Jones that investigators "don't currently have a suspect" but that keeping certain information "from view is going to be critical into trying to develop that." The Idaho police communications director answered: "It will potentially put more fear, more suspicion on a wide variety of people versus if we use that to really refine where we're at in our investigation.” Jones also spoke with former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro, who similarly confirmed that information from criminal profilers and evidence collected at the scene was being withheld. Mauro said Saturday evening that in addition to protecting the integrity of the investigation, the scarcity of key details that have been released to the public could lead investigators to swiftly find a suspect. A murder weapon has also not been found. The four students were found dead at a house just yards from the U of I campus, hours after police say someone attacked them in their sleep. Snell said authorities also believe the attack "was a targeted incident" toward one or more of the three women who lived there. Chapin, the sole male victim did not live at the home and was visiting his girlfriend, Kernodle. As for who was the target, that information is not publicly known. Snell also assured community members that investigators are utilizing the best technology available to get a picture of the series of events of Nov. 13. Another concern Snell addressed is the potential contamination of the crime scene, as two roommates are believed to have been in the home at the time of the murders. They are cooperative and have been ruled out as suspects. Other people were invited into the home between when the bodies were initially found and when law enforcement arrived but Snell said the investigation was not compromised. All individuals who were in the home when police arrived have been cleared.

Storia d'Italia
Il trionfo di Eraclio (628-630), ep. 125

Storia d'Italia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 61:06


Una massima celebre di Karl von Klausewitz è che la guerra è la prosecuzione della politica con altri mezzi. Arrivati però al termine di una guerra, spesso anche l'inverso è valido: la politica è una prosecuzione della guerra con altri mezzi. Vediamo come Eraclio se la cava al tavolo della pace.---PER ACQUISTARE "IL MIGLIOR NEMICO DI ROMA":- Amazon (link affiliato): https://amzn.to/3DG9FG5- IBS: https://www.ibs.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Feltrinelli: https://www.lafeltrinelli.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Mondadori: https://www.mondadoristore.it/miglior-nemico-Roma-Storia-Marco-Cappelli/eai978882821008/---Ti piace il podcast? Sostienilo, accedendo all'episodio premium, al canale su telegram, alla citazione nel podcast, alle première degli episodi e molto altro ancora:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/italiastoria Tipeee: https://it.tipeee.com/storia-ditaliaPer una donazione: https://italiastoria.com/come-sostenere-il-podcast/---►Informazioni sul mio libro "Per un pugno di barbari":https://italiastoria.com/libro/►Registrarsi alla mia mailing list:https://italiastoria.com/mailing-list/►Trascrizioni episodi, mappe, recensioni, genealogie:https://italiastoria.com/►FacebookPagina: https://www.facebook.com/italiastoriaGruppo: https://www.facebook.com/groups/italiastoria►Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/italiastoria/►Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ItaliaStoria►YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzPIENUr6-S0UMJzREn9U5Q►Canale Discord:https://discord.gg/cyjbMJe3Qk►Contattami per commenti, idee e proposte di collaborazione: info@italiastoria.com---Musiche di Riccardo Santatohttps://www.youtube.com/user/sanric77---Livello Giuseppe Verdi: Massimiliano PastoreLivello Dante Alighieri: Musu Meci, Manuel Marchio, Mauro, Marco il Nero, Massimo Ciampiconi, Mike Lombardi, David l'Apostata, Luca Baccaro. Musu Meci, Manuel Marchio, Mauro Samarati, Marco il Nero, Massimo Ciampiconi, Mike Lombardi, David l'Apostata, Luca Baccaro e Gugliemo de martino! Grazie anche ai Leonardo da Vinci: Paolo, Pablo, Simone, i due Jacopo, Riccardo, Frazemo, Enrico, Alberto, Davide, Andrea Vovola e D'agostini, Settimio, Giovanni, Cesare, Francesco Favazza e Cateni, Jerome, Diego, Alanchik, Flavio, Edoardo Vaquer e De Natale, Stefano, Luca, Arianna, Mariateresa, John, Fasdev, Norman, Claudio, Marko, Barbaking, Alfredo, Manuel, Lorenzo, Corrado, Piernicola, Totila, Vito, Tascio, InSpaten, Carlo, Daniele, Matteo, Luigi e Simone!Grazie anche a tutti i miei sostenitori al livello Marco Polo e Galileo Galilei!---Musiche di Riccardo Santato

21st Century HR
The Act of Love in Innovation With PepsiCo SVP & Chief Design Officer Mauro Porcini

21st Century HR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 40:41


In this episode of Redefining HR, I spoke with PepsiCo's SVP and Chief Design Officer, Mauro Porcini. Mauro and I discuss what great design looks like, how it ties to innovation and insights from his recent book, “The Human Side of Innovation.” We also discuss why everyone is a designer in many ways.

HR Leaders
The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People, with Mauro Porcini

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 52:44


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast I'm joined by Mauro Porcini to discuss the human side of innovation: the power of people in love with people.Mauro Porcini is PepsiCo's first ever Chief Design Officer. He joined the food & beverage corporation in 2012 and in said role he is infusing design thinking into PepsiCo's culture and is leading a new approach to innovation by design that impacts the company's product platforms and brands, which include Pepsi, Lay's, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Sodastream, Doritos, Lifewtr, Bubly, Aquafina, Cheetos, Quaker, 7Up, Mirinda, amongst many others.

Service Design Show
The Human Side of Innovation / Mauro Porcini / Episode #163

Service Design Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 49:49


When you asked me to play the piano, I can assure you that nothing close to music would come out. Would we, at that point, say that the piano is broken? That would be silly, right? Somehow, this is the typical approach when organizations bring in design. When design doesn't fully deliver on the expected outcomes, it's the process that is declared faulty. Mauro Porcini is the Chief Design Officer at PepsiCo. In his career, he has seen many design-driven initiatives fail, and some succeed. This led him on the quest to find out what the differentiator is between the two. Can you guess the answer? This shouldn't surprise you by now; it's people. So if that's the case, what kind of people does it take to make design work? Well, Mauro decided to write a dedicated book about this with the inspiring title: The Human Side of Innovation. The book just got published, and I invited Mauro on the Show to share the key insights with you. This is a good one! We explored many ideas in this conversation, but one thing that stood out for me was kindness as a competitive advantage. And you know what? It makes complete business sense! Enjoy the episode, and if you do consider sharing it, someone who might as well :) --- [ 1. GUIDE ] --- 00:00 Welcome to episode 163 03:30 Who is Mauro 05:00 Lightning round 08:15 How did it start 12:30 The key message 14:30 Why now 19:00 Focus on people 22:15 What to look for 25:45 Reception by business 30:30 Unicorns 33:30 True human centricity 40:00 How to make it bigger 43:00 Design happiness 47:00 Contest announcement 48:15 Final thoughts --- [ 2. LINKS ] --- * https://www.linkedin.com/in/mauroporcini/ * The Human Side of Innovation (book) - https://amzn.to/3Opl8h2 * In Your Shoes (podcast) - https://open.spotify.com/show/6u90U1OT6mLdByL0TAYRW6 * Stage Not Age (book) - https://amzn.to/3ETZNcz --- [ 3. CONTEST ] --- To enter the contest, head over to the video version of this conversation on YouTube and leave a comment there to answer the question posed in the episode. https://go.servicedesignshow.com/episode163 --- [ 4. CIRCLE ] --- Join our private community for in-house service design professionals. https://servicedesignshow.com/circle

Más sabe el Diablo por Vieja
Ep 129 TRANSformando realidades con Mauro Alessandri

Más sabe el Diablo por Vieja

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:43


Mauro Alessandri, creador de contenido digital, comunicador y activista trans, nos acompaña para hablar de privilegios, visibilidad trans en personajes de ayer y hoy y algunos consejos para padres / madres / xadres de personas disidentes de la cis heteronorma. ¡Acompáñanos!

Stock Pickers
#173 Final de 98, Gabigol fora e Argentina campeã? Especial Copa com Mauro Beting e Júlia Aquino

Stock Pickers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 91:47


Fundo Selection Stock Pickers: https://lp.infomoney.com.br/fundo-stock-pickers-presente-exclusivo-v1?utm_source=infomoney&utm_medium=stockpickers&utm_campaign=202208_infomoney_stockpickers-10082022_youtube________________Henrique Esteter e Fernando Ferreira recebem a presença ilustre de Mauro Beting, jornalista esportivo, e Júlia Aquino, analista quantitativo da XP, pra falar de tudo sobre a copa do mundo, as expectativas e previsões, no episódio #173 do Stock Pickers.________________EQUIPE DE PRODUÇÃODireção de cortes, produção e edição: Nando LimaProdução: Mariana ShimojoRedes sociais: Rafaella Bertolini

Sip With Me
Jeff Mauro, Food Network's “Sandwich King” & Owner of Mauro Provisions

Sip With Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 39:58


How does one become King of Sandwiches? Known by fans around the world and Aaron's mom as “The Sandwich King”, Jeff Mauro is an Emmy-nominated celebrity chef who became known for destroying the competition with his consistently amazing sandwiches. Winning Season 7 of Food Network's “Food Network Star”, Jeff became the go-to authority on all things sandwiches, cooking, and of course hilarious entertainment. Jeff has his own show “Sandwich King”, co-hosts “The Kitchen”, has his own cookbook, podcast and a business (WOWOWOWOW). A local Chicagoan, we chat about Jeff's upbringing and how Chicago food helped influenced him in his career. Then we find out how many times Jeff had to audition for Food Network Star, and hear about his experience filming the show in secret away from his family and friends. Jeff also told us about his Chicago-based company “Mauro Provisions”, which sells craft giardiniera, meat, and seasoning- essentially everything you'd need to create the perfect Chicago meal! We love a company with a foodie mission!! Last, Jeff tells us about his podcast “Come On Over” which we binged after the interview because he's literally a stand up comedian. We end this episode with a round of rapid fire, finding out Jeff's favorite bun, what cookbook he's reading right now (which was literally next to him on his desk), his go-to Chicago restaurant, and his favorite cocktail!

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine
Kind By Design (with Mauro Porcini)

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 53:27 Transcription Available


Mark speaks with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo’s first ever Chief Design Officer and the author of the timely book—both manifesto and memoir—called The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. Together we explore the important call to prioritize human-centered design and innovation when it is most at risk. Today, Commander Divine speaks with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo’s first ever Chief Design Officer and the author of the timely book—both manifesto and memoir—called The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. In the episode, Mauro makes the call to prioritize human-centered design and innovation when it is most at risk. In a constantly changing world, Mauro stands for human-centered design to maintain our human nature in business and life. Key Takeaways: Love at work builds collaboration & efficiency. Mauro describes how kindness at work decreases redundant tasks. Specifically, many people spend countless moments trying to avoid sabotage and back-stabbing by overcompensating and looking over their shoulders. When kindness is at the forefront, time and energy are saved - and business gets done quicker, with more ease and happiness. One page, 24 qualities of leadership. If you don’t read the book, Mauro recommends you simply pick up the book and turn to the one page that lists all 24 of his main qualities of leadership. Try these out in your own life, and watch your success and your organization soar. Design thinking vs. design. Mauro shares the difference between design thinking and design in and of itself, sharing how many designers go to school for design and forget everything they learned regarding the design thinking process. Every design thinking organization needs designers. But not all designers are naturally design thinkers. The three design thinking pillars. Design, Strategy, Prototype as the way of the future in life, business, politics, and beyond. Mauro advocates for design thinking as the ideal way to address any problem to find the most effective solution.

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine
Kind By Design (with Mauro Porcini)

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 53:27 Transcription Available


Mark speaks with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo’s first ever Chief Design Officer and the author of the timely book—both manifesto and memoir—called The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. Together we explore the important call to prioritize human-centered design and innovation when it is most at risk. Today, Commander Divine speaks with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo’s first ever Chief Design Officer and the author of the timely book—both manifesto and memoir—called The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. In the episode, Mauro makes the call to prioritize human-centered design and innovation when it is most at risk. In a constantly changing world, Mauro stands for human-centered design to maintain our human nature in business and life. Key Takeaways: Love at work builds collaboration & efficiency. Mauro describes how kindness at work decreases redundant tasks. Specifically, many people spend countless moments trying to avoid sabotage and back-stabbing by overcompensating and looking over their shoulders. When kindness is at the forefront, time and energy are saved - and business gets done quicker, with more ease and happiness. One page, 24 qualities of leadership. If you don’t read the book, Mauro recommends you simply pick up the book and turn to the one page that lists all 24 of his main qualities of leadership. Try these out in your own life, and watch your success and your organization soar. Design thinking vs. design. Mauro shares the difference between design thinking and design in and of itself, sharing how many designers go to school for design and forget everything they learned regarding the design thinking process. Every design thinking organization needs designers. But not all designers are naturally design thinkers. The three design thinking pillars. Design, Strategy, Prototype as the way of the future in life, business, politics, and beyond. Mauro advocates for design thinking as the ideal way to address any problem to find the most effective solution.

Flow
ZÉ ROBERTO, MARCOS UCHOA E MAURO BETING - Flow #140

Flow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 165:44


Uma mesa de especialistas para falarmos sobre a copa e fazer aquele esquenta. É a nossa mesa do hexa!

Pantynova.com
Black Frigay

Pantynova.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 10:11


Hélio decide comprar um vibrador anal em uma promoção de black friday e estrear ele com seu boy Mauro. Será que esse vibrador anal foi aprovado? Vem conferir

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
The People Advantage: How Diversity Creates Innovation with Mauro Porcini

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 55:37


The creative field is rife with challenges, and Mauro Porcini knows this better than most. In his three-decade long career, Mauro has gone from a young aspiring designer to the Chief Design Officer of PepsiCo. In this episode, Mauro shares his journey and how he's learned to navigate the ever-changing landscape of the design industry. He also fills us in on his new book, The Human Side of Innovation, and how it came about as a way to give back to the design community. In addition, Mauro talks about what he looks for in new creative talent, and how he's able to foster an environment that allows them to do their best work. Whether you're a young designer just starting out, or a seasoned professional looking to take your career to the next level, this conversation with Mauro is sure to leave you inspired. Highlights of our conversation: Mauro's upbringing and the value of humility as an aspiring creative Ascending the corporate ladder as a designer Maximizing the value you can provide as a leader What the best creatives have in common and the tools he uses to find them Enjoy!

Na Ponta dos Dedos
Na Ponta dos Dedos #144 – Stock Car com Gaetano Di Mauro e GP de São Paulo de F1

Na Ponta dos Dedos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:22


Na 35ª edição da quarta temporada do podcast Na Ponta dos Dedos, Bruno Fonseca, Rafael Lopes e Luciano Burti recebem Gaetano Di Mauro, piloto da Stock Car, para conversar sobre sua carreira e falar sobre a atual temporada da maior categoria do automobilismo brasileiro. Além disso, tudo sobre o GP de São Paulo da Fórmula 1.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
In Spain, beekeepers continue to battle killer hornets

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022


Beekeeper Samuel Ramal's hives just outside the town of Sabadell in northeast Spain look fine. But Ramal often has to defend them against hornets. He runs back and forth in front of his hives, swinging a bamboo pole with a piece of bright yellow glue paper attached to the top of it. “I spend all of my free time here defending my hives,” Ramal said. “We're losing money because we're not making honey. And, he said, "there are more hornets every day.” Ramal said he's lost a honey harvest this fall worth more than $3,000.In the US, there's a huge effort underway to stop the spread of the Asian giant hornet, which preys on insects, including honeybees. Meanwhile, Europeans have been battling its close cousin, the Velutina hornet, for about 15 years. Many Spanish beekeepers have sent out a mayday for help, but so far they've been left to defend their hives on their own. Samuel Ramal manages to keep smiling, despite having lost 20 out of his 100 hives to the Velutina hornets.  Credit: Gerry Hadden/The World The Velutina hornet often hovers in groups of two or three right outside the entrances to Ramal's hives. In a flash, one caught a bee in mid-flight. Typically, it would cut the bee's head off and take the body home as food. But Ramal was ready.About 10 Velutinas stuck to Ramal's swatter. They're roughly four times the size of the bees. They have black bodies with orange bands, with giant heads and mandibles. They bite hard but their sting is worse.“I'm used to bee stings but not these hornets,” he said. “I've been bitten twice. The wound swells up and hurts for days on end. Some people have to go straight to the hospital,” he said. Ramal fashioned a hornet-trap out of glue-paper normally used to catch mice. He stalks the hornets who stalk his bees in front of his hives.  Credit: Gerry Hadden/The World The Velutina hornet arrived accidentally in Europe from China by ship about 15 years ago, wreaking havoc on honeybee populations.Ramal said that in Spain, there's currently no national plan or even a hotline to report the invasive Velutina. He said he's lost 20 out of his 100 hives this year. For now, it's up to each town hall to come up with a plan to fight the predators. In small villages, that means, well, it's better to stock up on glue-paper than wait for the cavalry.  Beekeeper Samuel Ramal has set up electric fencing at the entrance to his hives to zap the hornets who come to catch and behead his honey bees. He also fashioned a trap from a plastic bottle. Still, he spends hours a day swatting at the invadors. Credit: Gerry Hadden/The World But it's hardly much better in cities. For one, the nests are not easy to spot. They're high up in trees, or sometimes underground. On a recent morning, a retired school teacher named Paco Navarro showed The World a Velutina nest in an oak tree near his home in Barcelona. He said he reported the nest in late August to the police and city hall. The exterminators didn't arrive until early November. The two men, Mauro and Pere, wore hornet-proof padding and carried a giant can of insecticide. They didn't give their last names as they weren't authorized to speak to the media. Mauro also assembled a paint-ball style gun loaded with frozen globs of poison.He warned to stay alert in case the hornets swarmed. A Velutina hornets' nest in a tree just behind this reporter's house, on the outskirts of Barcelona. Exterminators destroyed this one, but local police say the park is replete with Velutina nests and that people will just have to learn to live with them.  Credit: Gerry Hadden/The World Within 15 feet of the tree, he let loose a volley of poisonous balls that pierced the nest. Angry hornets zoomed everywhere. Mauro said the poison will kill most of them, but not all, and the ones that survive will settle down again and return to the nest.“Each season we lose ground against the Velutina,” he said. “We can't get them all. Various queens, he said, "are sure to escape." And then they start new colonies.The Spanish government estimates the Velutina giant hornet is extending its territory southward by some 60 miles a year, putting more honeybees and other pollinators at risk. The entrance to Ramal's bee hive zone. The sign warns visitors. Credit: Gerry Hadden/The World But not all hope is lost. Some honeybees have learned to swarm on top of the giant hornets "cooking" them until they overheat and die.Back in Sabadell, beekeeper Ramal said his bees have at least started banding together.   “Look how the bees form a solid block just outside the entrance of their hive,” he said. “The hornets won't attack the group. This gives returning bees a safe landing pad.” But that doesn't mean Ramal can let down his guard. He is quick to pick up his homemade hornet swatter and try to take down the Velutina, one swing at a time. 

The Playbook
How to Innovate Your Business & Personal Life | PepsiCo Chief Design Officer and SVP, Mauro Porcini

The Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 19:59


On this episode of #ThePlaybook, Mauro Porcini, Chief Design Officer and SVP of PepsiCo, shares his thoughts on: [3:04] - The different ways that top performers are able to innovate in their businesses and personal life  [5:50] - What it takes for a change agent to overcome the resistance they experience from people [8:10] - How to realize when you're in the “Hidden Rejection Phase” and overcome it [12:23] - Why he believes that love is at the center of innovation Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Storia d'Italia
L'archeogenetica, con Guido Alberto Gnecchi Ruscone. Ep. 124, speciale

Storia d'Italia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 90:10


In questa puntata, come preannunciato, affronteremo un argomento che è la vera frontiera della ricerca storico-archeologica contemporanea. Il nostro ospite è Guido Alberto Gnecchi Ruscone, ricercatore del Max Planck institute di Lipsia, nel dipartimento di archeogenetica guidato da Svante Pääbo, novello nobel per la Medicina e uno dei pionieri dello studio del DNA antico. Con Gnecchi Ruscone, autore di un importante paper sull'origine degli Avari, esploreremo le basi scientifiche delle nuove scoperte sul DNA antico e parleremo di alcuni esempi di ricerca, dal rivoluzionario paper che ha stabilito un link tra il cimitero longobardo di Collegno e un cimitero longobardo in Pannonia, passando per una ricerca che ha evidenziato la composizione genetica della popolazione romana attraverso diversi millenni di storia, per finire appunto sull'origine degli Avari. ---Canale YouTube del progetto HistoGenes:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myla0_cCEWU---PER PRENOTARE "IL MIGLIOR NEMICO DI ROMA":- Amazon (link affiliato): https://amzn.to/3DG9FG5- IBS: https://www.ibs.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Feltrinelli: https://www.lafeltrinelli.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Mondadori: https://www.mondadoristore.it/miglior-nemico-Roma-Storia-Marco-Cappelli/eai978882821008/---Ti piace il podcast? Sostienilo, accedendo all'episodio premium, al canale su telegram, alla citazione nel podcast, alle première degli episodi e molto altro ancora:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/italiastoria Tipeee: https://it.tipeee.com/storia-ditaliaPer una donazione: https://italiastoria.com/come-sostenere-il-podcast/---►Informazioni sul mio libro "Per un pugno di barbari":https://italiastoria.com/libro/►Registrarsi alla mia mailing list:https://italiastoria.com/mailing-list/►Trascrizioni episodi, mappe, recensioni, genealogie:https://italiastoria.com/►FacebookPagina: https://www.facebook.com/italiastoriaGruppo: https://www.facebook.com/groups/italiastoria►Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/italiastoria/►Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ItaliaStoria►YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzPIENUr6-S0UMJzREn9U5Q►Canale Discord:https://discord.gg/cyjbMJe3Qk►Contattami per commenti, idee e proposte di collaborazione: info@italiastoria.com---Musiche di Riccardo Santatohttps://www.youtube.com/user/sanric77---Livello Giuseppe Verdi: Massimiliano PastoreLivello Dante Alighieri: Musu Meci, Manuel Marchio, Mauro, Marco il Nero, Massimo Ciampiconi, Mike Lombardi, David l'Apostata, Luca Baccaro. Livello Leonardo da Vinci: Paolo, Pablo, Simone, i due Jacopo, Riccardo, Frazemo, Enrico, Alberto, Davide, Andrea Vovola e D'agostini, Settimio, Giovanni, Cesare, Francesco Favazza e Cateni, Jerome, Diego, Alanchik, Flavio, Edoardo Vaquer e De Natale, Stefano, Luca, Arianna, Mariateresa, John, Fasdev, Norman, Claudio, Marko, Barbaking, Alfredo, Manuel, Lorenzo, Corrado e Piernicola. Livello Galileo Galilei: Davide, Francesco, Jacopo T., Riccardo, Stefano, Roger, Anna, Pierangelo, Luigi, Antonio, Giulia, Ezra, Andrea, Paola, Daniele, Mariano, Francesca, Gabriella, Alessio, Giovanni, Alessandro, Valerio, Angelo, Alberto, Viviana, Riccardo, Giorgio, Francesco G., Francesco B., Emanuele, Giacomo, Francesco M, Giacomo, Martina, Yuri, Lorenzo, Jamie, Gianluca, Danilo, Echtelion, Matteo, Valerio P., Guglielmo, Michele, Massimo, Tommaso J, e Francesco C., Stefano, Giulio S., Davide P., Elisabetta C., Don Fabrizio, Massimo S., Luca F, Luca M., Dario P, Venus Schiavonia, Annalaura B., Marcus Walker, Michael Kain, Nicola De Gasperi, Pietro Sancassani, Andrea Silimbani, Anna, Marco M., Danilo R., Luca B., Paola C., Francesco C., Stefano S., Nicola L., Enrico C., Andrea F., Remo A., PortaKiTeppare, Lapo S., Mauro, Paolo G., Gaetano R., Matteo D., Lorenzino, Gabriele B., Michele P., Valerio M.Grazie anche a tutti i miei sostenitori al livello Marco Polo!---Musiche di Riccardo Santato

Brand Design Masters Podcast
The Human Side of Innovation: Interview with Mauro Porcini, CDO, Pepsico

Brand Design Masters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 50:55


He was previously 3M's first chief design officer. Over the years Porcini has been the recipient of many honors, among them Fast Company's 50 Most Influential Designers in America, Fortune's 40 under 40, and Ad Age's list of the 50 world's most influential creative personalities. Mauro whole-heartedly believes that design has the power to create long-term value for companies and society - and innovation is the root of that power.  In this episode, Mauro shares his insights on working as a chief design officer at PepsiCo, how to future-proof your creative career, and plenty of insights from his latest book 'The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People In Love with People'.  Mauro and I explore:  ●   His journey to becoming a chief design officer ●   How creative professionals can go from being just another brand designer to achieving ‘unicorn' status●   What the traits are of a unicorn designer ●   Finding the pathway to discovering what you want to do in life●   How a brand can introduce disruption to motivate and excite people  If you want to put the power of innovation to work in your career and business and learn from one of the most notable titans in the design and branding industry, you don't want to miss this episode!  Mentioned in this episode: “The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People" by Mauro Porcinihttps://amzn.to/3Ac7vf0 Mauro Porcini: https://design.pepsico.com/ To connect with Mauro: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mauroporcini/Twitter: @mauroporciniInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/mauroporcini/ Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this episode of the podcast, use the following links for more of my work and some valuable resources to get you started on your branding initiatives. Until the next episode! VISIT MY WEBSITE:http://www.philipvandusen.com   JOIN THE BRAND•MUSE NEWSLETTER:  http://www.philipvandusen.com/muse  JOIN THE BRAND DESIGN MASTERS FACEBOOK GROUP:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/branddesignmasters/ SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL:http://www.youtube.com/c/PhilipVanDusen        FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER:https://twitter.com/philipvandusen   LIKE MY AGENCY ON FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/verhaalbranddesign Bring Your Own Laptop - Adobe Training with Daniel Scotthttps://www.byol.me/philip  InVideohttps://bdmpodcast.com/invideo Discount Code: "PHILIP50"           Tubebuddyhttps://wwwtubebuddy.com/philipvandusen  ____________________________The Brand Design Masters Podcast targets entrepreneurs, designers, creative professionals and anyone interested in brand strategy, business planning, graphic design, personal branding, trends and marketing.Philip VanDusen is the owner of Verhaal Brand Design, a brand strategy and design agency based in New Jersey. Philip is a highly accomplished creative executive and expert in brand strategy, graphic design, marketing and creative management. Philip provides design, branding, marketing, career and business advice to creative professionals, entrepreneurs and companies on building successful brands for themselves and the clients and customers they serve.

Fail Faster
#297 - The Human side of Innovation, the power of people in love with people

Fail Faster

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 40:00


Mauro Porcini is PepsiCo's first-ever Chief Design Officer. He joined the food & beverage corporation in 2012 and in said role he is infusing design thinking into PepsiCo's culture and is leading a new approach to innovation by design that impacts the company's product platforms and brands, which include Pepsi, Lay's, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Sodastream, Doritos, Lifewtr, bubly, Aquafina, Cheetos, Quaker, 7Up, Mirinda, amongst many others. Before joining PepsiCo, Mauro served as the first-ever Chief Design Officer at 3M. His mission was to build and nurture a design-sensitive culture in a technology-driven global corporation. His teams, based in the U.S, Italy, China and Japan, won many of the world's most prestigious design and innovation awards.

Hustle Inspires Hustle
Tips On Growing Your Brand Ft. Eric Pacinos Roa & Mauricio Londoño With Alex Quin

Hustle Inspires Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 60:38


Episode Summary: In this podcast episode, Eric "Pacinos" Roa and Mauricio Londoño join Alex Quin to discuss tips on growing a personal brand. The conversation covers a range of topics including the importance of bringing enough value to the table, the role of social media in personal branding, and how to stand out from the competition. They also share their own personal experiences and advice on growing a personal brand.Eric Roa is a celebrity barber, entrepreneur, and the founder of Pacinos; a line of men's grooming products. He is also a popular social media influencer with over 700k followers on Instagram.Mauricio Londoño is a Latin content creator and podcaster, whose name you might recognize from his work on the podcast Checking con Mauro! Mauricio interviews entrepreneurs, digital nomads, and other interesting people from around the world.Wisdom Nuggets: 1. If You Don't Ask, You Might Miss OpportunitiesAsking questions is essential if you want to learn and grow. It can also help you identify opportunities that you might have otherwise missed. And it can also open doors to new and exciting experiences.2. Bring Value To The TableIf you want people to take notice of you and your brand, you need to make sure that you're bringing enough value to the table. This means offering something unique and valuable that others can't or don't offer.3. Be A Big ObserverOne of the best ways to learn and grow is to be a big observer. This means paying attention to what's happening around you and taking note of what works and what doesn't.4. It's All About RelationshipsBuilding strong relationships is key to growing a personal brand. These relationships can be with customers, clients, colleagues, or anyone else that you interact with.5. Feeling Down? Do Something FunWhen you're feeling down, it can be tough to get motivated to work on your brand. But one of the best ways to get out of a funk is to do something that you enjoy. This can be anything from reading a book to going for a walk.Podcast Outline: Alex : (00:41) What's up everybody? This is Alex Quinn and you're listening to the Hustle Inspires Hustle podcast. On today's episode, we have two very special guests, Eric, better known as Pacinos, and Mauricio Londono.Mauricio: (00:55) Thank you very much for the invitation, bro. Alex : (00:57) No, man, Thanks for being here. I've, I've been wanting to do this with you and with you for quite some time and I'm glad we're, the three of us are here Alex : (01:22) And that's when you introduce me to, to Eric and dude, I love what you have going on, man. Appreciate you have a serious track record. Just to give everybody a little bit of background, Eric is an entrepreneur, and Mauricio is a content creator.Alex : (01:35) He's in the entertainment space, he's worked in radio. He's extremely known because of his podcast. And I seriously look up to the content he creates. So it's honestly an honor to have him here. We're used to all used to speaking in Spanish because of our Spanish audience.Alex : (01:56) This is one of your creations, man. Wonder if we talk about this a little bit? Eric: (01:58) Absolutely. So this is basically just years of being a barber and understanding all the different hair types and hair textures. And then me basically just branching off from the barber shop and saying, You know what? I wanna come out with my own line of hair products.Alex : (02:46)I like that. So there's a lot of you that are watching, but there's a lot of you that are listening. If you're listening and don't know what we're talking about, We're sitting in front of some men's grooming products by the name of Pacinos.Alex : (03:37) Hey, so talk to me about your, your days before this.Eric: (03:49) So basically I started off as a barber, Well, let me take you a little bit farther back. Okay. Again, I know I look like I'm 21, but I'm not 21. I'm actually 22 nowEric: (04:07) That's awesome. Columbian power. If anybody has any Latin parents, you know, parents hate to pay the electric bill. Right. So like living in sunny south Florida, it was like hot and I'd be in the bathroom cutting my hair like for three hoursEric: (05:17) Was a little, I had just got out of the Navy. I was 22 years old. Okay. 22 years old. And, uh, looking for a job like bro, to be honest, it was like I got out and I couldn't find a job. Like I was looking in the newspaper and finally said like, shampoo assistant.Eric: (05:29) And I was like, Excuse me, hairstyle assistant. So I thought I was gonna go in there and cut some hair. He was like, Nah, nah, you're gonna be in here washing all these heads. And I was like, Oh my God. So I was there trying to be like the best shampoo boy you could ever like meet because I was only getting paid $5 an hour.Eric: (06:01) Yeah bro. I was like, man, this guy's really making some really good money, you know, doing haircuts. Right. And that's when I said, You know what? Like I need to just one day open up my own shop and, pretty much, you know, have the same model.Eric: (06:35)And I discovered the pomade they were using loud on the West coast. And, um, a lot of it was more wax not so water-soluble. Now, you know, there are a lot more pomades that are water. So water is soluble. And that's when I said, All right, I'm gonna get with a chemist and start formulating my own products. Alex : (07:00)There. Yeah. Cuz it's part of the process too, like Absolutely. Did you get a chance to open your barbershop or you worked outta a barbershop and learned then maybe did cuts like on, on a one-on-one basis, private cuts? Or how did that work? Eric: (07:11) So, so good question. So basically I started off as a, actually, I started out a salon first cutting hair. And then from there, I went to another salon. And then while I was in that salon, I literally just started going to the nightclubs and I would shake the hands of all the owners and ask 'em, Hey, listen, I wanna cut you here for free.Alex : (08:55) So yeah. Essentially what I'm hatching from that is that you bring value to the table. So like you, you know, you need something and you know who you need to reach out to. Yes. But you reach out to them and you already bring value to the table. Eric: (09:10) Yes. One hand watches the other. And it's all about just understanding. It's like anything in business, you have to understand first about, you know, what's your niche? You know mm-hmm. like, what, what is it that you're good at?Eric: (09:31) And those are the people that don't mind spending a little bit of money. Yeah. You know, so for me, it's almost like, all right, do I go for that or do I go for the guys that like, you know, with all due respect, maybe they're, you know, they have a different interest and they don't really care about their hairstyle.Alex : (09:58) Right. And you know, it's interesting that, that you, when you were working at the salon, you did it with Pride and you wanted to learn because you know, in salons there you're more used to seeing these types of products, especially back in that day. Right? Alex : (11:06) So you, you, started off in Columbia, How far back Mao Mauricio: (11:10) In 1993? I started as a, I was born in 1993. Yeah. Mauricio: (11:18) I started as an assistant, you know, for, the DJ. And they, they only, you know, let me in, in, in the studio. And, and that's it. They, don't allow me, to talk on air or, you know, just answer the phone. And people requested songs.. Alex : (12:14) It was very different back then. There's no computer where you go, All right, let me put this song or mix it in. You actually have to put the vinyl on.Mauricio: (13:07) But, you know, I, I was, I'm surprised that I was making content without knowledge, you know? Yeah. Right. Zero-knowledge. And, and I'm impressed about that because nobody, you know, I, I, I was burning a little town, you know, with no radio stations, no opportunities.Mauricio: (13:57) My passion for the music, you know, takes me to the radio to, to start listening to the radio. Right. And then, uh, I, I, I used to listen like 10 hours per day. I was obsessed.Mauricio: (14:24) I used to listen to, you know, the late night shows until 4:00 AM you know, imagining things, because radio is the theater of the sound. Right. And yeah, One day I used to, I was thinking, why don't I Look for a job in the radio? Okay. Yeah.Alex : (15:53) Somebody with hunger. Yeah. And that's probably one of the best people you could bring to your team. Honestly. It is. Alex : (16:22) So, bro, how did that evolve into what you do now? Why don't you talk to us a little bit about what you do now, your podcast?Mauricio: (16:38) Yeah. Yeah. I love to have deep conversations with, you know, interesting people. Mm-hmm. , I, I'm not pursuing only artists. You know, I, I, most of the time I'm, I'm interviewing artists because, you know, I, I'm in the, into the music industry. But my goal is to talk with, you know, actors, you know, entrepreneurs, you know, like you.Alex : (19:35) You guys wanna know something interesting, right? Because my main thing, I'm a digital marketer. Okay. So, companies pay me to run their ads and make them money, whether it's products or services. Yeah. So naturally, I post a lot of content online about digital marketing, or I consume a lot of content online about digital marketing. Alex : (19:50) And check this out, the hashtag digital marketing in English. Right. On Instagram. And, and YouTube. And TikTok specifically has fewer posts and reach than hashtag marketing, In Spanish. In Spanish. So there is an explosion of Latin content, specifically in the marketing world. Alex : (20:43) Let's talk a little bit about how you guys came together on that, on, on that podcast and how you, how you're essentially a supporter and sponsor of, of, of Mau a show. Yeah, absolutely. So, checking with Maido, Eric: (20:52) So I was in Las Vegas, I was actually out there for the Latin Grams week. Mm-hmm. . And, uh, we were also, the same thing, doing an activation, cuz I'm always big on just marketing.Eric: (21:38) And I'm the type of person, I always like to invest into people. I'd rather invest into people first before I invest into anything else. Because for me it's almost like, alright, again, I rather go to war with people.Alex : (23:13) You guys are very connected. You get, you're in every event ever. Like everEric: (23:22) Listen, at the end of the day, for me, it's always been that way with me. It's like, you know, like ma like what he was just talking about the radio station.Eric: (23:32) If you just crack the door open a little bit for me, I'm gonna find the way to get Eric: (23:36) I'm, I'ma find the way to get in there. And again, it's like, you know, I just feel like with anything like, you know, I've worked with different artists and stuff like that, like, you know, top tier artists, like people like Puff Daddy, Jay-Z, Nas, and that's one thing, you know, I'm a big observer. Alex : (24:27) When I was younger, I was trying to figure out ways to get in. How do I communicate, how do I bring something to the table?Eric: (26:08) So yeah, before I got into the products and stuff like that, as a barber, ironically enough, like just networking, you know, I met this gentleman by the name of Curtis Smith.Eric: (28:13) We did a whole tour with me, him, and Snoop, where we literally did 30 cities in Europe and I would just like his barber. Eric: (31:10) Yeah. I was like, yo, this just got real. Like, I'm not going out to like, yo, I gotta figure this out. So I started going to production. I was like I started to get on my Puff Daddy. I was like, yo, where are the outlets? I was like, I need an extension card. Eric: (34:08) Artists would just come to his house and I'd be there like, Hey, can you cut up this guy? You know, can you cut up this guy? And it's like, all right.Alex : (34:29) What was the catalyst? Right? So you're, you're, you're, you're hanging out with all these guys, you're doing business with all these guys. Alex : (36:33) What was the first product of Pacinos?Eric: (36:34) My Pomade Yeah. And then the matte. Yeah. The pomade was, again one of the biggest reasons because it used to work on me, and then all of a sudden when I found out there was a matte paste that would still give you a hold but wouldn't give you like that shiny look.Alex : (37:32)Did you start selling first before you were a rockstar? Eric: (37:39) Well here's the thing. It's like for me it's like I've always just felt like if I push, if I pushed this brand enough, somebody's gonna take notice. Eric: (38:33) And so doing that, I caught the attention of a gentleman that basically sells to Target.Eric: (40:22) Yeah. And I told him, I said, Well, everybody keeps telling me like 75% of the shoppers that target is women, so how are we gonna win that space? And he was like, What you're doing, there's a need for it. It'll happen. Yeah. And sure enough, he had just got that position to be able to pitch like that.Alex : (41:53) So the question for you, for somebody at home that's watching this, and this is heavily inspired by, by your story, Eric, what are a few things, maybe a handful of things that you recommend to somebody who's looking to start a consumer package brand that wants to get out there? What are the, like the pillars that they should have like locked in before they even consider maybe doing an approach to one of these big retailers? Eric: (42:16) That's a good question. I'd say the first thing is to understand, really understand what you're trying to sell. Mm-hmm. , that's just number one. Alex : (45:43) Yeah. So what I'm catching from everything you're saying is to have a quality product, understand who you're selling to, and why they're buying. Yep. Create great content. Absolutely. Understand that social media is important, right? Yep. What else am I missing? Ads. Ads, Right? Understand marketing, Alex : (47:33) I love how you guys support each other. I fuck with that. Eric: (50:18) I'm just a firm believer of like, you take care of those people who take care of you.Alex : (53:47) Question, how long has this been, how has this brand been alive? Eric: (53:51) I'd say since 2012. Mm-hmm. It's been, uh, 10 years now since we started it. But I'd say our biggest break was probably like in 2016 when we got on target.com.Alex : (54:28)Now to finalize, you're in all these great locations. Do you have anything on your wishlist of anything, anywhere you would like your products to ultimately be? Eric: (54:39) I'd say probably just, I wanna tap into Asia. Well, we actually got into Asia. We were in Aloft stores and there's another store called like in Japan. Alex : (55:08)I love learning from guys like you. Like, you know, it's, that's why I do this podcast, you know, people are learning with me so whoever's listening right now watching, they're learning from what you're talking about. Alex : (58:31) First of all, make sure if you speak Spanish and you like entertainment, you like content, you like anything related to the entertainment industry, check our Mauricio.Alex : (59:30) All right y'all, this is hustle inspires hustle. We're in Miami today, honoring Pacinos and honoring these two great guys!Power Quotes: Alex : (16:17) “Hard work beats talent. When talent doesn't work hard.”Eric: (23:32) “If you just crack the door open a little bit for me, I'm gonna find the way to get.”Alex : (24:52) “People will remember you because of your word, because of your work ethic, because of your empathy.”Eric: (49:03) “I don't think anything in this life means anything. If you're not able to give back to those who like really were there for.”Resources Mentioned: Pacinos websiteEric's InstagramMauro's PodcastHustle Inspires Hustle websiteSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Leaders in the Trenches
Leadership and Innovation with Mauro Porcini at PepsiCo

Leaders in the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 24:32


Leadership and innovation are a combination of leadership styles that influence employees to produce creative ideas, products, and services. It is also about figuring out how to add value to an organization and, like with most practices, reaching mastery of leadership and innovation starts within the person herself- or himself. It is the ability to inspire productive action in yourself and empower others during times of creation, invention, uncertainty, and risk. Today's guest is Mauro Porcini, Chief design officer at PepsiCo and Author of The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. He is responsible for leading innovation by design across PepsiCo's food and beverage portfolio, extending from physical to virtual expressions of the brands. PepsiCo products are enjoyed by consumers more than one billion times a day in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. Their product portfolio includes enjoyable foods and beverages, including many iconic brands. In this episode, Mauro talks about leadership and innovation. He also talks about the human side of innovation and making people dream with you. Learn how having a human-centered culture in a workplace makes everything extraordinary.   Get the show notes for Leadership and Innovation with Mauro Porcini at PepsiCo Click to Tweet: Listening to a fantastic episode on Growth Think Tank featuring #MauroPorcini with your host @GeneHammett https://bit.ly/gttMauroPorcini   #LeadershipandInnovation #GHepisode935 #TheHumanSideofInnovation #ThePowerofPeopleinLovewithPeople Give Growth Think Tank a review on iTunes!

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: Why design matters more than ever, w/PepsiCo Chief Design Officer Mauro Porcini

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 32:34


Design is more than aesthetics. It is an essential competitive tool for an age of perpetual disruption. PepsiCo Chief Design Officer Mauro Porcini shares his 5-point system for sparking creativity at scale. Author of the new book The Human Side of Innovation, Porcini explains how anyone can deploy a designer's mindset to improve their business and organization. Sharing stories from 3M to Mountain Dew, Porcini emphasizes the imperative of excellence and why innovation is "an act of love."Read a transcript of this episode: https://mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Steve Cochran on The Big 89
Celebrate National Sandwich Day with Jeff Mauro of 'The Kitchen'

Steve Cochran on The Big 89

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 16:02


Jeff Mauro knows a good sandwich when he sees one and he brings his culinary expertise in-studio with Pete McMurray and Jane Clauss. They talk about the delicious offerings from Mauro Provisions and why Jeff firmly believes that a hot dog is indeed a sandwich.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Welcome to Strategy Skills Episode 291 with the first-ever Chief Design Officer and SVP of PepsiCo, the world's second-largest food and beverage company, Mauro Porcini. In this episode, Mauro talked about how his career started and how his love of what he is doing helped made PepsiCo what it is today. He also talked about the step-by-step process of designing and establishing a new culture in any corporation and how this would lead to innovation, eventual growth, and overall success. In the past eight years, Mauro and his design team have won more than 1,100 design and innovation awards and in 2018, PepsiCo was recognized by Fortune in its Driven by Design list. He was previously 3M's first Chief Design Officer. Porcini has been recognized with several personal awards, including Fortune's 40 under 40, GQ Italia's 30 Best Dressed Men, and Fast Company's 50 Most Influential Designers in the United States. In 2018, he was awarded a knighthood (cavaliere) by the president of the Italian Republic. He lives in New York City. Get Mauro's new book here: The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. Mauro Porcini. Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Thomistic Institute Angelicum.
Dr. Mauro Mantovani "Dio, creatore e provvidente"

Thomistic Institute Angelicum.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 52:23


Dr. Mauro Mantovani "Dio, creatore e provvidente" by Angelicum Thomistic Institute

Coffee with Kim
Designing A Better World With Mauro Porcini

Coffee with Kim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 53:57


As the first Chief Design Officer at PepsiCo, Mauro has seen what works and what doesn't when it comes to innovation and branding. Join us as Mauro shares tactics to infuse kindness & empathy amongst your teamand wider company. We're diving into tips on how small changes at work can help you become a unicorn at your company.Notes:06:56 Consumer vs People09:32 Focus on creating value for people11:50 Tips for your team/group18:44 Why you never want to reach level 522:55 Questions to ask companies to see if they put people first38:03 Building a safety netIf you loved this episode you should check out this episode 10X Your Mindset Today With Jim KwikIf you enjoyed today's episode, please:1.) Sign up for notes at copymyhomework.com for a full list of resources, links and recommendations listed on today's episode.2.) Post a screenshot of the episode & tag me on LinkedIn or Instagram @kimkaupe so we can talk about your favorite parts!3.) Leave a positive review (shameless, but someone's gotta say it right?!)4.) Subscribe for new episodes every Tuesday on your favorite podcast app.Connect with Kim over on the socials!Instagram + TikTok:@kimkaupeLinkedIn:[https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimkaupe]

In Your Shoes With Mauro Porcini
Mauro Porcini On The Human Side of Innovation

In Your Shoes With Mauro Porcini

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 74:46


On this special solo episode of In Your Shoes, Mauro Porcini opens up about his new book, authorship and how putting human needs at the center of your design process is the secret to life-changing innovation.Explore more from PepsiCo Design + Innovation: 

Inside Outside
Human Aspects of Innovation with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo's Chief Design Officer & Author of The Human Side of Innovation

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 28:27


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo's first ever Chief Design Officer and author of the new book, The Human Side of Innovation. Mauro and I talk about the human aspects of innovation and the importance of love in the innovation process. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive, in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Mauro Porcini, PepsiCo's Chief Design Officer and author of The Human Side of InnovationBrian Ardinger:  Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Mauro Porcini. He is PepsiCo's first ever Chief Design Officer, and author of the new book, The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People in Love with People. Welcome to the show. Mauro Porcini: Thanks, Brian. Thanks for having me. It's really a pleasure. Brian Ardinger: I am super excited to have you on the show. I'm big fan of PepsiCo and your work prior at 3M, and you've got this new book out and I wanted to have a conversation about some of the things that you've seen in this world of innovation. How do you define innovation? Mauro Porcini: That's a good question. Every time you touch, you start score, every time you take something, anything, it could be a product, it could be an experience, it could be an institution, anything in your life. You try to change. And now this change could be directed in a positive way. It could go in a negative way. It could be a major change. Destructive but true as we call those kind changes in innovation world. It could be very incremental, very minimum, but anything you do, the change, the status quo is innovation by definition. Brian Ardinger: I like that definition because you know, I think a lot of people get hung up on the fact that innovation, they think it has to be the biggest change in the world. It's I've got to come up with the next flying car. But you talk about in your book, innovation is not just about that. It's about incremental improvements. It's just creating value in change. Mauro Porcini: This point we are both making right now, I think is extremely important because often people out there, media, opinion leaders, are looking at companies investing in innovation, and if they don't produce the next iPhone, they're like, well, they're failing. They're not really extracting the value that they should from that innovation team, that design team, whatever is the form shape of that innovation organization. And instead, in many situations that innovation is more in the genetic code of the company. Is happening so many different ways in the way you serve a customer. In the way you build experiences. In the way you promote your brands, or you build new ones. Or eventually also in some small incremental products that make your portfolio more meaningful, more relevant. Or financially more interesting for you and your shareholders or more strategic for your company. So, it's very, very important to make this point. I read a few articles recently. They were attacking and challenging companies that were not producing the next iPhone after these loud investments in the innovation machine. And the reality, many of those companies are actually different companies today than today than what they were in the past. Thanks to that innovation culture that they built. Brian Ardinger: Absolutely. I heard you talk about design and that great design comes from this earnest desire to make other people happy. Can you expand on that a little bit?Mauro Porcini: That's how everything started. Thousands of years ago when the first act of innovation or design, because for me, are exactly the same thing happened. When the historic man or woman. Who knows if it was a man or if it was a woman, for the first time, took something that was available in nature, a stone, and modified that to give it a different destination of use. To use the stone as a more effective hunting tool. Or a tool to prepare the food. Or later on to decorate your body. Or later on to celebrate your gods.By the way, just mentioned, three different dimensions of the Maslow Pyramid. You know, the bottom of the pyramid that is about survival and is safety and is your physiological needs. The center is about self-expression, the connection with others. And then the top that is about something that transcend yourself is bigger than you.Yeah. And so already those utensils made out of stones were serving specific needs. They were all about reaching your happiness. Because the Maslow Pyramid, at the end of the day, the needs Pyramid is all about reaching what we call today happiness. If you work in all these dimensions. So already back innovation or design was an of love. This is how I start. Also, the book, innovation is an act of love. An act of love towards yourself. If you were creating this for yourself, but obviously already back then, we were organized in little communities. We have people around us. We wouldn't have the concept of family yet, but you were creating these products also for the people around you. It was an act of love for them as well. And then you started to create more and more product by yourself. At a certain point, there were so many products. You needed help. You needed to start delegating the creation of those products to other people.And then over there, hundreds of years and thousands of years, we started to organize ourselves in different communities. We invented the idea of work. We invented companies. Then later on brands. And so, what happened when that started to happen is that essentially you start to put scale. Literally scale between you innovator and the people that you love and that you are serving.The scale plays the distance between the two of you and the love started to get lost in translation in the scale. And instead of love, you started to change love with profit and financial revenue and other things. And so, in the name of profit, eventually you could create products that eventually were not ideal for the people you wanted to serve.But products that eventually you could extract as much financial value as possible out of. And so, this is what has been happening for hundreds of years, more recently. That we are surrounded by so many mediocre products and services and brands and experiences because they were created in the name of profit instead of the name of love.What is changing today is that we live in a world, where if you don't create the ideal extraordinary, excellent solution for people needs and wants, the solution could be once again, a product, service, a brand, or experience. Somebody else will do it on your behalf. Why this was not happening 20 years ago, 30 years ago was simply because if you were a big company, you could protect your product. With big barrier to entry. Made of scale of production, of distribution, and communication. Today. Instead, anybody out there can come up with an idea, get easy access to funding through kickstarter.com or their proliferation investment funds that are hunting for the next startup. The custom manufacturing is going down driven by new technologies and globalization.You can go straight to your end users through the digital platforms to sell them stuff through e-commerce channels and to promote your products through social media. In these areas, these companies, the big ones, were building their barriers to end. It was impossible for the men and woman in the street to go compete with them Today they can, and therefore the big and the small, they're left with just one possible solution. They need to really focus on people and really create something extraordinary for them. You may have the best product, the best brand. Very bad service. Your competitor will create the best product, the best brand, and eventually something with a better service.Or you may have all of them, but your product is not sustainable enough. Or is not healthy enough. That's exactly where competition will come. Thank God we live in a world where the big and small need to do just one thing to create excellence for people. There is no space for mediocrity anymore. You cannot protect the mediocrity with your old barriers to entry anymore.Brian Ardinger: I love that concept and coming back to the idea of innovation is love, if you think about one of the best acts of love is solving a problem for somebody. And at the end of the day, that's what innovation is. It's finding a problem and solving that problem for yourself or whoever's having that problem. Mauro Porcini: And going maybe a little bit further, you know, many years ago, around 18 years ago, I was working at 3M. And 3M named that year, the year of customer satisfaction. The idea was, let's focus on the customer. Let's really celebrate and please the customer. This year more than ever. So was thinking about customer satisfaction and the etymology of the world satisfaction and the meaning of the word. And at a certain point, I realized that as a designer, as an innovator, I didn't care at all about satisfying the customer.I really didn't care at all about satisfying the customers. I wanted to love the customer. What is the big difference between satisfaction and love? Satisfaction is all about identifying a need and fulfilling the specific need. But if you love somebody could be your children, it could be your wife or husband, or your parents and your friends. You try to do more; you try to do the magic. Then expect to go above and beyond. To really surprise them. And this is what innovators, the real innovators do. They want to surprise. They want to do the magic. And you know that to surprise them, do the magic, you need an extra effort. You need to really change things. You need to do things that people do not expect. Not just the people you serve, but unfortunately, and this is the difficulty of doing innovation also, the people surrounding your boss. Your investors. Your colleague. There is a subtle difference between satisfaction and love, and I think love is really the word synthesized for innovation.Brian Ardinger: That's a great. You talk about in the book how you have to go after and find these, what you define as unicorn employees. The employees that possess a lot of these key talents that you're talking about. Can you expand on what a unicorn employee is and why it's so important to have them in your innovation space?Mauro Porcini: Well, the first definition that is also the subtitle of the book is There are People in Love with People. So, until now, we talked about how important it is to refocus everything on people. That's the second people in the sentence. We briefly talk about love that synthesizes essentially everything. The first people I started to focus on, the first people of the sentence that are innovators, entrepreneurs, the leaders of the world, the designers.Many years ago, for a very practical reason, you know, everything is in the book comes from the practical needs that I faced in my professional journey. Who was this need? Well, I was building design teams in 3M, and I was hiring people, and I had a series of technical skills. They needed to be the best possible designers.They also needed to be business savvy. They needed to have also you know, a series of characteristics that were very clear to me. And then I was giving more, less an idea of the soft skills that these people needed to have. And very soon I realized that it was so difficult to find the kind of talents that I wanted.They had all the technical skills there, the business skills, but they were missing when something was important to move projects forward. Something else happened in part. I was there to introduce design thinking and design driven innovation, or as we call that kind of innovation, human center innovation in 3M.And I was studying every other company, what they were doing, how they were applying innovation, big companies, small companies. And one of the trendy words of the time was Design Thinking. And of course, as a designer, I would introduce that idea inside the company. And they started to introduce the tools, the processes, the ways of working of Design Thinking.This is what you were reading in books, listening, hearing, conferences, and what the, the consultant out there were selling to these companies. And so here I am. I started to run dozens and then hundreds of projects with this methodology. And some of them were succeeding and some of them were miserably failing.And then you start to look at them. You start to analyze them. And then at the beginning I was thinking, okay, maybe the process is not the right one. I need to tweak it and evolve it and I need to change the way of working and some of the tools. And you do all of this and still some succeed in some not. And at that point you try to find what is the root cause of this. What are the common themes? And you're right to want conclusions. That is pretty obvious if you say, but the reality in the companies, people don't talk enough about this when they talk about innovation. The difference was made by the people driving the projects. And there were people with certain kind of characteristics and people with others. Mindset, ability to observe reality and take certain kind of decisions, extract certain kind of insights and learnings, courage to drive things forward to face roadblocks, ability to take orders with you.I mean, there are a series of skills that back then when I was hunting for all these people to join my teams at 3M, I listed literally in the list for my HR department. Because I needed these people to have this kind of characteristic. Then the list became a paper for the Design Management Institute Review. It became something that will share in conferences. And it became something very public for a simple reason because I wanted everybody out there that was interested to join my teams, to know what kind of people I was looking for.And so, in the past 17 years. I've been tweaking and evolving the list. And two-thirds of this book is about characteristics and the way these unicorns think and behave. And some of them are more obvious than others, like the ability to dream and think big when you talk about leaders and innovation, obviously you need to think big.It's not that easy though. You know, we think big, and we dream when we are children and then society try to convince us that is not okay. That that's a childish kind of activity. Because society wants to normalize people. They don't want people to dream too much because people need to be a feature and be stable, you know. Within the society that we have today.Instead, we need to find ways to protect those dreams and we need to understand that when we dream, we'll face people that will push back on us. They, they will stop us from dreaming because that's what they believe in. You shouldn't dream or you need to be practical. You need to be pragmatic. The problem is that then even if you succeed in dreaming, that's not enough.There are many people that dream, there are great visionaries, but are unable to make things happen. They stay up there in the dimension of dreaming. That is also very comfortable dimension because to make things happen is tough. So, you know the balance between dreaming and execution is very important.Now, this is something that you hear about when you talk about innovation. You talk about leadership; you talk about design. But there are other characteristics that are less obvious. For instance, kindness, optimism, curiosity. How many times you heard the CEO or a business leader or a hiring manager asking, is this person a kind person or is this person curious or optimistic and, and there are many others. Again, there are 24 traits of these innovators. And in my, again, journey, I found that these characteristics are what made the difference in my teams. At the beginning, even before I started to create this list, they were kind of intuitive. People love to be surrounded by people that are similar to them, so. I grew up in this family of kind people and optimistic people. I mean, it was just the way we were.I wish all Italians were like this. Actually Italy, we have the opposite. Yeah, kind maybe. I don't know. But is the opposite. I think the problem of Italy today is that we're not optimistic at all today. Unfortunately. At the second point, I realized with full awareness, the power of something like this. For instance, curiosity is what drives you to talk with others. To get out of your comfort zone and embrace people that think differently than you. Curious people usually love diversity because they see diversity, diversity of thinking and background, the precious gift of knowledge.They know that people that are different than them have something to offer to them and they can learn from. And it doesn't mean that the other point of view is better than yours. It means that through dialogue and therefore respect to other characteristics of the unicorns, ability to create a dialogue and respect. To dialogue and respect, you can build a bridge with these other perspectives and your perspective. Perspective number one, combine with perspective number two of the other person. Create a third or regional perspective, that is the novel perspective, is what drives innovation. Curiosity makes you read books and travel from one place to the other without just stopping at the meeting room where you're going because of the business commitment that you have. But going out in the city and getting lost in the city and observe people and falling in love with, you know, the way they talk, they behave, they dress, they eat, they drink, they read anything they do. Curiosity make you grow every single day. Brian Ardinger: So, I'm curious to know, so you talk about these particular traits and that. Do you think they can be trained and taught to folks that are already on your team. Or is this something you have to go out and hire for and is it, is it in fact a unicorn from the standpoint of it's a mythical creature that doesn't always exist and is hard to come by. Mauro Porcini: Yeah, exactly. First of all, as you mention it, the unicorn doesn't exist. The person that embodies, to the extreme, the 24 skills of the unicorn doesn't exist. And this is what the unicorn is about. Plato will place the unicorn in the world of ideas up there.The Unicorn is an idea you strive to for the rest of your life. You want to keep seeing your life as a never-ending opportunity that will end with your death eventually, depending on what you believe in. And opportunity to keep learning. And so that's what the unicorn is about. And therefore, is implicit in the very idea of the unicorn that you need to learn, that you can grow. You can improve, you can become a better unicorn than you were when you were born.So, I think there are two dimensions to the idea of the unicorn. On one side, there are talents you are born with, like you play soccer, and you are Maradona or Tennis, Serena Williams or you run and Usain Bolt. Those are people who are born with those talents, but they need to train also, Maradona, Serena Williams or Usain Bolt need to train that talent. We move people with goals. At the beginning, even just building awareness. Realizing that I am Maradona. You know how many amazing potential baseball player or tennis player are out there. And there are maybe employees in a company or doing other things because they never became aware on an amazing talent because they never happened to play baseball for example. They just, you know, they didn't do sport and they ended up, or they were swimming.And so the first role of education is build awareness about specific characteristics. And again, now we're talking about sports. But understanding the power of curiosity. Understanding the power of optimism. The power of humbleness. You know, a series of traits that can make the difference in your innovation journey.The second goal is that once you're aware, you want to practice so that you can take it to the next level. The third one is that you want to, when you right to a certain level, you know, a professional kind of level, you think that you are done, because you are there. You're up there, you've been successful. You did amazing innovation projects.You are Maradona. Somebody stopped learning, somebody stopped growing. And this is a big mistake driven by the opposite of one of the characteristics of the unicorn that is evidence. And the characteristic is that humbleness combined with confidence. So short answer, partially is natural talent, partially training. You may be born with less of a natural talent as a unicorn than somebody else. But you may become a better unicorn than a natural talent if you practice and if you get that kind of education. Brian Ardinger: You brought up the fact that you got to be a natural learner and continually prime that pump. How do you stay fresh and current and connected to new ideas and that?Mauro Porcini: Look, I practice that idea of curiosity I was describing also earlier. But while in the past was kind of random. Like I was just curious by nature. But it was very in efficient. Sometimes I was more curious, sometimes I was less. Today I force myself to be extra learner. And really, you know, for instance, you may already understand from this conversation between the two of us that I love a lot to talk and you put me in a room, we start to talk and I start, and then I learn over the years, when you are in the room and you meet people, people you know, but especially people you don't know, that if I was talking too much, I was wasting the opportunity to learn from others.So, one of the things I learned to do is to stop and list theme. Listen is so, so important. And also, not doing that just in a casual occasion, but also during a business meeting. During a design or innovation meeting. And this is so important because often people, for lack of confidence are there in those rooms feeling the gap of their, of the silence.We justify their presence there, to build their credibility, even if what they're saying is not really meaningful to the conversation. It's not really adding value. There are so many of these people and to them, almost bothered by that because I feel it in my skin, like a waste of time and lack of efficiency in that kind of conversation.I think we should talk when we add value to bring to the conversation, and we shouldn't when we don't. By the way, this value doesn't need to be just intellectual value. Maybe there is a moment that we need a joke or some irony. You know, to create a different vibe in the conversation. So, I'm talking about that.But this is something important I think, and we need to always keep in mind. And then finally, a little trick, again, very spontaneously for me, I am very, very active in social media. Especially in Instagram, in LinkedIn. And I post every day in Instagram especially. And so, posting every day, you always want to have interesting content to post.And so, this force you to walk the streets of life and be curious and see people around you and always hungry for an interesting thing that happens. So that you can snap that picture, that could become content. And it's not just the picture, but it's the story behind that picture. So, you need to observe, you need to understand what's going on, and then you need to give an angle, a perspective that is your unique, that helps so much being alert and looking around and always observe what's going on around you.Brian Ardinger: What it also allows you to do is to make mistakes. Like you can try things and you get better as you try things. I imagine the first time you posted a picture of your shoes, was maybe not the first best conversation piece, but I know that you do it on a regular basis and having the ability to learn and grow and change as you experience and do things, that's probably important trait as well. Mauro Porcini: Yeah. You, you, you say two things that I think are very important here. One is consistency. You may do things at the beginning, look weird, but if you do it consistently because in a consistent way, then it becomes part of your brand. Or you may do things that people perceive as not authentic because they're like, ah, that's not really him, you know, or her in your social media or at work in, you know, in what you do every day, your company. So, at the beginning, there will be this uncomfortable situation. People want to know, you know, why you're doing certain things. But if you keep doing that sooner or later, they will understand that you really believe in what you're doing. So, consistency is very powerful, but it requires a little bit of courage and getting out of your comfort zone at the beginning. When you disrupt, you do things differently. Brian Ardinger: So obviously you work at a company like PepsiCo that's always doing some amazing things out there in the consumers world and headspace. What are some of the trends that you're seeing or that you're excited about? Mauro Porcini: Well, there are three with an overarching platform that could be codified as an additional fourth trend. In our industry, but they're common also, many other industries. Sustainability, health and wellness, personalization, enabled by technology. Technology could attach itself to all of this dimension and really change the game. Sometimes people ask me, well, you've been 10 years at PepsiCo.You were 20 years earlier in 3M, where do you see yourself in the future? The first part of the answer is that you never know, right? I was not planning to leave 3M and then it happened. But I'm not planning to, to leave PepsiCo anytime soon. And one of the reasons why, since 10 years I'm doing exactly the same job. And I could keep doing a job eventually for 20 more years, is that it's exactly these four challenges that I just made.We're working in a industry that is in evolution. Is changing. And companies like PepsiCo give people like me, the platform to reach everyday billions of people. Billions of people. So even the incremental changes that eventually the media don't notice because they're not the next iPhone, who generate a positive impact, for instance, in sustainability, in health wellness.That is exponentially bigger than anything a small company is, can do, and is doing today. The impact what we're doing today, with a variety of different activities that human center design driven is unbelievable. So, it's so exciting to work on these four dimensions today in an industry like this, with a company to give you this kind of access and resources as well.For More InformationBrian Ardinger: It's exciting times we're living in for sure, and I really do appreciate you coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to kind of share your thoughts. I'm really excited about the book coming out. For folks who want to find out more about yourself or about the book, what's the best way to do that?Mauro Porcini: If you follow me, my Instagram, Mauro Porcini and my LinkedIn. Mauro Porcini as well. I'm pretty active there. And then there is the possibility eventually even to communicate directly. So probably are the best two platforms. Brian Ardinger: Well Mauro, thank you again for coming on the program. Very excited to continue the conversation in the years to come and appreciate your time. Mauro Porcini: Thank you. Thank you, Brian. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Unleash Your Greatness Within
Leadership and Innovation with Love | Mauro Porcini

Unleash Your Greatness Within

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 84:19


Check out my latest podcast, "Success Interview," with Mauro Porcini. Mauro Porcini is the Chief Design Officer at PepsiCo. Mauro Porcini is the author of "The Human Side of Innovation: The Power of People In Love with People." In this interview, we talk specifics about leadership, innovation, culture, and the human side of innovation. Enjoy! #MauroPorcini #leadership #performance #innovation #greatnesswithin #love #culture - Watch on Youtube: https://youtu.be/NQh57ylWddw

Design Matters with Debbie Millman
Mauro Porcini

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 54:22 Very Popular


PepsiCo's award-winning Chief Design Officer, Mauro Porcini, reveals the secret to creating life-changing innovation in his new book, a manifesto for a genuine, authentic, and deeply humanistic approach to design.

Storia d'Italia
Sotto il cielo di Ninive (626-628), ep. 123

Storia d'Italia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 54:52


Questo secolo di narrazione, lo ricorderete, è iniziato con un avvenimento traumatico: la ribellione di Phocas che portò alla morte di Maurizio, e dei suoi figli maschi. Da allora, da ben un quarto di secolo, la guerra ha consumato i grandi imperi della tarda antichità: quello romano e quello persiano. In tutto questo, gli imperi sono ormai giunti all'ultima fase della lotta: hanno consumato le ricchezze accumulate in generazioni. I sovrani sanno ormai che il loro destino è legato al successo. Non si fermeranno di fronte a nulla pur di raggiungerlo, e lo scontro finale avverrà nei pressi di una delle grandi capitali imperiali dell'antichità: Ninive. ---PER PRENOTARE "IL MIGLIOR NEMICO DI ROMA":- Amazon (link affiliato): https://amzn.to/3DG9FG5- IBS: https://www.ibs.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Feltrinelli: https://www.lafeltrinelli.it/miglior-nemico-di-roma-storia-libro-marco-cappelli/e/9788828210085- Mondadori: https://www.mondadoristore.it/miglior-nemico-Roma-Storia-Marco-Cappelli/eai978882821008/---Ti piace il podcast? Sostienilo, accedendo all'episodio premium, al canale su telegram, alla citazione nel podcast, alle première degli episodi e molto altro ancora:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/italiastoria Tipeee: https://it.tipeee.com/storia-ditaliaPer una donazione: https://italiastoria.com/come-sostenere-il-podcast/---►Informazioni sul mio libro "Per un pugno di barbari":https://italiastoria.com/libro/►Registrarsi alla mia mailing list:https://italiastoria.com/mailing-list/►Trascrizioni episodi, mappe, recensioni, genealogie:https://italiastoria.com/►FacebookPagina: https://www.facebook.com/italiastoriaGruppo: https://www.facebook.com/groups/italiastoria►Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/italiastoria/►Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ItaliaStoria►YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzPIENUr6-S0UMJzREn9U5Q►Canale Discord:https://discord.gg/cyjbMJe3Qk►Contattami per commenti, idee e proposte di collaborazione: info@italiastoria.com---Musiche di Riccardo Santatohttps://www.youtube.com/user/sanric77---Livello Giuseppe Verdi: Massimiliano PastoreLivello Dante Alighieri: Musu Meci, Manuel Marchio, Mauro, Marco il Nero, Massimo Ciampiconi, Mike Lombardi, David l'Apostata, Luca Baccaro. Livello Leonardo da Vinci: Paolo, Pablo, Simone, i due Jacopo, Riccardo, Frazemo, Enrico, Alberto, Davide, Andrea Vovola e D'agostini, Settimio, Giovanni, Cesare, Francesco Favazza e Cateni, Jerome, Diego, Alanchik, Flavio, Edoardo Vaquer e De Natale, Stefano, Luca, Arianna, Mariateresa, John, Fasdev, Norman, Claudio, Marko, Barbaking, Alfredo, Manuel, Lorenzo, Corrado e Piernicola. Livello Galileo Galilei: Davide, Francesco, Jacopo T., Riccardo, Stefano, Roger, Anna, Pierangelo, Luigi, Antonio, Giulia, Ezra, Andrea, Paola, Daniele, Mariano, Francesca, Gabriella, Alessio, Giovanni, Alessandro, Valerio, Angelo, Alberto, Viviana, Riccardo, Giorgio, Francesco G., Francesco B., Emanuele, Giacomo, Francesco M, Giacomo, Martina, Yuri, Lorenzo, Jamie, Gianluca, Danilo, Echtelion, Matteo, Valerio P., Guglielmo, Michele, Massimo, Tommaso J, e Francesco C., Stefano, Giulio S., Davide P., Elisabetta C., Don Fabrizio, Massimo S., Luca F, Luca M., Dario P, Venus Schiavonia, Annalaura B., Marcus Walker, Michael Kain, Nicola De Gasperi, Pietro Sancassani, Andrea Silimbani, Anna, Marco M., Danilo R., Luca B., Paola C., Francesco C., Stefano S., Nicola L., Enrico C., Andrea F., Remo A., PortaKiTeppare, Lapo S., Mauro, Paolo G., Gaetano R., Matteo D., Lorenzino, Gabriele B., Michele P., Valerio M.Grazie anche a tutti i miei sostenitori al livello Marco Polo!---Musiche di Riccardo Santato

Drake Sports Media Podcast
Be Blue Podcast | Bulldog Breakdown with Randy Mauro

Drake Sports Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 65:37


One final primer before the 2022-23 campaign. The radio broadcast team dissects the Bulldogs' non-conference schedule, and gives the inside scoop on each class. Plus, soundbites from Media Day featuring head coach Allison Pohlman and members of the team.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

VoxTalks
S5 Ep48: Climate and debt

VoxTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 23:18


Mitigating and adapting to climate change is economically rational. But it is also expensive, it's not clear how the cost should be financed, or which countries or actors assume the burden. The 25th Geneva Report from CEPR investigates these questions. Beatrice Weder di Mauro and Ugo Panizza tell Tim Phillips about the report's conclusions.

Ticaracaticast
EP 202 - MAURO NAVES

Ticaracaticast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 139:28


MAURO NAVES

Homeless in San Diego

We're taking a short recess in recording this week while we prepare for our Annual Meeting and Grand Opening of our Turk Recuperative Care Center on October 26th .  This gives us the perfect opportunity to look back on a previous episode with Mauro a local artist and the visionary behind the largest mural in Escondido titled "Journey to Healing."  This mural will live on as a symbol of recovery for all those who will begin transforming their lives at the Abraham and Lillian Turk Recuperative Care Center, for years to come. 

Italian Indie
Vendere coaching e corsi grazie a Youtube (con Mauro Pepe )

Italian Indie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 63:34


Scopriamo tutti i dettagli della strategia con cui @Mauro Pepe si è affermato nella crescita personale E vende corsi e coaching direttamente da Youtube. In questa intervista scoprirai: - il flusso di lavoro che gli permette di pubblicare 2-3 video ogni settimana, - come incorporare intrattenimento nei contenuti senza fare stupidaggini, - come avere continuamente nuove idee, - come convertire gli spettatori in clienti ricorrenti, con una tecnica "all'antica". RISORSE PER PRODUTTORI DI CONOSCENZA

The FOX News Rundown
Extra: Street Crime Is A Major Concern. Is It Time For A National Task Force?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 22:17 Very Popular


Violent crime has been a big concern of Americans and a major campaign issue ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. That's not surprising. Homicide rates already were on the rise for years, but many cities experienced significant spikes since the pandemic. Recently, former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro joined special Rundown guest host Dana Perino on the podcast to discuss the nationwide problem and how we reduce the bloodshed. He pointed out that handguns have been a common denominator in not only the recent upticks in violence but also in street crime for generations. Despite that, he believes there has not been enough focus on trying to curb illegal trafficking of them. Mauro made his case to Dana about why there is a need for a Handgun Trafficking Task Force and how it would allow local police officers and the feds to make a significant dent in America's alarming murder and armed robbery stats. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the conversation in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro and hear more of his take on fighting gun violence and why he believes his idea is simple, less political, and more effective than other approaches. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Extra: Street Crime Is A Major Concern. Is It Time For A National Task Force?

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 22:17


Violent crime has been a big concern of Americans and a major campaign issue ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. That's not surprising. Homicide rates already were on the rise for years, but many cities experienced significant spikes since the pandemic. Recently, former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro joined special Rundown guest host Dana Perino on the podcast to discuss the nationwide problem and how we reduce the bloodshed. He pointed out that handguns have been a common denominator in not only the recent upticks in violence but also in street crime for generations. Despite that, he believes there has not been enough focus on trying to curb illegal trafficking of them. Mauro made his case to Dana about why there is a need for a Handgun Trafficking Task Force and how it would allow local police officers and the feds to make a significant dent in America's alarming murder and armed robbery stats. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the conversation in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with former NYPD Inspector Paul Mauro and hear more of his take on fighting gun violence and why he believes his idea is simple, less political, and more effective than other approaches. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Storia d'Italia
Le mura di Costantinopoli (626), ep. 122

Storia d'Italia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 61:16


Sotto la minaccia degli Unni, e con negli occhi il sacco di Roma di Alarico, il prefetto Antemio aveva fatto costruire le più impressionanti mura dell'antichità. Lo scopo? Proteggere la nuova capitale dell'Impero, Costantinopoli, da ogni minaccia attuale e futura. La semplice vista di questo impressionante apparato difensivo è stata finora sufficiente a scoraggiare ogni tentativo di assedio. Non più: nel 626, gli Avari e i Persiani marciano su Nuova Roma. Riuscirà Eraclio ad impedire che sulla sua città cada lo stesso fato dell'antica Roma?---Ti piace il podcast? Sostienilo, accedendo all'episodio premium, al canale su telegram, alla citazione nel podcast, alle première degli episodi e molto altro ancora:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/italiastoria Tipeee: https://it.tipeee.com/storia-ditaliaPer una donazione: https://italiastoria.com/come-sostenere-il-podcast/---►Informazioni sul mio libro "Per un pugno di barbari":https://italiastoria.com/libro/►Registrarsi alla mia mailing list:https://italiastoria.com/mailing-list/►Trascrizioni episodi, mappe, recensioni, genealogie:https://italiastoria.com/►FacebookPagina: https://www.facebook.com/italiastoriaGruppo: https://www.facebook.com/groups/italiastoria►Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/italiastoria/►Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ItaliaStoria►YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzPIENUr6-S0UMJzREn9U5Q►Canale Discord:https://discord.gg/cyjbMJe3Qk►Contattami per commenti, idee e proposte di collaborazione: info@italiastoria.com---Musiche di Riccardo Santatohttps://www.youtube.com/user/sanric77---Livello Giuseppe Verdi: Massimiliano PastoreLivello Dante Alighieri: Musu Meci, Manuel Marchio, Mauro, Marco il Nero, Massimo Ciampiconi, Mike Lombardi, David l'Apostata.Livello Leonardo da Vinci: Paolo, Pablo, Simone, i due Jacopo, Riccardo, Frazemo, Enrico, Alberto, Davide, Andrea Vovola e D'agostini, Settimio, Giovanni, Cesare, Francesco Favazza e Cateni, Jerome, Diego, Alanchik, Flavio, Edoardo Vaquer e De Natale, Stefano, Luca, Arianna, Mariateresa, John, Fasdev, Norman, Claudio, Marko, Barbaking, Alfredo, Manuel, Lorenzo, Corrado e Piernicola. Livello Galileo Galilei: Davide, Francesco, Jacopo T., Riccardo, Stefano, Roger, Anna, Pierangelo, Luigi, Antonio, Giulia, Ezra, Andrea, Paola, Daniele, Mariano, Francesca, Gabriella, Alessio, Giovanni, Alessandro, Valerio, Angelo, Alberto, Viviana, Riccardo, Giorgio, Francesco G., Francesco B., Emanuele, Giacomo, Francesco M, Giacomo, Martina, Yuri, Lorenzo, Jamie, Gianluca, Danilo, Echtelion, Matteo, Valerio P., Guglielmo, Michele, Massimo, Tommaso J, e Francesco C., Stefano, Giulio S., Davide P., Elisabetta C., Don Fabrizio, Massimo S., Luca F, Luca M., Dario P, Venus Schiavonia, Annalaura B., Marcus Walker, Michael Kain, Nicola De Gasperi, Pietro Sancassani, Andrea Silimbani, Anna, Marco M., Danilo R., Luca B., Paola C., Francesco C., Stefano S., Nicola L., Enrico C., Andrea F., Remo A., PortaKiTeppare, Lapo S., Mauro, Paolo G., Gaetano R., Matteo D., Lorenzino, Gabriele B., Michele P., Valerio M.Grazie anche a tutti i miei sostenitori al livello Marco Polo!---Musiche di Riccardo Santato