Podcasts about West Wing

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  • 1,534PODCASTS
  • 2,599EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
West Wing

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Best podcasts about West Wing

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Latest podcast episodes about West Wing

World Business Report
Update: Biden defends his first year

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 17:14


President Biden has held a rare press conference to mark a year in office. Biden has defended his administration's response to the global economic impact of the pandemic, and concerns over supply chain problems.We speak live to the BBC's Gary O'Donoghue outside the West Wing. Also in the programme more than 100 billionaires and millionaires have issued a plea to political and business leaders, asking them to make the super rich pay more tax.

The West Wing Thing
Things ACTUALLY Fall Apart w/Special Guest Kate Willett

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 102:47


Impossible space shuttle problems, decent Republicans, and the horrors of a contested Democratic convention. It's a very special science fiction episode of The West Wing!

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, We are rolling up to the one year anniversary of Joe Biden in the White House and what an ugly year it has been

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber FIERCE AND FEARLESS – the relentless Pursuit of the truth—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— A monster storm is dumping snow and ice on one side and releasing fierce thunderstorms and tornados—on the other side of the line—   TWO— The FBI is getting hammered for what critics are calling complete ‘corrupt' comments—following a terrorist attack at a Dallas Texas area Synagogue—by trying to downplay—the very motive of the attack—   THREE— We are rolling up to the one year anniversary of Joe Biden in the White House—and what an ugly year it has been—   It began with Biden ending America's energy independence by issuing executive orders to cancel the Keystone XL pipeline—and canceling new leases for oil and gas exploration on federal lands—and closing off hundreds of millions of acres from American energy companies—   His mis-steps on the Covid pandemic have been too often to re-count here—but as we are watching a nation hit its highest number of cases and hospitalizations yet—with almost no tests to go around and let people know if they are in fact sick— which could have been avoided a dozen times—but the amateurs in the West Wing cannot seem to figure it out—   Afghanistan—is a stain on America—that we will all remember for the rest of our lives—and for 13 military personnel—it was the last mistake Joe Biden made in their young lives—   And now—with his Socialist Utopia dreams falling apart—he is attacking his political opponents—both Republicans and now Democrats too—is the most base and vulgar way—comparing those that don't embrace his unhinged worldview—as the worst kind of racists—and bigots—   He has dug so far down—that one former Presidential Candidate—has taken all she can—Tulsi Gabbard—a one-time Biden supporter—has seen enough—  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Biden Administration is failing on every level when it comes to dealing with the Covid Pandemic

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber FIERCE AND FEARLESS – the relentless Pursuit of the truth—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— A most horrible scene in Brazil over the weekend—when a column of rock—in a tourist destination—collapsed onto several boats below—killing numerous tourists—   TWO— The New Mayor of New York City—may soon out distance Bill DeBlasio—in the “worst mayor of all time” category—it really is shocking how bad this guy is—maybe they need non-citizens to vote!   THREE— The Biden Administration is failing on every level when it comes to dealing with the Covid Pandemic—now in its 3rd year—and soon to be the virus that ends Bidens Presidency and maybe the Democrat Party—   I am not sure you could possibly over promise more—and deliver any less—I mean seriously—   Joe Biden ranted on and on about how he would shut down the virus—he can't even control his own bladder—   Not only has he failed to shut down the virus—he has continued to push the panic button—and has failed to deliver on another key promise—getting millions of tests out to the American people—   500 million tests he promised by the first week of January—the last time we checked in—with Jenny the red haired stepchild of the West Wing—they still didn't even have a contract in place—   So all over America—millions of people are wasting millions of man-hours (YES I SAID MAN HOURS) hunting for the tests—or waiting in lines—hours and hours at a time—   Tempers are short—almost as short as Joe Bidens memory—but he was in Colorado—joking about the people who lost their homes to a crazy wildfire—set maybe it appears by a crazy Global Warming nut—but that is for later—   Right now—its all about the Administration—failing—and now suggesting we need to alter America—entirely to save her—that's right Democrats are failing—and flailing and they say to save America—we simply must burn her down—I for one have a fire extinguisher—and use it every single day—   Lets start with going by the numbers—  

The West Wing Thing
In God We Trust w/Special Guest James Fritz

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 153:49


Comedian James Fritz joins Josh and Dave to talk about God, children, ice cream, and the awesome January 6 celebration, with a special appearance by West Wing superfan Lin-Manuel Miranda.  Plus, an interview with social epidemiologist Justin Feldman about his terrific piece on the Biden administration and Covid, which you can read here:  https://jmfeldman.medium.com/a-year-in-how-has-biden-done-on-pandemic-response-88452c696f2

The Bob Lefsetz Podcast
Snuffy Walden

The Bob Lefsetz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 122:49


Snuffy Walden was a raving madman of a guitar player with his band Stray Dog, opening for the likes of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, and then he sobered up and became a composer for television. Not only did Snuffy write the iconic "thirtysomething" theme, he scored "The West Wing," "The Wonder Years," "Once and Again," "Friday Night Lights" and more. Listen to how a dedicated rocker married his background with the craft of television composing and succeeded! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord
Coming January 10th - Marvel's Wastelanders: Black Widow

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 2:40


Marvel's Wastelanders: Black Widow, starring Susan Sarandon as Helen Black, coming to the SiriusXM app and desktop player on January 10th. Written by Alex Delyle (Fear the Walking Dead), directed by Timothy Busfield (Thirtysomething, The West Wing), with sound design and original music by Daniel Brunelle (The Two Princes, Sandra). Learn more at Siriusxm.com/Marvel 

Your Show, My Show
The West Wing S2 E8 - Shibboleth

Your Show, My Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 74:31


In this episode we talk about demon furbies, necronautical societies, the white house video game, and why someone might not eat a sandwich. Email: Yourshowmyshow@gmail.com Twitter: @yourshowmyshow --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/your-show-my-show/support

Ricochet's Unpacking the News
The Dumbest Books of 2021 (Darts and Letters ep43 w/ Luke Savage & David Moscrop)

Ricochet's Unpacking the News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 53:46


The first annual Dumb Book Awards turns the page on 2021 as Washington Post columnist David Moscrop and Jacobin staff writer Luke Savage join host Gordon Katic to review the mostly mediocre 'The Two Michaels: Innocent Canadian Captives and High Stakes Espionage in the US-China Cyber War', Pete Buttigieg's totally terrible 'Trust: America's Best Chance' and more. Support the show at https://www.patreon.com/dartsandletters SHOW NOTES: First, (@4:09) the two Michaels and Meng affair gripped Canada and the world for the better part of three years. Could a single book capture the intricacies, context, and implications of that behemoth geopolitical moment? Washington Post columnist, podcaster and Darts and Letters show-notes writer/guy writing this sentence David Moscrop argues…maybe. But it's certainly not The Two Michaels: Innocent Canadian Captives and High Stakes Espionage in the US-China Cyber War by Mike Blanchfield and Fen Osler Hampson. Then, (@17:39) some argue trust is the glue that holds society together. But what if a book mangled the concept and mobilized it with a series of vapid phrases designed to superficially inspire centrists as only such a book–and maybe an episode of the West Wing–could? And what if that same book was written by one of the least trustworthy people in politics? Jacobin staff writer and co-host of the podcast Michael and Us Luke Savage makes the case for Pete Buttigieg's Trust: America's Best Chance. Finally, (@29:01) the left needs to understand and contend with serious, right-wing books that seek to chart the course for the future of the ideology. Scholar, PillPod podcaster, and writer Matt McManus has found two offerings that are…not that. But they need to be reckoned with in their own way anyway. He takes down Ben Shapiro's The Authoritarian Moment: How the Left Weaponized America's Institutions Against Dissent and Mark Levin's American Marxism.

The West Wing Thing
La Palabra w/Special Guest Eddie Pepitone

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 98:43


We force the great comedian Eddie Pepitone to watch his first ever episode of your favorite show, then laugh at his howls of anguish. Plus - did we just hear the stupidest line of dialogue ever spoken on The West Wing?

Extra Connections
Extra Connections with Actor and American Sign Language Interpreter Gabriel Jarret

Extra Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 44:11


Actor Gabriel Jarret recently co-starred as an auto repair shop owner and ambulance dispatcher, opposite Amy Smart, Thora Birch and Anne Heche, in writer/director Lindsay Gossling's true tornado survival Quiver feature, 13 Minutes. He plays a man of the cloth opposite Tom Malloy, Briana Evigan, Jesse Kove and Joyce DeWitt the romantic the comedy Ask Me to Dance, and he's Heckle, a 13th Century plague sanitizer in Bring On the Dancing Horses, a limited series that stars Kate Bosworth. In the latter, all of his dialogue is in American sign language. A native of Westlake Village, California who grew up in Malibu, Gabe is the son of screenwriter Jeremy Joe Kronsberg who wrote Clint Eastwood's celebrated comedy Every Which Way But Loose. At 11, Gabe's first show business opportunity came when he picked up a copy of Daily Variety and spotted a talent audition ad. Taking the bus from Malibu to Hollywood, he was selected to play one of the background kids on Walt Disney's Mousercise, an exercise show. Graduating from high school, Gabe was accepted at UCLA but decided to pursue acting full time. He made his scripted television debut on Goodnight, Beantown, and appeared opposite Joe Pantoliano in the play Vampire Guts. Then his big break came when he won the lead opposite Val Kilmer in the comedy Real Genius, in which he played a fourteen-year-old whiz kid who goes to college. He has been a working actor ever since. His feature credits include The Karate Kid Part III, Apollo 13, The American President, Las Days, Poseidon (as the helmsman), Frost/Nixon, Swing State and Limbo. His television credits include 21 Jump Street, The Bronx Zoo, Freddy's Nightmares, L.A. Law, Party of Five, The West Wing, The Game and Mystic Cosmic Patrol. When Gabe isn't acting, he's an American sign language interpreter who works in many venues, including press conferences, cruise lines, theme parks and medical conventions.James Lott jr is the host!

More In Common Podcast
History is Accountability and Atonement /// Paula Yoo /// EP145:Part2

More In Common Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 30:04


History is always 20/20 if we decide to look.  Looking at history from the present perspective is a flawed exercise loaded with past judgment. Too often, we don't look at history from the present it once represented.  As a result, we don't see the perspectives of those that came before us and what they did to give us what we have today. Paula beautifully discusses this phenomenon relative to those who had to stay silent for us to be able to speak today.    ///   We are with award-winning book author, TV writer/producer, and feature screenwriter Paula Yoo.  Hailing from Los Angeles, CA, she loves to spend time hanging with her family and cats.                  Her latest Young Adult narrative non-fiction book, FROM A WHISPER TO A RALLYING CRY: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement, is from Norton Young Readers (W.W. Norton & Company). Her books have won many awards, including IRA Notables, Junior Guild Library Selections, and starred reviews from Kirkus.                 Paula's TV credits include Freeform's Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists, The CW's Supergirl, SyFy's Defiance, Eureka, Amazon's Mozart in the Jungle, and NBC's The West Wing. She has also sold TV pilots and feature scripts.                 Paula is also a professional violinist, but not just as a hobby…she has played with the Southeast Symphony, Vicente Chamber Orchestra, Torrance Symphony, Glendale Philharmonic and Detroit Civic Symphony Orchestra, toured and recorded with bands including Il Divo, No Doubt, Fun, Arthur Lee, Love Revisited and Spiritualized, and appeared on national TV shows and commercial spots, including A&E's The Two Coreys reality show and a United Airlines commercial.   /// Topics we discuss:   AAPI experienceCoverage variability What's still happening History of AAPI Hate Vincent Chin and her Book COVID experience as an Asian Woman What framed and influenced her perspective Prejudice within the Diaspora    References: Paulayoo.com Texas Abortion decision AAPI history in Illinois mandate Vincent Chin From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry - Her Book Atlanta Spa Shootings Sundown Towns   Credits:   Music: Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive. All music created by DJ Rufbeats

The Broken Brain™
Broken Chat Ep 5 West Wing Trauma

The Broken Brain™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 54:33


Twice a month "The Broken Brain" joins "Let's Chat with Chris Revill" to create the Patreon-only show: "The Broken Chat!" This is a free sample of what you may be missing in the patron feed. In addition to The Broken Chat show there is also extended interviews, follow-ups with guests, and other special projects. Check out www.patreon.com/brokenbrain to learn more and to subscribe.  In this Fifth episode of The Broken Chat, Chris and Dwight discuss "Noel," the 10th episode of season 2 of the television show "The West Wing." A re-watch of this episode actually triggered a series of events that led Chris to learn about his own PTSD and seek the treatment that he spoke about on the main feed of this Podcast.    Bradley Whitford's character, Josh, is dealing with the psychological repercussions of trauma following a shooting that left him in critical condition. Set in the weeks following this incident, he is being assessed by a trauma psychologist (Played by Adam Arkin) to see how these incidents may have affected him. We discuss the show, how these events relate to Chris' own experience with Complex PTSD, and other related issues. All with our trademarked tangental ramblings, because ADHD is truly with us always. 

Chick Chat
Life is Short, Buy the Cream Cheese

Chick Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 78:09


'Tis the season for holiday deadlines and 80s TV. The ladies take a walk down memory lane as they break down the recent LIVE broadcast of Facts of Life and Diff'rent Strokes… and their casting decisions. And while there were many other topics to discuss, we fell into the ever-popular rabbit hole of “remember that one show, with that one guy… what's his name again?” and never got to them. They wrap things up with a pretty little legal ribbon as MM announces who has earned a special spot in hell this week. In what other show could you hear about The Facts of Life, One Tree Hill, Who's the Boss, High School basketball, Diff'rent Strokes, Scream, ER, West Wing, Sons of Anarchy, The Duggars, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, and Prince Andrew all in one episode?? Bonus! Like a fool, Mary-Margaret shares not one but two other podcasts you should ALSO be listening to. Pass the Oreo Balls, it's time for ChickChat's final episode of 2021!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord
Marvel's Wastelanders: Black Widow - Teaser

Marvel's Wastelanders: Star-Lord

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 2:04


Marvel's Wastelanders: Black Widow is the third installment in the "Marvel's Wastelanders" audio epic. Starring Susan Sarandon as Helen Black. Written by Alex Delyle (Fear the Walking Dead), directed by Timothy Busfield (Thirtysomething, The West Wing), with sound design and original music by Daniel Brunelle (The Two Princes, Sandra). Learn more at marvel.com/wastelanders.

We’ve Scene That Podcast
Transformers: Rise of the Fallen #066

We’ve Scene That Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:24


0:07:35 - What We're Watching (The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, Shang-Chi, Cowboy Bebop, The West Wing, First Place and cash bonus at trivia) 0:13:16 - Hype Horn - Kevin James Netflix Comedy about Sean Payton, "erotic thriller" Deep Water going straight to Hulu, The unbearable Weight of Massive Talent Trailer, Licorice Pizza Trailer 0:23:10 - Transformers: Rise of the Fallen Review Upcoming episodes - #067 - Spider-Man: No Way Home with Adam!! As always, you can follow us on Twitter @Weve_Scene_That, like us on Facebook or email us at WeveSceneThatPodcast@gmail.com. Thanks for listening!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scenethatpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scenethatpod/support

Popcorn Podcast
Being The Ricardos

Popcorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 28:24


Aaron Sorkin's newest drama, Being The Ricardos, is a snapshot of a couple in crisis, as iconic husband and wife comedy duo Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz face challenges that could end their marriage as well their careers. Popcorn Podcast brings you the rundown on West Wing showrunner Sorkin's journey into biopic territory, starring Nicole Kidman and Javier Bardem. Plus, Popcorn Podcast chats to the creative team behind upcoming animation The Bad Guys, Nicolas Cage leans into the curve with his most Nicolas Cage movie yet, and the first trailer for The Secrets Of Dumbledore heralds a wizarding war. Join us for Popcorn Podcast's final regular episode of season six. Don't forget to hit that follow button while you're here, it means a lot.Visit popcornpodcast.com for more movie reviews, celebrity interviews and news.Popcorn Podcast interviews the biggest stars, including Hugh Jackman and more, on YouTube: Popcorn Podcast

Just Another Crush Podcast
Episode 18: Oceans meet Shores, Disney Villains, and the West Wing… It's a Long Term Relationship Panel!

Just Another Crush Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 85:03


Who better to learn about relationships than people who are in long-term relationships? In this episode, Imani chats with Andrew (Ondy), Stephanie, and Richelle about the real talk about being in a committed relationship with lots of laughs and analogies along the way. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

BTC Cast
Vale, Uber, Westwing, Enjoei | Riachuelo, Alpargatas, Espaçolaser, Cogna | BTC Journal 16/12/2021

BTC Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 45:57


Analise notícias de negócios como os instrutores da Business Training Company: https://bit.ly/3nMGJURPainel semanal de notícias de negócios e empresas, comentadas e analisadas pela Business Training Company!Temas comentados:M&As- Vale anuncia venda de fatia em produtora de aço dos EUA por US$ 400 milhões- Uber quer vender participação na Didi por falta de transparência no mercado chinês, diz CEO- Westwing cancela negociações para compra da agência de viagens on-line Zarpo- Enjoei compra a Gringa, o "brecho de luxo" de Fiorella MattheisMovimentos estratégicos- Riachuelo e Clorent lançam plataforma de aluguel de roupas- Alpargatas deve se preparar para ir às compras e criar portfólio de marcas além da Havaianas- Espaçolaser lança fundo para apoiar novas franquias- Cogna: Kroton separa área de cursos de medicinaSe você gostou, INSCREVA-SE em nosso canal e curta o nosso vídeo! ----------------------------------------------------Siga a Business Training Company nas redes sociais!Facebook: https://bit.ly/face-btcInstagram: https://bit.ly/insta-btcLinkedIn: https://bit.ly/linkedin-btc----------------------------------------------------Confira nosso site: www.btcompany.com.br

More In Common Podcast
Productive Procrastination /// Paula Yoo /// EP145:Part1

More In Common Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 42:35


We are with award-winning book author, TV writer/producer, and feature screenwriter Paula Yoo.  Hailing from Los Angeles, CA, she loves to spend time hanging with her family and cats.                  Her latest Young Adult narrative non-fiction book, FROM A WHISPER TO A RALLYING CRY: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement, is from Norton Young Readers (W.W. Norton & Company). Her books have won many awards, including IRA Notables, Junior Guild Library Selections, and starred reviews from Kirkus.                 Paula's TV credits include Freeform's Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists, The CW's Supergirl, SyFy's Defiance, and Eureka, Amazon's Mozart in the Jungle, and NBC's The West Wing. She has also sold TV pilots and feature scripts.                 Paula is also a professional violinist, but not just as a hobby…she has played with the Southeast Symphony, Vicente Chamber Orchestra, Torrance Symphony, Glendale Philharmonic, and Detroit Civic Symphony Orchestra, toured and recorded with bands including Il Divo, No Doubt, Fun, Arthur Lee, Love Revisited and Spiritualized, and appeared on national TV shows and commercial spots, including A&E's The Two Coreys reality show and a United Airlines commercial. /// Topics we discuss:   Understanding what holds others backEveryone has a pattern Ask questions Walking away when necessary Her processHow she does all she does What she focuses on Identity ProcrastinationProductively and unproductively   References:   Paulayoo.com Texas Abortion decision AAPI history in Illinois mandate Vincent Chin From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry - Her Book Atlanta Spa Shootings Sundown Towns   Credits:   Music: Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive. All music created by DJ Rufbeats

The Minefield 
“Prestige television” and the moral life

The Minefield 

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 54:07


One of the most notable cultural changes to have taken place over the past two decades is the emergence of “prestige television” — which is to say, television as the visual equivalent of literature, and with similar ambitions. What has this shift done to our moral sensibilities, or to our understanding of the shape and demands and limits and possibilities of the moral life?

Live from Pawnee: A Parks and Recreation Fan Rewatch Podcast
Pawnee Spotlight: Featuring Andy Milder

Live from Pawnee: A Parks and Recreation Fan Rewatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 43:09


Mark and Allen last caught up with Andy as part of their coverage of Season Three's classic episode "The Fight" but got to talk about a whole lot more that just Parks and Recreation. Check out Andy's impressive resume of TV, Movies and Voice-work including Apollo 13, Fame-LA, Armageddon, Frost/Nixon, Legion of Super Heroes, Austin and Ally, a little show called Weeds...and, of course, our two favorite hard-hitting political shows - West Wing....and Parks and Recreation!  Listen this week to hear the entire interview with Andy and get some great industry insights from the man himself! You won't regret checking out this great full interview!

The Daily Beans
Kanye West Wing (feat. Hugo Lowell)

The Daily Beans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 56:42


Today, in the Hot Notes: Jason Miller is cooperating with the J6 Committee; California Governor Gavin Newsom calls for a law allowing citizens to sue for assault weapons and ghost gun parts; a Kanye West publicist joins the coup; we have confirmation that the Powerpoint we all saw last week giving a roadmap to the coup is the same one in substance that Mark Meadows gave to the January 6th Committee; AG wins a bet she made about a federal judge deciding whether Bannon could try his contempt case in the media; plus Allison and Dana deliver your Good News. Our Guest: Hugo Lowell https://twitter.com/hugolowell https://www.theguardian.com/profile/hugo-lowell Follow AG and Dana on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Dana Goldberg https://twitter.com/DGComedy Follow Aimee on Instagram: Aimee Carrero (@aimeecarrero) Listener Survey: http://survey.podtrac.com/start-survey.aspx?pubid=BffJOlI7qQcF&ver=short Have some good news, a confession, a correction, or a case for Beans Court? https://www.dailybeanspod.com/confessional/ Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Turn your least active times into your most productive opportunities to stay healthy with Cubii! Visit cubii.com/beans to find the Cubii elliptical model that's right for you!  Get back in control with Calibrate. Get $50 off the one year metabolic reset when you use promo code DAILYBEANS at http://JoinCalibrate.com With Upstart, you can pay off your existing debt quickly and easily and start living your life. Find out how Upstart can lower your monthly payments today when you go to http://upstart.com/dailybeans. With Scribd, you get instant access to millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more. Right now, we're offering listeners of this program a free 60-day trial. Go to try.scribd.com/AG for your free trial. Best Fiends has literally thousands of levels—with more added all the time. Download Best Fiends FREE today on the App Store or Google Play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hacks & Wonks
Shasti Conrad's Vision of an Inclusive King County Democratic Party

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:43


Today Crystal is joined by Shasti Conrad, Chair of the King County Democrats, to discuss Shasti's journey from working on progressive national campaigns to immersing herself in political organizing with the local Democratic Party. In 2018, Shasti became the first woman of color chair of the King County Democrats and set out to re-make the local party into a place where everyone can belong and make an impact in their community. Come listen in on the conversation and learn how to be part of a vision that both recruits and retains passionate volunteers. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and Shasti Conrad @ShastiConrad. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com. Resources King County Democrats: https://www.kcdems.org/     Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes.  Today, I'm thrilled to be joined by Shasti Conrad, a friend of mine, the Chair of the King County Democrats, and someone who's done a lot of work in the electoral space, campaign space, both locally and nationally. Thank you for joining us. [00:00:57] Shasti Conrad: Hey, Crystal, it's so great to be here. [00:00:59] Crystal Fincher: Well, I wanted to start off and just talk about who you are and how you came to this work. How did you first get started in politics? [00:01:09] Shasti Conrad: Well, in some ways, I feel like I never had a choice not to, in some ways. I felt called into this work even as a little kid. My family were - they treated politics as though it was a part of your civic duty. My grandmother was from Britain and got her citizenship in her 50s and I'm adopted from India. And so it was one of the hot topics at the dinner table - was just being on the issues of the day - what was happening, what elected officials were doing. And then my grandmother would take me to go vote - every year she would go and would make a big deal out of it. And so I was just like the kid on the playground that was constantly talking about politics. I would school my preschool teachers on why they were supporting Ronald Reagan and telling them that they were making bad choices.  So, yeah - and then I worked on my first campaign when I was in high school. It was a school bond levy campaign. And then when I moved up to Seattle University to go to college, I reached out and started working for the Washington State Democrats as an intern and just kind of fell into all of this work and it became a huge part of my life. [00:02:26] Crystal Fincher: So what was your path between just that very beginning and winding up in the White House? [00:02:32] Shasti Conrad: Yeah. So I went to Seattle University for college and it was during the Bush administration. And so I was spending a lot of time protesting, and I was really active in the anti-war movement and was really trying to rail against the system. And then in my senior year, a guy named Barack Obama decided to announce that he was going to run for president. And I had been working on my senior thesis, which was on hiphop and politics and this cultural connection between political activism and community organizing. And then Barack Obama entered the scene and I read his book, Dreams from My Father. And he talked about being this cultural ambassador between white society and his white family, and then into communities of color. And as an adopted kid by a white mom in a small white town, that really spoke to me. And so I just believed in him. I just wanted to help him. And so I jumped on that campaign - I was an Obama organizing fellow and out of the Everett Labor Temple actually.  And I always like to remind people - we weren't supposed to win. We were not the chosen candidate back in 2008. And so when he became the nominee and then when we won, it was such a huge deal - just felt like such a chance for America to deliver on its promise. And a friend of mine had been working on the campaign and went to the White House to go set up their internship program. And she asked me to apply for the internship program. And that's how I was in the first class of Obama White House interns in the summer of 2009. There was 100 people chosen out of, I think, 6,000 applications. And that was what set me off on the trajectory that's led me to today. [00:04:27] Crystal Fincher: Thanks for the reminder about Barack Obama - not supposed to win. A lot of people are - I mean, you're certainly younger than I am - a lot of people are a lot younger than I am. And after Barack Obama had been president for eight years, it seems it's really easy to assume that he would've been pretty standard Democratic nominee, but everything was geared to go the Hillary Clinton route. And certainly the establishment was largely in favor of her, so that was an uphill battle that did not at all look like it was going to happen until much later in the game. So yeah, you found your dark horse candidate. [00:05:15] Shasti Conrad: Yeah - I remind people - he was the progressive in that race. He was the left candidate that people thought like, "Oh, cute, he'll try, but there's no way he'll actually win." I mean, there was also all of the first Black president. I mean, I think so many of us - particularly older people of color - had Jesse Jackson. They'd seen how this stuff had played out previously and they're like, "There's no way in hell. America is not going to allow this Black man to win." And so I always go back to that - it was a real moment of hope and it was a real - say what you want about how the administration ended up - that was a really special time in American history. And improbable. [00:06:06] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. I mean, I think we've seen in the time since then a significant backlash against that happening and a concerted effort to not allow something like that to happen again, because they just didn't think it was going to happen at that time. Kind of snuck in under the gun before they realized what was happening. But anyway, so you landed at the White House and you wound up working for Valerie Jarrett, which a lot of people certainly look at that and are just like, "My goodness, that's a big deal, really big deal." What was your time like there? And I guess how did it shape the work that you've done since then? [00:06:46] Shasti Conrad: Yeah. I mean, when I look back, that arc is so crazy even for me to be like, "How the hell did I end up there?" So when I was an intern, I was in the Office of Urban Affairs. And the plan was it was a summer internship - I was going to go to graduate school that fall. And I did really well in my internship - I worked so hard. My goal was basically to be the person that it was - people just knew they could rely on me. It was like anything that needed to get done, it was like, "We have Shasti. We know we can trust her. We know that she's a value here." And so at the end of my internship, I talked to Valerie's chief of staff, Michael Strautmanis, who had been an intern for Michelle Obama back when they were lawyers in Chicago. And I sort of said to him like, "Hey, I'm supposed to go to graduate school, but I feel called to do this work. I want to stay, I want to build." And he said, "Dream big." He's like, "Okay, put it on the line." And I decided to defer graduate school for a year - I gave myself a year to try to see if I could get a job in the administration.  And in a couple of months, Michael Strautmanis came back to me and he said, "We've got something for you." And so I ended up in the Office of Public Engagement, working for the special assistant to the president on disability policy. He was a blind civil rights lawyer. And I worked with him for about seven months and then was promoted to Valerie's office. And that was such an incredible honor. For people who don't know, Valerie Jarrett was basically the President's best friend - had been the kingmaker in Chicago, met Michelle Obama who - Michelle Robinson - who introduced Valerie to her fiancé, Barack Obama, and they became fast friends. And so I was able to work in her office, which meant that I had an office in the West Wing. And it was intense - there was a lot of crises at that time - it was in the first term. So we were trying to get the Affordable Care Act passed, we were dealing with "Don't ask, Don't tell," there was the BP oil spill - there was just so many things that were happening over and over. There were crises all over the time. But I learned a lot about the toughness and trying to hold onto your compassion and humanity while dealing with deep serious issues where people's lives are at stake. So that balance was a good thing for me to learn - it was in my early 20s. [00:09:33] Crystal Fincher: So what was the path from there to then becoming involved with the King County Democrats? [00:09:41] Shasti Conrad: Well, I'll try to give you the short version. The short version is - so I left the White House to go work on the re-election campaign. Because I loved DC, it was really intense experience, it was all kinds of special opportunities and getting to really - you feel like you're making a difference - but I missed the people part of the work. So I went back on the campaign and we won again, and that was great. And by that point, I felt like, "Okay, we did it." And I was kind of ready to take a little bit of a break. And for me, that break meant going to graduate school. And so I did that and then I went and worked for the Malala Fund and did a couple of other international development foundation projects. Then you speed all the way up to 2016, and I worked on the Bernie Sanders campaign. I did advance for Bernie. And then I came home. And Trump won and folks were in shock and traumatized and there was such a sort of like, "What are we going to do?" And I came back and decided that the best thing that I could do was to try to rebuild, here in the Seattle area in King County, because so many people look to us as this like Blue paradise. And if we couldn't get it together in Seattle, then I was like, "What hope do we have for the rest of this country? We've got to try to build a really strong Democratic Party. We need to..." And you remember, in 2016 - the infighting that was happening because in part, we lost. We turned on each other to say, "Well, it's because you guys messed this up because you messed it up. You pulled the party in these ways," and everybody was fighting. And it was like I just wanted the fighting to stop so that we could pull together to be able to fight back against what Trump was - I knew the Trump types and the GOP - what they were going to go after and we needed a strong front. So that's what brought me back into this work. [00:11:58] Crystal Fincher: Well, and at that time - you talk about fighting and discord nationally. And the local party here in the King County Democrats - there was a chair at the time who had been found to be involved in a variety of different types of misconduct and unethical practices - from harassment to financial mismanagement, in addition to a lot of issues before that and subsequently - come to turned out. But you were taking over - were elected to become the Chair of the King County Democrats - and were taking over an organization that was almost an organization in name only. There was so much that had been either dismantled or was not cared for under the previous chair - there was very little infrastructure. How did you, I guess, go into - thinking about, looking around - what were you seeing as the state of the party then? And what was the vision you had for what it could be? [00:13:12] Shasti Conrad: Yeah. The Democratic Party, both at the county level and some of - not all of the LDs - but in a number of the LDs, there was all of that in-fighting and there was a history of this type of fighting and jockeying for power. And really, I do want to say that there have been a lot of incredible volunteers who have held the line for the Democratic Party. I am appreciative of their work, but there were leaders who were using the party as basically their own power base. It was just about what they could do for themselves, who they could intimidate, who they could - all this kind of quid pro quo stuff behind the scenes. And it just wasn't serving the community. It wasn't doing the work - like sure, we were getting Democrats elected, but it was leaving so many people out. And so - I had no plans. I was not planning to be a leader in the Democratic Party. That wasn't what I was like, "Yes, that's my dream." But I just kept seeing all of this pain. I just kept meeting people who were like, "I got hurt this way when I got involved in the Democratic Party, and I dealt with this type of racism and sexism, and this leader harassed me." And I just was like, "I just want the pain to stop." And so the vision, and I think you helped us back when we were running as Vision 2020, was really that we wanted to create a healthy professional organization that was about the old ethos of Obama - it was like respect, empower, and include. And we really recognized that the party needed to be more diverse and needed to be more inclusive. And we needed to have a team that was going to - who believed in those values. One of the things that I had recognized when I looked back at the history of the different iterations of leadership at King County Democrats, is that in the elected officers, you would have people who had run on different teams who didn't like each other. There was no consensus in, "This is what we want to do. This is what we stand for. These are our values. And so we are going to do this together." And so we ran as a slate because I needed to know that I had a solid team who bought into this belief of, "We want to create an inclusive, welcoming organization that has a culture of accountability, transparency, and is about electing Democrats - people with our values - and not just gate-keeping, not just about power maintenance for a small group." That's what the other team does. That's not what we were going to do. And so we won back in December of 2018 and we set forth on doing the work to try to restructure this organization and bring in new people, bring in more young people, more people of color, more women - and create a space where people felt like they could do good work and they could make a difference in their communities through being involved with us. [00:16:33] Crystal Fincher: This local party apparatus is really what determines whether you have strong, competent elected officials at the local level - and that's the bench that then proceeds on to the national level. So it really does take competent, intentional organizing at the local level. And the local party is ideally supposed to be that. What it actually was was pretty far from that. And I think one of the things that you brought with your vision was to be influential and consequential in local government - and looking at what's happening with city councils, and playing a role in advocacy, and making sure the right people are in the right positions to make the right decisions. And to lead and push those decisions. I know, certainly from my perspective as a Black woman, and we've had conversations about this before, but similar to a lot of us - where we've experienced from party sources - racism and sexism, and viewed harassment and bullying, and things that we fight against. And I had grown quite frustrated with the party quite frankly because of watching those things persist in the local level and not feeling like it was very relevant. I definitely felt that when you came aboard, you were seeking to really completely change that direction and make it relevant again. What have you been working on to help the average person in Seattle, regardless of whether they have a partisan affiliation or not, know that there's a local party, see that it's influential, and trying to help them in the issues that they're dealing with on an everyday basis? [00:18:29] Shasti Conrad: I mean, so much of it is it's basic - it's education, it's connection, it's building authentic relationships, and it's showing up. I think that there had often been this idea that people had to come to the party and that it wasn't that the party was showing up. And there's so much expectation a lot of times that when it comes time to vote, everyone should just get on board with what the Democrats are doing. But if we're not there for the community, if we're not there for other community partners for the rest of the year, we lose our ability to have any leverage to say like, "Hey, remember August primary? Remember November general? Hey, in February, did you know there's special elections for King Conservation District, or there's this or that?" People - they didn't know - and we didn't do a great job of communicating what the value is.  We certainly have benefited for the last couple of years of a much more heightened spotlight on politics, I think, because of 2016. You have people who are paying attention who weren't paying attention previously. But yeah, we have tried to demonstrate how important it is to focus on the local. Now, my career, I have worked on four national presidential campaigns. I was like so many other Democrats where it was like my energy and excitement would be in a presidential year. I'd be all about the national. I love my national politics, but I know that the place where I can make the biggest difference is in helping to flip the city council in Sammamish, it is helping to make sure that on our school boards across King County that we are fighting back against these people who are pushing anti-Critical Race Theory nonsense. We've got real white supremacists that are getting onto Black Diamond City Council - that's happening right here. And so I can drive 10 minutes, 20 minutes, an hour across the county, and I can make a difference in people's lives in a way that - when I was on Obama's campaign, I'm one of several thousand staffers - when you are part of - and it's great, it's exciting, but we have to remember that you have to guard the cast every single election. And in some ways, I find that these odd-year elections - often have way lower turnout than the even years - are the most important. And Seattle - we'll have Democrats - there is a battle between the type of Democrat that we want leading the City. But in places across the County, you really are fighting against people who don't believe in democracy. My counterpart, King County GOP Chair, Joshua Freed, has totally thrown in with the insurrectionists. He says that wearing masks is child abuse. These are not people who fully believe in what we consider American values. That's what we're fighting against. So I think that's really important for us to continue to keep the spotlight on. And then we've been pushing for getting Precinct Committee Officers - which you helped us with that project - where we have found that, in 2019, in precincts where we had Precinct Committee Officers, there was a 5% higher voter turnout and that those numbers matter. We found that if we'd had full coverage of PCOs in every precinct in King County, we would've passed I-1000. It makes a difference here in King County, but it's also for statewide elections and statewide initiatives. Those progressive votes are going to come out of King County. So if we're not solid here, it impacts the entire state and that impacts the region. So all of this work really, really matters. [00:22:29] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it does matter. And one of the reasons why I decided to say, "Okay, let me go ahead and try and help," was seeing that someone was willing to do the work even when it got uncomfortable and even when you were facing some pushback to say, "No, it is important to have a local party that looks like the communities that it serves. It's not okay to make people feel unwelcome, to pass off racism and misogyny as casual, let people get bullied out of the organization," and really moving to have the party truly represent and serve people in communities. Which a lot of people have come into meetings, seen that they - especially for someone taking some free time in their evening to come into a meeting - if they see people in-fighting, or if they hear things that are like, "This is not a welcoming or inclusive place for me, I don't feel like this is a space for me," they're just going to peace out, and they had been in droves. And in my view, there's such a potential - and clearly in yours, right? Such a potential for the party to be impactful in driving some of those key meaningful things where, to your point, there are certainly especially sometimes in Seattle, these extremely passionate but really ultimately nuanced conversations about like, "What is the correct climate policy that we should be pursuing? What is the correct zoning policy where some people are just like, 'No, we don't believe in the concept of climate change, we don't believe in the concept of a minimum wage?'" You would be surprised how many local city council candidates right now in King County are publicly saying they don't believe there should be a minimum wage. Period. Not, "We shouldn't raise it to a living wage," just there shouldn't be. We are going all the way back. And to your point, just some blatantly talking about violence and being okay with undemocratic processes and just really just being flat-out racist and violent, and it's not cool. So I guess in looking at how people can and should get involved and what the party has in the pipeline here in King County, what are you looking to do, I guess, as we come upon these November elections, how are you involved with that? And overall, just in communities, how are you engaging? [00:25:14] Shasti Conrad: Well, and let me underline one thing - which is the other thing that we saw over the last couple of years is that the Republicans were doing a much better job than we were at building a bench. They were so much better. So in King County, they'd kind of given up to some degree the State Legislature. But what they were doing was they were back-filling in Hospital District Commissions, on Water Districts, in City Councils, and School Boards. They were doing a much better job fixating and getting people running in those places, which then made these - yes, they're smaller offices - but they had a huge impact. They were more conservative. And it was flying under the radar because we were like, "Oh, good, we've got the governor." Finally in 2017 with Manka like, "We've got the State Legislature - good enough." And then people were getting deeply hurt in their communities by what was happening there. So that was one of the biggest things for us where we were like, "This is clear." Also, just to put it out there, the King County GOP has 10 times the amount of money that we do at King County Democrats. They are better funded than we are because, again, people know to give to somebody who's running for Congress, they know to give to their candidates, but the regular Democrat wasn't investing in the infrastructure. I often describe the party as candidates and campaigns are the jazz. As a party, we're supposed to be the steady drum beat. Whoever shows up and says, "I'm willing to put my name on the ballot, I'm willing to run, I align with your values," our job is to show up with volunteers, to show up with resources to say like, "We understand the lay of the land, we know the communities here, and we've got your back." That is our job. [00:27:08] Crystal Fincher: People want to get involved or learn more, where can they contact you or the King County Democrats? [00:27:14] Shasti Conrad: Our website is kcdems.org. And then my email is chair@kcdems.org. And I'm always happy to answer questions, or if you folks have ideas in their communities that they want to amplify, get up to me. And there are 17 legislative districts in King County - all of them have Democratic Party organizations. And we love to have people get linked into their Democratic LD organizations as well. [00:27:43] Crystal Fincher: One thing a lot of people talk about, especially here in King County, is there are Democrats, there are Democratic Socialists, there's the People's Party - there's a lot of people who are on the left politically but may not identify as Democrats either - because just in the City in particular, just kind of everybody's a Democrat, that's kind of taken for granted. But other people on purpose have felt like the Democratic Party is not the place for them and they want another home. How do you view them or candidates running under - who are not officially Democrats, but who may hold values that a lot of Democrats agree with and a lot of people on the left agree with - how do you work through that? [00:28:29] Shasti Conrad: Well, I think people might know that I worked on Bernie Sanders' campaign both in 2016 and 2020. I consider myself a strong progressive and align with a lot of the values of, like you said, folks who are the Working Families Party, or People's Party, or DSA. And I think for us leftists and progressives, we have to build the coalition. And so I think there's room for those organizations to exist, but what I always like to remind people is - for better, for worse, we are currently a two-party system. That's just the reality of what we have. And sure, I would love to do all kinds of other things, but I recognize that the Democratic Party - that's what we had. That is the most solid party organization that represents the most people. If you believe in democracy, that's what we have. And so I am an institutionalist in the sense that I believe it is our job to go into these institutions, into the infrastructure, and try to change them from within. I've done the work on the outside, and there's a place and a role for that, but you also - these institutions are what stay. And so I believe that it is valuable to try to work with the party to try to change it, to open it up, to build the coalition so that more people who identify and feel comfort with DSA and People's Party and Working Families Party - that they feel welcomed back into the Democratic Party - because I think that's how we're going to win, is if we build that broad coalition. And so I'm in full support. I understand why people may not have wanted to work with the Democratic Party before. But I am trying to lead a millennial, Gen Z, woman of color organization. I'm trying to do the work to change it so that it doesn't feel as - it's not as traumatic or painful as it has been previously. And that is what I have - put my stake in the ground, and what I really believe in, and I'm trying to fix. [00:30:46] Crystal Fincher: Do you see your role as the Chair of the Democrats, or just should the Democrats, in your opinion, be supporting candidates who may not share the label, but who are sharing the values? [00:31:05] Shasti Conrad: Absolutely. Look, I look at it as it's somewhat of a marketing issue. My job is to understand why someone would not want to choose our brand. It is to understand that and to be able to recognize, what are the ways in which we can change that to be more appealing to a broader base of people - who for the most part, you look at the Venn diagram of it all, for the most part, probably share 90% of our values. And so what is it that we need to fix internally and externally? Sort of an outward facing front, but also internally, what do we need to change that will welcome those people back in? I believe you can hold - two things can be true at once. You can be a proud DSA member, a proud member of the People's Party or Working Families Party, and also work with us in the Democratic Party. I mean, that's how we get things done. That's how we move the needle. At the end of the day, we are the caucus that you're going to have to work with to get things done once you get into office. So that's my hope, is that we can better build something that people want to be a part of, even as they hold these different identities. [00:32:26] Crystal Fincher: I managed campaigns for a long time, so I went to lots of different LD meetings with several different candidates - that's just a thing that you do. And man, these meetings are oftentimes horrible things to go to. Lots of great people doing great work, lots of great volunteers, but in the past has been the exception and not the rule for the meeting not - the meeting to be relevant. You go in there, you hear people arguing, using Robert's Rules of Order. You see these long marathon hours, multiple hours, long endorsement meetings. You hear people just like yipping and yapping at each other. Sometimes you hear people with microaggressions or macroaggressions. And so a lot of people will dip their toe into their local LD and just not feel like it has been the best use of their time. Like, "Hey, I'd rather watch a movie instead of listening to someone debate one tiny element of one thing for 20 minutes using Robert's Rules of Order." What do you say to people who have looked at the Democratic Party locally and been like, "I tried it before, it didn't quite work out, it may not be a place for me." [00:33:53] Shasti Conrad: I mean, look, I get it. And I hear them. And I've felt that way. Like we talked about earlier, I came back into the party and into Washington State politics in 2016. And I remember going to these LD meetings where there was like 100+ people. And then I watched over the next few months as those numbers dwindled because people wanted to do something, they wanted to be actively involved. And the Democratic Party offered them nothing. What it offered them was, like you said, Robert's Rules of Order, people getting completely wrapped around the axle on some minutia that didn't really matter. It wasn't open and accessible to the average person by any means. And particularly to people of color and younger people who it's like - I'm trying to survive here. I'm trying- [00:34:42] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and people with disabilities, parents. Yeah. [00:34:47] Shasti Conrad: Yes. I mean, in some ways, the pandemic has given us the opportunity of being able to do things in a way that are slightly more accessible in that - before, I would hear parents - it's like you'd have a meeting at 7:00 PM in Renton, that's right in the middle of bedtime and dinner and all of that. And so at least now we are able to do it where it's like, "Hey, hop on online and we'll make it easier." But I would say like, "Look, I get it. And what I am trying to do as the first woman of color chair for this organization is I'm trying to rebuild an organization that is welcoming. That is a safe space for everybody. That it's not about power gate-keeping." I'm like, "Hey, you want to come in and do some work?" Come on in. There's power for you too." And we have to do this work because we're fighting against fascism, we're fighting against authoritarianism. And I think also come on back - we want to welcome you back in. I want to know how it didn't work and I want to make it better. I had a call with a woman of color who's running for school board up in the northern part of the County two weeks ago. And she was talking about the endorsement process and how awful she had been treated by a couple of these LDs. And I was like, "Tell me, because I want to go and fix it." And like, "Let me go help you hold these folks accountable. Help me demystify the process." For better or for worse, I feel like I've gotten a PhD in this weird party stuff. And the reason why that matters is because I am here to be a resource to help change the way that it works, but also to help explain it. To help be able to say, "Hey, here's the side door. Let me help show you the way and how you can make this work and get done what you want to get done." And I believe that we're doing that. I mean, you've gotten involved, Crystal, in some ways in helping us. And you said you would never - I remember when we first met - you were like, "I'm done with the party." And you've been helping out here and there because I think we're making those changes and we're doing that work.  And it's not perfect, by any means, but I can't do it alone. I think that's also what I really want to be clear. When it's just me, I can't make the changes and I can't do the work that needs to get done. And so I need more people who are also committed to these types of changes to come in and help me build an organization that is of value to everyone that is a part of our community and not just for the few. That same way of doing things doesn't work. One of the things I am most proud of is - in 2019, we endorsed and we supported people like Tammy Morales, Shaun Scott. We supported people who - other places weren't. And Shaun didn't win, but he has gone on to do all kinds of amazing work in the community. And last year, with the State Legislature, we replaced Democrats with more progressive Democrats, more Democrats of color, and that shifted and changed the type of legislation we were able to get passed. [00:38:03] Crystal Fincher: Oh, absolutely. I mean, we don't get capital gains without those changes, we don't get a number of the progressive policies - some of the environmental policy, certainly the police accountability legislation - that doesn't happen without the changes on the Democratic side to more progressive people that were there. And I think you bring up a great point. I mean, you talk about me - and I don't know that I've talked a lot about this on the podcast - but certainly have had major frustrations with the party, consider myself a progressive and continue to have frustrations with the party, particularly on the national level. But when there are people in places, and just FYI, these local Democratic organizations, they're actually all their own organizations. They're part of a master organization, but it actually is not like a company with branches - they have a lot more autonomy than that. So there's actually a lot that can be done in shaping these local party organizations - how they're composed, the leadership that is in there, and how they can interact with and serve their communities. And the Democratic Party has resources. It's a party of resources and those resources certainly can be helpful in getting people elected. So if we can use those resources in the right way to get the right people to make the right decisions and in the right position with the appropriate power to do so, that's a good thing. And I think what I saw in you was, "Okay, there is someone willing to work and willing to push in the right direction." So if there is a tool available, with resources behind it, that can actually be a force for good, Hey, I'm willing to help have it be a force for good. Would I do that if - I wasn't doing that - I'd said that I was not going to do that unless I saw that. Had not seen that up to that point and was skeptical that I would, but certainly here at the local level with you being involved and willing to push in the right direction. And a lot of times bend over backwards to make the process more accessible to more people - is helpful. And to help the local LD organizations move in that direction too and be spaces that are inclusive and open enough to even have leadership that understands the ability and the potential and how to be more inclusive and continue walking down that road. So that's how you hooked me in - was my ability to see you doing the work. And so if someone's willing to do that, I am willing to help. I do have some skills and talents that I can use to be helpful. And so I appreciate that. So if there are other people who are perhaps considering where they are going to be investing their time and talent, this is certainly an option and one that can be consequential in who gets elected, and what decisions are made, and what policies pass. With that said, the accountability piece is also important and holding people accountable - both within the party, within the party organization, and with electeds - and seeing you be serious about that was another reason why I got involved because, man, was I sick of just watching people do ridiculous, buck wild, out of pocket things - and in some instances, unethical things that - [00:41:57] Shasti Conrad: Yeah. It's not fair to ask someone to come in and be a part of something that you know is going to be traumatizing for them. So we have a recruitment problem and we have a retention problem. And so that is where it is both on the doing the outreach, getting out into the community, but it's also creating a culture of accountability and creating these spaces that are welcoming and conducive for all kinds of people to be able to do work that they find meaningful and can be proud of. And my subversive reasons for being in this role is because I know that the Democratic Party is an organization that has to change from within. It just does. And so we need more people to become members of these LDs who then can vote. And if they become Precinct Committee Officers, they can vote on leadership. They can choose people to lead in a way that backs up their values and is going to take these organizations in a direction that they want. If you're just railing from the outside, nothing changes. That's just where we're at. So that's why I think it's so important to come back in and I'm doing everything I can to try to create a place at King County Democrats where people who want to do good work can do that. [00:43:14] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And it's worth pointing out that, to your point, PCOs or Precinct Committee Officers, kind of the most grassroots party position that there is - you're like a neighborhood captain - they vote on appointments of elected officials. When there's a vacancy in the Legislature and on some County Councils, they vote for those replacements. And those votes are pretty well-attended in Seattle, but I will tell you, in many of the LDs here in King County, those votes often don't include more than 30 people. [00:43:55] Shasti Conrad: Our good friend, Representative Jesse Johnson - that's how he was picked for - down in the 30th LD. And he's wonderful and that's great, but 30 people were able to make that decision. And so it's absolutely an incredibly important role to play. I first got involved when I was running for an appointment to fill Pramila Jayapal's State Senate seat. And so about 100 some odd people voted on who became the State Senator - and that was Rebecca Saldaña, another wonderful elected official. But look, this stuff actually matters. A third of the State Legislature was picked by PCOs. It's not a small number - so it's really important. So if you become a Precinct Committee Officer, you get to vote on leadership within the party, you potentially get to choose elected officials, and you get to volunteer and knock doors in your community and get to be a leader in your neighborhood. That's pretty cool, and I think a really fun way to get to participate in democracy. [00:44:55] Crystal Fincher: Sounds good. Thank you so much. [00:44:57] Shasti Conrad: Thank you. This has been fun. [00:44:58] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar, be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes.  Thanks for tuning in and we'll talk to you next time.

Björeman // Melin
Avsnitt 286: Airpodsambassadör

Björeman // Melin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 95:33


Uppföljning/uppvärmning Skruvjakt DMZ retro-rapporten? Jocke lämnade precis sista sidan med text (BBS-sidan). Tidningen trycks den 13:e december Springboard - dokumentären - finns nu på Youtube Fredrik använder sina stora brusätarlurar igen, köper reservdel till sina Airpods Bear rekommenderas som en Markdowneditor för den som inte vill göra det Fredrik gör Licensen på Nova går ut om tre dygn. Fredrik kommer inte att köpa Vinegar uppdateras med stöd för 4K Modern för Wikipedia HomeKit vs julbelysningen Fronter till dina Ikea-högtalare Jockes BBS har problem. Måste byta dator… igen… och telia verkar fimpa analoga nätet år 2022. Ämnen iMac 27” ihopmonterad. Typ Jocke blir prepper Film och TV West Wing finns nu på svensk streamingtjänst No time to die - äntligen har alla sett. 4/5BMÅ Länkar IKEA reservdelar DMZ Retro Springboard på Youtube App: the human story Jezper Bear Tipset om Bear Nova Hypercritical MKBHD testar Fairphone Gunnar på Twitter Modern for Wikipedia Wikipanion Egna fronter till IKEAs tavelhögtalare Plipbox Nikom Jockes limmade dator West Wing på IMDB West Wing på Via Play No time to die Scorched tanks MIRV Fullständig avsnittsinformation finns här: https://www.bjoremanmelin.se/podcast/avsnitt-286-airpodsambassador.html.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
December 7, 2021: Mark Thompson - Why is Hollywood still hiring this raging anti-Semite?

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 13:49


"Cancel Mel Gibson. Why is Hollywood still hiring this raging anti-Semite?" Joshua Malina, film and stage actor known for playing Will Bailey on the NBC drama The West Wing, Jeremy Goodwin on Sports Night, US Attorney General David Rosen on Scandal, and Caltech President Siebert on The Big Bang Theory joins The Mark Thompson Show to share his recent article for The Atlantic. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Startup Insider
Startup Insider Daily • 1Komma5Grad • Home24 • Westwing • SpaxeX • Spotify • Delivery Hero • Google • Bitmart

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 33:33


Heute u.a. mit folgenden Nachrichten: - 100 Millionen Euro für 1Komma5Grad - Home24 und Westwing fliegen aus dem SDax - Esa-Chef fordert Regeln für Weltraum - Neuer Twitter-CEO kündigt Reorganisation an - Spotify verbannt Kabarettisten wegen Streitigkeiten um Tantiemen von seiner Plattform - Wettbewerbsbehörde untersagt Delivery Hero Zukauf in Saudi-Arabien - Google integriert TikTok-Ergebnisse in Suche - US-Börsenaufsicht SEC ermittelt gegen Tesla-Solarsparte - Großangelegter Hack bei Kryptobörse Bitmart Heute begrüßen wir im Rahmen der Reihe “Investments & Exits” Martin Janicki, Principal bei Cavalry Ventures.

Literally! With Rob Lowe
Dulé Hill: Move a Mountain

Literally! With Rob Lowe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 43:55


West Wing alert! Old friends Rob Lowe and Dulé Hill sit down to talk all things West Wing, Wonder Years and more! In today's episode find out how Dulé landed his role as Charlie Young after being dropped by his agency, what's happening on the new Wonder Years, and if he still tap dances on set! Got a question for Rob? Call our voicemail at (323) 570-4551. Yours could get featured on the show!

The West Wing Thing
Special mini Crooked Media episode w/Special Guest Briahna Joy Gray

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 96:47


We HAD to do it - Briahna Joy Gray joins us for a deep dive into Crooked Media's very weird West Wing video. If you must see it, here's the link:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eHe0GHC_6c

Wake Up with KC
An inspirational interview with upcoming actress Ashlie Lawson

Wake Up with KC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 56:50


Ashlie has played duel characters in a Drunk History genre short film. She plays a drunk narrator, and a not so secret Agent in this short comedy about stealing the answers to all life's questions. In a Western film, Ashlie is the lead female character. She portrays a frontier woman ready and willing to do whatever is necessary to protect her land after her husband dies, and old enemies come knocking. One of her favorite projects was working on a Hallmark Christmas movie,Christmas Wishes and Mistletoe Kisses starring Jill Wagner (Braven, Teen Wolf) and Matthew Davis (Legally Blonde, The Vampire Diaries), which aired it's premiere on the network during Christmas 2019. Ashlie's upcoming projects include Beneath The Trees in which she holds a lead role; filming early 2021 for a major streaming network. Casting the First Stone filming in 2021. And she was recently offered the female lead in a sitcom entitled Safe At Home also filming in 2021. Ashlie trains Scene Study & Character Development classes with working actors in the industry,  Glenn Morshower (The Resident, The West Wing) and Lar Park Lincoln (Knots Landing, Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood). Ashlie also has theatre credits under her belt. Theatre is where she started, and honed in her acting chops. Starring as the Red Fairy in Sleeping Beauty, she got to play her first villain role. She also played vulnerable characters in the Holocaust play, Nellis' Song, and the Queen in Many Moons, which served as her very first leading role.In her freetime, Ashlie is working on her first novel. A suspenseful thriller sure to leave readers turning the pages till the end. She also makes no apologies for her Amazon shopping habits."

Ray Appleton
Hour 3 - Matthew McConaughey Makes Decision On Whether He Will Run For Texas Governor. 'Nobody' In Biden's West Wing Is Shutting Down Chatter Of Buttigieg As A Potential Presidential Successor..

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 38:56


Matthew McConaughey announced Sunday that he has decided against a run for Texas governor amid speculation that the actor might enter the race. When Pete Buttigieg arrived in Washington, DC, earlier this year, the former South Bend, Ind., mayor had already become a household name through his scrappy 2020 presidential campaign that saw him soar in Iowa and New Hampshire before his eventual exit from the Democratic primaries at the hands of now-President Joe Biden. Vice President Kamala Harris is the top choice for Democrats if President Biden chooses not to run again in 2024, according to a new poll. Former first lady Michelle Obama came in second with backing of 10%. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fallacious Trump
Conflating Views - FT#88

Fallacious Trump

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 96:21


In the eighty-eighth episode we explore Conflating Views, starting with Trump lumping New Mexicans in with Californians regarding the Wall and claiming Biden had vowed to defund the police; and Candace Owens suggesting Rittenhouse disbelievers were more charitable to OJ.In Mark's British Politics Corner we look at Priti Patel being unsympathetic to immigrants (shock!) in the wake of the Liverpool taxi bomb last week.In the Fallacy in the Wild section, we check out examples from Gone With The Wind, Breast Men, and The West Wing.Jim and Mark go head to head in Fake News, the game in which Mark has to guess which of three Trump quotes Jim made up.Then we talk about the various ways anti-vaxxers are trying to detox after taking the vaccine.And finally, we round up some of the other crazy Trump stories from the past week.The full show notes for this episode can be found at https://fallacioustrump.com/ft88 You can contact the guys at pod@fallacioustrump.com, on Twitter @FallaciousTrump, or facebook at facebook.com/groups/fallacioustrumpAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

Best Supporting Podcast
Episode 107: Marlee Matlin - "CODA" (2021)

Best Supporting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 59:06


What starts as a familiar story of familial obligation, high school romance and one girl's coming of age evolves into something so much more powerful and gay gasp worthy in "CODA." Marlee Matlin and Troy Kotsur are both vying for BSA as the deaf parents of Emilia Jones's Ruby, the sole hearing member and de facto interpreter for her family, especially when it comes to running their fishing business. We queen out on our favorite moments--the concert, the audition and of course, that pickup truck scene!--and Nick reveals his true history with The West Wing, Email: thebsapod@gmail.com Twitter: @bsapod Colin Drucker Twitter: @colindrucker Instagram: @colindrucker_ Nick Kochanov Twitter: @nickkochanov Instagram: @nickkochanov

The History of the Americans
Sidebar: Notes on Thanksgiving

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 37:45


This November, it has been 400 years since the traditional First Thanksgiving at Plymouth Colony - Patuxet in 1621. But the history of that collaborative feast of the English and the Wampanoag Indians was lost for more than 200 years. For most of that time, Americans celebrated "thanksgiving" all over the country at different days in the autumn, decreed by local and state governments, without knowing its origin story. This episode explores the conversion of thanksgiving from a local custom to a revered national holiday. Along the way, we learn about Sarah Josepha Hale, the remarkable woman to whom Americans owe the greatest debt for the holiday they will celebrate today. There were political objections to Thanksgiving, too, rooted in exactly the debates we have today after the proper role of the federal government, and how precisely to separate church and state. Finally, we learn about the central role of football on Thanksgiving, dating from Thanksgiving of 1873, only four years after the first college football game. By 1893, Americans were playing thousands of games of football across the country on Thanksgiving Day. Oh, and we should all be grateful that President Franklin Roosevelt didn't screw it all up, which he very nearly did. Selected references for this episode Melanie Kirkpatrick, Thanksgiving: The Holiday at the Heart of the American Experience Melanie Kirkpatrick, "Don't Let Ideologues Steal Thanksgiving" "How the Great Colchester Molasses Shortage Nearly Ruined Thanksgiving" All the Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations 1789-2018 (pdf) The West Wing, "I get to proclaim a national day of Thanksgiving" The American Story Podcast: Sarah Josepha Hale

Your Weekly Dose
Your Weekly Dose Podcast Show 241 (Time To Gobble Gobble)

Your Weekly Dose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 93:33


Your Weekly Dose Show #241 Opens with Let's Turkey Trot by Little Eva - yes the same Little Eva that gave you The Locomotion. We open with Steve talking about his Fantasy football - Sean talks about doing a jam session and his visit to Petco.  Then we talk sports with Os Davis. Next the guys give you some Thanksgiving Tweets. Next they test Pickup Lines for Thanksgiving on Producer Kasey. What the top side dishes are from worst to best. Calling Butterball Hotline from the West Wing, Thanksgiving Facts and Johnny Cash's Thanksgiving Prayer. Last the guys offer up a Pocket Size Cinema Double Feature.  LINKS: Little Eva's Music            

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: November 19, 2021

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 46:09


Today Crystal is joined by Amy Sundberg, author of Notes from the Emerald City & Co-Chair of the Seattle Committee of People Power Washington - Police Accountability and Shannon Cheng, Chair of People Power WA - Police Accountability. Crystal, Amy and Shannon break down the latest on the Seattle City budget process, the mess that is Washington State redistricting, and talk about a wonderful opportunity to get involved with the Institute for a Democratic Future. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-hosts, Amy Sundberg at @amysundberg and Shannon Cheng at @drbestturtle. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   References: “Seattle's Divide on Public Safety is Fueling a Fight Over Next Year's Police Budget” by Ben Adlin from The South Seattle Emerald: https://southseattleemerald.com/2021/11/15/seattles-divide-on-public-safety-is-fueling-a-fight-over-next-years-police-budget/ “In Reversal, Council Keeps Durkan's Expanded Police Budget Mostly Intact” by Paul Faruq Kiefer from The South Seattle Emerald: https://southseattleemerald.com/2021/11/19/in-reversal-council-keeps-durkans-expanded-police-budget-mostly-intact/ “Seattle's LEAD program wins accolades, but not everyone is a believer” by Amy Radil from KUOW: https://www.kuow.org/stories/seattle-s-lead-program-wins-accolades-but-some-officials-want-more-options “The Community Responder Model: How Cities Can Sent the Right Responder to Every 911 Call” by Amos Irwin and Betsy Pearl from the Center for American Progress: https://www.americanprogress.org/article/community-responder-model/ “Council Declines to Fund Two Big-Ticket Asks from Homeless Authority” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola: https://publicola.com/2021/11/17/council-declines-to-fund-two-big-ticket-asks-from-homelessness-authority/ “In a first, court will decide new WA redistricting plan as commission falters” by Melissa Santos from Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/politics/2021/11/first-court-will-decide-new-wa-redistricting-plan-commission-falters Learn more about how you can get involved with Institute for a Democratic Future here: https://democraticfuture.org/ Find the contact for your Seattle City Councilor here: https://www.seattle.gov/council/meet-the-council   Transcript: [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a co-host. Welcome to the program today's two co-hosts - Chair of People Power Washington-Police Accountability and indispensable member of the Hacks & Wonks and Fincher Consulting teams, Dr. Shannon Cheng. And, Amy Sundberg, author of Notes from the Emerald City and Co-Chair of the Seattle Committee of People Power Washington-Police Accountability - an excellent live-tweeter of municipal meetings in Seattle, indispensable informer of all of us, and the person who's happy to take your baked goods for compensation. Welcome to both of you, Amy and Shannon. [00:01:21] Shannon Cheng: Thanks Crystal. [00:01:23] Amy Sundberg: Good to be here. [00:01:24] Crystal Fincher: So I am happy to have you both on here to start talking about the Seattle budget process, the actions that the Council just took - particularly because you both have been instrumental in keeping people up-to-date on where we're at in this process. And this was an eventful week. So what has been happening? [00:01:48] Amy Sundberg: Well, a lot of very long meetings have been happening, especially yesterday's marathon all-day meeting. I signed off at 6:30p and it was still going. So the Councilmembers have been talking about proposed amendments to the Budget Chair's Balancing Package this week. [00:02:12] Crystal Fincher: Okay. In that process, what was under consideration and what ended up getting passed? [00:02:19] Amy Sundberg: I mean, there was a fair amount under consideration. In terms of public safety, there were several proposed amendments that would - basically the Chair's Balancing Package decided to invest a bit less in the police department than what they had asked for in the mayor's proposed budget. And- [00:02:51] Crystal Fincher: So pausing for a second. What is a Balancing Package? [00:02:54] Amy Sundberg: The Balancing Package is basically Budget Chair Mosqueda - she gets feedback from community, she gets feedback from Central Staff about various issues having to do with the mayor's proposed budget, she speaks with her colleagues. They already went through a round of amendment proposing, and then she looks at where she thinks the strong consensus is going to be for the Council in terms of what they all agree on - what should be funded and what should not be funded in the year's budget. And then she puts together a package that funds these priorities and balances to where they think revenues will be for the year. [00:03:46] Crystal Fincher: Okay. So where are the points of likely agreement? What did they end up saying, "Yeah, we're all on the same page."? [00:03:55] Amy Sundberg: I mean, the Balancing Package - and one of the great things I think that was in that package was a huge investment in affordable housing, much more than we've ever seen. So that was very exciting. I would say that's probably the most notable thing that was happening in the budget. But in general they were funding a lot of services for people - so a lot of food assistance. And there were also a lot of district-specific investments - fairly small investments for various projects within a particular district. And obviously that varied a lot, but there were a bunch of those - different parks, different sidewalk projects, different community centers, all of that sort of thing. There was some consensus around public safety, but a lot of the requests for funding for alternatives, like alternative emergency response, for example, or for LEAD to be scaled up, or for mental - [00:05:16] Crystal Fincher: And LEAD is Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, which is an alternative to incarceration or further involvement in the criminal legal system and trying to give people pathways and alternatives out of the system. [00:05:31] Amy Sundberg: Exactly. Just Care, which helps house people in hotels if they don't have a home or a place to stay. Behavioral health response - all of these things were proposed in amendments and most of them were not fully funded in the Balancing Package. So there was - [00:05:57] Crystal Fincher: And these proposals were making good on commitments that Councilmembers had made to fund alternatives to basically police patrolling the streets, and alternate responses that may be more appropriate to the challenges that people calling 911 are actually calling about. So if someone is having a behavioral health crisis, if someone is unhoused, many Councilmembers have said, "Yeah, actually probably an armed patrol response is not the appropriate response for that." Or certainly isn't able to address some of the root causes to address the issue that's being called about. So having someone with a different set of expertise that may not be armed, that doesn't introduce or escalate a situation in an unhelpful way may be more appropriate in addressing the root cause of the issue and actually solving the problem that's being called about. And the Council collectively had previously signaled and made commitments to move in that direction. Is that a fair synopsis? [00:07:11] Amy Sundberg: Yeah. I would say that's correct and I would even go further and say it's not even particularly controversial. In general, people would like there to be alternate responses. In general, people would like people who are qualified to answer some of these needs and some of these calls - they don't all need to be armed policemen. [00:07:35] Crystal Fincher: And so, these community responses were a number of the ones that you just talked about, but the Council seemed like it changed direction and didn't follow through on there. How did that come about? What were the votes that changed what happened? [00:07:53] Amy Sundberg: I mean, it wasn't voted upon. I mean, that's what happened. The first round of amendments are not voted upon - and basically Chair Mosqueda has to go back and she has to look at all the different proposals, all which cost money. And then, she has to look at how much money is available and she has to make some hard choices about where to spend that money. And she did not find the money to fully fund some of these programs. One of the ones I was personally most disappointed to see not funded was - Andrew Lewis had proposed money for standing up a CAHOOTS-style community-based alternate emergency response for 911 calls. And you know - a couple million dollars. It wasn't, in the scheme of the budget for Seattle which is very large, it was not much money. And $400,000 of that did get allocated to start working on dispatch protocols so that 911 dispatchers can start to figure out how to route calls in alternate ways, which is great. I mean, that is an important step, but the rest of the money was not given to that project to start to actually stand it up. [00:09:14] Shannon Cheng: Yeah. I think it's just been really frustrating that it is kind of generally agreed upon that we want a faster ramp up of alternative responses to armed police, but obviously the money does have to come from somewhere. And this whole budget process has been about SPD digging their heels in - whenever any even tiny amount of money or arguing about semantics about funded versus unfunded positions. And all the energy is being spent on that instead of actually building actual solutions that are going to help all of us. [00:09:52] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And I mean, there were certainly articles this week and some clarifications that were trying to be made about the funding of 110 police positions and that being - that right now they are positions that are not filled. And so, it's not like they are removing any police from the streets. That was never the proposal and nothing there, even though that had been strongly implied by several of the usual suspects who report on it. But even things like that seem to be caught up in political spin and moving that away from the roots and the crux of what's being discussed. And what the community voted for. And to say that you support moving in a different direction, making a commitment to do that, and then failing to provide any funding to do that is just plain old not meeting the commitment and going back on your words. So I certainly hope that gets addressed throughout the budget process. What are the options to address this further on in the budget process and how can people advocate for seeing a budget that reflects their values? [00:11:10] Amy Sundberg: Well, the budget process is almost over now. It will be done on Monday. So if you want to speak up, now is the time. You can definitely call and email your Councilmembers now. And there will be a chance for public comments on Monday at 2:00 PM. So I guess signups would be at around noon then - right before all the Councilmembers take their final vote on the budget, which will be at the 2:00 PM meeting on Monday. I will say, also, regarding those positions that you talked about in the police department that aren't filled but are funded - not only are they not filled, they cannot be filled. It is literally impossible for SPD to fill those positions because they have a hiring pipeline. They've figured out how many officers they can hire next year - that amount of officers, there's money for that. And then, these are in addition to any officers that they could possibly hire. They probably can't even hire them in 2023, to be frank. So these are not positions that are going to be filled any time in the near term. The fact that this amendment was not able to be passed, even though it's completely about transparency of budget and fiscal responsibility and has very little to do with staffing, is deeply disappointing. [00:12:47] Shannon Cheng: Yeah. I was really frustrated about that one as well, Amy. I guess I was trying to think about how to relate that to a household budget situation. So I was thinking it'd be like you have two people in a household but you only have one car. And so, you're trying to budget money to buy a second car for the second person to get to work, but conditions are currently difficult - used cars are super expensive, maybe you aren't able to get the car. But then it would be like the first person who has the car telling the other person, "No, you can't use any of this money that's been allocated for a car to take the bus to work and you have to walk." And I guess that's just how I feel about these unfunded positions - that SPD gets to hold the money and we don't get to use it for any of the other things that we desperately want and need. And it's just going to sit there. And then, if Council does ever try to take the money back that SPD isn't even able to spend, it just becomes this big messaging spinning from - we've seen already Chief Diaz and others come out and make it sound like we're trying to take money from them. [00:13:52] Amy Sundberg: But even in the dialogue going on right now, we've been talking about these amendments that are going to restore a $10 million cut in the police department. But I mean, it's only a $10 million cut because they had all of this money to begin with for these unfilled, unfillable positions. So then, it gets to be called a cut but it's not actually - the framing of it becomes very convoluted and it becomes harder to talk about it in a really honest and straightforward way. [00:14:23] Crystal Fincher: I mean, there is a City Councilmember who was just elected, a future member who was elected, who talked about finding waste in Seattle and finding money that isn't being used optimally that we can use for other things in the City, and there has to be somewhere. We found the somewhere. We found where money cannot be spent, where money is allocated that is not serving any purpose. These are residents' funds, this is public money. And so, where there is money that cannot be spent, it's not even possible to spend it, and is only there to serve as a budget line because they just solely want a bigger number for vanity purposes and for messaging purposes - that could be used to help the people of Seattle in different ways more directly and be spent on something, instead of just sitting dormant in an account. We found it. It's SPD budget. It is for positions that not only are not filled, cannot be filled. And for some reason there are not the votes at this moment to use that funding for something more productive. It really is mind-boggling. It's disappointing, and I certainly would hope that people listening and those that you know, that you encourage people to call their Councilmembers to talk about this, to ground this conversation in reality and facts. And that we need dollars that are there to be spent on people, on the residents of Seattle, and not sitting in an account because of some political messaging war. It just doesn't make any kind of sense. We are facing too many challenges that are so big and so pressing that we can't let funding get caught up in this pettiness. And it is pettiness. And I'm just very challenged by that. And hope it changes, but yeah, that's been a frustrating conversation to look at. And another frustrating thing was that the Council declined to fund two requests from the Regional Homelessness Authority and Erica Barnett wrote piece about this in PubliCola. But we have had so many conversations about the priority of addressing homelessness - certainly the mayor-elect, who is coming in, made commitments about doing this. The Council has made commitments about this. Residents of Seattle have talked about this being the most important thing. And what we've heard for years really, and heard continuing conversation about is, well, this really needs to be a regional solution. We really have to take action in conjunction with our regional partners. And we all have a role to play in this. And Seattle certainly is the largest city in the region and would be carrying the lion's share of that responsibility with contributions from others. But there is a responsibility from the City of Seattle in this. And the City declined the requests from the Homelessness Authority. As Erica Barnett mentioned in her article, there was a request for a high acuity shelter to help stabilize unsheltered people experiencing health crises. The King County Regional Homelessness Authority asked for $19.4 million. They will receive $5 million of that, with potentially another $5 million from the county to begin work on a shelter. That's supposed to help that, but certainly looking at a quarter of the funding there. And then a $7.6 million request to fund 69 peer navigators, people who have lived experience being homeless to help unsheltered people navigate through the homeless system, won't receive any funding. This one came with a justification that there are several existing providers that provide similar services that may be able to do that without incurring additional expenses and be able to build on their current expenditures and current processes. So that will be interesting to see how that shakes out. And they're looking at certainly coming up with proposals to see how they might be able to address that, but this is something to keep our eye on and just feels a bit counter to all of the rhetoric and a number of the promises that have been made. And certainly the direction of the solution that a number of electeds in the City and people who were just elected have made. It's a bit confusing to hear rhetoric for years - we need to participate in a regional solution. It's like, "All right, regional solution, got everybody on board. Here we go." And it's like, "Yeah, never mind, maybe not so much." But we will see if the City comes up with a better plan on their own or not. But I think that's something to keep our eye on. And also looking at how legitimate is this Regional Homelessness Authority going to be if the charter it's been given and the solutions that they are looking to implement may be dead or disabled on arrival because of a lack of funding. I mean, really a lot of what we talk about in policy - it's great to talk about these policies, it's great to talk about these alternative public safety programs. And it's great to talk about needing to address all of our unhoused neighbors and getting them into housing. It takes money and that money has to be allocated. And when it's not, we're not going to make progress on solving these problems. So I am curious to see what results from this - and what targets they have, how they plan to meet the commitments that they've made. And if not funding this as part of a regional solution is in their plans, what is the regional solution they've been talking about for years and what are they going to do about it? And I'm interested in hearing that from the mayor's perspective and from the Council perspective. Certainly it's an issue that people want addressed. It's an issue that people who are unhoused need addressed and so we will see how that happens. [00:21:24] Amy Sundberg: It's going to be really interesting to watch the transition and see how much power the City of Seattle is willing to cede to the regional authority, because they're used to kind of doing their own thing, right? And so, I think there might be a little bit of resistance there. I also know, for example, that the Council has been very excited about tiny home villages for some time now. And the new CEO of the Regional Homelessness Authority is not so excited about tiny house villages. So you get these interesting kind of policy discussions and power dynamics that I don't think we know how they're going to play out yet. [00:22:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And speaking of things we don't know how they're going to play out yet, we might as well talk about redistricting. Redistricting. So this has been a bit of an eventful, not eventful week in the arena of redistricting. So if you haven't seen, and do not fault anyone for not having seen - this is not a fun thing to be following. But our state has a bipartisan Redistricting Commission that we put in charge of redrawing maps every 10 years in response to the changes in population and demographic compositions that we learn from the Census that is taken every 10 years. In Washington state, we have Democrats appoint two members and Republicans appoint two members. And then there is a different Chair of the organization - that is the Redistricting Commission. They are responsible for collecting public comment and basically balancing the population and composition within districts, which involves adjusting boundaries of different districts to even out population - some districts grow a lot in size, some shrink. And so, from Congressional Districts on down, the boundaries have to be adjusted to balance out - to rebalance - population and representation to make sure everyone is being represented fairly and accurately throughout the state. This process has successfully produced maps every year that it has been in existence, which this current process has been in existence since 1983. Every 10 years they have successfully performed their jobs and produced maps, until the deadline this past Monday, which they missed. And they didn't just miss it, they missed it in such interesting, ridiculous, and we can plug in whatever adjective we want to use their way. [00:24:19] Amy Sundberg: Shady. I would say it was kind of shady. [00:24:23] Crystal Fincher: There was a lot shady about it, and likely straight up potentially illegal about how it happened. Because the deadline was Monday night. Now it is not at all uncommon for a commission to take to nearly the deadline, or any entity to take until nearly the deadline to complete their job. A lot of times a deadline is a helpful pressure point to help people who may be disagreeing negotiate and come to an agreement. And that clock ticking down is helpful in getting that done. However, as the deadline approached, there didn't seem to be any progress. And oddly and troublingly, as the deadline approached, in what was supposed to be a public meeting - because by law, these commissioners and these commission meetings have to be held in public. This is not like the Legislature - this is like most other bodies where their deliberations have to be held in public. And they actually are forbidden by law to meet in groups of more than two to prevent there being any meeting basically that is not in view of the public. However, leading up to this deadline, instead of meeting in view of the public, the commissioners retreated - they said - to meet in groups of two, and they were going to meet and come back and discuss publicly. And then they didn't come back. And then they didn't come back again. And then, the updates were non-updates and the meeting that was supposed to take place in public view did not. And then, there was an update that coming up to the midnight deadline on Monday, maybe there is a vote to be taken. There wasn't. And then, the word came that - they came back just in time to take the vote, to approve - it's still confusing what they did or did not approve and what timeline and this is part of the confusing part. What was presented in public at the time - they said that they voted to approve a framework, just after the midnight deadline, I believe. But that framework did not have any maps attached to it. And so, this was a very confusing time, and it's not quite sure what was approved and they have not clarified much about their deliberations or what was approved. And then, the next day, late in the day, and this was well after the deadline, they published some maps that they said were what was approved in the framework. Both Congressional District and Legislative District maps, which a lot of people - I mean, the first reaction was just, for most people, well these maps are invalid. One, you missed the deadline to vote - that's kind of very cut and dry, that's actually a pretty black and white thing. They admitted they missed the deadline, there doesn't seem to be any disagreement that they missed the deadline. What they do seem to be saying is, "But we voted just after the deadline. And so we put so much work into it that maybe you should consider what we did." However, the maps that they eventually - that the commission eventually published a day later after the deadline passed - it has issues. It has a number of issues, but I think a lot of people are really not even getting into those issues yet at this point in time, just because they missed the deadline and therefore - in a situation where it would've gone to the Legislature to be approved, now it is up to the Supreme Court. If you missed a deadline, it gets kicked over, Redistricting Commission is done. What they have done is basically all null and void because they did not produce what they were supposed to approve and produce in the timeline that they were supposed to do this. And this is prescribed by law, so it's not like someone can just decide to take a little bit more time. And in this process with the Supreme Court, they have until now - April 30th - to approve maps. So what seems pretty clear is that the Supreme Court has no obligation to consider anything that the Redistricting Commission has done. The challenge becomes that the Supreme Court is not a mapping body. This is not anything that is in their - it's not in their job description. [00:29:09] Shannon Cheng: Yeah. And Crystal, isn't that April 30th deadline really problematic? Isn't filing week for a lot of these positions, that people need to know their districts for, the second week of May, usually? [00:29:22] Crystal Fincher: It's so problematic. And that's such a good point. I mean, the reason why the deadline is in mid-November is because we actually moved it up from the end of December. We moved the deadline up because it was such a stretch to implement all of this and have people learn their new districts. And so we said, "Hey, we actually need more time to - once we decide what these maps are, everything that follows the new maps - need more time to implement it." So not having maps now and moving this deadline to April 30th does mean that some representatives do not know which district they are going to ultimately represent. Depending on which version of which map you look at, some representatives are in one district on some maps, they're in another district on another map. They maintain their incumbency according to some maps, they don't according to others. Different candidates who have run four different positions or are considering - are in one district according to some maps, another district according to others. So this uncertainty now goes until April 30th. The candidate filing deadline is May 20th. So there are less than three weeks, fewer than three weeks between the time districts become final and the time that people learn, not just whether if you're an incumbent, whether you're still in your district, but what the composition of your district is. And we know that there are going to be several districts whose compositions meaningfully change. So you don't know what neighborhoods, what areas you're going to be representing or not. As someone who may potentially be a candidate, you don't know where you might end up running, who you might challenge. There may be one person who you're very interested in running against, there may be another person who you're not. This is all up in the air until April 30th. I hear a lot of people say, "Well, maybe the Supreme Court will get done early." And to that I say, what entity has ever gotten done early? There is nothing that has happened in the past that suggests that this would happen early. It could happen. The thing is this is actually a completely unprecedented process and we don't know what's going to happen, but trying to assume upfront that they're going to get done early does not seem like it's the most likely thing, given that, I mean, you have a commission whose job it was just to figure out these maps - who came in and it was on their job description, part of their job description, to get these maps done. They had process, they had staff, they had this whole thing. They were unable to get this process done by the deadline. I don't know why kicking it over to a body that doesn't have any of the preparation that this one had would make us think that they would get done faster. Certainly is possible but - [00:32:16] Amy Sundberg: And weren't there also problems with a lot of the proposed maps in terms of the legality?So I mean, that becomes an issue as well. [00:32:24] Crystal Fincher: Oh there are so many problems. Yeah. There have been several independent analyses, from Harvard to UCLA, I think the League of Women Voters - looked into several of these maps and several of them have pretty blatant Voting Rights Act violations. They appear to be unconstitutional, they appear to be illegal maps. That's certainly a major issue that had been talked about throughout this process. The alleged maps - it's hard to even say - this last map that was published after the deadline, which seems to have several issues even on top of the Voting Rights Act violations. Yeah, that's a problem. And so, the one thing I would say is I would assume, I would hope and I actually would assume from our Supreme Court, our Washington State Supreme Court, that they are interested in adhering to the Voting Rights Act, which would automatically mean, because of that would mean that some of the maps that have been published, that their maps would not look like those. And so, there's going to be a question of where do they start? Because the process is not defined. There are some states who have gone through similar processes. Some would be useful to follow, others may not be good to follow - but that's all going to be determined. But really what we have now is we're in an unprecedented situation for our state. The Redistricting Commission did not complete their job by the time that was required, so the normal process that we are used to following is no longer the process that we're in. We're in a brand new process, we are going to see what happened. Because there is so much - I'm sitting here probably - I still don't get what happened on that Monday, and what they approved, and what they didn't approve, and what happened when. And I probably did a horrible job of explaining that - the reason why, is because we don't know. It is very confusing as to what happened. In fact, the Supreme Court has ordered the Chair of the Redistricting Commission to basically submit a sworn statement about what did happen because no one knows. We are supposed to know. It's supposed to be in public for deliberation. What was the timeline of the events? What happened? When did it happen? And that is due by this coming Monday, the 22nd? I think Monday is the 22nd. So we will hear the Redistricting Commission's sworn version of events and from there we'll see where it goes. But it seems pretty black and white from what they said before that they did not make the deadline for the map. So that basically - question one, the most important question is, did you approve those maps in time by the deadline? They did not. I'm sure they will be like, "But it was only by a little bit." And the thing about when a deadline is prescribed by law - is when you miss it, it doesn't matter whether it's by two seconds or two days. It is missed. And so that's question one, which is why it is now in the hands of the Supreme Court. And we'll see where it goes from here. We will probably have other shows talking about this in more detail, but certainly as we get more information. But this is something to continue to pay attention to and certainly to make sure that you are engaging, especially as we have, these conversations about whether districts adhere - proposed districts - and that's adhere to the Voting Rights Act primarily. And that's important for issues like in Central Washington, looking at places like Yakima - are there attempts, bad faith attempts really, made to dissect that community in a way that eliminates voting power, organizing power that would normally be there because of the population? Or are they looking at that and trying to dilute the power of specifically non-white populations in order to maintain electoral power? And this is the conversation that we see with gerrymandering in so many other states, right? And so we were trying to avoid that here. So we'll talk about this a lot more, but it's a mess. [00:37:10] Amy Sundberg: I think too, that it bears repeating how shocking it is that we don't know what happened. And that it's now Friday and we still don't know what happened. And that these are meetings that are legally required to be within public view. And that all the commissioners felt emboldened - they felt just fine not having to be transparent. [00:37:35] Crystal Fincher: Well, I will be careful in characterizing what all of the commissioners done - I mean, did. I don't know where all of the commissioners were, I don't know if a couple of them felt strongly about this and a couple others didn't. I don't know that, but I do know that the process overall was certainly not ideal. And even that meeting in pairs - it is also illegal if you meet in pairs and then have an intermediary relay information from one of those meetings in pairs to a member of the other pair. You can't pass information back and forth that derives from those smaller meetings, because that in effect is a meeting. That is also specifically illegal. So I think most people are going now - it is not believable to think that this process happened completely behind doors, behind closed doors, there was no agreement beforehand. You come back in time to take a vote, but no one talked to each other, even though we didn't see what you were doing and somehow came to an agreement. No one believes that. [00:38:47] Amy Sundberg: No. [00:38:48] Crystal Fincher: I think we're there. I don't believe that. [00:38:54] Amy Sundberg: And I would say if you're appointed to be a commissioner, one of your tasks is to work towards transparency. So making sure the public does know what you're doing. And I mean, yes, maybe there are circumstances we don't know about, maybe you can just be swept along - but, I mean, transparency is part of what you should strive for. [00:39:18] Crystal Fincher: Part of what we should strive for. And really that issue in itself, whether or not they violated Open Meetings Acts and whether or not they adhere to the law there, even if they would have voted in time, could invalidate that entire process. So there are just so many issues with how this process came to its non-conclusion conclusion, but we will get more information about what the commission says happened by Monday. And certainly we'll be talking about this next week too on Hacks & Wonks. One last thing I wanted to talk about before we left was - we are approaching the deadline for applications to the Institute for a Democratic Future. What's the Institute for a Democratic Future, you ask - I'm glad you asked. It is a fantastic six-month fellowship where you spend about a week in a month immersing yourself in politics and policy on the ground throughout the state of Washington and there's even a trip to DC. But it is an excellent way to get an education on not only a range of policy and politics, but to see how the policy that is passed connects to real-world conditions on the ground for people in different circumstances and in different walks of life. So being in Eastern Washington, being in Central Washington and talking to farmers and talking to farm workers and talking to union leadership and talking to people who are doing environmental work and talking to business organizations and just the full range of people in communities. And how different legislation impacts them, how different challenges are presenting themselves, and what their feedback and perspective is on different things. And it's varied. And especially, I think most of the people who are listening to this podcast are in the King County area, how things look in rural communities is different. How life is experienced in rural and communities elsewhere is different. And it's important to understand how that manifests in order to create policy in a way that actually does help people. This program is for people who are 39 or under. The deadline is approaching, coming up in about a week. So if this sounds like it's something interesting to you, I would highly encourage you - reach out to me on Twitter, I'm @finchfrii, send me a text message, email, send me a message to the website. I'll be happy to talk about it more with you, but this is actually how I got my start in politics. I had a career before I worked in politics - I was in corporate sales, but I knew that I wanted to make a change and do something different. I was pretty naive - I didn't know what jobs and stuff there were in politics, what options were. I had watched the West Wing and knew of those positions there, but really didn't understand the wide variety of positions in politics. But also how that also works together with policy positions, advocacy positions, and there is a rich world that you can work in and contribute to. And it can be in a full-time paid capacity or not, but it's just really useful and helpful to be able to see how policy translates. What type of policies in the conversation, what different people from different areas are saying about their lives and what they're facing. And what is helping and what is not helping. And a lot of it will surprise you. A lot of it may not fit neatly into rhetoric that we're used to hearing. And that's really important to engage with and understand. So I highly encourage you to do that. If you're listening to this and you know me, there's a letter of recommendation required - talk to me. If you know me and we can do that, I'm happy to do that. I've done it before for people, but highly recommend this for anyone interested in being more engaged in the world of politics or policy or advocacy, it really is invaluable. You would not be hearing my voice on this podcast right now if it weren't for the Institute for a Democratic Future. I wouldn't be working in politics. It is just really important and helpful. So if this sounds interesting to you or you think it would sound interesting to any others, you can go to democraticfuture.org. I'll also put that in the show notes so that you can read more about it. But it really is valuable. And for young leaders, young progressive leaders, age 21 to 39, and the program itself runs January through June. And there are 11 weekends between January and June plus a Washington, D.C. week. So give me a chat if this is interesting, but Institute for a Democratic Future is great. And it's also just a great network of people and really helpful and useful network of people to belong to, and you would be surprised how many people have been through this program and who are working there. It has been useful for a ton of us. So that's where I'm at on those. And I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on today, November 19th, 2021. And thank you to the producer of Hacks & Wonks, Lisl Stadler, who is assisted regularly by Shannon Cheng and our wonderful co-host today - who, hey, Shannon Cheng, the Chair of People Power Washington-Police Accountability, as well as Amy Sundberg, author of Notes from the Emerald City and Co-Chair of the Seattle Committee of People Power Washington-Police Accountability. You can find Shannon on Twitter @drbestturtle, Amy Sundberg @amysundberg and you can find me @finchfrii. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks & Wonks" in the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listening to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
November 16, 2021:  John Rothmann - Frustration for Kamala Harris

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:41


Key staffers working for VP Kamala Harris say they feel abandoned by her and say she has yet to form a coherent agenda. Several confidants told CNN that Harris feels politically constrained by the Biden administration, with which she reportedly enjoys a slightly strained relationship at the best of times. “It's hard to miss the specific energy that the White House brings to defend a White man,” one former aide told the network, “knowing that Kamala Harris has spent almost a year taking a lot of the hits that the West Wing didn't want to take themselves.” Fox News host Tucker Carlson has suggested that Vice President Kamala Harris is not from the United States. Kamala Harris was born in Oakland, and attended high school in Montreal after her mother accepted a job as a teacher and researcher in the Canadian city. “There's a lot we don't know about Kamala Harris,” said Carlson on his show when commenting on her nationality, and her growing up in Canada, “that doesn't mean she is not going to be a good vice president,” he continued. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Escape From Plan A
Ep. 311: Billionaire Gods

Escape From Plan A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 102:12


Jess, Chris, and Teen talk about the public's shifting attitudes towards wealth, billionaires, and power-by-inheritance, starting from the 1990s to contemporary times. References are made to The West Wing, Succession, Gossip Girl, Crazy Rich Asians, Silicon Valley, and more.

Undeceptions with John Dickson

This episode is sponsored by Zondervan's new book Person of Interest: Why Jesus still matters in a world that rejects the Bible by J. Warner Wallace.Meet Our Guests Nigel Biggar: Regius Professor of Moral & Pastoral Theology, and Director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life, University of Oxford. Andrew Hastie: Australian Federal Member for Canning and Assistant Minister for Defence. Former Officer, Australian Defence Force. Links “There is no flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people," is a quote from Howard Zinn's 2011 book On War. We quote statistics from the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project. The Effect of War on Economic Growth, report from Cato Institute. Listen to Winston Churchill's full speech, We Will Never Surrender, from 1940. Read Nigel Biggar's book, In Defence of War.  Find out more about Augustine's City of God.  You can read more of the letters between Augustine and his Christian military officers,Marcellinus and Boniface, here. Australian war casualty statistics are from the Australian War Memorial. Read Romans 13 for yourself. Mike Bird was one of our 'phone a friend' guests for this episode. He wrote The Story of God commentary for the Book of Romans for Zondervan and is a lecturer at Ridley College. Henry Chadwick is the great Augustine biographer. He wrote the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Augustine which you can find here. Read the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reporting on the alleged war crimes committed by Australian soldiers in Afghanistan. You can find the full Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force Afghanistan Inquiry report (commonly known as the Brereton Report), here. More on Thomas Aquinas and Just War. If you're using Apple Podcasts, go to undeceptions.com for the full show notes, which cut off after 4000 characters here. We did a big, two-part episode on the Crusades in Season 4 - called 'God's War I and II'. Learn more about General William Tecumseh Sherman, the Union General who said, "War is hell".  Jarrod McKenna was another of our lovely 'phone a friend' guests for this episode. He is an advocate for non-violence direct action. Christianity Today profiled a series of 'Christian soldiers' back in 2015 for a series called Ponder Christian Soldiers.  We featured a clip from The West Wing, Season 1 Episode 3: A Proportional Response. Find out more about Carl von Clauswitz and his 1832 tome, On War. Here's the Australian Defence Force Philosophical Doctrine we quote from towards the end of the episode. Here's the plot of Shakespeare's Henry V. Watch The Hollow Crown: Henry V. 

The Bob Cesca Show
A Network For The Dumbsh*ts

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 68:33


[Explicit Language] Kimberley on the Stephanie Miller Show. Our freezing apartment. House 1/6 Committee issues 10 subpoenas to former Trump officials. The West Wing and legal fees. The exciting world of inflation and what's causing it right now. GOP candidate for U.S. Senate is the worst person in the world. The Republicans want the racist, white supremacist, misogynist vote. An update on Trump's DWAC stock. 13 Trump officials may have violated the Hatch Act. Trump and Ric Grenell appear to have violated the Logan Act. COVID rampaging across Europe. With Jody Hamilton and Buzz Burbank, and music by Elijah Bone and Joe Matera. And more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chatter on Books
Ken Follett – Never

Chatter on Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 38:21


“Only too realistic.“ A very special edition of Chatter as best-selling author (so many times over) Ken Follett Zooms back in.  With David and Torie he debriefs Never, his very real take on small mistakes turning into modern-day international catastrophes. From the West Wing to the Sahara Desert and Beijing, this one is hard to put down.

Woman's Hour
Amanda Knox, HRT prescriptions, Stockard Channing and 'Night, Mother'

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:20


Fourteen years ago this week, 21-year old British student Meredith Kercher was sexually assaulted and killed in a brutal attack in her apartment in the Italian city of Perugia. Her death was a shocking and unimaginable loss to her family. But sadly her name did not become the most memorable in the murder investigation that followed. As the world's media descended, a narrative quickly emerged around Amanda Knox - Meredith's American flatmate - and her then boyfriend Rafaele Sollecito. Dubbed 'Foxy Knoxy', the story became about a sexually voracious femme fatale and her accomplice, who it was said killed Meredith in a drug-fuelled sex game gone wrong. After being found guilty and serving four years in prison, Amanda was fully exonerated by the Italian Supreme Court on appeal in 2015. Amanda now lives back in Seattle, is married, and has just had a baby - having built a career as a writer, podcaster, and campaigner against wrongful conviction. In an exclusive interview with Woman's Hour and Newsnight, Amanda Knox talks to Emma about trying to restore her reputation, losing control of her identity, and speaking out about the film Stillwater starring Matt Damon, which she says drew on and profited from her story without her consent. The cost of repeat prescriptions for hormone replacement therapy in England is to be significantly reduced. The Labour MP for Swansea East, Carolyn Harris, had put forward a Bill to make HRT free, as it is currently in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland where there are no charges for prescriptions. Although the Government didn't support the change in full, it announced at the end of last week that women would only have to pay for one prescription charge a year – potentially saving over £200 annually. The Government also announced that they will be setting up a menopause taskforce, which will be co-chaired by Carolyn Harris, who says it is time to revolutionise menopause support. Though best known for playing Rizzo in the film Grease, First Lady Abbey Bartlet in the television series The West Wing, and Julianna Margulies' mother Veronica in The Good Wife, multi-Emmy award-winning actor Stockard Channing is a Broadway veteran nominated for multiple Tonys. Currently on stage at the Hampstead Theatre in London in ‘Night Mother' - a tense two-hander play that takes place over a single evening – she joins Emma to discuss her latest performance and first as a London resident.

Are You Serious?
Episode 461 October 31, 2021

Are You Serious?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 164:04


Trick or Treat, you decide… this week we're giving you two episodes in one. It's been a rough month and I had an unreleased episode sitting on my computer, so I combined it with this newly recorded episode. Dune, Ted Lasso, The West Wing, …What If?, movie critics, Foundation and a lot more. Hope you enjoy. Sorry for the impromptu hiatus.   We have an online version of our “Great American Movie Challenge” and you're invited! https://www.facebook.com/events/1017720099063666?ref=newsfeed    

The West Wing Thing
365 Days w/Special Guest Jared Yates Sexton

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 139:01


We're joined by recovering West Wing fan Jared Sexton to discuss what may be the Rosetta Stone of West Wing episodes. Plus, we learn that not all American contractors in Latin America work for the CIA. America is good!

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 268 - Mary McCormack

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:39


Mary McCormack is one of today's boldest and most versatile actresses, continually challenging herself with roles that often defy Hollywood standards and bring to light the complex lives of ordinary women. The LA Times says, “McCormack has a kind of 20th century sass, a lively impertinence you find in classic Hollywood comedians like Barbara Stanwyck, Irene Dunne and Rosalind Russell.” She has shown her immense talent working in film, television and on stage, and has tackled roles ranging from slapstick comedy to intense drama. Tony-nominated for her role in Broadway's “Boeing Boeing” opposite Mark Rylance, she is also widely known for her four seasons as a regular cast member of “The West Wing" (two SAG Award nominations), as the lead of USA's critically acclaimed “In Plain Sight,” and for her role opposite Howard Stern in Private Parts.  McCormack's recent television work includes starring roles in the ABC series “The Kids Are Alright,” the AMC series “Loaded,” the NBC comedy series “Welcome To The Family” as well as arcs on such shows as HBO's “The Newsroom,” “Scandal” (ABC), Gus van Sant's award-winning miniseries “When We Rise” (ABC), “House of Lies” (Showtime) and the “Will & Grace” reboot (NBC). McCormack will also appear in the new Hulu Blumhouse anthology series “Treehouse.” McCormack can also be seen in the HBO Max feature Unpregnant. In non-scripted, McCormack produces the hit game show “25 Words or Less” alongside Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky which was just renewed for a second season. Next up, McCormack can be seen staring in the STARZ series “Heels.”  McCormack returned to the Broadway stage in 2008 to star in “Boeing Boeing” alongside Christine Baranski, Mark Rylance and Bradley Whitford. Marc Camoletti's classic sixties comedy won the Tony for Best Revival and earned McCormack a 2008 Tony nomination for “Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play.” Additional stage credits include a highly successful run opposite Alan Cumming as Sally Bowles in the Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall-directed Broadway production of “Cabaret” for the Roundabout Theatre Company, as well as the acclaimed London stage production of Neil LaBute's play “Bash,” the David Warren-directed productions of “My Marriage To Earnest Borgnine” and Jon Robin Baitz's “A Fair Country.”  McCormack breakout performance, opposite Howard Stern in Private Parts, won her universal critical acclaim. McCormack's additional television and feature credits include: Aaron Sorkin's NBC smash hit “The West Wing,” a recurring role on “ER,” Right At Your Door, the Stephen King thriller 1408, Christopher Guests' “For Your Consideration,” the Steven Soderbergh and George Clooney HBO political series “K-Street,” as Justine Appleton in Steve Bochco's “Murder One,” as well as the USA Network miniseries “Traffic,” directed by Stephen Hopkins (24). In addition, McCormack has appeared in varied roles in such films as Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star opposite David Spade; K-PAX opposite Jeff Bridges and Kevin Spacey; Full Frontal, directed by Steven Soderbergh and opposite David Duchovny and Catherine Keener; High Heels & Low Lifes with Minnie Driver; Mystery, Alaska, written by David E. Kelley and starring Russell Crowe; Other Voices, with Stockard Channing and Campbell Scott; The Broken Hearts Club, opposite John Mahoney and Timothy Olyphant; The Big Tease opposite Craig Ferguson; Gun Shy with Sandra Bullock and Liam Neeson; the Clint Eastwood film, True Crime; Mimi Leder's Deep Impact; The Alarmist, opposite Stanley Tucci; Father's Day and Miracle on 34th Street. She also appeared in Michael G. Cooney's The Men and the feature film Drone with Sean Bean as well as Amazon's period drama American Girl: Mary Ellen.  Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, McCormack is a graduate of Trinity College and resides with her family in Los Angeles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Charlie Kirk Show
Trump 2024? In-Depth with ‘The Chief's Chief,' Mark Meadows

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 42:30


On a special extra episode of The Charlie Kirk Show this week, former Congressman and White House Chief of Staff to President Donald Trump, Mark Meadows—one of the show's earliest original guests joins Charlie again to talk through the politics of the day—where we stand, how we got here, and most importantly: where do we go now? You'll get exclusive insight from the highest ranking Trump official on what it was like during his time in the West Wing as well as an update on election integrity, China, NIH, Infrastructure, and so much more. Charlie and Mark walk through what it will take to reclaim Congress for the good guys before diving into the million dollar question: is the Big Man coming back in 2024? Get the inside scoop and opinion from one of Trump's most trusted advisers, here only on The Charlie Kirk Show.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The West Wing Thing
Opposition Research w/Special Guest Tom Sexton

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 102:57


In which we discover that no one on the West Wing writing staff knows what an activist is.  Plus - Dave comes up with the world's greatest podcast. 

Fear & Malding
Hey Kids! Give Back America with Matt Walsh and Tim Simons

Fear & Malding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 87:20


Hasan and Will are joined in-studio by cohosts of the new podcast, Second in Command, a Veep Rewatch and stars of the HBO show, Veep, Matt Walsh and Tim Simons. They are big fans of the show and of Armando Iannucci, so it was exciting to meet them. They got into a lot of issues today, from comparing Veep to The West Wing, ideas of a military draft, Will Shatner going to space, and how divided we are today as a nation.  Make sure to rate, review, and subscribe anywhere you get your podcasts. Leave us a voicemail: http://www.speakpipe.com/hasanpiker Follow us: https://www.instagram.com/hasandpiker and https://www.instagram.com/thewillneff  Matt Walsh IG: https://www.instagram.com/mrmattwalsh Tim Simons IG: https://www.instagram.com/timothycsimons See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ruthless
Let's Go Brandon

Ruthless

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 71:29


Fellas talk Fauci's Christmas cancellation, "let's go Brandon," and Biden's attempt to recreate The West Wing, before playing a game of Klain to Fame. Senator Thom Tillis joins the progrum for a terrific interview.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 – Oct 1 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 45:10


Caravans on their way to the border after Haitians were let in. Psaki on The West Wing and Veep. De Blasio, leftists reveling effectiveness of their covid totalitarianism. The fact that vaccine mandate coercion works isn't a justification. NBA's Draymond Green says vaccine mandate is un-American. California mandates vaccinations for children 12 and up. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com