Podcast appearances and mentions of Jane Fonda

American actress

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Best podcasts about Jane Fonda

Latest podcast episodes about Jane Fonda

Present Company
Welcome to Season 5!

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 9:12


Krista takes a look back at her favorite responses on last season's theme: ambition. Plus, she reveals what we'll be discussing in season 5!

Nata PR School (EN)
108- The Jane Fonda of public relations

Nata PR School (EN)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 10:15


As many of you probably know, time is a strange concept that seems to pick up speed as the years go by. One day, I celebrated my fiftieth birthday and I asked myself, how is this possible? Yesterday I was 35, and now here I am 15 years later. I still remember it like it was yesterday – I was the youngest employee at the Opéra de Montréal. I was 24 years old and, after a bachelor's in music, I'd just finished my graduate degree in arts management at Concordia University in Montreal. My role models were musicians, pianists and politicians, who were 20 years older than me at that point. After a bout of depression the day after my 50th birthday, I wondered, was I still loving my career in public relations? The answer was yes, because my two deepest motivations are still the same: 1- I love learning new things. 2- I love discovering new ideas. Public relations is a constantly changing universe, fuelling novelty and new ideas, which are the engines that drive this business forward. So yes, I still have just as much love for this marvellous profession, which is about getting businesses and visionary leaders known and launching new products. I have to admit, there are fewer and fewer people from my generation – the fifty-somethings – doing launches or new product events. Many, probably the last ones to receive generous pension plans, have left their jobs as journalists or executives, opting for early retirement. And the pandemic has only sped this process up. For a few years there, our clients were fixated on the Millennials (Generation Y): there wasn't a single service offer or PR strategy that didn't put them at the bullseye of the consumer target. And since they're now becoming the new thirty-somethings, it's time for our clients to start obsessing over Gen Z: the next wave of potential customers. The youth cult was still everywhere, but nothing kept me from looking elsewhere… but where?! When I saw Jane Fonda on the cover of ELLE Magazine, and a few months later as the cover girl on the ultra-famous Paris Match, it was a revelation. Fonda is known for her commitment to the environment and now, at over 84 years old (she was born in 1937), she's more active than ever. One of her latest accomplishments is her role in the wonderful Netflix series, Grace and Frankie, which is now in its seventh season. More recently still, the French paper Le Monde told her story in a series of five articles. So, might our clients be interested in something other than young people? *Baby boomers are the generation born between 1946 and 1964. Millennials were born between 1981 and 1996, and Gen Z arrived between 1997 and 2010. So, generally, Zillennials are 40 and under. Curiously, no one seems to be paying attention to Generation X, born between 1965 and 1980. Taken from the following article: https://www.lapresse.ca/societe/2021-02-18/la-generation-z-a-la-conquete-du-monde.php Join me and sign up to our lists and training sessions where I show you step-by-step public relations tactics that you can implement immediately. GET PEOPLE TALKING ABOUT YOU, FOR FREE https://prschool.natapr.com/evergreen_fr THE FREE NATA PR MODEL https://prschool.natapr.com/Le-Modele-NATA-PR SIGN UP TO OUR LISTS www.natapr.com * NEW MEDIA CANADA: https://nmc-mic.ca/2021/12/02/digital-newspaper-readership-continues-to-grow-research-shows/

Z & Keith Watched A Movie
[FREE EXTRA BONUS FOR THE PROLES] "Chicken Ranch" & "9to5: The Story of A Movement"

Z & Keith Watched A Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 54:35


Surprise! In this EXTRA FREE VALUE-ADDED episode we're talking about two documentaries related to our other viewing this month. We watched Chicken Ranch (1983) and Keith watched 9to5: The Story of A Movement (2020). The first goes inside a notorious legalized brothel in Nevada which claims a lineage with the house of the same name that was the basis for The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. The other, as you probably guessed, is the true story that inspired Straight Talk. jk 9to5 details the history of a movement of women organizing around discrimination is the workplace. Beginning with clerical workers at Harvard, it eventually became a nationwide organization. Along the way there were scandals, unions and even a Jane Fonda here and there. links: ERA Chicken Ranch trailer 9to5 site --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/zandkmoviepod/support

Jiffy Pop Culture
Ep 120. Klute

Jiffy Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 107:29


Once this serial killer sees call-girl Jane Fonda‘s shag haircut, there is no stopping him.

Alpha Health & Wellness Radio
Ep. 110 The Business of Birth Control

Alpha Health & Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 53:03


Abby Epstein made her film directing debut at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival with the documentary, V-Day: Until the Violence Stops, featuring Jane Fonda, Salma Hayek, and Rosie Perez. The film won the Audience Award at Vancouver's Amnesty International Film Festival and premiered on Lifetime Television, receiving both an Emmy and a Gracie Allen Award. In 2007, she teamed up with Ricki Lake for their widely acclaimed documentary, The Business of Being Born, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and was released by New Line Cinema/Netflix and broadcast on Showtime. The film's success led to their follow-up series, More Business of Being Born, featuring Cindy Crawford, Alanis Morissette, Gisele Bündchen and Christy Turlington plus a book, Your Best Birth, published by Hachette. Next, the duo teamed up for Weed the People, which premiered at the 2018 SXSW Film Festival and won the Audience Award at the Nashville Film Festival. Weed the People was acquired by Netflix for distribution. Under their company, BOBB Films, Ms. Epstein and Ms. Lake produced the documentaries Breastmilk and The Mama Sherpas and are currently in production on The Business of Birth Control. Prior to her film work, Ms. Epstein directed Broadway theater, helming national tours and international productions of RENT and The Vagina Monologues. Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessofBirthControl Instagram: @businessofbirthcontrol / @rickilake @abbyepsteinxoxo https://twitter.com/thebizoffilms Show Notes: https://www.thebusinessof.life/ Discount Code: ALPHA50 ALPHA50 and is valid for all screening options of BOBB & BOBC available at this link: https://watch.thebusinessof.life/bizoffilms For the Masterclass, anyone 'buying' the MC can use the coupon code ALPHA50 for 50% off the Annual Plan ($147 less 50%) - that is accessible here - https://morebizof.mykajabi.com/offers/2USzDSNg If you are liking the information you hear in this podcast and want to continue learning more, join the Alpha Health Membership Support the brands I love Get access to my online supplement/herb dispensary Connect with me on my website: drhalieschoff.com Connect with me on social: @drhalieschoff and @alpha.chiro.health.wellness --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/drhalieschoff/support

Beauty Translated
Episode 12: Becoming Janie Danger - Janie like Jane Fonda

Beauty Translated

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 61:28


In the season 1 finale of Beauty Translated Carmen is in the closet one more time with an old friend. Janie Danger is a punk musician from Atlanta who is also a hilarious follow online. We talk about her sound and music, her latest album “Sensitive Skin” is streaming everywhere! Other topics include: negative trans representation in media, significant moments of her transition, normalcy of the trans experience, transphobia disguised as allyship, the queerness of the punk rock scene, captialism destroying creativity, materialism vs identitarianism & MORE!   For more from Carmen and Beauty Translated, visit @whereintheworldis_carmen & @beautytranslatedpod! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Marilyn Denis & Jamar
Lily Tomlin, The Voices In Our Head, & The Age Kid Realize

Marilyn Denis & Jamar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 46:53


Jamar hit the TIFF red carpet for the premier of "Moving On", where he had a chance to speak with Lily Tomlin about the feature of comedy and Jane Fonda.  The University of Toronto and Harvard released a study showing when your kids start realizing when you are full of it.  Plus we asked you who do you picture narrating your day to day life and what not to put on your resume.  Azalea covers the Michelin guide, a Leafs poutine, and what Britney Spears it is up to in Trending. 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Silence on Set
Quick Clip: At the Luck premiere in LA we talk to the cast about the movie's magic, hope, and understanding of luck

Silence on Set

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 11:25


We were at the Luck premiere in LA to talk to the cast about the meaning behind good and bad luck. As Jane Fonda mentions, she hopes fans are less afraid of bad luck and understand that bad luck is part of good luck, and it's the opposite of the same coin, and there is a lot to be learned. Other cast members spoke about the magic and fun the movie brings for kids and adults -- and the importance of hope. Not to mention how the experience of making the film, for some, was a dream come true. We spoke with Eva Noblezada, Flula Borg, Whoopi Goldberg, Jane Fonda, Simon Pegg, Peggy Holmes, and Yuriko Senoo. Host: Monica Gleberman (@Monica1236) Editor: Miranda Currier Social Media Graphic: Jojo -- Synopsis: The story of Sam Greenfield, the unluckiest person in the world. Suddenly finding herself in the never-before-seen Land of Luck, she must unite with the magical creatures there to turn her luck around. *Luck is currently streaming on AppleTV+ Don't forget to follow us on Twitter @SilenceonSet and Instagram @SilenceonSetPod --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/silence-on-set/support

Practicing with Purpose: For Lawyers Only
Ep39: The Values of Authentic Firm Leadership with Blair Glaser

Practicing with Purpose: For Lawyers Only

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 44:30


Blair Glaser, MA is an executive and leadership consultant who helps mission-driven leaders create highly functional teams and dynamic businesses. She has worked with leaders and teams in nonprofit organizations such as Emerge America and Mt. Sinai Hospital of New York; Fortune 500 organizations such as Citibank and Ralph Lauren; law practices, and small businesses alike. A licensed therapist, she has led empowerment workshops for women nationally and at the Omega Institute, and was hired by Jane Fonda to develop and facilitate a workshop for girls. Blair is also a writer whose personal and business essays appear on her blog and online publications such as The Muse, HuffPo, Insider and Shondaland, to name a few.  In this episode, we discuss: A crash course in the difference in professional and personal development in the workplace. Switching between being an attorney and a business owner. Managing teams with creativity and passion instead of going after negatives. Standing in authority and confidence, especially as a female leader. Please let me know your thoughts!  Connect with Blair Glaser: website: www.BlairGlaser.com  twitter: https://twitter.com/BlairGlaser  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blair_glaser  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blair.glaser  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blairglaser/  Connect with Cindy Watson: Wesbite: https://watsonlabourlaw.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/womenonpurposecommunity/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/WomenOnPurpose1  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/womenonpurposecoaching/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCHOGOsk0bkijtwq8aRrtdA?view_as=subscriber  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Reel Deep Dive
9 to 5 (1980)

Reel Deep Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 36:27


9 to 5 centers on the vicarious charge yielded from three working women overthrowing their company's corrupt, misogynistic, and bigoted boss. Initially pitched as a dramatic vehicle for Jane Fonda, 9 to 5 struck gold once it was retooled as a wacky office comedy with its feminist subtext framed in a satirical vein. While very much an ensemble story that gives just as much screen time to Fonda and Lily Tomlin, 9 to 5 is often remembered primarily for a hit theme song and breakout acting performance from Dolly Parton. That, coupled with sharp dialogue, memorable antics, canny one-liners, and a number of boldly-filmed fantasy sequences, made 9 to 5 one of the most profitable films of its day; a long-running TV sitcom and a Broadway musical adaptation are among the things spun off from it. Ryan is joined by Sylvan and Cheryl for a discussion about this madcap crowd-pleaser. Discussion topics include sexism in the workplace, income inequality, rape culture, and why 9 to 5 made Ronald Reagan very, very upset. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ryan-valentine3/support

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
7-8am- Disney Plus Day & Scott Budman

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 39:11


It's Disney Plus Day, Pinocchio is coming out, Vinnie is not a fan of She-Hulk, Cars on the Road is premiering, there is a shirt with “You Are All Welcome Here” written in elvish from Elijah Wood, House of the Dragon has green fingers in one of the scenes, Jennifer Aniston and David Schwimmer joke with each other, Tom Hanks doesn't do sequels, Jane Fonda has cancer, Scott Budman joins us to talk about the newest Apple event, the NFL is back, NFL Betting has reached an all new level, and Vinnie reads your texts!

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly
“Working Nine to Five”

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 13:18


“We inspired Jane Fonda to make her movie and Dolly Parton to write her song. And we made countless bosses get their own coffee.” Labor Radio Podcast Network hosts chat with Ellen Cassedy, co-founder of 9 to 5, and author of a brand new book, “Working Nine to Five, A Women's Movement, A Labor Union, and the Iconic Movie,” with a forward by Jane Fonda. #LaborRadioPod @AFLCIO @ellencassedy @9to5org Edited/produced by Chris Garlock; social media guru Mr. Harold Phillips.

Don’t Yuck My Yum
EPISODE 28: 9 TO 5

Don’t Yuck My Yum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 56:48


We're back! Baby! Oh my goodness gracious and a sack of potatoes. We're back to never discuss Spider-Man again! (Unless you want it). No. We're discussing Courtney's pick, 9 to 5! A pro woman in the work place wacky film starring the great gems of Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, and Dolly Parton! Get ready for this! Because you're not!

Hard Factor
Fat Leonard, the US Navy Conning, Prostitute Carousel Party Throwing, Criminal, Flies the Coop | 9.7.22

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 69:07


On today's episode…..THE FATATHON IS BACK! (00:04:50) Jake Paul Vs Anderson Silva is confirmed, Jason Momoa is a huge hypocrite (00:15:00), Indian carnival ride almost kills dozens (00:24:30), a Brazilian man survives at sea for 11 days in a cooler (00:28:35), Fat Leonard and his carousel of whores, spiked marathon water, fancy Japanese toilets that can make you cum (00:51:50) & Burning Man was an absolute disaster this year (00:04:50) - FATATHON KICK OFF DETAILS ☕ Cup of Coffee in the Big Time ☕ (00:09:25) - Fun Facts: Whales scaring sharks, whale vaginas and whales helping whales (00:12:05) - Newspaper talk (00:13:25) - Sports Update: UEFA, Jake Paul Vs Anderson Silva (00:15:00) - Huge hypocrite and weirdo Jason Momoa shaves head to protest single use water bottles (00:19:00) - Jane Fonda announces cancer batter and Will's neighbor used to pee on her face (00:20:35) - Body of heiress Eliza Fletcher found after kidnapping in Memphis (00:21:55) - Boris Johnson resigns as PM of England, Liz Truss takes over (00:22:55) - Amazon sales slow and Elon Musk hating on “Rings of Power” show on Amazon (00:24:30) - Indian carnival ride plummets to ground, caught on VIDEO (00:27:20) - 47K Fentanyl multi colored pills found at border

98.3 The Coast
The Daily Dish – September 6

98.3 The Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 1:41


Jane Fonda reveals Cancer diagnosis, First guest on Jennifer Hudson's talk show will be Simon Cowell, season 6 of The Crown will show William and Kate's acting, Bob Odenkirk wants to do more action now that Better

Nonprofit Architect  Podcast
How to Maximize your Gala and Auction with Dean Crownover

Nonprofit Architect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 66:57


He has raised millions of fundraising dollars for his nonprofit clients. Dean can manage even the most boisterous crowd while generating millions of dollars. He has twelve years of experience as an auctioneer and is skilled at charity auctions. Dean Crownover joins Travis to discuss how to get the most out of your gala and auction.Remarkable Quotes:Dean: I became a 10 because what I'd learned is that these nonprofits are on the front line. They're underpaid and overworked. Dean: “Fund A Need” is the biggest money-maker outside of sponsorships at an event.Travis: The secret is, don't hold back until the gala to showcase whether you show people every day what on Earth it is that you do and what the transformation is. Dean: How can I get a deal? Right, because we're used to shopping that way. I battle that mindset of donors and buyers every night.Highlights:{08:20} The “fund a need” framework{12:09} The triumph and the umbrella video{17:00} Why promotion is important{18:34} How Covid changed the landscape{26:16} Finding items for live auctions{34:25} The different types of mindsets at a fundraiser{42:50} Be willing to say “I don't know” {51:50} The Golden ticket{57:11} The best order of service at a fundraiserDean Crownover Bio: Dean Crownover, My Benefit Auctioneer, is a Profit Consultant and author, with a track record of raising millions of fundraising dollars for his nonprofit clients. Jane Fonda said, “Dean Crownover is a dynamic auctioneer with the fast-talking pizzazz needed to rake it in!” He is the author of PADDLES UP! My Benefit Auctioneer Reveals Post-2020 Gala Fundraiser Secrets. The book shares proved fundraising strategies, including those that emerged from virtual events during the pandemic, and how they can be incorporated for live events.Connect with Dean: https://mybenefitauctioneer.comNonprofit Architect Podcast LinksMore Episodeshttp://nonprofitarchitect.org/blog Ultimate Podcast Guidehttps://nonprofitarchitect.org/ultimate-podcast-guide/ Ultimate Podcast Course fully WASC accreditedhttps://envisageconnect.com/education-training/partner-products/synergy-learning-institute/ Subscribe and Leave a Reviewhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nonprofit-architect-podcast/id1481292481 Get Fully Funded by Sharing the Credithttps://mpro.sharingthecredit.com/appointly/appointments_public/form/DBF73E8A-7D93-438E-B42C-6683022EE380

HBO Max Movie Club
Werking 9 to 5

HBO Max Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:37 Very Popular


Satire-comedy, “9 to 5,” stars the iconic trio, Judy Bernly (Jane Fonda), Violet Newstead (Lily Tomlin), and Doralee Rhodes (Dolly Parton), as exhausted secretaries navigating their toxic workplace. While under the heavy thumb of their sexist boss, they find their wildest revenge fantasies coming true, while of course, hilarity ensues. To recall the classic, Matt is joined by writer and friend of the show, Louis Virtel, to reflect on Jane Fonda's imprint on the film, and gush over favorite scenes and BTS gems. Establishing Dolly as more than a country singer and entertainer, but truly as a star, “9 to 5” started life-long friendships for the leading ladies and cemented a home for acrylics in the workplace. Never forgetting the song of the same name, “9 to 5” was a Billboard Hit and Grammy winner, and simultaneously immortalized the legacy of the film. Watch on HBO via HBO Max: “9 to 5” until March 31, 2023See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

General Policy: FWM
9/3/2022--9/4/2022 News General Policy: Free Women & Men

General Policy: FWM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 52:12


Serena Williams loses by the numbers. Another correct prediction as Artemis1 failed to launch on Saturday as planned. Saturday was lit as somebody allegedly stole a plane & was going to fly it into a Mississippi Wally World. Baltimore school shooting. Jane Fonda with Cancer. Canadian TikTok star Tanya Pardazi dead via parachute. Taurus Dawn Staley aka headcoach of the South Carolina LadyCocks, cancels games with the Mormons. Shooting in Virginia. Bed Bath & Beyond suicide plus more! Press plaaay!

C à vous la suite
Laurent Ruquier, Michèle Bernier, Olivier Sitruk et Patrick Bruel - C à Vous - 05/09/2022

C à vous la suite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 59:25


Au programme de C à vous la suite : Invités : Laurent Ruquier, Michèle Bernier et Olivier Sitruk • Laurent Ruquier : à lui les samedis soirs ! • Laurent Ruquier, libéré délivré ! • Laurent Ruquier, grosse tête bien faite • La nouvelle pièce de Laurent Ruquier Infos Express : • A la recherche du « QUE » perdu ! • Jane Fonda, une icône face au cancer • Sobriété : faites ce que je dis, pas ce que je fais ! L'Oeil de Pierre - Mouloudji, un déserteur centenaire • “Je préfère qu'on reste ensemble”, la nouvelle pièce de L. Ruquier • M. Bernier, O. Sitruk : ensemble c'est tout ! • M. Bernier, O. Sitruk, L. Ruquier : Au théâtre ce soir • M. Bernier, O. Sitruk, L. Ruquier : Rois du boulevard • Vive Michèle Bernier ! • Tout le monde aime Line ! • Line Renaud, décorée par E. Macron Invité : Patrick Bruel • Live : “Encore une fois” - Les 7 & 8 octobre au forum de Liège (Belgique) • 3 raisons d'aimer Patrick Bruel • Patrick Bruel, encore une fois ! • Inarrêtable Patrick Bruel ! • Patrick Bruel ravive la flamme L'ABC - Les actualités de Bertrand Chameroy

Tea Time With Nick
ALLEGEDLY... DID I SAY IT ENOUGH?

Tea Time With Nick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 10:30


IT'S MONDAY AND IT'S MY ONE MONTH ANNIVERSARY OF MY PODCAST!Thank you all for listening! I truly do appreciate it, you have no idea! Well it is Monday so you know we are talking about the latest topics in the celeb world we are talking…Tiffany Haddish, The Weeknd, Jane Fonda, Rihanna and MORE!!Grab the champs, the mimosa, the vodka, whatever you wanna drink to celebrate and come listen! allegedly

Alan Jones Daily Comments
US Report: Jane Fonda's cancer battle

Alan Jones Daily Comments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 2:52


A news update from the United States.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ben Fordham: Highlights
US Report: Jane Fonda's cancer battle

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 2:52


A news update from the United States.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CNN News Briefing
10 PM ET: Russian gas shortage, Jane Fonda's diagnosis, College Football Playoff expansion & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 4:16 Very Popular


An extended shutdown through a key pipeline that supplies natural gas to Europe could worsen fears of an energy crisis in the region. Plus, the Biden administration has agreed to a deal to provide weapons to Taiwan – a move that could increase tensions between the US and China. Veterans will soon have access to abortions in certain cases, regardless of state laws. Actress and activist, Jane Fonda, opened up about her cancer diagnosis. Lastly, more college football teams could soon have a shot at competing in the playoffs.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Noticentro
México recibirá 10 millones de vacunas pediátricas de Pfizer

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 1:40


•México tiene propuestas de donativos de vacunas•Ingrid Escamilla fue asesinada por su pareja sentimental•Jane Fonda reveló que padece cáncer•Más información en nuestro Podcast

The Tammy Podcast
Jane Fonda 84

The Tammy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 4:25


Just diagnosed with a treatable cancer --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/Tammy English /message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/Tammy English /support

Noticentro
La nave Artemisa I sufrió un nuevo contratiempo

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 2:06


•Nuevas unidades de la R14 llegarán el 11 de septiembre •Serena Williams pone fin a su carrera •Jane Fonda reveló que padece cáncer•Más información en nuestro Podcast

Metaphysical Soul Speak - - The Podcast!
Earth Changes Report And Weekly Weird World News!

Metaphysical Soul Speak - - The Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 123:28


Intro regulars: Schumann Resonance News for 1 place on Earth, the spikes happening in the otherwise calm baseline of 7.83 Hertz! Sun activity, cosmic radiation news, solar wind news, CME and sunspot news. NASA's all sky cameras fireball news for the USA. Intro: I discuss blocks an obstacles and how a spiritually mature person handles them. Hint: if you haven't handled this one yet correctly maybe I can offer some insight. I give some examples from my own life of curveballs at life through at me and the horrible way I handle it but what I learned about it later. Sometimes these obstacles are actually saving your ass but you don't know it until years later! So if you can, save yourself decades of time in resentment by appreciating that there's a bigger reason and a bigger picture that you can't see yet that will help. Little Miss Knowledge Ravenspell report. Tonight's Topic: Earth Changes Report And Weekly Weird World News! Cherokee Nation holiday and Powwow 33sec. clip of the snake dance. This episode dedicated to the Cherokee Nation. Prayers called for to help Jane Fonda get over her cancer that she announced she had today. I have missing time for an hour. I have a little mini lecture on why you should never take anything too seriously that's going on in your mind or body from a standpoint of not being able to laugh at yourself because in reality you're actually perfect and whole on the soul level and everything else is just for karma and for spiritual growth. Three whole stories and a volcano report that's it for Earth changes. And lots of laughter about multiple things including a man milking spiders and raising scorpions, dung beetles navigating with the Milky Way But fighting with each other, animal rescues, did Willy Wonka do it? Buy a house with bushels of wheat in China, buy beer with sunflower oil in Munich, Internet Explorer gets its own grave site, zero star hotel provides a no night sleep, the goats have been released in New York City heaviest freshwater fish, would you marry an alligator to secure abundance? Popsicles for pandas in a zoo And much more..

AP Audio Stories
Jane Fonda says she has cancer, is dealing well with chemo

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 0:45


AP correspondent Mike Gracia reports on Jane-Fonda.

The Manila Times Podcasts
NEWS: Jane Fonda says she has cancer, is dealing well with chemo | Sept. 3, 2022

The Manila Times Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 2:01


https://www.manilatimes.net/2022/09/03/latest-stories/jane-fonda-says-she-has-cancer-is-dealing-well-with-chemo/1857088Subscribe to The Manila Times Channel - https://tmt.ph/YTSubscribe Visit our website at https://www.manilatimes.net Follow us: Facebook - https://tmt.ph/facebook Instagram - https://tmt.ph/instagram Twitter - https://tmt.ph/twitter DailyMotion - https://tmt.ph/dailymotion Subscribe to our Digital Edition - https://tmt.ph/digital Check out our Podcasts: Spotify - https://tmt.ph/spotify Apple Podcasts - https://tmt.ph/applepodcasts Amazon Music - https://tmt.ph/amazonmusic Deezer: https://tmt.ph/deezer Stitcher: https://tmt.ph/stitcherTune In: https://tmt.ph/tuneinSoundcloud: https://tmt.ph/soundcloud #TheManilaTimes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Lori & Julia
9/2 Friday Hr 3: LOJ's Final Stretch from the 2022 MN State Fair!

Lori & Julia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 21:41 Very Popular


Holly's Dirt alert: Sad news from Jane Fonda's camp and Britney Spears's kids are talking and we don't like that her Ex is letting them do this!

Open Form
Episode 43: Chloe Cooper Jones on Coming Home

Open Form

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 52:52


Welcome to Open Form, a weekly film podcast hosted by award-winning writer Mychal Denzel Smith. Each week, a different author chooses a movie: a movie they love, a movie they hate, a movie they hate to love. Something nostalgic from their childhood. A brand-new obsession. Something they've been dying to talk about for ages and their friends are constantly annoyed by them bringing it up. In this episode of Open Form, Mychal talks to Chloe Cooper Jones (Easy Beauty) about the 1978 film Coming Home, directed by Hal Ashby and starring Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, and Bruce Dern. Chloé Cooper Jones is the author of Easy Beauty. She was awarded a 2020 Whiting Nonfiction Grant and was a finalist for the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in Feature Writing. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Morning Meditation for Women
Meditation: Jane Fonda (Daily Quotes) ❣

Morning Meditation for Women

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 9:35


Join Premium! Ready for an ad-free meditation experience? Join Premium now and get every episode from ALL of our podcasts completely ad-free now! Just a few clicks makes it easy for you to listen on your favorite podcast player.  Become a PREMIUM member today by going to --> https://WomensMeditationNetwork.com/premium

Parent Footprint with Dr. Dan
Girls Who Run (And Green) The World with Diana Kapp

Parent Footprint with Dr. Dan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 57:35


Dr. Dan and journalist/mom/author Diana Kapp have an impactful, inspiring, and timely conversation about the environment, activism, books, and much more. Jane Fonda (actor, political activist, environmentalist) says Diana's new book “Girls Who Green the World shows how brave girls who pay attention have launched ideas and organizations that may very well save us all.” Dr. Dan interviews Diana Kapp about her newest book Girls Who Green the World (a playbook for the contemporary environmental movement), eco-anxiety, and how she was motivated and inspired to write Girls Who Green the World—and previous book Girls Who Run World—by her own kids. Diana leaves listeners with hope about the future and proof that one person can make a difference.Visit Diana's website for more information: https://dianakapp.com/.Email your parenting questions to Dr. Dan podcast@drdanpeters.com (we might answer on a future episode).Follow us @parentfootprintpodcast (Instagram, Facebook) and @drdanpeters (Twitter).Listen, follow, and leave us a review on Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, Wondery, or wherever you like to listen!Don't forget, you can hear every episode one week early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery+ in the @WonderyMedia App.For more information:www.exactlyrightmedia.com www.drdanpeters.comFor podcast merch:www.exactlyrightmedia.com/parent-footprint-shopSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Jane Fonda Takes The Colbert Questionert | Colbert Classic

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:48 Very Popular


Do you really know someone if you don't know which is their favorite sandwich? Or their favorite action movie? Didn't think so. That's why Stephen seeks answers to these questions from the iconic Jane Fonda in this edition of The Colbert Questionert. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cultura Secuencial
The Heirs of the Dragon (2022) | Ep. 220

Cultura Secuencial

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 125:38


En nuestro Ep. 220 Vanesthy, Megan, Gabriel y El Watcher hablan sobre las últimas Películas y Series de Televisión que han visto en el segmento "Wachin' con Wacho", el libro "Under a Sky of Memories" escrito por Soraya Lane en el segmento "Book Rewind", la trayectoria de las actrices Faye Dunaway, Jane Fonda y Diane Keaton en el segmento "Awards Spotlight" y conversan sobre sus episodios y momentos favoritos de "Game of Thrones" y el primer episodio de "House of the Dragon" (2022) titulado "The Heirs of the Dragon". ¡Apoya nuestro contenido uniéndote a nuestro Patreon! Visita: https://www.patreon.com/CulturaSecuencial ¡Síguenos y Suscríbete a nuestro canal de Twitch! Visita: https://www.twitch.tv/culturasecuencial ¡Síguenos en Twitter! Visita: https://twitter.com/CultSecuencial ¡Síguenos en Instagram! Visita: https://www.instagram.com/culturasecuencial ¡Síguenos en Facebook! Visita: https://www.facebook.com/CulturaSecuencial ¡Subscríbete a nuestro canal de YouTube! Visita: https://www.youtube.com/culturasecuencial --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/culturasecuencial/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/culturasecuencial/support

Let Them Fight: A Comedy History Podcast

Today we're bringing you a man who left the frozen wasteland of Canada for greener pastures, America. Then after all those years of enjoying our sweet, sweet freedoms, he decided it was time to give back. He didn't care what Jane Fonda said, he got balls deep in the Vietnam War. Then he decided it wasn't enough to be one of the biggest, baddest swinging dicks in the country. He became a goddamn war hero, and he did it on hard mode. Listen in to find out what that means. Enjoy!

Late Night Playset
STEVE O'DONNELL: Late Night Deep Dive LNP488

Late Night Playset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 92:11


Tuesday August 23, 2022 - Guest: STEVE O'DONNELL Legendary comedy writer/producer Steve O'Donnell is here to turn J into Chris Farley... remember that time when? From Merrill Markoe's writing to Letterman's car collection, to Bonnie Hunt, Norm MacDonald, Jimmy Kimmel, Chris Rock, Jane Fonda & more... we cover it all for 90 minutes before tabling the rest of the conversation for Part 2 (coming soon). Steve is hilarious, generous and quite possibly THE most-well-rounded encyclopedia of Late Night comedy knowledge that exists. We discuss visiting the Smithsonian, but Steve belongs in it. Comedy Geeks, this one's for you! THANK YOU for watching, liking, sharing, subscribing etc... WE LOVE YOU!

What I'm Grateful for Today
The Final Episode: Absence Makes the Heart Jane Fonda

What I'm Grateful for Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 57:12


It's time to say goodbye! Shaun sits down with Mikhila McDaid and Simon Dowling for the final ever episode of What I'm Grateful for Today to look back over the pandemic and share what they're grateful for thanks to this crazy ordeal. Thank you everyone for your support over the course of this show - it's been a blast! Follow Shaun on Instagram (@shaunynolan) and Twitter (@shaunycat).

Moms Don't Have Time to Move and Shake
Healthy Habits Wanted: Judgment, Guilt, and Shame Need Not Apply

Moms Don't Have Time to Move and Shake

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 29:31


Kristi Willbanks — yoga teacher, health coach, group fitness instructor, mom of two teenagers and two rescue pups, and an avid reader — discusses her journey from doing Jane Fonda workout videos in her living room as a teenager to 25+ years as a group exercise instructor with her friend Kathryn Fink Martinez — registered dietician, group fitness instructor, and dedicated student in Kristi's yoga classes. Kathryn shares her story of becoming a registered dietician, choosing joyful movement, and easing anxiety through regular yoga practice. Based on their own struggles with body image, weight, and food, as well as their expertise in the health and fitness industry, they share tips and strategies for living happier, healthier lives without the judgment, guilt, and shame typically involved with dieting and restrictive rules. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

Why Use a Benefit Auctioneer: Interview with Dean Crownover Why hire a professional for the fundraising (it's so much cheaper to do it on our own)!? Hey – valid question. What a lot of people don't realize is that auctioneers need to be licensed in many states – like Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama. There are legalities around selling items, even for charity, and you need to be covered. Make sure you know the rules for your state. What's even more important for your nonprofit, though, is that a professional auctioneer can maximize the revenue you generate at your event. After all, why put in all the time and effort of hosting a gala NOT to generate the most money you possibly can to support your mission? And if you ARE hiring a professional, check out Chapter 7 of my book to learn how to hire a benefit auctioneer for your event. You'll want to know some important details like… How much experience do they have being a profit consultant? How much funds have they helped raise? Who else have they worked with (and were their clients happy)? An auctioneer can boost the price of your auction items and (hopefully) keep your audience entertained, but are they holistically looking at your whole event and identifying ways to increase funds and revenue? This is my FAVORITE part of what I do. As a Profit Consultant I look for all areas and opportunities to cover your event costs, increase the amount people give and new ways to create more revenue even before or after the event is over. Then, at your event, I auction-tain your donors from stage to open their wallets and give generously! Dean Crownover, My Benefit Auctioneer, is a Profit Consultant and author, with a track record of raising millions of fundraising dollars for his nonprofit clients. Jane Fonda said “Dean Crownover is a dynamic auctioneer with the fast-talking pizzazz needed to rake it in!” He is the author of PADDLES UP! My Benefit Auctioneer Reveals Post-2020 Gala Fundraiser Secrets. The book shares proven fundraising strategies, including those that emerged from virtual events during the pandemic, and how they can be incorporated for live events. More about Dean Crownover at https://www.MyBenefitAuctioneer.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Filmgazm
OSCAR SUNDAY | 116 - A Soldier's Way Saves The Day

Filmgazm

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 107:56


This week, we discuss a poignant movie about the personal aftermath of the Vietnam War, the Oscar-winning drama COMING HOME starring Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern, and Penelope Milford. Hosted by Austin Johnson and Connor Eyzaguirre Music by Cooley Cal New episodes every Sunday! Don't miss THE FILMGAZM PODCAST every Wednesday and BEYOND THE BAD every Friday! E-mail us at filmgazm@gmail.com, subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Breaker, Overcast, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Amazon Music, or Anchor.fm, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube or leave a comment below if there's a movie you want us to review! Visit https://www.filmgazm.com for movie reviews, articles, podcasts, and trailers of upcoming movies. DISCLAIMER - We do not own nor do we pretend to own any posters, artwork, music, or trailers. We mean only to review and discuss movies fairly and without bias. All trademarks are the property of the respective trademark owners. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-filmgazm-podcast/support

Canceled Too Soon
Critically Reclaimed #38 | Klute (1971)

Canceled Too Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 69:48


Welcome to CRITICALLY RECLAIMED, where film critics William Bibbiani and Witney Seibold catch up on older movies one or both of them have never seen before, as chosen by YOU, our listeners! Because YOU demanded it, this week William Bibbiani and Witney Seibold investigate Alan Pakula's Oscar-winning thriller KLUTE, starring Jane Fonda as a sex worker who's stalked by a serial killer, and Donald Sutherland as a private detective on the hunt for the madman. Want to vote for future episodes of CRITICALLY RECLAIMED? All you gotta do is subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe on Patreon at www.patreon.com/criticallyacclaimednetwork for exclusive content and exciting rewards, like bonus episodes, commentary tracks and much, much more! And visit our TeePublic page to buy shirts, mugs and other exciting merchandise!  Email us at letters@criticallyacclaimed.net, so we can read your correspondence and answer YOUR questions in future episodes! And if you want soap, be sure to check out M. Lopes da Silva's Etsy store: SaltCatSoap! Follow us on Twitter at @CriticAcclaim, join the official Fan Club on Facebook, follow Bibbs at @WilliamBibbiani and follow Witney at @WitneySeibold, and head on over to www.criticallyacclaimed.net for all their podcasts, reviews and more! Support the show: https://www.patreon.com//criticallyacclaimednetworkSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily Pop
J.Lo & Ben's Wedding Celebration This Weekend, Christina Ricci Embarrassed By Role – Daily Pop 08/19/22

Daily Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 42:09 Very Popular


Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck are reportedly having 3 days of wedding festivities in Georgia, Heather Dubrow tells why she won't let her plastic surgeon husband Dr. Terry Dubrow retire, Jane Fonda has a tactic to get over a breakup and Taylor Lautner and his future wife will have the same first and last name. Plus, Eva Mendes shows her cell wallpaper and Christina Ricci explains why she's embarrassed by her performance in Casper.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Broads You Should Know
Nancy Dowd — Breakout Female 70's Screenwriter [Darren Callahan]

Broads You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 33:17


This week, guest Darren Callahan brings us the story of screenwriter Nancy Dowd! After graduating from Smith College, Nancy enrolls at UCLA determined to forge a career writing for film. Not only does she succeed, she ends up writing some of the most renowned films of the 70s and 80s, and even winning an Oscar for her first feature script COMING HOME, but while the original script was entirely her own, she had to share that Oscar with two other writers. Listen now to find out how that film created a rift between her and Jane Fonda that would last a lifetime, and why much of her writing since has been credited under pseudonyms, and sometimes even uncredited! — A BROAD is a woman who lives by her own rules. Broads You Should Know is the podcast about the Broads who helped shape our world! — See All Our BROADS at www.BroadsYouShouldKnow.com Suggest a BROAD on the website, or email to BroadYouShouldKnow@gmail.com — BYSK is hosted & produced by Sara Gorsky (@SaraGorsky) BYSK is edited by Chloe Skye with original music by Darren Callahan — Support BYSK by: Writing a review on Apple Podcasts Sharing your favorite episode with your friends & family Follow us on social IG:@BroadsYouShouldKnow FB: @BroadsYouShouldKnow TW: @BYSKpodcast

Two Dudes Watch Cartoons
38. Apple TV+'s Luck

Two Dudes Watch Cartoons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 63:53


Two Dudes tempt fate and review Apple TV+'s first animated feature film, Luck. Sam, a young woman aging out of her group home, befriends a black cat and travels to the land of Luck to try and change the fate of her friends in the orphanage. Featuring the voices of Eva Noblezada, Simon Pegg, Jane Fonda, Whoopi Goldberg, Lil Rel and more, can Apple's first foray into the medium carve out a space in the pantheon of Western animation or has Apple's luck run out? Tune in to find out. Follow and Subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Apple Podcasts Spotify Youtube Instagram TikTok Twitter --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/2dudeswatchcartoons/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/2dudeswatchcartoons/support

The Turnbuckle Tavern
Broken VCR #30: On Golden Pond (1981)

The Turnbuckle Tavern

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 108:58


This week Mark Rydell's 1981 film, On Golden Pond is up. We talk Jane Fonda acting opposite her father Henry Fonda and how the film mirrored their rocky real life relationship. We also discuss the Katherine Hepburn, the comedy, the fascination with death, and the themes at the film's core. This is a fun one. Follow theturnbuckletavern.com for all your Tavern needs!

Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast
Ep. 253 - Book Club (Movie)

Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 78:21 Very Popular


Hey y'all! EF Dodd is here to recap the 2018 movie Book Club! We had so much fun worshipping Jane Fonda's wardrobe, watching Murphy Brown make a romantic comeback with Mr. Holland's Opus, and yelling about terrible daughters! Lady Loves: EF: Fancy coffee makers and the best friends who support you in everything! Mel: Paint your ceiling yellow and get the most florescent rug you've ever seen in your life... of whatever your equivalent is! Just make your space yours because it feels really great. Make sure to check out EF's newest release https://www.efdoddwrites.com/books/ (EARNING IT)! It comes out on August 23rd, 2022 and you can preorder it now! Make sure to check out Mel's new podcast https://bonkers-romance.captivate.fm/listen (Bonkers Romance)!  Subscribe! Rate! Review! Tell all your friends :) Get more content on https://www.patreon.com/heavingbosomspodcast (PATREON!!) Sign up for our https://www.heavingbosoms.com/ (Newsletter)!  MERCH! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/heaving-bosoms-podcast?ref_id=13852 (Teepublic), https://chicalookate.myshopify.com/collections/heaving-bosom (Chicaloo Kate), https://www.redbubble.com/people/heavingbosoms/shop?asc=u (Redbubble) Make your life better and https://justasknat.com/ (hire Natalie) to assist you!!! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heavingbosoms/ (@heavingbosoms) Twitter: https://twitter.com/Heaving_Bosoms (@heaving_bosom)s

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley
Mayberry, Grace and Frankie, Left-Handed

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 45:35


Guest host: Tracy Smith. In our cover story, Rita Braver looks at how left-handed people cope in a right-handed world. Plus: Ted Koppel visits a town that reinvented itself as Andy Griffith's "Mayberry"; Tracy Smith sits down with Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, stars of the Netflix series "Grace and Frankie"; Martha Teichner delves into the story behind a new opera about a Muslim enslaved in America; And Conor Knighton checks out how a small town in Illinois got on the map by dreaming VERY big.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald
Are we Dating the same Guy! Chris Franjola and Sarah Colonna

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 87:49 Very Popular


Sarah and Chris are here together! Britney Spears is a nark. Jane Fonda is finally having good sex after 80 years. One of my favorite weird things happened again: “I didn't know I was pregnant” story where a baby was birthed in the toilet. Crazy girlfriend fills cheating boyfriend's condom with habanero oil. Nick Cannon is a dad once again AF. Martha Stewart lost her peacock to some coyotes. The new book about Meghan Markle is full of juice. If you are ginger in London, you get to see movies for free. Love Is Blind contestant is suing the show for bad treatment. If you get a subway sandwich tattoo on your body, you get a free subway for life… Chris is considering it. Ricky Martin's Nephew retracted his incest statement. The Bachelorette is the juiciest it has been in years. I just discovered there are Facebook groups for single women to find out if they are dating the same guy. The boy that faked floating away in a balloon so many years ago is back with a hot new single. Enjoy! Get extra juice on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/juicyscoophttps://heathermcdonald.net/Support our sponsors:https://www.betterhelp.com/HEATHERlivingproof.com/juicy bestegg.com/juicyMedterracbd.com/JUICYhttps://sleepnumber.com/JUICYworthy.com/JUICYdrinkcirkul.com/juicyDogtopia.com