Podcasts about Steel Magnolias

1989 American comedy-drama film directed by Herbert Ross

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Steel Magnolias

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Best podcasts about Steel Magnolias

Latest podcast episodes about Steel Magnolias

Opening Weekend
Episode 85: The Little Mermaid - Steel Magnolias - Harlem Nights: November 19, 1989

Opening Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 97:04


“Drink your juice, Shelby.” Mermaids, Magnolias, and Murphy; that's what November 19th, 1989 was offering up at the multiplex. This week the boys take a deep dive under the sea with Disney's THE LITTLE MERMAID, hit the hair salon for STEEL MAGNOLIAS, and roll the dice with HARLEM NIGHTS. Grab your dinglehopper and get ready for Episode 85 of Opening Weekend!

Most Excellent 80s Movies Podcast
Steel Magnolias (1989)

Most Excellent 80s Movies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 62:00


Join Filmmaker Nathan Blackwell (Voyage Trekkers, Last Movie Ever Made) and Comedian Krissy Lenz (Neighborhood Comedy Theatre, Saturday Matinée Podcast) with special guest, multiple Emmy award-winning Leigh Ann Dolan (Busy Tonight, Phoenix Film Festival, Valley Youth Theater) as they quip their way through the world of improbable illness and ineffectual men. What will the Deep Cut Recommendations be? What will they rate this classic "laughter through tears" extravaganza?

Kare Reviews Podcast
Kathleen Garrett of North Carolina Theatre's STEEL MAGNOLIAS

Kare Reviews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 12:20


From November 4th-13th, North Carolina Theatre will be launching their 2022-23 season with a production of Robert Harling's STEEL MAGNOLIAS at A.J. Fletcher Opera Theatre, which is located inside Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts. I recently had the great pleasure of interviewing actress Kathleen Garrett, who will be taking on the role of Ouiser Boudreaux. She has countless screen credits which includes appearing on episodes of different TV shows such as HOME IMPROVEMENT, ER, MURDER, SHE WROTE, MURPHY BROWN, THE WEST WING, BEVERLY HILLS, 90210, MALCOLM IN THE MIDDLE, LAW & ORDER, INVENTING ANNA, THE FIRST LADY, and many more. She's also appeared in Oscar nominated films such as 2007's AMERICAN GANGSTER directed by Ridley Soctt and 2020's THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7 directed by Aaron Sorkin. Be sure to catch North Carolina Theatre's production of STEEL MAGNOLIAS. It will be playing at A.J. Fletcher Opera Theatre from November 4th-13th. For more information, please visit: www.nctheatre.com/shows/steel-magnolias Follow Kathleen Garret at www.kathleengarrett.com and on Instagram: @thisiskathleengarrett If you love this show, please leave us a review. Go to RateThisPodcast.com/karereviewspodcast and follow the simple instructions. Follow Kare Reviews at www.karereviews.net and on Twitter: @KareReviews Also please visit the newly launched Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/jeffreykare?fan_landing=true Follow Jeffrey Kare on Twitter: @JeffreyKare If you like what you've heard here, please subscribe to any one of the following places where the Kare Reviews Podcast is available. Anchor: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-kare Apple: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/kare-reviews-podcast/id1453846013 Google: www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy85NWFhZDFjL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/6GL69s4zoDQmBcZf3NALTG Breaker: www.breaker.audio/kare-reviews-podcast Overcast: overcast.fm/itunes1453846013/kare-reviews-podcast Pocket Casts: pca.st/47Vw RadioPublic: radiopublic.com/kare-reviews-podcast-6rMdXk --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-kare/support

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 322 - Christine Ebersole

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:36


CHRISTINE EBERSOLE, is currently celebrating her new album After the Ball from Club44 Records, has captivated audiences throughout her performing career. Recognized with a string of honors that includes two Tony Awards, she has appeared in twenty Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, as well as gracing television series and specials, films, concerts, recordings and opera. It was for her “dual role of a lifetime” as Edith Beale and Little Edie Beale in Grey Gardens that Ebersole won her second Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical, as well as virtually every available Off-Broadway honor. Other memorable New York roles include her Tony-winning turn as Dorothy Brock in the hit revival of 42nd Street, her Tony-nominated portrayal of Elizabeth Arden opposite Patti LuPone in War Paint, her Tony- and Outer Critics Circle-nominated appearance in Dinner at Eight, her Obie-winning and Drama Desk-nominated appearance in Alan Bennett's Talking Heads, her performance as Guinevere alongside Richard Harris and Richard Burton in Camelot, and her leading roles in Oklahoma!,On the Twentieth Century, Steel Magnolias, The Best Man, and the revival of Noël Coward's Blithe Spirit. In 2018 she made her operatic debut under James Conlon's leadership as the Old Lady in Francesca Zambello's production of Candide at LA Opera. Recently starring as Lucille Dolittle, a role based on Lucille Ball, in Paul Thomas Anderson's Oscar-nominated Licorice Pizza, Ebersole has appeared in numerous feature films. Previous film credits include The Wolf of Wall Street, Amadeus, Black Sheep, Dead Again, Folks!, Ghost Dad, My Girl 2, Richie Rich, Tootsie, True Crime, and The Big Wedding, which features her account of her original song “Gently Down the Stream.” Since launching her TV career alongside Eddie Murphy as a regular cast member of “Saturday Night Live,” Ebersole has also accrued a long list of television credits. Currently starring in Chuck Lorre's hit CBS sitcom “Bob Hearts Abishola,” she recently portrayed Estelle Schneider in the award-winning Netflix series “The Kominsky Method,” and has appeared on “American Horror Story,” “Blue Bloods,” “Madam Secretary,” “Murphy Brown,” “Pose,” “Search Party,” “The Colbert Report,” “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” “Will & Grace” and Gypsy, in which she played Tessie Tura to Bette Midler's Mama Rose. Ebersole has performed at some of the nation's foremost concert halls, including New York's Carnegie Hall, L.A.'s Disney Hall, Boston's Symphony Hall and the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Her concert highlights include appearances in San Francisco Symphony's tribute to Leonard Bernstein, concert versions of The Grapes of Wrath at Carnegie Hall and of A Little Night Music with the Boston Pops, and Gershwin at 100: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall and The Rodgers & Hart Story: Thou Swell, Thou Witty, both of which were filmed for broadcast on PBS TV. A celebrated recording artist, her discography includes Christine Ebersole: Live at the Cinegrill, In Your Dreams, Sunday in New York, Christine Ebersole Sings Noël Coward, and Strings Attached. www.christineebersole.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Full Out, The Real Travis and Stacy Podcast

Guest Interview: Travis Japan, Debut single, “Just Dance”, Competing on America's Got Talent, TJ's Fan Family, Industry Dance Day in Las Vegas presented by Susan Salgado Entertainment, Mike “Dropz” Cameron, Cirque du Soleil, Rosero, Jawkeen, Marvin Columbus, Dominique Columbus, Travis Payne Directing "Crossing The Line", Osmonds, Home Renovations, Steel Magnolias, Passive Income, Tara Nicole Hughes, Robert Iscove, Little Mermaid starring Halle Bailey, working on Cinderella starring Brandy and Whitney Houston, Remembering Gianni Versace, connection to Universal Backlot, working on Date Movie, collaborating with Maia & Alex Shibutani. DANCE HERO: Rob MarshallSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Finding God in Our Pain
Hope Deferred with Lainie Stubblefield - Marriage and Children

Finding God in Our Pain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 57:55


Hope Deferred with Lainie Stubblefield - Marriage and Children God's word says, hope deferred makes the heart sick but desire fulfilled is a tree of life. If so, then why would it seem that God withholds good things from us? Specifically for this conversation, withhold marriage and children from my guest Lainie Stubblefield? If you've longed for something for many years and it feels as though you've been overlooked, let Lainie's story encourage your heart because she shares how she struggles with God about her pain and the revelations she receives by engaging God's heart in her journey of deeply desiring to be a wife and mom. Hope deferred can be about many different desires of the heart. It's longing for something but not seeing it come to fruition. As mentioned, Lainie's heart desire has been for marriage and children and as a Christian she's chosen to wait on God's timing. A double edged sword for sure. On the one hand, I consider it a sliver of gold, being confident that God knows the man whom has He chosen to be my spouse. At the very least, when marriage gets tough I could rest in the fact that everything's going to be okay because God picked this one for me. And yet, when it's taking so long for God to answer, it's very easy to also blame Him when things don't turn out like I want or had envisioned. Lainie reminded me of my friend Kathrine. They are steadfast in their waiting. I'm not saying it's easy. Both women are transparent about their experiences with pain and struggle but they stay the course until God moves His hand. And by move His hand, I am also not saying that He answers in the way they wanted or desired. In their struggling well with God they discover new intimacies about His heart for them. They find that God is enough in every situation. I can't count the times when I was waiting on the Lord to answer a prayer and then at some point I get it in my head that He needs help. I jump in and "help out" aka take control. I've got this mindset that surely I missed what He was saying or where He was leading so I'm going to steer this prayer request in the right direction and get the answer I'm looking for, pronto. So, more times than I can count I have returned to the Lord in repentance with more baggage attached to my original request. Good news though, God's unfazed with my antics. In the past, He's spoken into my spirit something along the lines of, sweet child I could have saved you all of that if you'd just been patient. I say that to say this, we can get out there and make things happen. There are other options to waiting on Christ. Lainie has other options. One of those options being that she could stay focused on her struggle and pain becoming bitter but she has set it in her heart and has chosen to submit herself to God's timing and His wisdom. To some it may look like God has forgotten Lainie or is withholding this good thing, even Laine has asked God that question. But Lainie has pressed deeply into the heart of God to discover the beauty of intimacy with Christ. In doing so, Christ has revealed His sufficiency in singleness. So you might be thinking, what is the importance of waiting on God? For Christians, it's in the waiting that our faith is exercised. It's where we discover new levels of relationship with God, where He reveals hidden things, gives us access to new dimensions of His heart. It's where we explore and discover things we didn't even imagine to know or ask. After all, an immediate gratification God does not require faith and certainly no relationship. There is beauty to be found in the midst of the pain and waiting.  Lainie is warm, friendly and easy to. She talks about the various revelations that God shared with her and I loved that she had a strong understanding of the importance of both married couples and the singles with regard to the body of Christ. She has, what I would call, an intuitive understanding and even shares what she discerns with her pastor (who is very open to her input) from a singles perspective. She shares how to blend the two (married and single) in various ways for a mutually beneficial experience that edifies the whole body of Christ. Listen in to hear all that God revealed and how Lainie has applied it to her life so that hope deferred doesn't become the sole pursuit of her life. Live Loved and Thrive! @alifeofthrive.com Connect with Lainie: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com/ https://www.accessmore.com/pd/Have-Love-Will-Travel- Resources Mentioned: Tim Keller, The Meaning of Marriage Sam Alberry, The 7 Myths about Singleness Bio: Lainie Stubblefield has helped others receive healing in their bodies as a massage therapist for over 20 years. As a follower of Jesus, she also has a heart for seeing others receive the freedom that is available in our hearts and minds through Jesus Christ. She is the co-host of the Steel Magnolias podcast discussing various aspects of Southern Culture as well as a new travel podcast coming out soon called Have Love, Will Travel on the Access More Network. Transcript: https://www.happyscribe.com/transcriptions/b9efa3a7cff54eb09f74e358bf0dbe94/edit_v2    

Full Out, The Real Travis and Stacy Podcast

Guest Interview: Darran Bruce, EP of The DJ Sessions Podcast /Topics: Dance Music, Content Creation and the start of ITV, Home renovations, Steel Magnolias, Dolly Parton, Welcome Home Donna, Self-care, Disney's Newsies, Kenny Ortega, Gene Kelly, Aaron Lohr, Madonna, Choreographers Carnival, Dance Belts, working on Dancing WIth The Stars, Michael Jackson, Apple, YouTube, The hardest part of working in the Entertainment Industry, Charlotte Dobre, Girl With The Dogs, Trap House Lore, Tasha K, Joe Rogan, Andrew Schultz, The Breakfast Club, Jeffree Star, Kar-Jenners, RIP Greg Walker, Dan The Man DANCE HERO: Kevin Stea Lifetime Achievement AwardSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Full Out, The Real Travis and Stacy Podcast

Guest Interview: Dominique Kelley Topics: Honoring our Dads, RIP Greg Walker, working with Donna Summer, Steel Magnolias, Dance With Me, Audition vs. Direct Booking, Cai Xukun, Stuart Little Movie, Brian Setzer Orchestra “If You Can't Rock Me” director: Joseph Khan, Kim Kardashian, Disaster Movie, Vanessa Williams, TV Land Awards, Becky Stahl Caladara, Remain a Student, ‘Oklahoma' receives Henry Award, Mariah Carey's ‘Magical Christmas' Special, ‘The Princess & The Frog', CHOREOGRAPHERS GUILD Launch DANCE HERO: Ruthy InchausteguiSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hello Dysfunction
187: Small Town Girl

Hello Dysfunction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 98:14 Very Popular


If you don't like us, we feel you. Pata Fria was given a defective vagina, Crystal used to love morning after pills and there's a fine line between subtle enhancements and full on transformation. Crystal lasered herself a new face and loved telling everyone all about it.  Men flirting is really cringe. Sexual dysfunction is stressful and Crystal is NOT from Steel Magnolias. For bonus content and additional episodes join our Patreon!! Patreon.com/hellodysfunction  Follow us on IG: Instagram.com/hellodysfunction  Instagram.com/patafria.again  Instagram.com/crystaldamato21 Email us your questions/stories at: hellodysfunction@gmail.com 

Suds and Cinema
Episode 125: Pearl & Barbarian feat. Unbalanced Breakfast

Suds and Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 156:37


This week we unpack our mommy issues in our review of Pearl. Then we go another level deeper in our 'featured' review of Barbarian. We also discuss House of the Dragon, Gattaca, All the President's Men, Old School, Heavy, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Steel Magnolias, I Am Legend, Major League II, Clue, On the Count of Three, The Boys (Season 3), and Band of Outsiders. All while drinking Unbalanced Breakfeast. A fruited sour by Great Notion Brewing, out of Portland, Oregon. Intro and Beer Selection 0:00-19:10 Pearl Review 19:10-43:41 Barbarian Review 43:41-1:20:21 Nano Reviews/ Italy Review 1:20:21-2:29:34 Outro 2:29:34-2:36:37 Like us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/SudsAndCinema/ Follow us on iTunes! podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1494990925 Follow us on Spotify! open.spotify.com/show/3Ludeu2hrTDuBfSGc9y7tO Follow us on PodBean! sudsandcinema.podbean.com Follow us on Instagram! www.instagram.com/sudsandcinemapodcast/ Follow us on TikTok! Find our Premium Episodes Here! https://sudsandcinema.bandcamp.com/ Send your questions and comments to sudsandcinemapodcast@gmail.com Logo and Artwork by @djmikeholiday

Can I Getta Amen
Episode 146: Grit, Wit & Fit with Fr. Stephen Gadberry

Can I Getta Amen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 66:35


Y'all! We got to virtually hang with a very cool country boy from Arkansas, Fr. Stephen Gadberry, or as we will now lovingly refer to him, Fr. Flex. If an American Gladiator and M'Lynn from Steel Magnolias had a baby, it'd be this guy! What a journey he takes us on! From being raised on a farm in the Arkansas Delta to the first priest competing on American Ninja Warrior, we got all the stories to share. No stranger to brotherhood, Fr. Stephen enlisted in the Air Force where he would eventually feel called to the priesthood while on tour in Germany.Fr. Stephen is a lover of beautiful things, cheap beer, hunting, and fitness. His joy is found in the GRIND of life, recommitting himself to his calling every.single.day. You will leave this back porch chat feeling inspired to drop your nets and follow Jesus in a new way.

Page To Stage
81 - A Beautiful Noise: Kathy Fabian, Props Supervisor

Page To Stage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:41


Kathy Fabian shares the process of creating props, set dressing, and researching for A Beautiful Noise. If you are listening to this on Apple Podcast, we'd love it if you could share your love in a review! ABOUT KATHY FABIAN Fabian's Broadway credits include: The Rose Tattoo, American Son, All My Sons, Burn This, True West, Bernhardt/Hamlet, Pretty Woman, The Parisian Woman, Indecent, Sunday in the Park with George, Falsettos, Fiddler on the Roof, China Doll, On Your Feet, Living On Love, The King and I, An American In Paris, The Real Thing, The Realistic Joneses, If/Then, Rocky, The Bridges of Madison County, I'll Eat You Last, Kinky Boots, Lucky Guy, Breakfast at Tiffany's, The Anarchist, Chaplin, Nice Work If You Can Get It, A Streetcar Named Desire, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, Stick Fly, Relatively Speaking, Chinglish, The Normal Heart, House of Blue Leaves, Anything Goes, Ghetto Klown, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, A Life in the Theatre, Fences, All About Me, A Behanding in Spokane, Race, Fela!, Bye Bye Birdie, A Steady Rain, Waiting for Godot, You're Welcome America, Pal Joey, American Buffalo, Speed the Plow, A Man For All Seasons, Les Liasons Dangereuses, South Pacific, Sunday in the Park with George, The Homecoming, Cyrano de Bergerac, Pygmalion, Old Acquaintance, 110 in the Shade, Talk Radio, Prelude to a Kiss, Spring Awakening, High Fidelity, Barefoot in the Park, Souvenir, Steel Magnolias, Sweet Charity, Match, Fiddler on the Roof, Bobby Boland, Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, and Golda's Balcony. Recent Off Broadway: West Side Story, Stage Around, Tokyo, Mary Jane and Othello, (NYTW) and Turn Me Loose, (Westside Theatre). Recent TV projects include creations for Fosse Verdon, Samantha Bee, and Sesame Street. MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: A Beautiful Noise on Instagram: instagram.com/abeautifulnoisemusical A Beautiful Noise on Facebook: facebook.com/ABeautifulNoiseMusical Get Your Tickets: abeautifulnoisethemusical.com --- Come say hi to us! Facebook: @PageToStagePodcast @BroadwayPodcastNetwork Instagram: @PageToStagePodcast @TheMaryDina @BrianSedita @BroadwayPodcastNetwork Twitter: @TheMaryDina @BwayPodNetwork YouTube: @PageToStagePodcast @BroadwayPodcastNetwork #PageToStagePodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond Reproach
S5 Ep55: She is the Moment: Episode 55 (The Story of Alice Roosevelt Longworth, the Original Hyper-Public First Kid)

Beyond Reproach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 55:30


In our first episode of Season 5 we are coming to y'all from Detroit!! We kick off the season with a cocktail called the Hanky-Panky. This drink is Ada “Coley” Coleman's most famous drink from the turn of the century. Her classic concoction is still on menu today at her old bar and it ties perfectly to the era and theme of STEPHANIE's scandal. 

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 314 - Marsha Mason

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 44:40


Marsha Mason has received four Academy Award nominations for her roles in the films The Goodbye Girl, Cinderella Liberty, Only When I Laugh and Chapter Two. She has been the recipient of two Golden Globe Awards for her film roles and an Emmy Award nomination for her role on “Frasier.” Her other TV credits include “The Middle,” “The Good Wife,” “Madam Secretary,” and “Grace & Frankie.” Broadway roles include Impressionism with Jeremy Irons, Steel Magnolias, The Night of the Iguana, The Good Doctor, King Richard III, and Cactus Flower. Off-Broadway she co-starred in the world premiere of Terrence McNally's Fire and Air at Classic Stage and Little Gem at the Irish Repertory Theatre (Outer Critics Circle Award winner for Outstanding Actress in a Play). Regionally she has starred in All's Well That Ends Well at Shakespeare in Washington, DC, A Doll's House at ACT in San Francisco, Arms and the Man at Old Globe Theatre in San Diego and Watch on the Rhine at Arena Stage in Washington, DC. As a director, Marsha, has helmed productions of Neil Simon's Chapter Two and Steel Magnolias at the Bucks County Playhouse, Chapter Two and the first female An Act of God with Paige Davis at the Arizona Theatre Company, Juno Swans for Second Stage in New York City and the world premiere of Tennessee Williams's Talisman Roses starring Amanda Plummer at the Tennessee Williams Festival in Provincetown, Mass. Marsha was Associate Director with Jack O'Brien for the Roundabout Theater's production of All My Sons on Broadway. She received a Daytime Emmy® Award for Direction of “Little Miss Perfect”. In 2020, she directed Walter Bobbie and Brooke Shields in The Man Who Came to Dinner for Bucks County Playhouse, starred with Brian Cox in Dear Liar for Bucks County, and opposite Richard Dreyfus in The Letters of Noel Coward for Bay Street Theater. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

GLT's Sound Ideas
Community Players' centennial season opens with a heartwarming production of ‘Steel Magnolias'

GLT's Sound Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 5:17


Community Players Theatre kicked off its 100th season Thursday with a new production of Robert Harling's “Steel Magnolias.” The show runs two weekends through Sept. 11 at Community Players Theatre in Bloomington.

Break It Down for Brackens Podcast
Steel Magnolia Flower Shop Owner Stephanie Hottel Shares the Big Moves She is Making with Her Business

Break It Down for Brackens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 53:06


Steph Hottel knows flowers. She manages her flower shop, Steel Magnolias, and runs Hot Mess Farms.  She has big plans for expanding her business in 2022/3. (304) 261-1193 Steelmagnoliasflowershop.com   https://www.facebook.com/SteelMagnoliasFlowerShop/ 4828 Summit Point Rd  Charles Town, West Virginia 25414 Sponsored By Brackens Painting www.brackenspainting.com City National Bank www.bankatcity.com Music by Peter Clark After Dark found on www.soundcloud.com  

Masculine Journey Radio's Podcast 28min
Brokenness After Hours

Masculine Journey Radio's Podcast 28min

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 27:24


Welcome fellow adventurers! The discussion on brokenness continues right here on the Masculine Journey After Hours Podcast. The clips are from "You Should Have Left," "Steel Magnolias," and a song by Cody Carnes titled "Run To The Father." There's no advertising or commercials, just men of God, talking and getting to the truth of the matter. The conversation and Journey continues.

Never Just A Dog
MATHILDE de CAGNY, HOLLYWOOD MOVIE DOG TRAINER

Never Just A Dog

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 54:04


In this episode your host John Littlefair chats with award winning Hollywood movie dog trainer Mathilde de Cagny. Mathilde's journey is inspirational. Born and raised in Paris, France, she moved to Los Angeles at the age of 20. Starting as a volunteer for Birds and Animals Unlimited, she would eventually rescue a dog called Fred who was hired to play Einstein in the Back To The Future sequel. Mathilde's most famous and extensive collaboration was with the late Moose, the Jack Russell terrier who starred for 11 years as 'Eddie' on the television show FRASIER. Other notable credits include Steel Magnolias, My Dog Skip, Marley And Me, As Good As It Gets, Lassie, Hotel For Dogs, Beginners, Hugo and Max I and II. Mathilde is dedicated to rescuing shelter dogs and giving them a second chance, many going on to be famous. This is her story. http://www.mathildedecagny.com/

Why, Bloody Valentine?
Episode 60 - Steel Magnolias (RomCom Revenge)

Why, Bloody Valentine?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 45:45


It's a RomCom Revenge!  Join Rich and Carolyn for Steel Magnolias!

Fandom Podcast Network
All Good Things: A Star Trek Universe Podcast Episode 083: First Contact Pt. 1

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 67:09


All Good Things: A Star Trek Universe Podcast Episode 083: First Contact Pt. 1 Mark and Christos blast off with the new First Contact Series where they discuss the Strange New Worlds episode ‘Children Of The Comet”. They also talk about Nichelle Nichols stamp on the legacy of Uhura, Babylon 5 and Steel Magnolias. You won't want to miss this installment of your favorite interGAYlactic Podcast! For: Nichelle Join our listeners group The BQN Collective on Facebook. Follow the network on Instagram @BQNPodcasts Find us on Twitter: The Network: @BQNpodcasts The Show: @AllGoodPod Amy: @MissAmyNelson Mark: @MarkWhite207 @GreekGeekSD BQN Podcasts are brought to you by listeners like you. Special thanks to these patrons on Patreon whose generous contributions help produce the podcast! Tim Cooper Anonymous Mahendran Radhakrishnan Peter Hong Tom Van Scotter Vera Bible Jim McMahon Justin Oser Greg Molumby Thad Hait Chrissie De Clerck-Szilagyi Joe Mignone Carl Wonders You can become a part of the Hive Mind Collective here: https://www.Patreon.com/BQN We'd love to add your uniqueness to our own! Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. STAR TREK and all related marks, logos and characters are owned by CBS Studios Inc. “All Good Things” is not endorsed or sponsored by or affiliated with CBS/Paramount Pictures or the STAR TREK franchise.

Bundle Buddies
Episode #83 - 20 Minutes Till Dawn

Bundle Buddies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 57:43


Alex and Matt talk anime, the tragic beauty of owning dogs, and Steel Magnolias before diving deep into the must-play 20 Minutes Till Dawn, which you should definitely buy instead of avocado toast. The ethical gamer holds court. Matt has opinions about Metroid: Dread. Alex takes a detour from Xenosaga into arguably stranger territory. Our cause is once again any abortion fund! However, this week we are donating to National Network of Abortion Funds Collective Power Fund. It will redistribute direct abortion funding to 28 member abortion funds across more than 20 states and is concentrated in the South and Midwest, where it's often hardest to get an abortion. The Collective Power Fund supports: Cost of an abortion Transportation to a clinic Childcare Lodging Abortion doula support All dollars raised will be redirected to local abortion funds on the frontlines of abortion access. We've donated to them, if you donate and send us proof we will shout you out on the show.

Make It A Combo
STEEL MAGNOLIAS

Make It A Combo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:01


This week the crew breakdown the 1989 classic, Steel Magnolias, starring Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis, and Julia Roberts. Listen in while Jesse gushes about his love for this movie and how it makes him cry every watch. Junior dishes about how much he hates Sally Field's overacting. Plus Andi gives insight into Groom's Cakes, Are they real or not?   Where to find the crew: @MAKEITACOMBO on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok Jesse @LordLenix on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok Junior @a.jr.combo on Instagram and @ajrcombo on Twitter Andi @am.i.a.slut_podcast on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok   All Our Podcasts on Make it a Combo Productions: Am I a Slut @am.i.a.slut_podcast on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok The Minorities Report @minoritiesreportpodcast on Instagram and @minoritiesreport on TikTok  

All Good Things: A Star Trek Universe Podcast
AGT: 083: First Contact Pt. 1

All Good Things: A Star Trek Universe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 67:10


Mark and Christos blast off with the new First Contact Series where they discuss the Strange New Worlds episode ‘Children Of The Comet”. They also talk about Nichelle Nichols stamp on the legacy of Uhura, Babylon 5 and Steel Magnolias. You won't want to miss this installment of your favorite interGAYlactic Podcast!For: Nichelle Join our listeners group The BQN Collective on Facebook.Follow the network on Instagram @BQNPodcastsFind us on Twitter:The Network: @BQNpodcastsThe Show: @AllGoodPodAmy: @MissAmyNelsonMark: @MarkWhite207@GreekGeekSDBQN Podcasts are brought to you by listeners like you. Special thanks to these patrons on Patreon whose generous contributions help produce the podcast! Tim CooperAnonymousMahendran RadhakrishnanPeter HongTom Van ScotterVera BibleJim McMahonJustin OserGreg MolumbyThad HaitChrissie De Clerck-SzilagyiJoe MignoneCarl Wonders You can become a part of the Hive Mind Collective here: https://www.Patreon.com/BQN We'd love to add your uniqueness to our own! Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.STAR TREK and all related marks, logos and characters are owned by CBS Studios Inc. “All Good Things” is not endorsed or sponsored by or affiliated with CBS/Paramount Pictures or the STAR TREK franchise.

News Talk 920 KVEC
Hometown Radio 07/26/22 3:30p: SLO Rep presents "Steel Magnolias"

News Talk 920 KVEC

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 20:56


Hometown Radio 07/26/22 3:30p: SLO Rep presents "Steel Magnolias"

Mass-Debaters
104 Top 80s Movies Tournament

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 147:37


We are talking about the results of the fan-voted top 104 80s movies. We asked people to vote round by round and reseeded each round so the high seed will always play the low seed. The 104 lists came from a Rotten Tomatoes list, with other movies sprinkled in that we thought should be in. I hope you enjoy this, and here are the 104 80s movies in this tournament: TOP GUN (1986)Harlem Nights (1989)DIRTY DANCING (1987)CADDYSHACK (1980)THE LOST BOYS (1987)BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985)Coming to America (1988)E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (1982)Wall Street 1987GHOSTBUSTERS (1984)REVENGE OF THE NERDS (1984)STAR WARS: EPISODE V -- THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980)SPACEBALLS (1987)SIXTEEN CANDLES (1984)THE LAND BEFORE TIME (1988)THE SHINING (1980)ST. ELMO'S FIRE (1985)RAGING BULL (1980)LABYRINTH (1986)RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)DEAD POETS SOCIETY (1989)DO THE RIGHT THING (1989)COMMANDO (1985)THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987)FIELD OF DREAMS (1989)THE THING (1982)THE NAKED GUN (1988)DIE HARD (1988)THE KARATE KID (1984)THE TERMINATOR (1984)police academy (1984)BLADE RUNNER (1982)less than zero (1987)RAISING ARIZONA (1987)TOOTSIE (1982)EVIL DEAD 2 (1987)THE RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985)AIRPLANE! (1980)WHEN HARRY MET SALLY... (1989)PREDATOR (1987)TIME BANDITS (1981)STAND BY ME (1986)LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1986)SAY ANYTHING... (1989)THE LITTLE MERMAID (1989)THE GOONIES (1985)PURPLE RAIN (1984)PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES (1987)WARGAMES (1983)SHORT CIRCUIT (1986)DRAGONSLAYER (1981)THE NEVERENDING STORY (1984)STEEL MAGNOLIAS (1989)BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984)FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980)THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985)A FISH CALLED WANDA (1988)FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF (1986)FOOTLOOSE (1984)HEATHERS (1989)Breakin' (1984)A CHRISTMAS STORY (1983)INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM (1984)RISKY BUSINESS (1983)Rain Man (1988)A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)REAL GENIUS (1985)ROBOCOP (1987)BIG (1988)BEETLEJUICE (1988)BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (1989)THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984)THE COLOR PURPLE (1985)THE BLUES BROTHERS (1980)WEIRD SCIENCE (1985)GREMLINS (1984)TRON (1982)DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN (1985)TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (1985)STAR WARS: EPISODE VI -- RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983)MYSTIC PIZZA (1988)FULL METAL JACKET (1987)PRETTY IN PINK (1986)BATMAN (1989)the last dragon (1985)TRADING PLACES (1983)FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982)NATIONAL LAMPOON'S Christmas VACATION (1989)ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (1981)PLATOON (1986)THE UNTOUCHABLES (1987)MAD MAX 2 (1981)REPO MAN (1984)AFTER HOURS (1985)BROADCAST NEWS (1987)WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988)THEY LIVE (1988)VALLEY GIRL (1983)SID & NANCY (1986)INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE (1989)LETHAL WEAPON (1987)SCARFACE (1983)POLTERGEIST (1982)BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (1986) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

Dorking Out
Steel Magnolias starring Julia Roberts, Sally Field, Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton, & Olympia Dukakis

Dorking Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 68:50 Very Popular


If you don't have anything nice to say, come sit by hosts Sonia Mansfield and Margo D. while they dork out about 1989's STEEL MAGNOLIAS, starring Sally Field, Julia Roberts, Shirley MacLaine, Olympia Dukakis, Daryl Hannah, and Dolly Parton. Dork out everywhere …Email at dorkingoutshow@gmail.comSubscribe on Apple PodcastsGoogle PlaySpotify LibsynTune In Stitcherhttp://dorkingoutshow.com/https://twitter.com/dorkingoutshow

Long Distance BFF
Episode 10: Steel Magnolias

Long Distance BFF

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 26:20


Besties, can you imagine hanging out at the beauty parlor with your best friends every week? In this weeks episode Sam and Tristan talk about how amazing this would be! This group of friends goes through all the good and bad things in life and they do it together.

Forte Catholic: Making Catholicism Fun Again
293: Old Ladies, Sleepy Faith & Back to Basics w/Allison Sullivan

Forte Catholic: Making Catholicism Fun Again

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 60:13


Allison Sullivan cohosts and talks with Taylor about the play she is in "Steel Magnolias." Taylor has a lot of questions for her, pokes fun at her and then they have a chat about mimicry and being present. Next, Taylor gives an update on the Foundations course he's leading and how returning to the basics of faith has been good for him and everyone else involved. Finally, they discuss something incredible that happened in the NBA Finals and it's parallels to Taylor's faith life. Enjoy! Subscribe/Rate Never miss out on the craziness of each episode by hitting the subscribe button RIGHT NOW! Help other people find the show and #MakeCatholicismFunAgain by taking a few moments to leave a review in your podcasting app. Thanks! YouTube Check out the show and other exclusive videos on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/fortecatholic Connect

95bFM
Long Player: Memory Foam 'Steel Magnolias'

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022


Yuko & Sam from Memory Foam chat to Hunter about 5 tracks from 'Steel Magnolias', for Long Player, thanks to NZ On Air Music! 

95bFM
95bFM Breakfast with Rachel: Rāmere, June 10, 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022


We've got a great show to round out your week, kicking off with a catch-up with SRN legend and friend Jamie at Radio One for The Breakfast Buffet; followed by jazz-fusion with Dr Zemke on Travelling Tunes; Samuel from local punks Memory Foam phones up for a kōrero about their debut album, Steel Magnolias; The Viewmaster brings in Stranger Things season 4, and Stefan of Māpura Studios drops by to let us know about a lovely upcoming gig. Kia pai tō rā whakatā whanau, and see you on Monday!

95bFM
I/V w/ Samuel Moore: June 10, 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022


Samuel of Memory Foam had a chat about their totally brain-meltingly cool debut album Steel Magnolias. Whakarongo mai nei, and don't miss them playing at Whammy on Saturday 18th June! 

Retro Movie Geek
RMG 289 – Steel Magnolias (1989)

Retro Movie Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 76:05


On this episode, the Retro Movie Geek crew is joined, once again, by the lovely Trista Robinson (see more from Trista HERE and HERE), and they're geeking out over Steel Magnolias (1989) and Trista's connection to the movie the amazing cast Sally Field friendship & parenthood and much, much more! Synopsis: Six divas of the silver screen – Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis and Julia Roberts – come together as bosom buddies in this hilarious and heartwarming story of life, love and loss in a small Louisiana Parish. At the center of the group is Shelby Eatenton (Julia Roberts), newly married and joyfully pregnant, despite the fact that her diabetes could make childbirth life-threatening. Terrified and angry at the possibility of losing her only daughter, M'Lynn Eatenton (Sally Field) looks to her four closest friends for strength and laughter as she battles her deepest fears of death, in order to join Shelby in celebrating the miracle of new life. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: LISTENER FEEDBACK: Leave us your voicemail feedback at (484) 577-3876. Check out Darrell's other cool podcasts here. Check out Peter's Retro Reviews over at ForgottenFlix.com here. Check out The Forgotten Flix Podcast here. Special thanks to Kevin Spencer for the fantastic show logo! Special thanks to Hayden for the use of his fantastic music for our opening theme this episode! You can check out more from this amazing artist here! Special thanks to Retro Promenade for the use of music from the album Carpenter. Music use permitted under a Creative Commons license. CLICK HERE and get a copy of the album and support these fantastic artists!

Our Moms Think We're Funny
Unnecessary Sequels

Our Moms Think We're Funny

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 60:38


Acomi and Turk182 talk about what songs they want played at their funerals and the need to make your own funeral CD. Take control of the last thing you can, after you no longer have the ability to take control of anything. The two talk about sequels made for movies that didn't need a sequel, like American Psycho 2. Contrastly, they both fully recognize movies like Aliens (1986), which was an unnecessary movie that is amazing. From there, they decide to make the worst sequels to movies that didn't need sequels. Sequels that no one ever, ever wanted. Steel Magnolias 2. Titanic 2: Electric Boogaloo. The Shining 2: Shine On. Face Off 2: Face On. Pulp Fiction 2. Old Yeller 2. Oldboy 2: Olderboy. Reservoir Dogs 2. And, an Acomi creation 80s Bully the Movie. #OMTWF #Acomi #Turk182 #KorovaEntertainment #funeralmusic #moviesequels #badmoviesequels #SteelMagnolias #Titanic #TheShining #FaceOff #PulpFiction #OldYeller #Oldboy #ReservoirDogs Follow Acomi on Twitter at @AcomiDraws and on Instagram at AcomiDraws. Follow Turk182 on Twitter at @Turk182_KE and on Instagram at Turk182_KE.

Chick Shit
Grief

Chick Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 60:05


Have you ever loved somebody so much it made you cry? Have you ever needed someone so much you can't sleep at night? Have you ever tried to say the words and they don't come out right? Have you ever? Sally fields has, and her love language is juice. Join LJ, Di and Jack as they talk about a really difficult subject, grief, using the absolute classic, Steel Magnolias. 

Diving In
17: Meghan Linsey - Growth Through Transformation

Diving In

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 58:49


Our guest on Diving In is Meghan Linsey, the runner-up on season 8 of The Voice, formerly in the successful country duo Steel Magnolia, and currently crushing it as a soul-country singer in Nashville, Tennessee. In recent years Meghan has used her voice and platform to speak out against injustices, even kneeling while singing the national anthem on live TV at an NFL game. We go in depth with her about her music journey, how she deals with trolls, as well as speaking about the trauma she endured in the music industry. *Trigger warning - this episode does talk about sexual assault. We also discuss: -Being bold and authentically yourself -The in's and out's of being on The Voice -Meghan's birth chart read by Marissa Sponsored By: Paleo Valley For 15% off you first order, go to: www.paleovalley.com/divingin Check Out Meghan: Meghan's Instagram: @meghanlinsey Meghan's New Single Check Out Leslie and Marissa: - Diving In Instagram: @divinginpod - Diving In Website: Diving In - A Podcast - Leslie's Instagram: @lesliemosier - Marissa's Instagram: @marissamullen - That Cheese Plate: @thatcheeseplate - Doug The Pug: @itsdougthepug

Unabashed You
Are you Showing Up as YOU? - episode 113

Unabashed You

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 32:04


I had the opportunity to be on Molly Mandelberg's podcast, Tactical Magic. She was a guest on UY I Believe in the Law of Attraction, episode 104. She reached out and proposed we be on each other's show so we did. I enjoy collaborating. You don't know what things you may uncover about yourself, or others, through connection. It was a pleasure to talk about what I want for me. What I want for you.We talked a lot about being yourself and feeling confident to sit fully in that. I know it's not easy. I believe we spend far too much time wondering what others think and tailor-making who we are to fit into expectations that aren't actually ours. I think we all do it to a degree perhaps in particular situations or around specific people. My goal for myself, and for you, is to do less wondering, and expand into who you already are, without apology. Sound familiar?many great people during my 15 years there. People like her. During our conversation, Hillary shared her Grandma Shirley is a great source of inspiration through her example of faith, of insisting upon seeing the good in others, and why Steel Magnolias is one of Hillary's favorite movies. It's a well-thought our reason with lots of layers.Don't you love that she and her husband Greg got into Legos during the pandemic? Or that they put a jumpy in their garage instead of a car to help their boys get the wiggles out? This shows her playful, creative, innovative side which is usually at the ready. Hillary had insightful nuggets to drop like every day we can change our course. We can do it in our relationships, in our perspective at how we look at things, and in our responsibility for the part we play in our interactions. We can do something about that if we want to. Oh, and if you're struggling in any way be sure to lean on your people and ask for help. If they are your people they want to be there for you. Because you want to do the same for them.Thank you for being a part of the UY conversation.The Unabashed You website has a page for each guest of photos, quotes and a blog with embedded audio at unabashedyou.com. You can find the show on other podcast platforms. Want to lend your support and encouragement? We invite you to follow, rate, review and share.Social media (direct links):FacebookInstagramIf you have questions or comments email us at: unabashedyou@gmail.com.We build upon on website visits, social media and word of mouth to share these episodes. We appreciate growth knowing these conversations help you think, celebrate who you are, and move you in some way.So be encouraged and continue to listen, read and be inspired.

Unabashed You
Grandma Shirley would be Proud - episode 112

Unabashed You

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 41:53


Where do I begin with today's Believe guest, Hillary Henninger? I got to know her through children's theater which is a running theme on the show because I met so many great people during my 15 years there. People like her. During our conversation, Hillary shared her Grandma Shirley is a great source of inspiration through her example of faith, of insisting upon seeing the good in others, and why Steel Magnolias is one of Hillary's favorite movies. It's a well-thought our reason with lots of layers.Don't you love that she and her husband Greg got into Legos during the pandemic? Or that they put a jumpy in their garage instead of a car to help their boys get the wiggles out? This shows her playful, creative, innovative side which is usually at the ready. Hillary had insightful nuggets to drop like every day we can change our course. We can do it in our relationships, in our perspective at how we look at things, and in our responsibility for the part we play in our interactions. We can do something about that if we want to. Oh, and if you're struggling in any way be sure to lean on your people and ask for help. If they are your people they want to be there for you. Because you want to do the same for them.Thank you for being a part of the UY conversation.The Unabashed You website has a page for each guest of photos, quotes and a blog with embedded audio at unabashedyou.com. You can find the show on other podcast platforms. Want to lend your support and encouragement? We invite you to follow, rate, review and share.Social media (direct links):FacebookInstagramIf you have questions or comments email us at: unabashedyou@gmail.com.We build upon on website visits, social media and word of mouth to share these episodes. We appreciate growth knowing these conversations help you think, celebrate who you are, and move you in some way.So be encouraged and continue to listen, read and be inspired.

Dear Nina: Conversations About Friendship
Bonus: Analyzing Steel Magnolias With The Untitled Gen-X Podcast

Dear Nina: Conversations About Friendship

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 1:54


Did you love the movie Steel Magnolias in the 80s/early 90s? I did, but rewatching it recently brought up some thoughts I never would have had as a kid when I watched it MANY times.Instead of a regular Dear Nina episode this week, I'm directing you to a deep dive discussion I had with Lori at the The Untitled Gen-X Podcast. We left no stone of Steel Magnolias unturned, including the friendships it portrayed, like why did Julia Roberts' character have NO friends?!   The Untitled Gen-X Podcast is an all around really fun podcast. Each episode is dedicated to a different movie TV show music or some aspect of the genX experience.You can find the Untitled Gen-X Podcast anywhere you get your podcasts.

The Untitled GenX Podcast
Steel Magnolias (1989) — with Nina Badzin!

The Untitled GenX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 86:13


Friendship expert Nina Badzin is here to gossip and gab as we break down the tears and triumphs of 1989's celebration of female friendship, Steel Magnolias starring Julia Roberts, Sally Field, Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton, Daryl Hannah, and Olympia Dukakis. From needing the damn casserole, slow-moving plotlines and gaping plot holes, to Tinker Bell haircuts, the value of age-appropriate friends, and salons as gathering places, we chat teased hair, Laura Ashley dresses, mom and daughter duos, and supporting friends through grief. Get to know Nina Badzin: Nina Badzin is a writer, leader of creative writing groups, and host of the podcast, Dear Nina: Conversations About Friendship. She's a wife, mom of four, and a passionate recommender of books and TV, and a fan of all the tearjerker movies. Visit: ninabadzin.com Listen: Dear Nina: Conversations About Friendship Subscribe: Dear Nina: The Newsletter! Instagram @dear.nina.b Twitter @NinaBadzin Facebook Dear Nina -- Stay at the Steel Magnolias house Take a Steel Magnolias tour K.I.T. www.theuntitledgenxpodcast.com Support the pod on Patreon! Instagram.com/theuntitledgenxpodcast Facebook.com/theuntitledgenxpodcast untitledgenxpodcast@gmail.com

What Fuels You
S15E1: Tom Skerritt

What Fuels You

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:42


Tom Skerritt is the Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Triple Squirrels, a PNW lifestyle focused media content provider. Tom has led a successful acting career, being a two-time Golden Globe nominee and Emmy Award winner for Lead Actor in a Drama Series. In a 60-year acting career, Tom has appeared in more than 40 films and over 200 television episodes, including roles in classics, such as M*A*S*H, War Hunt, Alien, Steel Magnolias, Top Gun, A River Runs Through It, and Picket Fences. After Tom graduated high school, he enlisted in the US Air Force, then continued to UCLA, where he began his storytelling and acting career. Originally from Detroit, Tom now resides in Seattle with his wife Julie, who he co-founded Triple Squirrels with just prior to the covid pandemic. In his free time, you can find Tom working on his memoir and two new screenplays. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Film Schooled
Steel Magnolias

Film Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 72:49


Show Notes:No idea what we're watching next week, so stay tuned on social!!Follow Us!- @FilmSchooledFM- @CourtElHull- @TylersNewGroove

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Oscar-nominated and multiple Emmy winner Alfre Woodard, star of new series The Porter on BET plus

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 7:45


ABOUT ALFRE WOODARD AND THE PORTERBET+ has a new series on its way called The Porter and it's a civil rights drama that'll keep you coming back for more.The weekly series is set to premiere on May 5th and has an ensemble cast including Alfre Woodard, who also serves as an executive producer for the series.Woodard plays Fay, a woman who runs the local brothel in St. Antoine who is sexy, direct, and takes great pride in living life on her own terms.Set in the early 1920s and inspired by real events, the drama follows two train porters and their friends and families as a tragedy on the job sets them on starkly different paths to better lives - and on a direct collision course with each other.Other cast members include Aml Ameen, Ronnie Rowe Jr., Mouna Traoré, Loren Lott, Olunike Adeliyi, Luke Bilyk, Sabryn, Paul Essiembre, Arnold Pinnock, Bruce Ramsay, and Luc Roderique.The show will premiere on BET+ on Thursday, May 5th with all episodes readily available for streaming. Here's the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjgaLE16BOoAlfre Woodard's work as an actor has earned her an Oscar nomination, four Emmy Awards and seventeen Emmy nominations, three SAG Awards and a Golden Globe. The versatile Boston University School of Fine Arts graduate has portrayed doctors, judges, mothers high and low, queens, freedom fighters, suburban neighbors, POTUS and a comic book supervillain.Woodard's illustrious body of work includes an Oscar nominated performance in Martin Ritt's Cross Creek; HBO's Mandela, for which she earned an ACE award for her portrayal of Winnie Mandela; Lawrence Kasdan's Grand Canyon; John Sayles' Passion Fish; Joseph Sargent's Miss Evers' Boys, for which she won an Emmy, SAG and Golden Globe Awards; Spike Lee's Crooklyn; Gina Prince-Bythewood's Love and Basketball; Tyler Perry's The Family That Preys; Maya Angelou's Down in The Delta, and, most importantly, her intergalactic turn with Captain Picard in Star Trek: First Contact.We've enjoyed Alfre's astonishing range on screen over four decades, about which she advises "Google me!"She played Betty Applewhite on the ABC drama Desperate Housewives and Ruby Jean Reynolds, mother to Lafayette Reynolds, on HBO's True Blood. Woodard co-starred in Lifetime's hit remake of Steel Magnolias, for which she was nominated for Screen Actors Guild and Emmy Awards, and won a NAACP Image Award for her performance as Ouiser.Most recently, she appeared in the acclaimed drama 12 Years A Slave, directed by Steve McQueen, and Marvel's Captain America: Civil War, plus New Line's Annabelle, and the Netflix Original feature Juanita, as the title character. Somehow she also found time to star in Marvel'S Luke Cage as the diabolical Mariah Dillard, and she also appeared in the Apple series SEE, opposite Jason Momoa. Woodard also gave voice to Sarabi in Jon Favreau's Live Action The Lion King. Recently, her riveting portrayal of a death row prison warden in Chinonye Chukwu's Clemency, was awarded the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.Whilst building this illustrious career, Alfre co-founded Artists for a New South Africa, a nonprofit working to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS and further the cause of democracy and human rights in South Africa and the U.S. For this and her anti apartheid activism she was honored with the Order of Companions of Oliver Tambo, that country's highest civilian medal. Alfre directed and produced, Nelson Mandela's Favorite African Folktales, which won the 2010 Audiobook of the Year, and garnered a 2010 Grammy Award nomination for "Best Children's Spoken Word Album." The audiobook hosts a collaboration of talent both broad and diverse, featuring: Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Helen Mirren, Alan Rickman, and Samuel L. Jackson.In 2009, President Barack Obama appointed her to his President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities. As part of her work on the Committee, Woodard adopted several high poverty and under-performing public schools around the country.She is an active advocate for the arts in education, largely through her work on the Committee's "Turnaround Arts" initiative, which was launched in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education and the White House Domestic Policy Council to narrow the achievement gap and increase student engagement through the arts. Now based in the Kennedy Center, Turnaround Arts is spurring the creativity, expanding the scholarship, nurturing the citizenship, and introducing possibility in the lives of 50,000 kids, while turning around 80 formerly 'at risk' schools nationwide.She says acting is her profession, but feels everyone's real job "is to learn how to love each other - in our households, in our communities," she has said. "We do that by working for justice."Woodard is unfazed by the glitz of celebrity, but is grateful for its opportunity to "get her to the mic".  She remains fueled by the values she learned growing up in Tulsa.In November 2014, she was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, and took the opportunity to credit her parents in her acceptance remarks. Her parents, always mindful of the hardship of others, "planted the seed of humanity" in her as a child. "They allowed me artistic as well as personal freedom. They didn't say 'go out and conquer' or 'go out and accumulate,' they just said 'Go. Do it. Be it. Be yourself. Fill yourself all the way up, Alfre, and never, ever forget your neighbor.'" 

Did That Age Well?
#70 - Did Steel Magnolias age well? (w/ Molly's mom Peggy)

Did That Age Well?

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 61:48


It's a special Mother's Day treat! My mom, the legendary Pegster, joins me to discuss the timelessness of Steel Magnolias, how much we hate Furbies, and the countless ways in which I was (and still am) the most flawless, delightful, perfect daughter!! Follow @didthatagewell on Instagram and Twitter Follow Molly @mollybirdsmith on Instagram and Twitter --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/didthatagewell/support

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Meghan Linsey

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 52:17


We had the pleasure of interviewing Meghan Linsey over Zoom video!No. 1 Billboard recording artist, Meghan Linsey, recently released her latest single, "If You Need Me Don't." This project is bringing The Voice alum back to her soulful, blues-driven New Orleans roots. Linsey recruited a stellar lineup of musicians for the track.. The single was produced by Linsey's husband and GRAMMY-nominated producer, Tyler Cain (Gramps Morgan, Ashley Monroe, Aloe Blacc). About Meghan Linsey:With her soulful voice and unique ability to rattle the rafters with gritty vocals, Meghan Linsey knows no boundaries in the realm of music. Linsey captured the hearts of America along with the ear of Scott Borchetta, a judge on the CMT reality singing competition Can You Duet. She won the show and Borchetta, the head of Big Machine Records, immediately signed the country-soul duo Steel Magnolia to his label. Success came quickly after the debut single “Keep on Lovin' You” catapulted to the Top 5 on Billboard. The pair toured with superstar acts including Brad Paisley, Bob Seger and Reba and appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman and Jimmy Kimmel Live. Linsey embarked on her solo career writing and releasing two EP's before getting a call in 2015 from a producer for NBC's Emmy award-winning show, The Voice. During her time on The Voice, Linsey landed at No. 1 on the Billboard Christian chart with her rendition of "Amazing Grace" and had multiple No. 1's across all genres of the iTunes chart. She was crowned the season eight runner-up and was the first contestant in The Voice history to perform an original, self-penned song on the show's finale. We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com #podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #MeghanLinsey #CanYouDuet #TheVoice #IfYouNeedMeDont #NewMusic #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang
"Maren Got To Me" (w/ Maren Morris)

Las Culturistas with Matt Rogers and Bowen Yang

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 74:46 Very Popular


Matt & Bow are feeling like hard to GET starLETS today because, well, Maren Morris herself is the guest on their podcast Las Culturistas!!! From that fateful night at the Bowery Ballroom when our hosts saw Maren years ago, to this moment. Oooh!!!! This podcasting event explores how Maren found Matt through his Tayla Swiff "Lover" album, how the need to slow down during the pandemic affected Maren's writing, and Maren's discovery of Dolly Parton as an actress before she ever even realized she was a singer. Also, Steel Magnolias, 9 to 5, Maren's new album Humble Quest, the "short king" phenomenon, and an explanation of the lyric "like a Coca Cola on Christmas Day" from Maren's song "Sugar". All this, new Real Housewives of Beverly Hills thoughts, Watch What Happens Live experiences and meeting Kyle and Mauricio in the flesh! See Maren on the Humble Quest Tour all throughout 2022 and stream that damn album! This episode? That's myyyyyyyy churchhhhh! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Film Schooled
The Apartment

Film Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 70:41


Show Notes:Next week we'll be watching Steel Magnolias. It's streaming on Starz!Follow Us!- @FilmSchooledFM- @CourtElHull- @TylersNewGroove

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights
This Is The Only Way To Watch Steel Magnolias

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 6:30


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Doom Generation
Steel Magnolias (1989): "If you can't say anything nice about anybody, come sit by me."

Doom Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 68:12


Are you high?! We are! It's almost time for the East-uh Bunny so let's get Shelby (Julia Roberts) to drink her JUICE!. M'Lynn (Sally Field), Truvy (Dolly Parton), Clairee (Olympia Dukakis), 'ol Ouiser (Shirley MacLaine), and the Doom Generation gals laugh through tears (their favorite emotion). If you listen, we promise we won't talk about you like you're not here. Follow us on Instagram @doomgenerationpod for FREE bonus content Join our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/doomgeneration for PAID bonus content Stay tuned for Invasion of the Pod People Featuring: Full Circle Podcast, Tipsy Exchange Podcast, & Rotten Treasures Podcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/doomgeneration/message

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Crypto bros, missing the great economic bubbles of the early 2000s. We may as well have cotton candy furniture, Severance on Apple TV, Bad Vegan. Let Me Run This By You: Stage Moms, kindergarten theatre.Interview: We talk to Joe Basile about Long Island accents, NYU Tisch, Bradley Walker, Ensemble Studio Theatre, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, Mary Zimmerman's Metamorphoses, the Neo-Futurists Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind (The Infinite Wrench), perfectionism,  Roundabout Theatre Company,  A Bright Room Called Day, Suzan Lori Parks, Go Humphrey, sock puppet Showgirls, keeping the thread of community after college ends.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):3 (10s):And I'm Gina Kalichi.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (32s):Okay. I'm getting, I'm getting it together. I, Yeah, I woke up with this really interesting idea that I wanted to run by you, which was, cause I was really tired when I woke up and I thought, okay, everyone's tired when they wake up. And then I thought, well, and they always say like, Americans, you know, never get enough sleep. We're always tired. But like nobody ever investigates why really? Why that is that our system is really fucked up. So like, I don't know. I just was like, yeah, we always do all these like expos A's on like sleep or wellness. Right? Like Americans are the fattest and the most unhealthy. And I'm only speaking about Americans because that's where we live. I don't know shit about Madrid.2 (1m 13s):You know, I'm sure they're they have their own plethora of fucking problems. But I'm just saying like, we don't actually do the work to like, figure out what is wrong. We're just like, Americans are, this Americans are that nobody's getting enough sleep. And like, there's all these, you know, sort of headlines. Right. And we're not just like, well, why is nobody getting enough sleep? Like what is actually happening? So that was my grand thought upon waking up was like, yeah, like, I don't know. We just never dig deep in this case. We're not big on digging.4 (1m 46s):Probably not. I mean, I think our lifestyle overall is pretty unhealthy and it's because of our economic model.2 (1m 58s):What I was gonna say, it all boils down to see the thing is the more you talk to people, the more I do the angrier I get, especially like in my office, like slash co-working, like I gravitate towards the ladies and a lot of ladies of color. And we end up sitting around talking about how like capitalism and systematic racism and sexism are all tied together and how, and by the end, we're just so angry. We're like, okay, what can we do? And we're like, okay, well we need to stop putting money in the pockets of this old white man who owns the coworking. But like we have nowhere else to go. So we're like, now we're screwed. So anyway, it's interesting. It's like it all, every conversation I have of meaning with you or with my cousin and it all boils down to the same thing.2 (2m 43s):And then you end up thinking, I ended up thinking the really, the only way is mass extinction and starting over with a new species, fresh slate, fresh or revolution, right. Or some kind of bloody revolution, it's going to be bloody because you know, the, the, the, the people in power aren't going to let go as we see. So like, we're not, it's not good is all, but I don't feel necessarily like, and maybe it's because I took MTMA, but like, I don't necessarily feel terrible about it. I feel just like, oh yeah, like we're, we're headed towards this way, unless something drastic happens. And I'm not sure that's a terrible thing. Now I don't have children.2 (3m 23s):So I might feel totally different about my children and my children's children and their children, but I just don't, that's not my frame of mind. So anyway, that's what I was thinking as I was so tired, waking up.4 (3m 35s):Is there any world in which you and the other women in coworking can just put your, just rent and office?2 (3m 44s):So we're starting to organize to like, be like, okay, you know, like who would want to go in on a lease, you know? But the thing is, it's so interesting. It's like, well, maybe it's LA, but it's also the world. Like, people don't really trust it. Like we don't really know each other that well yet. So we'd have to like do credit checks and thank God. My credit is good. Thank God. Now it was terrible. But all this to say is that like also LA so transitory that people are like in and out and, and like my, you know, travel. It's just so it's such a weird existence, but we are talking and there's a guy, a black dude. Who's also like my financial guru guy who like, who works at co-working.2 (4m 28s):I met here, he's a mortgage guy. And he's just been like, talking to me all about fucking crypto bros and like how the crypto bros are like, he's like, it is insane. Now, Gina, did you know, now I'm just learning about this world. And he's like, it's all, make-believe basically we live in the matrix and that fucking, there is something called the virtual real estate. Did you know this? Okay, you can purchase virtual squares of real estate, like Snoop Dogg's house, like, like, and people are doing it. And the people who are, it's like a status thing and it's expensive. And the people who are becoming billionaires are the people who run the apps.2 (5m 9s):Right. Are the people who created the fucking program. We are in the matrix. And I was like, wait, what? And he showed me the site where you can buy any town. If you looked into your town, people are doing it. It is, it is consumerism mixed with people are buying things that don't exist.4 (5m 29s):Okay. Yeah. I feel like this is what happens when people with an unchecked power and privilege, it's like, okay, well, like literally we're just making it up. Let's just have cotton candy, be our furniture now. Like it's. So I tried to get into Bitcoin.2 (5m 50s):Oh yeah.4 (5m 51s):Like about five years ago, somebody that I went to high school with is rich from Bitcoin. And, and she was like one of the founders of one of these companies. And so the first problem I have is you shouldn't invest in anything that you don't understand. Right. So I tried to read about it and I'm just like, but what, I just kept reading and being like, yeah, but what is it? Right. You know, what's an NFT.2 (6m 20s):Oh my God. The NFTs. Oh my God. And his name is Lamont and I love him. And he was trying to teach me about those. And I was like, Lamont. I have to take some kind of drug to understand what you're saying. I don't,4 (6m 31s):I have, I, you know, I've read articles. I've had people explain it to me. I mean, I think what it is, is I do know what it is, but I'm just like, that can't be what people are spending that be that,2 (6m 43s):Yeah, because we're not stupid people. Like we can understand concepts of things.4 (6m 47s):The thing that got me off of cryptocurrency and, and FTS and all that is that it's so bad for the environment, blockchain, the amount of energy that's required to power blockchain is just like so destructive.2 (7m 3s):Okay. So this leads me to, so Lamont was like, you know, what's going on in the coworking row storage room. And I'm like, what? And of course me, I'm like, are there, is there like a torture chamber? That's why Was like, no, he's like one of the side businesses of the CEO of this place is to host these crypto machines that, that it's like credit card terminals, but for crypto. And so all the, all the crypto exchanges that go on need checks and balances, God, he's such a good teacher. He actually explained it to me. He's like, look, you, when you do a crypto exchange with somebody that has to be checked or else, how do you know you're actually getting shit, which is all like theoretical anyway.2 (7m 47s):But he's like, so then you have to create these machines that check the other machines. And those are some of those. And you get paid. It's just like having credit card terminals, right? It's like selling credit cards. You know, people that sell credit card terminals, like they make money off the, the things, the exchanges, the, the transactions, right? Transaction fees. It's like 10, 10 cents of whatever or something 4 cents. So we got machines in the fucking co-working that have nothing to do with coworking. And I re one day it was hotter than fuck over here. They take a lot of energy and Lamont Lamont goes to the guy, the crypto bro. Who's also the CEO of this coworking space who really wants to just be the crypto, bro.2 (8m 27s):He's like, listen, bro. Like, something's going to melt down. You got to have something to cool. These machines. I mean, it's a fucking disaster waiting to happen. We're all going to burn up because this motherfucker wants to do crypto. He's not even dude. He's just doing the terminals. They're called terminals. No wonder my motherfucking internet doesn't work. How much juice do these motherfuckers take? I got pissed. I got Lamont. And I got pissed. I said and Lamont so funny. He goes, yeah, I don't mind all this like virtual crypto shit, but I need some actual motherfucking green tee up in here. You haven't had green tea up in here for days.4 (9m 6s):This is what I'm going to say. This is a, like, when you all of this, when all of this starts swirling in my head and it's all overwhelming, I just go, oh, like, okay. But that's not for me. Like this whole ether, a world that's cotton candy furniture. Like that's not for me. I have to stick with what I know. I like go stick with your, with, with what's in your CTA, what's in your wheelhouse.2 (9m 30s):Right. She taught us. Catherine taught us that, right?4 (9m 33s):No, it was a2 (9m 35s):Catherine's job. Oh,4 (9m 38s):Josh. Yeah. Yeah. He was talking about, the programs are called the, your concentration is called dementia anyway, like in the same way that, you know, people create art that other people criticize. And then you say, well, it's not for you. Like, I just know that none of that is for me. So, you know, because here's the thing we Erin and I have had near misses on like a bunch of bubbles. Right? We lived in California, we lived in the bay area during the, what they used to call the.com. And all of our friends had these hundred thousand dollars a year jobs and worked at Google and places and got Friday night, beer parties and lunch catered, whatever, every single day.4 (10m 23s):And we were just like, oh my God, we're so dumb. We can't, we don't know how to work in tech. We don't, we can't get to me take advantage of this opportunity. Then it was the housing market. And in 2004, it's like, wow, you could get a house. Like we could buy a house. Somebody would give us a mortgage. When we have no money in so much debt, we thought we should buy a house. We looked into buying a house that didn't work out. That turned out to be a good thing. I think the crypto thing is another, like, I'm not saying it's a bubble. Although it probably is. Cause we have to be in a bubble. But I'm saying like, I put myself at ease about not being able to really grasp these things by just saying like, oh, that's not for me.4 (11m 10s):That's not what I'm, that's not what I'm really like here on this planet to eat, to do2 (11m 16s):It interests me. And also, yeah, it's so bad for the environment. And also I just don't give a fuck. Also give me my fuck. Oh, we haven't had creamer up in this bitch for like, and I started, I was like, I don't give a fuck what you do here, but I need creamer. So if you don't like it and they finally got it, you bet your ass when Lamont and I were like, okay, green tea, we need it. And they got it. Cause we were like, fuck you. Like we're not stupid. And then the other thing that I wanted to say about the whole Bitcoin, oh the minimalist movement that these, these kids that are in their thirties are doing okay, listen to this. This is insane.2 (11m 56s):So kids are having and kids. Yeah. They're like 30, right? They're buying Teslas. Okay. But great. They buy a Tesla. Teslas are now equipped with so much shit that you can basically live in it. As long as you have a charging, they fucking park their shit and their parents' house. I'm not kidding you. So a lot of them were living with their parents. Right. And they were like, well, this fucking sucks, but they're saving all this money. Right. Cause it's so expensive. So there's sock away, their money. They buy a Tesla, they park the Tesla in their parents' fucking driveway. And they do experiments where they plug in and then they see if they can live in it. Okay. This is like a real thing.2 (12m 37s):Right? So it has everything you need except a shower and the bed, or like you, your seats go down. It's actually an, a toilet shower and a toilet. And then they get, so they have a Tesla,4 (12m 48s):They get,2 (12m 49s):They get, they get, they get a gym membership. Okay. So they had a Tesla and a gym membership and that's all they need. And they fucking don't own shit except crypto currency in their Tesla and fucking go around to different cities. And there's like all these Airbnb hacks and, and rental car hacks that if they travel, they travel around the country. Like the guy who is the CEO of this place, doesn't live here. He lives kind of an Austin kind of here is a test. It is the weirdest thing.4 (13m 22s):Okay. Well, when the Russians send nuclear missiles and we ended up having hand to hand combat with the Chinese or whatever, well, these fighting people gonna to do nothing.2 (13m 32s):I don't know how to do nothing. There'll be dead. No, no. But you and I are scrappy. Like we could figure it out. They're dead. And that's fine.4 (13m 41s):I always think of, I just said, I think like people used to hunt, you know, like w w where if our world is predicated on so much pretend and like, and like also just like this very thin margin of, well, it's all fine and good until the power grid goes out. It's all fine. And good until like, suddenly for whatever reason, there is just no internet,2 (14m 3s):Like, or they get hacked. Right,4 (14m 6s):Right. Yeah. It's all fine. And good until like everything that we put our hope hopes and dreams and faith into just doesn't work one day, because that's what happens with machines is they just, sometimes they write2 (14m 17s):And Lamont was saying, and I kind of agree with him that like, what he thinks is happening. So frantically the government is scrambling to get into crypto. Right. Frantically our government is like, we're going to have a fucking stake in this. So what he thinks is going to happen and like agree with him is that they're going to figure out a way to sabotage the crypto system and say, we, we now run the cryptosystem. He's like, I know it's a conspiracy theory, that kind of thing. But of course it's money. Right. So they're going to say, okay, okay. Like you guys are going to get screwed because someone's going to hack, you, let the government take over, we'll run crypto. And then of course,4 (14m 54s):Which takes away the main draw of crypto, which is that it's this currency that cannot be traced to everything. So the second there's any type of regulation that, that, and it's like, well, you might as well just be talking about dollars. Right. Because you know,2 (15m 9s):That's what they're going to do. So it's going to be really interesting to see how this plays out. We'll probably be dead, but that's okay.4 (15m 14s):Yeah. We'll probably be done. I'm watching this television show called severance. Oh,2 (15m 19s):Everybody loves severance.4 (15m 21s):Wow. Wow. Wow. It's it's woo. It's really something else. But what I love about it is it's kind of hard to explain, so I won't try to explain it, but there's suffice it to say the company that these people work for, the job that they do is they sit at these computer terminals and they there's just a screen full of numbers. And they have to put these digits into the correct bins at the bottom.2 (15m 53s):Okay.4 (15m 54s):Based on their feeling about the numbers, like these numbers are scary and these numbers are half. Yeah. It's so weird. Right? When I, when I see them, they're putting the numbers into this little bins in the bottom and I go cut. This is like my daughters, you know, like educational games. She has to do something like this. Well, it gets to the end of the season. And the they've, all this little department has leveled. The there's all this pressure on getting a certain quota by the end of the quarter. And it's, we don't, we're not gonna make it and we're not gonna make it.4 (16m 35s):We're not gonna make it at the last minute. They make it. And what making it looks like for them is that a pixelated cartoon character comes on and says like, basically you leveled up. So really it, I dunno if this is the point that they're trying to make, but it really looks like they're just playing a video game.2 (16m 58s):This is insane. I love it. It's the same.4 (17m 2s):It's really, really good. And I, and I reached out to all of the actors on there and seeing if anybody wants to be on our show, I got one person who was like, oh, that sounds interesting. I'm like, is that a yes and no, I never, I never heard anything back from her, but yeah, listen, humans are designed to work. So when you don't have to literally like, grow your own food and cut down your own wood, you have to find something to do. That feels work, work ish. And I feel like a lot of our industries are kind of work adjacent2 (17m 43s):And like, and like a lot of sorting into bins. Yeah.4 (17m 50s):You2 (17m 50s):See fucking bad vegan.4 (17m 55s):No, I was wondering if I should watch it.2 (17m 57s):Okay. Watch it. And we'll talk about it because whoa. It is, the Myles was a very frustrated with this documentary based on,4 (18m 9s):Oh, it's a documentary. Oh, I thought it was a tele. I thought it was a fictional show.2 (18m 13s):Oh, it they'll make a fictional show out of it. But it's a documentary about a woman who started a vegan restaurant and so much more in New York city. And it comes down to what we always said. And I'll wait until you watch it. But I, it just reinforces what we always talk about, which is if you have an unfulfilled, inner need from childhood, that shit will play out. I could trace this, her whole demise, her whole demise. And it's a whole crazy ass fucking story about this woman. Her whole demise comes down to the fact that Alec Baldwin did not pick her to date. Okay. That's it.2 (18m 53s):Okay.4 (18m 54s):Completely plausible. I completely understand that.5 (19m 1s):Let me run this by you.4 (19m 9s):I know my son got this part in a movie. And so the thing we wanted to run by you is I, Hm. So many things I get, I get stage moms. I understand why stage moms is a thing. When my son started getting into acting, he was five years2 (19m 35s):Old. Yeah. It was really young.4 (19m 37s):And my thing was, I don't want to be a stage mom. I don't want to be a stage mom. I don't want to be a stage mum, which was reinforced by every time I've ever been on set. There's always at least one really out of control stage mom. And I think I told the story in the podcast before, but one time we, we were in a, he was doing Gotham that showed Bathum and there was like a gaggle of kids in this scene. And this one boy, I was just, you know, whatever. I was striking up a conversation with him and I said, oh, do you, do you really want to be an actor? And he said, no, my father makes me do this. I want to be at school.4 (20m 17s):And it was just so2 (20m 19s):Like,4 (20m 19s):God, and I met a lot of kids. This was back when he was doing all just all background stuff. I met a lot of that's where you find the most stage moms when the kids are like that, the stakes are just, couldn't be lower. Right. You know, they're just doing background, extra work, which is all just to say, though, I've had to be in dialogue with myself about what my aspirations are about working in film and television and my frustrated aspirations. And I, you know, I've had to just be constantly talking to myself about making sure that this is what he wants and not what I want. And in the classic thing that always happens is when he gets an audition, if he doesn't feel like doing it, it just, it becomes this thing.4 (21m 8s):And I always say, you don't have to be an actor. You don't have to have an agent, but if you're going to be an actor and you're going to have an agent, you have to do the audition.2 (21m 18s):That's true.4 (21m 19s):And you have to work at it and you have, you have to work hard at it. And that thing is actually really hard. And it takes a lot of work that we just kind of overcame this obstacle for the audition for this movie, because I made him put in maximum effort. Usually I don't usually, I'm just like, well, it's his career, you know, it's his life. If he doesn't want to work on it, why am I going to spend, you know, my whole time? But I'm really encouraged him to work on it. And he really did. And he did really well. And so now we're waiting to hear, you know, whether or not he's gotten it, but the first night that this was a thing, I couldn't sleep. I was awake. Like, I mean, part of it is thinking about the logistics.4 (22m 1s):Like how will I live in LA for a month when I have two other kids. Right. But the other part of it is just, what is this going to mean for him to, what's going to be what's next and what's next and what's next. And what's next. So I've talked a lot of shit about stage moms in the past. And I just want to say, if you're listening to this in your stage, mom, I get it. I get, I get, you know, because maybe this was your hope and dream, but also maybe just, you put a lot of effort into when you're the mom of the kid who wants to do this, it's so much work for the mom or the dad was the case may too much. It's, it's scheduling babysitters when you have other kids2 (22m 43s):Driving4 (22m 44s):Into the city for auditions paying for headshots every year, because they change so much every year communicating with doing the cell. I had to learn. This is actually how I learned how to do I moving because I had to, you know, work, learn how to edit his self-tapes and stuff like that. So, but have you encountered stage moms? Oh,2 (23m 7s):That's a great question. Yes. And I feel like I totally understand how moms and dads get and caretakers get to be that way. And I think also to remember for me is that it comes from this genuine usually place to want to help and protect your kid. And, and also, and then you mix that in with your own aspirations, which I would have to, if I had a child that I was shoveling around and also, yeah, I would encounter that. So I think I get it. And I also know that like when I worked at casting and at PR and I loved it, but they would occasionally be like moms that would bring in their kids or dads, but usually it's moms.2 (23m 57s):Right. Of course, who bring in their kids that were desperate to get the kid into the face of the casting directors. So they'd hang around. They didn't want to ingratiate themselves to casting at the audition. They'd come into the office and, and, you know, to their credit of my bosses, PR casting, they were lovely. Like they, but, but they also had work to do so. It was like, these kids are just sort of standing there smiling. And the mom is like pushing them and we all, it was very uncomfortable and it doesn't actually work like what works is being professional on set, doing a great job in the room, being a nice kid and being a nice parent, but it just feels like, and we know this from being actors.2 (24m 45s):It just feels like you have to like, sort of ingratiate and push yourself into the faces of the people with power in order to get anywhere. So then there's like these really uncomfortable moments of like talking about nothing while we're trying to get work done in the office, especially like, yeah, they have a lot of work to do. So it was just, it was just very, and you'll see when we go to PR like it's all glass. So like, you can see what the casting directors are doing in the office. So you want to be in there because it looks really fun.4 (25m 16s):Right. And2 (25m 18s):Actors who are like, quote, special, get to go in there and say, hi, like I'm friends with the, with the casting directors is the, is the idea. I'm not saying I'm like someone is, and then they get to go. It's just like a really weird thing. And it's also, it's very hard to navigate and I get it too. We, we, we want to be liked and loved and picked and chosen. And it is a universal thing.4 (25m 44s):I want the same thing for our kids. Yeah. Yeah. Totally.2 (25m 48s):I don't. I've had never had anyone that has been bonkers, you know, but maybe, yeah. I never, yeah, never.4 (25m 55s):Yeah. I think really they're bonkers behavior. I think actually, probably the kids are the ones who absorbed the brunt of it, which is, you know, and also it's really hard to teach a kid about acting because you're, as we've said many times, you're, you're trying to figure out how to play a character when you don't even know who you are. I mean, that's really true for a kid and trying to teach them, it's supposed to be it's. Yes. It's pretend, but you're supposed to be sincere and no, you're not the character, but yes, you have to be there. It's a lot of mental gymnastics,2 (26m 32s):Impossible. And like, if you don't know how to communicate that to a kid, let alone, the kid know how to do it. It's a mess. And then you're just, it's just kind of a crap shoot. Like, especially when you wouldn't see that were two and three years old.4 (26m 47s):Oh, see, now that I can't2 (26m 51s):Was like, yeah, some kids are, I mean, it's just to me, I thought it was amazing, but I also didn't have an agenda. I'm trying to get shit done. Like the directors and the producers on the, everyone is trying to get shit done in the room. And I have a kid doesn't, you know, whatever the kid is literally three years old. So like, I thought it was amazing, but I, they it's, it's a nightmare.4 (27m 15s):Yeah. Did I ever tell you the story of when I taught drama to kindergarten?2 (27m 21s):I know you did, but I don't know.4 (27m 24s):I had this job at this school called head Royce in the bay area. I got a job teaching after-school drama to kindergartners. It might've been my very first teaching thing. No, but it was early on and I hadn't taught, I certainly hadn't taught like my full-time teaching job that I eventually had at a middle school, but not having children and not having taught. I thought we were just going to do a play, you know, like They were going to memorize their lines. I seriously thought I seriously picked a play.2 (28m 5s):What was it? Do you remember? Was it like fucking, wouldn't it be funny if it was like, you know,4 (28m 10s):Romeo and Juliet2 (28m 11s):Steel Magnolias or something like just like totally amazing.4 (28m 15s):And it was age appropriate because it, it, it turned out to have whatever it was. I can't remember. But it was also a children's book, which I, oh, oh yeah. Oh, sorry. I adapted a children's book.2 (28m 29s):Oh my God. Okay.4 (28m 32s):And the entire time we were working on it, it never occurred to me that they couldn't memorize their lives. I just kept being like, well, maybe by next week, they'll know it. My next week they'll know it until it came time to do the performance and all the parents came and I shit, you not, it didn't occur to me until all the parents were walking in. Every single one of them had a video camera. This is before cell phones that, oh my God, they are expecting a show. And I guess I was too. And they don't know, we don't have a shell.2 (29m 7s):It look like my God, this is brilliant.4 (29m 10s):I got to the point for awhile. I was like doing the knee. I was the narrator. Right. And, and then they was supposed to be saying their lines, but then they would never say their lines. So then basically what it amounts to is I just read the entire book. Would2 (29m 26s):They do4 (29m 27s):Well, the kids just stood there. And the middle of it, when kid in the middle of my, and of course the more anxious and, and terrible, I felt like the more forced and forced, I must have looked crazy. I wish I could say videos. I bet I looked like a complete lunatic and in the middle of it as, and I'm also getting louder and louder. It's like, I would love to, I'm sure those parents are erased, taped over those tapes, but I would love to see just frantic me and I'm getting read By the time it was over, I just went to the headmaster's office.4 (30m 16s):And I was like, I did a terrible job. You should never hire me again. This was a complete disaster. And they were like, yeah, maybe this isn't your thing.3 (30m 39s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Joe, the seal, Joe is an actor and a writer and a content creator and a former Neo futurist. He has got a going on and he is lovely and charming and personable and a marketing genius. He has his own company. Now. He is all that. And the bag of chips as the kids used to say five years ago. And I hope you really enjoy our conversation with Joseph.4 (31m 21s):You still have that fabulous smile.7 (31m 27s):You were so sweet. It's so good to see both. Oh my goodness.4 (31m 31s):What you, what you don't have. What I remember is big hair. Oh, Well, you're a handsome bald bald man. So you can play.7 (31m 42s):Oh, thank you. Go on. Go on.4 (31m 45s):I will. I will. I will. But I'll start by saying congratulations. JoBeth seal. You survived theater school.7 (31m 51s):I did.4 (31m 52s):Yes. And you survived it with us mostly with bod. You guys are graduated in the same year, I think.2 (31m 58s):Yeah.7 (31m 59s):Yeah, we did. Yeah. Do you remember that year? We were in the same section, Johnny.2 (32m 4s):Here's what I remember about you. We went to a Halloween party together with my roommate with a non theater school, like my best friend, Sasha, who Gina knows Sasha and Carsey. And we went to a freaking Halloween party in the suburbs and you had the best costume ever. It was a robot. And you remember any of this? You look,7 (32m 24s):Oh my God. I don't know2 (32m 25s):Brilliance.8 (32m 27s):It7 (32m 27s):Was like, I was a robot. Wow.2 (32m 29s):Like a whole situation. And it was like, we had the best time, but it was like, we didn't know anybody. It was like in the suburbs. It was my friend.4 (32m 37s):Did he make2 (32m 38s):That? Yeah, it was all made. It was so good. Anyway, that's what I remember. That's the main thing that I remember being like, oh my God. His costume. Brilliant. So anyway, I do remember. I mean, I remember, yeah. I mean, remember bits and pieces. I remember that, like I thought you were like super nice. And also, yeah, that we all just were trying to figure it out. Like nobody knew what the hell was going on.7 (33m 7s):Yeah, no, I remember when you joined our section, we were so excited that like someone new was going to like join and we all knew of you, but we didn't know. And I remember that year, you were just like a breath of fresh air. You were just so direct and funny. And you know, I think at that point we were just getting a little tired and you just brought a lot of really beautiful energy into our sections.2 (33m 36s):Oh, the other thing I want to say before I forget is that I, when I was doing research on you, like just to catch up on you and stuff, there's other people with your name that, that some, some before like wild, like one, one guy, like a couple like therapists, couple has Lisa and Joe have your name and, and are like infomercial kind of P anyway, I just thought it was hilarious. And then there's another actor.7 (34m 3s):Yes. There's another actor in what had actually happened one year. It was, I was put in the DePaul, the theater school, alumni newsletter that I was on six feet under and all of this stuff. So people started reaching out to me and it was the other job.4 (34m 20s):That's funny. That's funny. I wonder about those alumni. So it's just, I mean, I guess you've answered the question is somebody scouring the trains or whatever, looking for names that they2 (34m 32s):Used to be John Bridges. And then I think also people submit themselves, which is so, I mean, I get it, but it's also like, I don't have time for that. I mean, like, I mean, not that I'm doing anything that fancy, but like, I, there's something weird about being like, Hey John Bridges, can you put me in the alumni news? I don't know. I'd rather be4 (34m 55s):Except for like your, but that's what it is. Right. That's what you have to do. That's what it's all about the network. I mean, I haven't ever done it either, but2 (35m 6s):I mean, I did it when I had a solo show because I thought, okay, in Chicago, maybe people will come, so I have done it, but I, I just,7 (35m 14s):Yeah, for promo, I think it might be helpful in some instances, but2 (35m 19s):Whatever it is4 (35m 22s):Actually the beginning you're from long island7 (35m 25s):And you have4 (35m 26s):Zero long island accent. Was that very intentional?7 (35m 30s):Well, it's so funny. You mentioned that because I think that was such a big thing my first year. And it really kind of changed the way I speak, because I felt like I was a fast talking like long island kid. And my speech really slowed down that first and second year. Cause I was so conscious of it. So the, after that first year, I think, you know, yoga between yoga and all the voice and speech stuff, like I was like standing up straight and talking like standard American, like, you know, whatever that was that we learned.4 (36m 5s):Like you had to do that in your, not what, even when you weren't on stage.7 (36m 10s):I mean, that was, that was a thing I think back then, I didn't really understand the distinction. I felt like I, I, I had to speak that way on stage and then it just transferred over to my real life. Also, you know, looking back, I was like, oh, you know, I wish I would have been able to make the distinction in my real life that I don't have to speak like this, but it's hard to learn something and practice it. Like I couldn't just practice that in class. It would have just been too difficult, but I started speaking a lot slower just because I was really conscious of the all sounds I was making, like all the sounds and, and I, it was pretty thick. I don't know. I don't know if you all knew me back then, but it was, there were some words I had never heard pronounced.4 (36m 52s):Well, I don't recall you as, I mean, I was surprised to learn that you were from long island and looking at your history because yeah. It seemed, it seemed like you had erased it. So were you the only person from, from New York in your class?7 (37m 10s):No. There were a cup there. Ed Ryan was also from New York. Yeah, but he was from Scarsdale, I think. And then I w I might've been the only one from long island, at least in my class that I remember.4 (37m 23s):And did you have DePaul as your, I mean, is that, was that the school you wanted to go to or your safety?7 (37m 30s):Oh my God. I was all about NYU. I was all about it. And then even before I went to, you know, before I started applying for colleges, my senior year, I went to a summer program at NYU. And at the time there was something called musical theater, works conservatory. And I spent a whole summer doing like conservatory training and, you know, to earn college credit. And it was such a great program at the time too, because we took classes during the day. And then the evening we saw shows and did all this cultural stuff. So after that experience, I was, I just wanted to go to NYU and I just loved it. I loved the city and then I didn't get, I didn't get in.7 (38m 16s):And then I was deciding between DePaul and Emerson and I visited both schools. And when I went to visit DePaul, I know you all had Bradley Walker. And I stayed, he probably doesn't remember this, but I totally stayed with him in the dorms. And the other weird kind of quirky thing I remember was I, I went to his dorm room and he was eating dog food. Like he was eating out of a box2 (38m 44s):And wait,7 (38m 45s):Wait, yeah, hear me out here. So he's like, do you want some? And I was like, okay, sure. You know, peer pressure. So I ate the dog food, like out of the box, it was like dry dog food. And he's like, yeah, it's just, we like how it tastes and it's cheap. And then like, after he told me it was just like cereal and they just like, say like, they put this cereal in the dog food box anyway,4 (39m 9s):Like7 (39m 11s):Quirky things that I remember about that weekend.2 (39m 15s):So here's the thing as a 46 year old tired ass lady. I'm like, who the fuck has time to be switching foods into different modifiers. I can barely get my shoes on 18 year olds who are in college. Like the good quirky marketing. It reminds me of something they might've done. And say that movie with Janine Gruffalo and Ben Stiller, whatever that movie was that they did about gen X, whatever, like reminds me of something like, Hey, let's switch the food into the, but anyway. Okay. So was he nice to you?7 (39m 54s):Oh my God. He really sold me on the school and not, he wasn't trying to sell me on the school. He's like, this is where we do this. And he took me on a tour of the theater school and, you know, I loved that it was in an elementary school and I visited in June, which is like a beautiful time of being in Chicago. And I mean, after that experience, I was just completely sold and I, it was cool. Cause I went by myself like my mom, just let me just go to all these places to visit and like got off the, you know, I took the train, I took the L to the school and everything and, and it was, it was cool. I felt like it was a really good fit. So it worked out nicely.4 (40m 33s):You did a bunch of things though. After theater school, you moved back to New York and got very involved in theater. So tell us about that epoch.7 (40m 42s):Yeah, I mean, I think I did a couple of shows in Chicago and I had major FOMO of what was going on in New York and I felt like I was missing out. And I think, you know, I had audition for a lot of stuff in Chicago and I just didn't wasn't landing things. And then, you know, when I moved to New York, I wanted to focus more on directing and writing. And I did an intern. I did a couple of internships, but I did want to ensemble studio theater. And that was super helpful because as part of the internship, you were in an actor director writing lab and yeah, and it was, I think the first time I had been in a place where you can kind of cross over and do different things.7 (41m 27s):And also the, we had a, a lab director who really kind of just taught me, like how to like give feedback to myself and how to give feedback to others. Like the big thing that she would always ask is like, after we would present some kind of work, she would just say like, what do you need to know in order to move forward with the work? Like, what is important to you? And we really, you know, we had a small group and we really experimented within that. And then after the internship, some of us kind of like stuck together. And I mean, at the time too, there were, there were a ton of interns. There was like over 20 and they gave us the keys to the theater.7 (42m 7s):And we had like, there were a couple of theaters there. So we would do our shows like on the top floor of, of, of the theater there on 52nd street and, you know, hang out after and drink beer. And like, I mean, something that probably is not happening today, but it was, it was a really co like a good landing pad for me. So just to meet other people.2 (42m 28s):Okay. So if we take it back a little bit, like when you work, cause I'm curious about that. So like, you didn't have FOMO about LA, right? Like moving to LA when everyone moved to LA or did you like when you graduated from DePaul and I asked, because now you're here obviously in Southern California, but also because it sounds like New York to you based on you, the summer program you did and stuff was sort of the, like in your brain, like the utopia Mecca for actors, but you, so you felt a FOMO, but like showcase wise. Cause I love the good showcase story where you focused on New York, like, cause you did we, did we go to, no, we didn't go to New York, but we7 (43m 7s):Did know.2 (43m 8s):So how, how did you make the choice to go? Not to LA? Like how did that go down?7 (43m 13s):Yeah. I mean, we took a, that film class our last year with Gerard. I don't know if you remember him.2 (43m 20s):Fuck.7 (43m 21s):Yeah. We took a film class. Yeah. We all, we all did. I think that's what his name was and that2 (43m 29s):Class.7 (43m 30s):Yeah. We took a film class where we did a scene on camera and I, the it call experience was like horrific.2 (43m 39s):Oh, I remember it was bad for all of them.7 (43m 43s):I have like a little breakdown after, cause I was like, I don't, I just felt very, you know, self-conscious, I mean, we had spent like years doing theater and I never really looked at myself. And then I was not like a theater snob at all. Like I was willing to do anything. I would do voice or do film, but I just didn't feel comfortable with the camera at all. And I think by the last year or two, I really started to get more interested in like experimental theater and performance art. And I felt there was more of that in New York at the time or maybe I was just unaware of it in Chicago and I wanted to lean in that direction.7 (44m 25s):And that's another reason I kind of went to New York also.2 (44m 28s):Yeah.7 (44m 29s):Yeah. I wasn't seeing that as much. Like I remember there were some companies in Chicago that did some really beautiful pieces, like all the Mary Zimmerman pieces I loved. And I was like, Ugh, that was like, all those were like the Northwestern kids who were in those shows.2 (44m 45s):Oh, I remember what metamorphosis happened. And everyone was like, we all want it to be in metamorphosis. And none of us got in because she of course chose Northwestern kids because that's who she taught and that's where she went. Right. And so whatever.7 (44m 59s):Yeah. And I ended up seeing that in New York anyway, when it was there. So it was like anything like that would eventually go to New York to,4 (45m 6s):And you did a lot, you worked a lot in New York theater, you worked at roundabout and you, and you worked for the Neo futurists, which I love that. I mean, I, that show too much light makes the baby go blind, which is now called infinite infinite wrench, wrenches that it's called.7 (45m 23s):Yeah.4 (45m 24s):I love that show. Tell me everything about being a part of that.7 (45m 28s):Yeah. You know, at that I first saw that show in Chicago when I was like right outside of, no, I saw my first year when I was 17 and then someone from DePaul had like a friend of mine had brought me to it and I, I loved it and then kind of forgot about it. And then I auditioned in Chicago for it when I was 21 and I was just not ready for it. And then when I moved to New York, I was there for maybe two or three years. I discovered that they had had started the show there. And I mean, that really kind of shifted so much for me. I, well, for one thing, it was like, it was so great to meet a group of people who were passionate about the same thing, like the aesthetic, you know, passion about being ensemble.7 (46m 19s):And that show is like so challenging and fun and stressful, but also like super rewarding. And also at the same time, you know, it kind of changed the dynamic I had as an actor and artists with the audience, because it's so rare as an actor that you get to just like be yourself on stage. It's like rarely happens at all. So to on a weekly basis, just stand in front of an audience and like be yourself. And then, and then also think about like what you want to say and how you want to say it. And you know, like through movement or puppetry or through humor or through earnestness or do something concise conceptual or abstract or, you know, and I did some like crazy shit,2 (47m 10s):Like what was your, what was your favorite cause like what I'm noticing and what as you're talking, what I'm remembering about you is that yeah. Like literally you, you, my experience of you and when we knew each other back in the day, was that yet you did not, you, you, you wanted to sort of push the envelope and step outside of the bounds of what we were learning at the theater school. Like you just had an experimental, like heart about you. So I guess my question is like onstage. What do you remember about to my, about the Neo futurist that like really sticks to you? Like performance wise? Like what was so special? Like when did she7 (47m 48s):So many things? I mean, I think, well, the craziest thing I did was take a shit on stage with someone2 (47m 57s):I never heard about this.7 (47m 60s):It was actually a very like poignant play about like writing. It was with my mentor who was, and then you have you trust and we have the same name and we both, the play was actually called untitled number two. And we had this thing in common before we would perform, we would always like have to take a pill. So I just wrote this play about that experience. And to me, like he was, you know, offered me so much advice and so many, you know, really kind of mentored me through being a new, a futurist. And so I wrote this play in homage to him and, you know, as a gift and a sense. So at the end we like produced.7 (48m 41s):We like, we were actually, we put in a bucket and then at some point we, you know, we turned the bucket over and then, which was really hard to do. Cause I have to like, hold my poo in all day. And I was like, it was not sure what was going to come out at a certain, but I also did other2 (48m 54s):So. Yeah. Yeah. But I guess because, okay, so like the old summit stage fright I think is about being a failure for me on stage, like being embarrassed, being shamed, being all the things, right? Like that's what makes me panic on stage. Right? So this is an experience where you literally are like showing your insides, like take excrement, like on stage for the sake of art and for the sake of, but like, was it freeing?7 (49m 26s):Yeah. I mean, there was, I really never forget when I first run that I did my good friend, Erica, who I met during the new futurist and who I'm still really good friends with now. She said to me, she's like, if you fuck up, you have to let it go because you'll ruin the moment that you're in. And the next moment. So there are so many times, I mean, it was, we would learn things like the day before, the day of, and it was inevitable that we were going to fuck up. So all of that perfectionism, you had to kind of leave at the door. And, and that moment I remember sometimes like being on stage and being like, I have a line coming up. I don't even know what that line is.7 (50m 9s):And here you are. And then you just kind of like, say whatever comes out of your mouth and it's just becomes part of the show. So it was really freaky for me, who I felt like at school, I was not a perfectionist, but I did do a lot of homework to make things go. Right. I had to just let, I mean, another moment to, I, we did this like dance number where we had, we had these masks, there weren't masks. They were like plastic plates with smiling faces on them. And we didn't get a chance to rehearse the dance number before we went on. So I was beat backstage and someone was telling me like what the dancing2 (50m 48s):Score.7 (50m 52s):So I had my glasses on, like with this plate pressed against me and I hardly could see. And I was just like, all right, I'm just going to like follow the person in front of me and just see what happens. And then I think that's on YouTube somewhere of me like,4 (51m 7s):Oh, well, they wait. So I'm glad that you started to speak to being a perfectionist in undergrad because it wasn't until you use that word about perfectionism that I, that rung a bell. Oh yeah. You were perfectionists or, or maybe you were just one of these people that, you know, like we've talked to before who took theater school rarely, seriously, and maybe didn't care for people who didn't. I don't know if that's true about you or not, but how have you wrestled with your perfectionism as a performer and as a writer?7 (51m 42s):Yeah, I mean, I think what was school? I had like a very different experience. My first two years, compared to the second two years, I was certainly a big nerd my first two years. And I wish I had it cause when I knew this was coming up and I couldn't find it, I think it's at my sister's place someplace, but I have a journal that I kept used to write after every acting class. And I would write like what happened and then I'd give myself some like insights and recommendations for like next time I still have it. It's just, I have to find it. And when I do I'll, I'll, I'll send you. Cause I think I was, it was, I definitely documented everything that happened.7 (52m 25s):Like breakdowns, like being really angry, being really happy, like all that kind of stuff.2 (52m 32s): coffee table book, like, like, like acting notes from a teenager, like, like, or like, I don't know. I think it could be really great, but, and with pictures, cause you're an artist the whole, anyway,7 (52m 49s):I will, I will scan a good journal entry and I'll send it to both of you when I find it. But I think, you know, writing that really helped me, I think thrive the first two years was like the writing aspect of it and reflecting on it. And I think in terms of what I do now, like I need breaks and that's how I handle like dealing with perfectionism. Now I sometimes like I've just kind of started to develop a writing practice the past two years. And I know when it's time to stop. And usually it's when I stop, I know I need to like go for a walk and reflect or just let it go.7 (53m 29s):And then like,2 (53m 30s):'cause, that's what your friend Erica told you. It's like, you have to, we have to just let it go at a certain point in order to not because what happens right. As fear begets, fear, begets perfectionism. So on stage, if something goes awry, since we're all artists, we can relate, like if something goes awry and you stay stuck in the earth, wryness you really miss out on what's coming next. And also you're destined to fuck up. What's coming next. So that letting go for you, it sounds like it's really important in order to move on now, even not on stage. Like, and so you, you say like writing and walking helps you let go and you've realized that like to move on.2 (54m 10s):Yeah.7 (54m 11s):Yeah. And I it's so funny. We were talking about letting go. Cause when I auditioned for the Neos, we had to write a play about our biggest challenge. And to me it was letting go and I wrote this play, well, we didn't say any words, but we, there was a paper shredder on stage. And then I wrote out like a word or two on a piece of paper and then like put it through the shredder. And then we gave like, we held out pens or markers to the audience and then like the audience could come up and write something and then shred it. And it was like very powerful. Cause like some people would write like, you know, my, you know, my ex-boyfriend or like envy or, you know, last seasons, like fashion collection or whatever it is, you know, that they wanted to let go of.7 (54m 59s):But I think to me that is something that's still, you know, resonates of like how, how do I let go? You know, like through meditation, through like the walking for me is a meditation and that's, that's usually like, it's a big part of my process just to take the time, you know, to take the time between creation, I guess.4 (55m 20s):What have you learned that you've had to let go in terms of how you saw yourself as an artist when you started school, versus when you came out, like in the time that you've been able to reflect? What, what I mean? Cause we, we had lots of ideas about our spas and I had lots of ideas about ourselves and who we were as artists and whoever people. And most of those were all completely, they were wrong. So, so this podcast has been a process of letting go of some of those antidotes. What's it been like for you?7 (55m 53s):Yeah, I mean a big thing for me at school I remember was I know I've listened to a ton of episodes and I feel like I was really at war with myself. You know, I, the criticism from the teachers wasn't as big of a deal as the, as the criticism that I gave myself. Like I, I never, there was no self validation at all. Like even when I did something, well, I never told myself I, there was always something wrong. And I think that has been a big part of my adulthood is just learning to give myself a gold star and to self validate and then also to learn, to understand permission, to get feedback.7 (56m 44s):And you know, I think that was something that was always a little challenging at theater school too, was, you know, I like, you know, the, the lab director that I mentioned earlier at EST, who would say like, what do you need to know in order to move forward? So often at school we weren't in control of the feedback that we got. So I think sometimes it was really challenging for me when I was like, I'm not ready for all of this or I don't need to know that. Why are you telling me that now? Or, you know, we couldn't, I couldn't control any of that. And maybe I needed to let go of that. And I did have a little bit of a habit and, and a little reputation for walking out of class.7 (57m 32s):Yeah. And it was, it was something I had to address and something, a lot of teachers talk to me about. And I mean, often it was because I was bored or just like needed a break, or I was like, I didn't want to like watch someone or whatever it was. And2 (57m 46s):I think it's really bold. Like what the fuck, man? I wish the one time I did that, I, I like got in big trouble for it. And like, but like whatever the reason is you were on some level trying to take care of yourself. Right. And so good for you. Like, fuck that. I don't know. I like it. I probably would be like, oh, oh, that's awesome. And secretly I'm like, oh, the audacity, the amazing audacity of Joe to walk out and inside. I'm probably like, I wish I could do that. But anyway, so7 (58m 20s):Yeah, I mean, to me it was, it was self care in a way. And that was before we knew anything about that. And you know, when I think of like what I was going through at the time too, was it was such an emotional time for me, like for so many reasons. And, you know, like, you know, being away from home and coming out of the closet and like, you know, like all the money struggles I had and like, I, you know, it just kind of gave me, I was just learning how to take care of myself. And then on top of all those things, like studying drama, like, okay, this is the perfect time to study drama now, you know, and even like doing all the things that we did, like, especially the movement stuff always had kind of profound effect on me.7 (59m 8s):Cause we were like retraining how to the nervous system, that sense of like freeing our natural voice and doing all these things. So I was really emotional, like the first two years a lot. And I would just leave to kind of like collect my thoughts and not like have a major breakdown in class or dumb about something that yeah.4 (59m 25s):To modulate. Right. Because that's what you, what you definitely have no control over is modulating the flow of feedback because it's not just feedback from your teachers. We're getting feedback from our peers. And sometimes you'd get feedback from peers that you didn't really respect them. So you were like, I'm not sure what to, I'm not sure what to make of this.2 (59m 42s):What's becoming clear. Is that based on what you experienced after that with the lab is that we needed a feedback class. Like we needed a literal class of how to give and receive feedback at the theater school would have been fucking phenomenal.7 (59m 58s):Oh my God. I know it wasn't until years later when I was a Neo that we learn, the, the show was on, I think east fourth street and right next to his New York theater workshop. And they do the Liz Lurman feedback method, which I love. And I'm like, oh my God, that was really a beginning point for me because then it just to follow that structure is brilliant. Like, just start with what you were struck by. I don't need your opinion right away on what to change. Look, just tell me what you were struck by what moments did you enjoy? What, you know, what questions do you have and then, or asking questions yourself. And I mean, maybe the school does that now, but I think that was really, that was really big for me.7 (1h 0m 39s):I, for any artist, whether you're a dancer or2 (1h 0m 41s):No matter whether you're a child getting feedback from your parent or a spouse, getting feedback from your other spouse or whatever, it, it, it works in all levels. And I think that what it does though, is disrupts the hierarchy of the power in an institution. And so nobody likes that. I mean, really like teachers need to feel like they're in control, right. Instead of what struck me, let's stay curious, let's stay open. That's not how conservatories are made. Like that's not the whole goal of them. And then maybe I hope they're changing, but like, yeah. Oh, I just love that you haven't had that experience after school with both the, the, the work in New York and the, the ensemble work you did and the Neo futurists sort of sh it sounds like it's really shaped your work moving forward as an artist, right?7 (1h 1m 34s):Yeah. I mean, it was really, I have to say, I mean, after that moment of being a Neo futurists, I was like, I don't think I can play a character ever again. I don't really know it can happen cause I, it just didn't, I, it really changed the dynamic I had with an audience. And I, I guess I didn't want to go back to what it was before also being a Neo. I had to let go of really all the things I had learned at school, in a sense, I mean, all I could really use was like maybe some of the voice and speech work we had done, but I, I mean, yeah, it really kind of shifted things for me, but being in that ensemble was great.7 (1h 2m 14s):Cause I, I, you know, we really learned how you really need to learn how to give and take and to, and, but also be an advocate for your own work because every week, you know, you had to kind of bring in something and you had to pitch it. You had to sell it to the five or six people who were deciding what was in the show that week. So it was, I think it's an experience that I, they do workshops, but like, I think everyone should do a workshop in that way because the show itself is living newspaper. So you have to think of like, what is relevant right now? What's relevant to this audience what's relevant in this moment, you know? And how can I bring that on stage?4 (1h 2m 55s):So wait, so you had an interest young in musical theater, but did you follow that? Have you remained interested in musical theater?7 (1h 3m 6s):No. You know what? I know you all have talked about the brochure and so I completely read the brochure wrong when I chose DePaul. Well, a couple of things I had for musical theater, I wanted to get a BFA musical theater. And there aren't a lot of schools that offer that. So I, you know, when I didn't get into some NYU, I was like, okay, well, what other school? So I had to be flexible with that. But the brochure I remember for DePaul the last year we took ensemble class. And I actually thought that that meant that we were in a theater company.7 (1h 3m 48s):So I not only thought that the, like, after you graduated, you're part of an ensemble theater company. So I told everyone, I'm like, I'm going to DePaul. And then I'm in a theater company. And then I thought that like, that was one crazy thing. And then also the movement stuff, which was, I actually really loved, like all the movements that we did. Like, I'm a big, like I'm, I was a big fan of moving to music. Like that was my jam at school. So I thought I was going to be getting some dancing training there, but I kind of, I did let it go. Certainly like, as the years of the2 (1h 4m 26s):Rest of the school, were you in any7 (1h 4m 29s):I wasn't and I really wanted to be, I, we did like Peter pan one year. And Were you in that?2 (1h 4m 38s):No, but Eric was saying was Susan Lee and she talks about it on the podcast.7 (1h 4m 45s):I heard that one. Yeah, yeah, Yeah. But yeah, no, I didn't do any musical theater stuff. I did love all the, we learned like period dance, which I was a big fan of, like, that was2 (1h 4m 57s):Me too. There was a fucking structure and it was like slow. And like, there was a way to do it. I remember the Elizabethan situation maybe, or like there was like this dance with Romeo and Juliet situation. And I loved that. I felt like there were actual steps we could take, there was a pacing to it.4 (1h 5m 21s):And you knew if you got it or not. Right. Like it was, it wasn't nebulous. Like you either understood how to do it or you didn't.7 (1h 5m 27s):Yeah. I thought I was like, I love the ritual of it. And it was, it was great to learn about history in that way too. And I liked all the Labon stuff that we did with Betsy, I thought,2 (1h 5m 38s):Is that the buoyancy and the, this and the, that.7 (1h 5m 42s):Yeah. I loved all of that stuff.2 (1h 5m 44s):Yeah.7 (1h 5m 45s):I mean, it was, you know, it was physically challenging too. We, I remember that thing we did with it was called like chaos, where you had to like go crazy. And4 (1h 5m 55s):I don't remember that.7 (1h 5m 57s):Yeah.2 (1h 5m 57s):It was crazy. And I remember I got such a stiff neck. I had to go to the emergency Because we were going crazy. And the next day I was like, I think I broke my neck, but I didn't break my head. So I had to go to that. And they were like, what did you do where he's like at a headbanging concert? I was like, no, it's a theater school now.4 (1h 6m 23s):Oh, we got another one. We got another theater,2 (1h 6m 27s):Chaos lady. I was like, I can't move. Yeah.4 (1h 6m 31s):Okay. But wait, so tell us about Susan Laurie parks, 365 plays and 365 days.7 (1h 6m 39s):Yeah. So that was, we, the Neos were given a handful of S of days for our scripts from that. And then as an ensemble, we were tasked with like interpreting it in any way that we wanted to. So it was cool to like, do a show at the public. And I remember we did one piece called FedEx to my ex where we had, like, we used actual FedEx boxes, like maybe like 50 or 60 of them. And we, we had letters on them or words and like kind of configured them to, to give messages out to the audience on these boxes.7 (1h 7m 24s):So I love that experience just cause we, as an ensemble, get to LA to celebrate this playwright with other like theater companies from, I think it was from, from all over the place. And it felt, again, like another professional experience, something that we didn't really get a chance to do, because the show that we did on a weekly basis was like on knew sports street at like 11 o'clock at night, you know? And this was more of a, like, you know, a different audience for us, which wasn't,2 (1h 7m 53s):When did you stop working with, is it like once a Neil always said, Neil, can you stop pack in and do stuff? Or like, how does it work?7 (1h 8m 1s):You can. Yeah. So the, I was like a regularly scheduled Neo for about two years or so. And then I jumped in to do the show at other times. And like we did a pride show that I would do often, or I would come in and do a run. And then we also had primetime shows. So I was involved in like two or three prime time shows as either a performer or assistant director or a collaborator in some way. And I did that up until I did some marketing for the company. I did that up until I moved to LA. And even my first year in LA, I did a project at here art center with my, one of my theater heroes chucked me that I went back to to, to see.7 (1h 8m 50s):So, but yeah, when I moved here, I kind of just decided to let, let that go.2 (1h 8m 60s):They're always themes that emerged with people's lives when they come on the show. So for you then stop and starting, like ed Ryan's is being interrupted and yours is like letting things go. So when did you arrive in LA?7 (1h 9m 13s):I moved here. It's been five years. So 2017 or so. And you know, I finally feel like now I'm kind of getting settled. I mean, I'd go back to New York a lot just to hang out and spend time there. And I work remotely. So I'm able to like go there and like work for a couple of weeks. I've learned not to stay too, too long. Cause last summer I was there for six weeks and I was like, oh, I feel like I'm in my old life.4 (1h 9m 42s):How do you satisfy? If you still have a craving for performance, how do you set it? Because now you have your own company you're self-employed, which is awesome. How do yo