Macro Musings with David Beckworth

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Hosted by David Beckworth of the Mercatus Center, Macro Musings is a podcast which pulls back the curtain on the important macroeconomic issues of the past, present, and future.

Mercatus Center


    • Dec 6, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 57m AVG DURATION
    • 311 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Macro Musings with David Beckworth

    Carola Binder and Christina Parajon Skinner on Populism and Legitimacy at the Federal Reserve

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 53:53

    Carola Binder is an Associate Professor of Economics at Haverford College, and Christina Parajon Skinner is an assistant professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Both are returning guests to Macro Musings and they rejoin the podcast to talk about populism at the Fed and its implications for policy. Specifically, they discuss rising technopopulism at the Fed, the effect of populist pressures on its legitimacy, the importance of balancing experimentation and intellectual freedom with managing risks of politicization at the Fed, as well as their thoughts on the recent bouts of inflation.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Carola's Twitter: @cconces Carola's blog: https://carolabinder.blogspot.com/ Carola's Haverford profile: https://carolabinder.sites.haverford.edu/   Christina's Twitter: @CParaSkinner Christina's Wharton profile: https://lgst.wharton.upenn.edu/profile/skinnerc/   Related Links:   Cato Institute 39th Annual Monetary Conference: Panel 1: The Populist Challenge to Fed Independence https://www.cato.org/multimedia/events/39th-annual-monetary-conference-panel-1-populist-challenge-fed-independence   *Technopopulism and Central Banks* by Carola Binder https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3823456   *Technopopulism: The New Logic of Democratic Politics* by Christopher J. Bickerton and Carlo Invernizzi Accetti https://oxford.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.1093/oso/9780198807766.001.0001/oso-9780198807766   *Central Bank Activism* by Christina Parajon Skinner https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/Microsites/fmlg/files/2021/Skinner_Central%20Bank%20Activism.pdf   *Laboratories of Central Banking* by Carola Binder and Christina Parajon Skinner https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3956845   *Fifty Shades of QE: Comparing Findings of Central Bankers and Academics* by Brian Fabo, Martina Jančoková, Elisabeth Kempf, and Ľuboš Pástor https://www.nber.org/papers/w27849   David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth David's blog: http://macromarketmusings.blogspot.com/

    Matthew Klein on Recent Inflationary Trends and What to Expect in the Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 50:32


    Matthew Klein is the author of The Overshoot, a newsletter that helps readers make sense of the global economy. Matt is also a returning guest to the podcast, and rejoins Macro Musings to talk about the hot topic of inflation and its outlook. Specifically, David and Matt discuss what is driving trend inflation, Matt's decomposition of the CPI, whether or not we should be worried about inflationary trends, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Matthew's Twitter: @M_C_Klein Matthew's Substack: https://theovershoot.co/about   Related Links:   *The Case for Patience on Inflation* by Matthew Klein https://theovershoot.co/p/the-case-for-patience-on-inflation   *What's Going On With Interest Rates? (Part 1)* by Matthew Klein https://theovershoot.co/p/whats-going-on-with-interest-rates   *Fed Policy Must Adjust for Inflation* by Martin Wolf https://www.ft.com/content/dc3bedc7-5694-4868-8b86-f9a215966f52   David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth David's blog: http://macromarketmusings.blogspot.com/


    Markus Brunnermeier on *The Resilient Society*

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 51:50

    Markus Brunnermeier is a professor of economics and the director of the Bendheim Center for Finance at Princeton University. Markus is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Markus joins Macro Musings to discuss his new book, titled “The Resilient Society,” as well as his work on safe assets and their implications for inflation. Specifically, David and Markus discuss the implications of the fiscal theory of the price level for inflation, the role of the Fed in stabilizing money markets, what is meant by “resilience” compared to “robustness” in economies, and much more.   Transcript can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Markus's Twitter: @MarkusEconomist Markus's Princeton profile: https://scholar.princeton.edu/markus/home   Related Links:   *The Fiscal Theory of the Price Level with a Bubble* by Markus Brunnermeier https://scholar.princeton.edu/markus/publications/fiscal-theory-price-level-bubble   *The Resilient Society* by Markus Brunnermeier https://bcf.princeton.edu/the-resilient-society/   *What Makes US Government Bonds Safe Assets?* by Zhiguo He, Arvind Krishnamurthy, and Konstantin Milbradt https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.p20161109   David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth David's blog: http://macromarketmusings.blogspot.com/

    Ajmal Ahmady on the Afghan Economy and the Challenges Facing the Nation's Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:56

    Ajmal Ahmady is the former governor of the Central Bank of Afghanistan and is now a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Ajmal joins Macro Musings to talk about his experience as a central bank governor in Afghanistan and the challenges now facing the nation's economy. Specifically, David and Ajmal discuss his unique role as the country's central bank chief, the structure of the Afghan monetary system, the state of the nation's economy moving forward, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Ajmal's Twitter: @aahmady Ajmal's biography and profile: http://www.afghan-bios.info/index.php?option=com_afghanbios&id=4307&task=view&total=696&start=36&Itemid=2   Related Links:   Ajmal's Twitter thread about Afghanistan's collapse: https://twitter.com/aahmady/status/1427265049668636674?lang=en   *Why Afghanistan Fell: An Insider's Account of What Went Wrong* by Ajmal Ahmady https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/afghanistan/2021-10-11/why-afghanistan-fell   *Severe Drought Adds to Afghanistan's Woes, Endangering Millions as Economy Collapses* by Sune Engel Rasmussen https://www.wsj.com/articles/severe-drought-adds-to-afghanistans-woes-endangering-millions-as-economy-collapses-11633872935#:~:text=Severe%20Drought%20Adds%20to%20Afghanistan's,Millions%20as%20Economy%20Collapses%20%2D%20WSJ&text=The%20drought%20has%20compounded%20the,Taliban%20overthrew%20the%20previous%20government.    *Regional Power Back Aid for Afghanistan as Russia Hosts the Taliban* by Aljazeera https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/10/20/russia-hosts-taliban-for-talks-but-warns-no-recognition-for-now   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Peter Stella on the Fiscal Theory of the Price Level

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:02

    Peter Stella is the former Head of the IMF Central Banking division and has researched and written extensively on safe assets, collateral and central bank operations. Peter now hosts a website Central Banking Archeology. Peter joins David on Macro Musings to discuss the role of money and its relationship to inflation as well as its relationship to the payment system. Specifically, David and Peter discuss the fiscal theory of the price level, how rising indebtedness can signal higher inflation in the future, the implications of the fiscal theory for contemporary fiscal and monetary policy going forward, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Peter's Twitter: @Stellar_Consult Peter's website: https://www.centralbankarchaeology.com/ Peter's Voxeu profile: https://voxeu.org/users/peterstella0 Peter's Research Gate archive: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Stella   Related Links:    *Some Incredible Monetarist Arithmetic* by Peter Stella https://www.centralbankarchaeology.com/post/some-incredible-monetarist-arithmetic   *Some Alternative Monetary Facts* by Peter Stella, Manmohan Singh, and Apoorv Bhargava https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2021/01/08/Some-Alternative-Monetary-Facts-49975   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Robert Orr on Supply Side Bottlenecks in the US Healthcare System and Solutions for Reform

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:51

    Robert Orr is a policy analyst at the Niskanen Center where he focuses on welfare, healthcare, and labor market policy. Robert joins Macro Musings to talk about one of the more important sectors of the US economy, healthcare, and some of the biggest supply side bottlenecks the industry faces. Specifically, David and Robert discuss the uniqueness of the US healthcare system, the reason for massive spending within the healthcare industry, and how to fix the supply bottlenecks that have emerged.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Robert's Twitter: @Robert_t_Orr Robert's Niskanen profile: https://www.niskanencenter.org/author/robert-orr/   Related Links:   *The Planning of U.S. Physician Shortages* by Robert Orr https://www.niskanencenter.org/the-planning-of-u-s-physician-shortages/   *The U.S. Has Much to Gain from More Doctors* by Robert Orr https://www.niskanencenter.org/the-u-s-has-much-to-gain-from-more-doctors/   *Unmatched: Repairing the U.S. Medical Residency Pipeline* by Robert Orr https://www.niskanencenter.org/the-u-s-has-much-to-gain-from-more-doctors/   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    George Selgin on Bitcoin and the Future of CBDCs

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 47:20

    George Selgin is the director emeritus of the Cato Institute's Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives and is a returning guest to Macro Musings. George rejoins David on the podcast to discuss cryptocurrency, stable coins, CBDCs, and a push for a higher inflation target. Specifically, George and David discuss the category of ‘synthetic commodity money' and how bitcoin is a potential example, the current state of Bitcoin amidst El Salvador's transition to Bitcoin as its legal tender, the role of fintechs in the potential future of a Fed central bank digital currency, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   George's Twitter: @GeorgeSelgin George's Cato Institute profile: https://www.cato.org/people/george-selgin   Related Links:   *Synthetic Commodity Money* by George Selgin https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2000118   *The Denationalization of Money* by F.A. Hayek https://www.amazon.com/Denationalization-Money-Analysis-Concurrent-Currencies/dp/0255360878   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Peter Conti-Brown on the Fed Trading Scandal, the Fed Chair Nomination Process, and Central Bank Governance

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:46

    Peter Conti-Brown is a legal scholar and financial historian at the University of Pennsylvania and is a nonresident fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution. Peter's scholarship focuses on the legal and historical issues of the Federal Reserve system, and he rejoins Macro Musings to talk about the many facets of Fed governance. David and Peter specifically discuss the Federal Reserve's recent trading scandal, the Fed Chair nomination process, the central bank's role in fighting climate change, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Peter's Twitter: @PeterContiBrown Peter's Brookings profile: https://www.brookings.edu/author/peter-conti-brown/ Peter's Wharton profile: https://lgst.wharton.upenn.edu/profile/petercb/   Related Links:   *Technocratic Pragmatism, Bureaucratic Expertise, and the Federal Reserve* by Peter Conti-Brown and David Wishnick https://www.yalelawjournal.org/feature/technocratic-pragmatism-bureaucratic-expertise-and-the-federal-reserve   *Restoring the Promise of Federal Reserve Governance* by Peter Conti-Brown https://www.mercatus.org/publications/monetary-policy/restoring-promise-fed-governance#:~:text=In%20%E2%80%9CRestoring%20the%20Promise%20of,it%20was%20designed%20to%20be.   Peter Conti-Brown on *Restoring the Promise of Federal Reserve Governance*: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/podcasts/01062020/peter-conti-brown-restoring-promise-federal-reserve-governance   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Scott Sumner on The Money Illusion

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:50

    Scott Sumner is David's colleague and the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center. Scott is also a returning guest to the podcast and joins David on Macro Musings to discuss his new book, The Money Illusion: Market Monetarism, the Great Recession, and the Future of Monetary Policy. Specifically, David and Scott discuss common misconceptions about the 2008-09 Recession, why bubble narratives too often miss the mark when explaining rising asset prices, whether the Fed's adoption of average inflation targeting signals that it is moving toward a level target, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Scott's Twitter: @ScottSumnerTMI Scott's blog: https://www.themoneyillusion.com/ Scott's Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/scott-sumner   Related Links:   *The Money Illusion: Market Monetarism, the Great Recession, and the Future of Monetary Policy* By Scott Sumner https://www.mercatus.org/publications/monetary-policy/money-illusion-market-monetarism-great-recession-and-future-monetary   *Eight Centuries of Global Real Interest Rates, R-G, and the ‘Suprasecular' Decline, 1311–2018* by Paul Schmelzing https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3485734   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Chris Russo on the 2021 Debt Limit Fight, Its Potential Impacts, and Solutions for Reform

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:45

    Chris Russo is a post-graduate research fellow in the Monetary Policy Program of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and is a former economist at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. He re-joins Macro Musings to talk about the growing concerns over the US debt ceiling, what it could mean for the economy, and how to fix the issue.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Chris's Twitter: @RussoEcon Chris's Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/christopher-russo Chris's Github site: https://christopher-russo.github.io/about/   Related Links:   *Permanently Suspend the Debt Limit* by Christopher Russo https://thehill.com/opinion/finance/553827-permanently-suspend-the-debt-limit   *What the Fed Will Do if Congress Doesn't Fix the Debt Ceiling* by Christopher Russo https://www.barrons.com/articles/inside-the-feds-playbook-for-a-dollar-default-51622055588   *America's Need to Pay Its Bills Has Spawned a Political Game* by Jim Tankersley https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/26/business/economy/america-debt-limit-political-game.html   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Hanno Lustig on Dollar Dominance, Dollar Safety, and the Global Financial Cycle

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 51:20

    Hanno Lustig is a professor of finance at Stanford University, and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Hanno joins David on Macro Musings to discuss his work on dollar safety, safe assets, convenience yields, and more. More specifically, Hanno and David discuss the dollar dominance in global financial markets, how the US's status as the world's safe asset provider reinforces its exorbitant privilege in money markets, whether the countercyclical demand for safe assets can help explain why US inflation has been so low this past decade, how years of low interest rate policy might have contributed to the growing wealth gap, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Hanno's Twitter: @HannoLustig Hanno's Stanford profile: https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/hanno-lustig   Related Links:   *Dollar Safety and the Global Financial Cycle* by Zhengyang Jiang, Arvind Krishnamurthy, and Hanno Lustig https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/working-papers/dollar-safety-global-financial-cycle   *Mind the Gap in Sovereign Debt Markets: The U.S. Treasury basis and the Dollar Risk Factor* by Arvind Krishnamurthy and Hanno Lustig https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3443231   *Manufacturing Risk-Free Government Debt* by Zhengyang Jiang, Hanno Lustig, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, and Mindy Z. Xiaolan https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3646430   *US Government Debt Valuation Puzzle* by Zhengyang Jiang, Hanno Lustig, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, and Mindy Z. Xiaolan https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3333517   *The Fiscal Theory of Price Level with a Bubble* by Markus K. Brunnermeier, Sebastian A. Merkel and Yuliy Sannikov https://www.nber.org/papers/w27116   *Debt As Safe Asset: Mining the Bubble* by Markus K. Brunnermeier, Sebastian Merkel, and Yuliy Sannikov https://scholar.princeton.edu/markus/publications/debt-safe-asset-mining-bubble   *The Safety Trap* by Ricardo J. Caballero and Emmanuel Farhi https://www.nber.org/papers/w19927   *Financial and Total Wealth Inequality with Declining Interest Rates* by Daniel Greenwald, Matteo Leombroni, Hanno Lustig, and Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3789220   *The Saving Glut of the Rich* by Atif Mian, Ludwig Straub, and Amir Sufi https://scholar.harvard.edu/straub/publications/saving-glut-rich-and-rise-household-debt   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Megan Greene on the Future of CBDC and How Central Banks Should Respond to Climate Change

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 53:41


    Megan Greene is a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and was formerly the global chief economist at Manulife John Hancock Asset Management. Megan is also a returning guest to the podcast and rejoins David to talk about the prospects of central bank digital currency as well as how to conduct climate change policy from a central banking angle.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Megan's Twitter: @economistmeg Megan's website: https://economistmeg.com/about/ Megan's Financial Times archive: https://www.ft.com/megan-greene   Related Links:   *Central Banks Need to Go Slow on Digital Currencies* by Megan Greene https://www.ft.com/content/21e3affe-8c57-4bac-b9c5-21b645e93d7c   *Adapting Central Bank Operations to a Hotter World: Reviewing Some Options* by the Network for Greening the Financial System https://www.ngfs.net/sites/default/files/media/2021/06/17/ngfs_monetary_policy_operations_final.pdf   *Megan Greene and Eric Lonergan on Dual Interest Rates and the Prospects of Average Inflation Targeting* https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/podcasts/10052020/megan-greene-and-eric-lonergan-dual-interest-rates-and-prospects-average   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Joseph Wang on the Fed's Impact on Money Markets

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 57:20

    Joseph Wang is a former senior trader on the open market desk at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York and the author of the book Central Banking 101. He also blogs at fedguy.com and is active on Twitter. Joseph joins Macro Musings to discuss what has happened at the Fed from the operational side, and we consider its implications for money markets. Specifically, Joseph and David discuss recent events from the perspective of the Federal Reserve trading desk, Joseph's conception of a two-tiered monetary system, continued dollar dominance in global money markets, whether the Fed's overnight repo facility is truly a temporary facility or trending towards a permanent one, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Joseph's Twitter: @FedGuy12 Joseph's website: http://fedguy.com/   Related Links:   *QE Zombifies Money Markets* by Joseph Wang https://fedguy.com/qe-zombifies-money-markets/   *The Gravitational Pull of Zero* by Joseph Wang https://fedguy.com/the-gravitational-pull-of-zero/   *RRP At The ZLB* by Joseph Wang https://fedguy.com/rrp-at-the-zlb/   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Philippa Sigl-Glöckner on the Debt Brake, German Fiscal Policy, and Full Capacity Utilization

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 48:35

    Philippa Sigl-Glöckner is the director of the German think tank Dezernat Zukunft, or the Institute for Macrofinance, and was formerly a part of the German Federal Ministry of Finance. Philippa joins Macro Musings to talk about fiscal policy in Germany, as well as her new paper, *A New Fiscal Policy for Germany*. Specifically, David and Philippa discuss the historical context for German fiscal policy, the three big economic challenges for Germany, and how the country can achieve full capacity utilization in the future.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Philippa's Twitter: @PhilippaSigl Philippa's website: http://philippasigl.com/ Philippa's Forbes profile: https://www.forbes.com/profile/philippa-sigl-glockner/?sh=383fb0233d30   Related Links:   *A New Fiscal Policy for Germany* by Philippa Sigl-Glöckner, Max Krahe, Pola Schneemelcher, Florian Schuster, Viola Hilbert, Henrika Meyer https://dezernatzukunft.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/A-new-fiscal-policy-for-Germany.pdf   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Jennifer Murtazashvili on Recent Developments in Afghanistan and Lessons for State Capacity Building

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 53:31

    Jennifer Murtazashvili is an associate professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh and directs the Center for Governance and Markets. Jennifer is also an expert on all things Afghanistan, given her experience working there and advising governments and international organizations on issues related to Afghanistan. She also has a new book titled, *Land, the State, and War: Property Institutions and Political Order in Afghanistan*, and joins the show to talk about it. Jennifer and David also discuss the recent developments as well as long-term developments in the country and lessons for state capacity building.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Jennifer's Twitter: @jmurtazashvili Jennifer's University of Pittsburgh profile: https://gspia.pitt.edu/faculty-and-staff/jennifer-brick-murtazashvili   Related Links:   *Land, the State, and War: Property Institutions and Political Order in Afghanistan* by Jennifer Murtazashvili and Ilia Murtazashvili https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/land-the-state-and-war/A7B8C98CB24780A3CC0EA1CD265D888A   *Informal Federalism: Self-Governance and Power Sharing in Afghanistan* by Jennifer Murtazashvili https://academic.oup.com/publius/article-abstract/44/2/324/1873292   *The Politics of Land Property Rights* by Meina Cai, Ilia Murtazashvili and Jennifer Murtazashvili https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3393160   *Bring the Afghans to America* by Benjamin Powell and Alex Nowrasteh https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/homeland-security/568964-bring-the-afghans-to-america?rl=1   *Inside Afghanistan's Cryptocurrency Underground as the Country Plunges into Turmoil* by MacKenzie Sigalos https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/21/bitcoin-afghanistan-cryptocurrency-taliban-capital-flight.html   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Bill Nelson on the Growth of the Federal Reserve

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 51:26

    Bill Nelson is a chief economist and an executive vice president at the Bank Policy Institute. Bill previously was a deputy director of the Division of Monetary Affairs at the Federal Reserve Board where his responsibilities included monetary policy analysis, discount window policy analysis, and financial institution supervision. Bill also worked closely with the BIS working groups and the design of liquidity regulations. Bill rejoins David on Macro Musings to discuss his article titled, “I Don't Know Why She Swallowed a Fly,” which looks back at the significant growth of the Federal Reserve, both in its reach and in its size, since the Great Recession of 2007-09. Additionally, Bill and David discuss steps the Fed could take to return to a reasonably sized institution, conducting policy with a light imprint on financial markets.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Bill's SIFMA profile: https://www.sifma.org/people/bill-nelson/ Bill's BPI archive: https://bpi.com/tag/bill-nelson/ Bill's American Banker archive: https://www.americanbanker.com/author/william-nelson-ab3618   Related Links:   *I Don't Know Why She Swallowed a Fly* by Bill Nelson https://morningconsult.com/opinions/i-dont-know-why-she-swallowed-a-fly/   *Why Do We Need Both Liquidity Regulations and a Lender of Last Resort? A Perspective from Federal Reserve Lending during the 2007-09 U.S. Financial Crisis* by Bill Nelson, Mark Carlson, and Burcu Duygan-Bump https://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/feds/2015/files/2015011pap.pdf   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Arthur Turrell on Economic Data, Modeling, and the Future of Nuclear Energy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 52:13

    Arthur Turrell is the deputy director at the data science campus for the UK Office of National Statistics (ONS). Arthur is also a former researcher at the Bank of England and a nuclear fusion scientist. He joins Macro Musings to talk about his work at the Bank of England, the future of economic data, and his new book on nuclear fusion titled, *The Star Builders: Nuclear Fusion and the Race to Power the Planet*.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Arthur's Twitter: @arthurturrell Arthur's website: http://aeturrell.com/ Arthur's Bank of England profile: https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/research/researchers/arthur-turrell   Related Links:   *The Star Builders: Nuclear Fusion and the Race to Power the Planet* by Arthur Turrell https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Star-Builders/Arthur-Turrell/9781982130664   *Coding for Economists* by Arthur Turrell https://aeturrell.github.io/coding-for-economists/intro.html   *Why Software Is Eating The World* by Marc Andreessen https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424053111903480904576512250915629460   *Solving Heterogeneous General Equilibrium Economic Models with Deep Reinforcement Learning* by Edward Hill, Marco Bardoscia, and Arthur Turrell https://arxiv.org/pdf/2103.16977.pdf   Princeton's *Net-Zero America* Project: https://netzeroamerica.princeton.edu/?explorer=year&state=national&table=2020&limit=200   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Kate Judge and Anil Kashyap on How to Improve US Financial Stability

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 56:18

    Kathryn Judge is a professor of law at Columbia Law School and editor of the journal of Financial Regulation. Anil Kashyap is a professor of economics and finance at the University of Chicago and is a member of the Bank of England's financial policy committee. Kate and Anil join David on Macro Musings to discuss their work on the Task Force on Financial Stability that recently released a report on how to improve financial stability in the US. Specifically, they discuss the origins of the Task Force on Financial Stability, the dynamics of the Treasury Market over the past year, why money market funds are still vulnerable despite an evolving set of regulations, the importance of rich and timely data for regulatory bodies and Congress, normalizing a financial stability mandate across regulatory bodies, the outlook of financial stability over the next decade, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Kate's Twitter: @ProfKateJudge Kate's Columbia Law profile: https://www.law.columbia.edu/faculty/kathryn-judge   Anil's UChicago profile: https://www.chicagobooth.edu/faculty/directory/k/anil-kashyap Anil's NBER archive: https://www.nber.org/people/anil_kashyap?page=1&perPage=50   Related Links:   Report of the Task Force on Financial Stability: https://www.brookings.edu/research/report-of-the-task-force-on-financial-stability/   *Financial Stability Considerations and Monetary Policy* by Anil K. Kashyap and Caspar Siegert https://www.ijcb.org/journal/ijcb2002_5.htm   *The Impact of Treasury Supply on Financial Sector Lending and Stability* by Arvind Krishnamurthy and Annette Vissing-Jorgensen https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304405X15001518   *Reforming the Macroprudential Regulatory Architecture in the US* by Kathryn Judge and Anil Kashyap https://voxeu.org/article/reforming-macroprudential-regulatory-architecture-us   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Larry White on Stablecoins, Money Market Funds, and the History of Free Banking

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 52:42

    Larry White is a professor of economics at George Mason University and is a returning guest to the show. He rejoins Macro Musings to talk about stablecoins, the history of free banking, and money market funds reform. Specifically, David and Larry also discuss the critiques levied against stablecoins, their impact on the banking system, and why stablecoins could be considered the new version of money market mutual funds.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Larry's Twitter: @lawrencewhite1 Larry's GMU profile: https://economics.gmu.edu/people/lwhite11 Larry's Alt-M profile: https://www.alt-m.org/author/white/   Related Links:   *Should We Fear Stablecoins?* by Larry White https://www.alt-m.org/2021/06/24/should-we-fear-stablecoins/   *Taming Wildcat Stablecoins* by Gary Gorton and Jeffery Zhang https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3888752   *Overview of the Recent Events and Potential Reform Options for Money Market Funds* by the President's Working Group on Financial Markets https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PWG-MMF-report-final-Dec-2020.pdf   Larry White on India's Demonetization and Austrian Macroeconomics: https://macromusings.libsyn.com/47-larry-white-on-indias-demonetization-and-austrian-macroeconomics   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Jerusalem Demsas on Problems in the US Housing Market and How to Fix Them

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 53:13

    Jerusalem Demsas is a policy reporter for Vox and joins David on Macro Musings to discuss the state of housing in America and its implications for policy. Specifically, Jerusalem and David discuss the current state of the housing market, whether there is a housing bubble, how the housing shortage creates avenues for discrimination, the dynamics of racism in the US housing market, the impact of zoning laws, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Jerusalem's Twitter: @JerusalemDemsas Jerusalem's Vox archive: https://www.vox.com/authors/jerusalem-demsas   Related Links:   *Housing Constraints and Spatial Misallocation* by Chang-Tai Hsieh and Enrico Moretti https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/mac.20170388   *Is There a Housing Bubble?* by Jerusalem Demsas https://www.vox.com/22464801/housing-bubble-market-crash-supply-shortage-great-recession   *Stuck! The Law and Economics of Residential Stagnation* by David Schleicher https://www.yalelawjournal.org/article/stuck-the-law-and-economics-of-residential-stagnation   *The Housing Shortage Makes Housing Discrimination Much Easier* by Jerusalem Demsas https://www.vox.com/2021/5/26/22453293/housing-supply-shortage-discrimination-real-estate-cover-letters   *America's Racist Housing Rules Really Can Be Fixed* by Jerusalem Demsas https://www.vox.com/22252625/america-racist-housing-rules-how-to-fix   *The Fight Over Housing Segregation is Dividing one of America's Most Liberal States* by Jerusalem Demsas https://www.vox.com/22335749/housing-prices-connecticut-segregation-zoning-reform-democrats-adu-parking-minimum   *Why Does it Cost so Much to Build Things in America* by Jerusalem Demsas https://www.vox.com/22534714/rail-roads-infrastructure-costs-america   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Scott Sumner on What Milton Friedman Would Think of Monetary Policy Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 53:05


    Scott Sumner is the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center. Scott joins David on Macro Musings to discuss Milton Friedman's views and what he might say about some of the recent developments in monetary policy. Specifically, Scott and David talk about nominal interest rates as indicators of the stance of monetary policy, fiscal austerity as means of reducing excessive aggregate demand, Friedman's critique of the Phillips curve and wage and price controls, what Friedman might have said about the recent inflation numbers, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Scott's automated Twitter: @MoneyIllusion Scott's blog: https://www.themoneyillusion.com/ Scott's Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/scott-sumner   Related Links:   *Friedman's Smashing Success­­* by Scott Sumner https://www.econlib.org/friedmans-smashing-success/   *Inflation is a Nominal Phenomenon* by Scott Sumner https://www.econlib.org/inflation-is-a-nominal-phenomenon/   *The Role of Monetary Policy* (1968) by Milton Friedman https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-349-24002-9_11   *What Would Milton Friedman Have Thought of Market Monetarism?* by Scott Sumner https://oxford.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198704324.001.0001/acprof-9780198704324-chapter-15   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Skanda Amarnath on Maximum Employment, Inflation, and the Fed's New Framework

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 51:44


    Skanda Amarnath is the executive director of Employ America and a former hedge fund economist. He rejoins Macro Musings to talk about the fate of the Phillips Curve, the inflation outlook, the Fed's new framework, and his vision for a better monetary policy future. David and Skanda also discuss the Fed's flawed assessment of maximum employment, how to modify the central bank's Summary of Economic Projections, and the significance of capacity constraints vs labor utilization.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Skanda's Twitter: @IrvingSwisher Skanda's Employ America archive: https://employamerica.org/author/skandaamarnath/ Skanda's Medium profile: https://medium.com/@skanda_97974   Related Links:   *Beyond the Phillips Curve: A Dynamic Approach to Communicating Assessments of 'Maximum Employment'* by Skanda Amarnath and Alex Williams https://employamerica.medium.com/beyond-the-phillips-curve-a-dynamic-approach-to-communicating-assessments-of-maximum-employment-c3eff48b2fcf   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Agustin Carstens on Agustin Carstens on Central Banking in Emerging Markets, the Distributional Footprint of Monetary Policy, and Central Bank Digital Currency

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 50:05

    Agustin Carstens leads the Bank for International Settlements or the BIS in his role as general manager and previously served as the governor of the Bank of Mexico. He also served as the deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund. Agustin joins David on Macro Musings to discuss the new BIS 2021 annual report. Specifically, David and Agustin discuss the macroeconomic developments of the past year, the distributional footprint of monetary policy, the evolving role of central banking, and the outlook for central bank digital currency (CBDC).   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Agustin's BIS profile: https://www.bis.org/author/agust%C3%ADn_carstens.htm   Related Links:   *Annual Economic Report 2021* by the BIS https://www.bis.org/publ/arpdf/ar2021e.htm   U.S. Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Cycle* by Silvia Miranda-Agrippino and Hélène Rey https://academic.oup.com/restud/article/87/6/2754/5834728?login=true   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Jason Furman on Overheating, Inflation, and Fiscal Policy in an Era of Low Interest Rates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 53:19

    Jason Furman is a former chair of the Council of Economic advisers and is currently a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Jason is also a professor at Harvard University and he rejoins Macro Musings to talk about overheating, the inflation outlook, and the right way to think about fiscal policy in an era of low interest rates.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Jason's Twitter: @jasonfurman Jason's Harvard profile: https://www.hks.harvard.edu/faculty/jason-furman Jason's PIIE profile: https://www.piie.com/experts/senior-research-staff/jason-furman   Related Links:   *A Reconsideration of Fiscal Policy in the Era of Low Interest Rates* by Jason Furman and Larry Summers https://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/mrcbg/programs/growthpolicy/reconsideration-fiscal-policy-era-low-interest-rates-jason   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Steffen Murau on the Eurozone, International Monetary Architecture, and the Future of the Dollar Zone

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 53:07

    Steffen Murau is a political economist at the Global Development Policy Center at Boston University and specializes in international money and finance. He joins Macro Musings to talk about the Eurozone, its role within international monetary architecture, and the future of the dollar zone. They also discuss balance sheet hierarchies, the roles of European banks compared to their American counterparts, and the fiscal ecosystem present within the Eurozone.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Steffen's Twitter: @steffenmurau Steffen's website: https://steffenmurau.com/ Steffen's GDPC profile: https://www.bu.edu/gdp/profile/steffen-murau/   Related Links:   *A Macro-Financial Model of the Eurozone Architecture Embedded in the Global Offshore US-Dollar System* by Steffen Murau https://www.bu.edu/gdp/files/2020/07/Murau-Eurozone-architecture.pdf   *The Hierarchy of the Offshore US-Dollar System: On Swap Lines, the FIMA Repo Facility and Special Drawing Rights* by Steffen Murau, Fabian Paper, and Tobias Pforr https://www.bu.edu/gdp/files/2021/02/Steffen-Murau-GEGI-Study-2-Feb-2021.pdf   *The Evolution of the Offshore US-Dollar System: Past, Present, and Four Possible Futures* by Steffen Murau, Joe Rini, and Armin Haas https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-institutional-economics/article/evolution-of-the-offshore-usdollar-system-past-present-and-four-possible-futures/B36ED9082CECE54F3F5B8E8F40D15148   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Daniel Smith and Alexander Salter on *Money and the Rule of Law: Generality and Predictability in Monetary Institutions*

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 53:53


    Dan Smith is an associate professor of economics at Middle Tennessee State University and directs the Political Economy Research Institute at MTSU. Alex Salter is an associate professor of economics at Texas Tech University. Dan and Alex join David on a special live episode of Macro Musings to discuss their new book, Money and the Rule of Law: Generality and Predictability in Monetary Institutions. Specifically, they discuss knowledge and incentive problems in setting monetary policy, what is meant by “rule of law,” how to make monetary policy accountable, centralized versus decentralized forms of digital currencies, thoughts on free banking, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Alex's Twitter: @alexwsalter Alex's website: https://www.awsalter.com/ Alex's Free Market Institute profile: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/freemarketinstitute/people/salter.php   Daniel's Twitter: @smithdanj1 Daniel's website: http://www.danieljosephsmith.com/about.html Daniel's MTSU profile: https://www.mtsu.edu/faculty/daniel-j-smith   Related Links:   *Seigniorage in a Cross-Section of Countries* by Reid W. Click https://www.jstor.org/stable/2601207   *Money and the Rule of Law: Generality and Predictability in Monetary Institutions* by Peter J. Boettke, Alexander William Salter, and Daniel J. Smith https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/money-and-the-rule-of-law/C825E982EDE5BD2BE41A99464DC885DB   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    David Andolfatto on a Standing Repo Facility, the Future of CBDC, and Plumbing Issues in Monetary Policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 54:07

    David Andolfatto is a vice president for the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank and has published widely in the field of monetary economics. David also blogs at MacroMania and is a returning guest to the podcast. He rejoins Macro Musings to talk about his thoughts on macro theory, plumbing issues, central bank digital currency, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   David's Twitter: @dandolfa David's St. Louis Fed profile: https://www.stlouisfed.org/about-us/leadership-governance/bank-officers/executive-bios/david-andolfatto   Related Links:   *Some Thoughts on Central Bank Digital Currency* by David Andolfatto https://www.cato.org/cato-journal/spring/summer-2021/some-thoughts-central-bank-digital-currency   *Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee: April 27-28, 2021* by the Fed https://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/files/fomcminutes20210428.pdf   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Mark Carney on *Value(s): Building a Better World for All*

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 54:53

    Mark Carney served as the governor of the Bank of Canada from 2008 until 2013, and as the governor of the Bank of England from 2013 to 2020. Mark also was the chairman of the Financial Stability Board from 2011 to 2018. Mark is currently the Vice Chairman and Head of Impact Investing at Brookfield Asset Management, as well as a UN Special Envoy for Climate Action and Finance. Mark joins David on Macro Musings to discuss his new book *Value(s): Building a Better World for All*, as well as his career in central banking. Specifically, they discuss Mark’s experience at the Bank of Canada during the Great Recession, nominal GDP targeting and average inflation targeting as central bank frameworks, the future of central bank digital currencies, dollar dominance and the shadow banking system, the role of central banks and the financial sector in combating climate change, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Mark’s Twitter: @MarkJCarney Mark’s Brookfield profile: https://www.brookfield.com/about-us/leadership/mark-carney   Related Links:   *Value(s): Building A Better World For All* by Mark Carney https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/669023/values-by-mark-carney/9780771051555   *The Growing Challenges for Monetary Policy in the Current International Monetary and Financial System* by Mark Carney (speech given at Jackson Hole Symposium 2019) https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/speech/2019/the-growing-challenges-for-monetary-policy-speech-by-mark-carney.pdf   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    George Selgin on Inflation, Fintechs, and Broadening Access to Fed Master Accounts

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 55:44


    George Selgin is the director of the Cato Institute’s Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives and is a returning guest to the podcast. He rejoins Macro Musings to talk about the Fed’s recent calls for comments on opening up Fed accounts to fintechs and other non-bank financial firms. George and David also discuss monetary plumbing issues, the state of fiscal QE, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   George’s Twitter: @GeorgeSelgin George’s Cato Institute profile: https://www.cato.org/people/george-selgin   Related Links:   *Keeping Fintech’s Promise: A Modest Proposal* by George Selgin https://thehill.com/opinion/finance/552614-keeping-fintechs-promise-a-modest-proposal   *Central Bank Digital Currency as a Potential Source of Financial Instability* by George Selgin https://www.cato.org/cato-journal/spring/summer-2021/central-bank-digital-currency-potential-source-financial-instability   *Federal Reserve Board Invites Public Comment on Proposed Guidelines to Evaluate Requests for Accounts and Payment Services at Federal Reserve Banks* by the Fed https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/pressreleases/bcreg20210505a.htm   *Aaron Klein on Real-time Payments and Financial Regulation* https://macromusings.libsyn.com/aaron-klein-on-real-time-payments-and-financial-regulation   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Adam Posen on *The Price of Nostalgia: America's Self-Defeating Economic Retreat*

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 55:57

    Adam Posen is the President of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Previously, Adam was on the monetary policy committee of the Bank of England. He has also worked at the New York Fed and has advised many central banks and governments. Adam is also a returning guest to the podcast and re-joins Macro Musings to discuss his new article, “The Price of Nostalgia: America's Self-Defeating Economic Retreat.” Specifically, David and Adam discuss the Fed’s new framework, secular stagnation, the economic impact of demographic changes, the China shock, and how the new political consensus on trade, growth, and the American middle class is short-sighted and self-defeating.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Adam’s Twitter: @AdamPosen Adam’s PIIE profile: https://www.piie.com/experts/senior-research-staff/adam-s-posen   Related Links:   *The Price of Nostalgia: America's Self-Defeating Economic Retreat* by Adam Posen https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-04-20/america-price-nostalgia   *Hysteresis and the Business Cycle* by Valerie Cerra, Antonio Fatás, and Sweta Saxena https://faculty.insead.edu/fatas/hysteresis.pdf   *The China Syndrome: Local Labor Market Effects of Import Competition in the United States* by David H. Autor, David Dorn, and Gordon H. Hanson https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.103.6.2121   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Judge Glock on The Origins of the US Mortgage Market and Its Evolution to the Present Day

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 61:02

    Judge Glock is an economic historian, a scholar at the Cicero Institute, and a returning guest to the podcast. Judge rejoins Macro Musings to talk about the origins of the US mortgage market as detailed in his new book, *The Dead Pledge: The Origins of the Mortgage Market and Federal Bailouts, 1913-1939*. David and Judge also discuss the emergence and evolution of the national US mortgage market, the price parity movement, the history of federal land banks, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Judge’s Twitter: @judgeglock Judge’s blog: https://judgeglock.medium.com/    Related Links:   *The Dead Pledge: The Origins of the Mortgage Market and Federal Bailouts, 1913-1939* by Judge Glock https://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-dead-pledge/9780231192538   *The “Riefler-Keynes” Doctrine and Federal Reserve Policy in the Great Depression* by Judge Glock https://read.dukeupress.edu/hope/article-abstract/51/2/297/137129/The-Riefler-Keynes-Doctrine-and-Federal-Reserve?redirectedFrom=fulltext   *Housing Finance at a Glance* by the Urban Institute https://www.urban.org/policy-centers/housing-finance-policy-center/projects/housing-finance-glance-monthly-chartbooks   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Christina Parajon Skinner on Central Bank Activism

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 55:33

    Christina Parajon Skinner is a legal scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, and formerly was a legal counsel to the Bank of England. Christina joins David on Macro Musings to discuss her work on central bank activism. Specifically, David and Christina discuss comparisons between the Fed and the Bank of England, tensions between central bank independence and executive override, contemporary examples of central bank activism, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Christina’s Twitter: @CParaSkinner Christina’s Wharton profile: https://lgst.wharton.upenn.edu/profile/skinnerc/   Related Links:   *Executive Override of Central Banks: A Comparison of the Legal Frameworks in the United States and the United Kingdom* by Michael Salib & Christina Parajon Skinner https://www.law.georgetown.edu/georgetown-law-journal/in-print/volume-108-issue-4-april-2020/executive-override-of-central-banks-a-comparison-of-the-legal-frameworks-in-the-united-states-and-the-united-kingdom/    *Menace of Fiscal QE* by George Selgin https://www.cato.org/books/menace-fiscal-qe   *Central Bank Activism* by Christina Parajon Skinner https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3817123   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Robert McCauley on the Global Domain of the Dollar and Threats to Its Dominance

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 59:20

    Robert McCauley is a Senior Fellow at the Global Policy Center at Boston University and a Senior Research Associate of the Global History of Capitalism project at the Oxford Center for Global History. Robert also worked at the Bank for International Settlements for 25 years and the New York Federal Reserve Bank for 14 years, and he joins Macro Musings to discuss questions surrounding the global domain of the dollar. Specifically, Robert and David talk about how the US currency rose to prominence internationally in the 1950s, the size and influence of the global dollar zone, dilemmas imposed by dollar demand worldwide, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Robert’s Boston University profile: https://www.bu.edu/gdp/profile/robert-mccauley/ Robert’s BIS archive: https://www.bis.org/author/robert_n_mccauley.htm   Related Links:   *The Global Domain of the Dollar: Eight Questions* by Robert McCauley https://www.bu.edu/gdp/files/2021/02/McCauley2021_Article_TheGlobalDomainOfTheDollarEigh.pdf   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Antonio Fatás on Hysteresis and the Business Cycle

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 56:27

    Antonio Fatás is a professor of economics at INSEAD, an international business school with campuses in Singapore, France, and Abu Dhabi. Antonio joins David on Macro Musings to talk about hysteresis and the business cycle. Specifically, David and Antonio discuss the history of the academic literature on business cycle and trend, the impact of the Kydland and Prescott model, and how endogenous growth models play into hysteresis.   Support Macro Musings and get a free NGDP targeting mug: https://donate.mercatus.org/mug/?utm_source=shownotes&utm_medium=hyperlink&utm_campaign=mug   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Antonio’s INSEAD profile: https://faculty.insead.edu/fatas/ Antonio’s Twitter: @AntonioFatas   Related Links:   *Hysteresis and the Business Cycle* by Valerie Cerra, Antonio Fatás, and Sweta Saxena https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3594152   *Time to build and aggregate fluctuations* by F.E. Kydland and E.C. Prescott https://www.jstor.org/stable/1913386?seq=1   *The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances* by Olivier Jean Blanchard and Danny Quah https://www.jstor.org/stable/1827924?origin=JSTOR-pdf&seq=1   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Matteo Maggiori on the Global Capital Allocation Project, Exorbitant Privilege, and Dollar Runs

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 58:34

    Matteo Maggiori is an associate professor of economics at Stanford University and joins David on Macro Musings to talk about global capital flows, reserve currencies, and the international monetary system. Specifically, David and Matteo also discuss the details of the Global Capital Allocation Project, the US and its status as banker to the world, the possibility we could see a major run on the dollar in the near future, and more.   Support Macro Musings and get a free mug: https://donate.mercatus.org/mug/?utm_source=shownotes&utm_medium=hyperlink&utm_campaign=mug   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Matteo’s Twitter: @m_maggiori Matteo’s website: https://www.matteomaggiori.com/ Matteo’s Stanford profile: https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/matteo-maggiori   Related Links:   The Global Capital Allocation Project: https://www.globalcapitalallocation.com/   *The Rise of the Dollar and Fall of the Euro as International Currencies* by Matteo Maggiori, Brent Neiman, and Jesse Schreger https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/maggiori/files/mns_pandp.pdf   *A Model of the International Monetary System* by Emmanuel Farhi and Matteo Maggiori https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/farhi/files/ims.pdf   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Scott Skyrm on the Dynamics of the Repo Market in 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 47:32

    Scott Skyrm is the Executive Vice President in Fixed Income and Repo at Curvature Securities. Scott joins David on Macro Musings to discuss REPO markets, where they have been and where they are going. Specifically, Scott and David discuss the role of broker-dealers like Curvature Securities in the repo market, how repo markets are tied to treasury markets and government deficit financing, why repo rates have recently entered negative territory, potential reforms to the repo market, and much more.   Support Macro Musings and get a free mug: https://donate.mercatus.org/mug/?utm_source=shownotes&utm_medium=hyperlink&utm_campaign=mug   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Scott’s Twitter: @ScottSkyrm Scott’s Bio: http://curvaturesecurities.com/our-team/#1540493883550-e8ec7543-62d3   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Ed Nelson on Milton Friedman’s Legacy, the Quantity Theory of Money, and His Vision for a Money Supply Growth Rule

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 57:14


    Ed Nelson is a Senior Advisor in the Monetary Affairs Division of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Ed has also previously been a professor and has worked at the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank, as well as the Bank of England. Returning to the podcast, Ed re-joins Macro Musings to talk about his new book, *Milton Friedman and the Economic Debate in the United States: 1932-1972*. Ed and David specifically discuss the life and work of Milton Friedman, as they explore his journey into monetarism, his contributions to the quantity theory of money, how he envisioned a money supply growth rule, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Ed’s website: https://sites.google.com/site/edwardnelsonresearch/ Ed’s Fed profile: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/edward-nelson.htm   Related Links:   *Milton Friedman and the Economic Debate in the United States, 1932-1972: Volume 1* by Edward Nelson https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo47674126.html   *Milton Friedman and the Economic Debate in the United States, 1932-1972: Volume 2* by Edward Nelson https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo47674466.html   *A Monetary and Fiscal Framework for Economic Stability* by Milton Friedman https://www.jstor.org/stable/1810624?seq=1   *Some Unpleasant Monetarist Arithmetic* by Neil Wallace and Thomas Sargent https://www.minneapolisfed.org/research/quarterly-review/some-unpleasant-monetarist-arithmetic   *Money Mischief: Episodes in Monetary History* by Milton Friedman https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/261872   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Dan Awrey on *Unbundling Banking, Payments and Money*

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 57:42

    Dan Awrey is a professor of law at Cornell Law School, a financial markets regulation scholar, and the editor of the Journal of Financial Regulation. Dan joins David on Macro Musings to discuss how to promote greater financial innovation, financial inclusion, and alleviate the “too big to fail” problem by safely unbundling banking, money, and payments in our financial system. Dan and David also go on to discuss tensions in the global shadow banking system, the history of how banks evolved to play such a central role in our financial system, how the law has reinforced this bundling of the banks’ roles, and much more.   Transcript of the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Dan’s Twitter: @DanAwrey Dan’s Cornell Law Profile: https://www.law.columbia.edu/faculty/daniel-awrey   Related Links:   *Unbundling Banking, Payments and Money* by Dan Awrey https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3776739   *Brother, Can You Spare a Dollar? Designing an Effective Framework for Foreign Currency Liquidity Assistance* by Dan Awrey https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2955763   *The Money Problem* by Morgan Ricks https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo22438821.html   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Chris Russo on Existing Fed-Treasury Tensions and Potential Solutions for Fixing Them

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 56:29

    Chris Russo is a Monetary Policy Program Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and has previously worked at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. He joins Macro Musings to talk about the work he is doing on tensions between the Fed and the Treasury’s management of their respective balance sheets. Specifically, David and Chris discuss what these tensions are and what fixes can be implemented to ameliorate the existing plumbing issues.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Chris’s Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/christopher-russo Chris’s Github site: https://christopher-russo.github.io/about/   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Saule Omarova on Emergency Fiscal Facilities and the Missing Architecture of Government Finance

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 58:17

    Saule Omarova is a professor of law and the director of the Jack Clarke Program on the Law and Regulation of Financial Institutions and Markets at Cornell University. Saule joins Macro Musings to talk about the prospects of an emergency fiscal facility, as well as a broader vision for a National Investment Authority. Specifically, Saule and David discuss the need for a third public finance agency, what the mandate of such an authority would be, and how the agency would be structured and held accountable. Saule also answers common objections to her vision such as the potential institutional redundancies, as well as how to prevent cronyism and excessive politicization.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Saule’s Twitter: @STOmarova Saule’s Cornell profile: https://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/faculty/bio_saule_omarova.cfm   Related Links:   *Data For Progress: A National Investment Authority* https://www.dataforprogress.org/a-national-investment-authority   *Why We Need a National Investment Authority* by Saule Omarova https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3566462   *The People’s Ledger: How to Democratize Money and Finance the Economy* by Saule Omarova https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3715735   *What Kind of Finance Should There Be?* by Saule Omarova https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3544103   *White Paper: A National Investment Authority* by Saule Omarova and Robert C. Hockett https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3125533   *The Money Problem* by Morgan Ricks https://www.amazon.com/Money-Problem-Rethinking-Financial-Regulation/dp/022633032X   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Pat Parkinson on the 2020 Treasury Market Meltdown and How to Avoid a Potential Sequel

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2021 56:38


    Pat Parkinson is a senior fellow at the Bank Policy Institute and a 30-year one veteran of the Federal Reserve system, where he served as director of the Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. During that time, he was also a member of the Basel Committee on Banking and advised Alan Greenspan, Ben Bernanke, and Tim Geithner on financial market issues. Pat joins Macro Musings to discuss the treasury market meltdown in March 2020, as well as what we can do moving forward to avoid this issue from happening again. Specifically, David and Pat outline the implementation of a standing repo facility, changes to the supplemental leverage ratio, expanded central clearing, and increased data collection as possible solutions to this problem.     Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Pat’s BPI profile: https://bpi.com/people/pat-parkinson/   Related Links:   *Enhancing Liquidity of the U.S. Treasury Market Under Stress* by Nellie Liang and Pat Parkinson https://www.brookings.edu/research/enhancing-liquidity-of-the-u-s-treasury-market-under-stress/   *US Treasuries: The Lessons from March’s Market Meltdown* by Colby Smith and Robin Wigglesworth https://www.ft.com/content/ea6f3104-eeec-466a-a082-76ae78d430fd   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Kathy Bostjancic on Priorities for the Fed in 2021 and Beyond

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 48:48

    Kathy Bostjancic is the chief US financial economist at Oxford Economics and joins Macro Msuings to discuss the outlook for monetary and fiscal policy in 2021 as well as in financial markets. Specifically, David and Kathy discuss the prospects for Fed policy and personnel under the Biden Administration, immediate concerns facing the Fed as the COVID pandemic continues into 2021, what steps the Fed can take to make their new AIT framework credible, how large scale asset purchases have impacted asset prices and the real economy, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Kathy’s Twitter: @BostjancicKathy Kathy’s Oxford Economics profile: https://www.oxfordeconomics.com/about-us/staff/267824/kathy-bostjancic   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Ricardo Reis on Central Bank Swap Lines, Fiscal Sustainability, and Outlooks for Inflation

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 61:37

    Ricardo Reis is a professor of economics at the London School of Economics and a returning guest to the podcast. Ricardo rejoins Macro Musings to talk about central bank swap lines, the importance of fiscal sustainability, and the outlook for inflation in advanced economies. David and Ricardo also discuss safe asset alternatives, and how to think about inflation, debt, and deficits in a more nuanced way.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Ricardo’s Twitter: @R2Rsquared Ricardo’s LSE profile: https://personal.lse.ac.uk/reisr/   Related Links:   *Central Bank Swap Lines* by Saleem Bahaj and Ricardo Reis https://voxeu.org/article/central-bank-swap-lines   *Central Bank Swap Lines During the Covid-19 Pandemic* by Saleem Bahaj and Ricardo Reis https://personal.lse.ac.uk/reisr/papers/20-covicbswaps.pdf   *The Constraint on Public Debt When r < g but g < m* by Ricardo Reis https://iepecdg.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/mpkrg-201112.pdf   *Inflating Away the Public Debt? An Empirical Assessment* by Jens Hilscher, Alon Raviv, and Ricardo Reis https://www.nber.org/system/files/working_papers/w20339/w20339.pdf   *The New Global Financial Safety Net: Struggling for Coherent Governance in a Multipolar System* by Beatrice Weder di Mauro and Jeromin Zettelmeyer https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2946452   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Robert Kaplan on the Fed’s New Framework, Inflation, and the Post-COVID Economy

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 41:01

    Robert Kaplan is the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Previously, he was a professor and Associate Dean at Harvard Business School, and prior to that was a Vice Chairman of Goldman Sachs. Robert is a returning guest to the podcast, and he rejoins Macro Musings to discuss the Fed's new framework, inflation, interest rates and more. Specifically, David and Robert talk about COVID’s impact on FOMC operations, how demographic trends are impacting productivity, the Fed’s expanding balance sheet, its average inflation targeting framework, and more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Robert’s Twitter: @RobSKaplan Robert’s Dallas Fed profile: https://www.dallasfed.org/en/fed/bios/kaplan.aspx   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Daniel Griswold on US Demographic Decline and the Case for Expanding Immigration

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 49:35

    Daniel Griswold is a senior affiliated scholar at the Mercatus Center and a nationally recognized expert on trade and immigration policy. Dan is also a returning guest is to the podcast, and joins Macro Musings to talk about immigration policy and the outlook for trade policy with the new Biden Administration. Specifically, David and Dan discuss the major demographic decline in the US, and how greater levels of immigration and can solve many of America’s economic concerns.    Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Dan’s Twitter: @danielgriswold Dan’s Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/daniel-griswold   Related Links:   *More Immigration Needed to Offset COVID-19 and America’s Demographic Decline* by Daniel Griswold https://www.mercatus.org/publications/trade-and-immigration/more-immigration-needed-offset-covid-19-and-america%E2%80%99s-demographic   *Half a Million Fewer Children? The Coming COVID Baby Bust* by Melissa Kearney and Phillip Levine https://www.brookings.edu/research/half-a-million-fewer-children-the-coming-covid-baby-bust/   *World Population Prospects 2019: Highlights* by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division at the United Nations https://population.un.org/wpp/Publications/Files/WPP2019_Highlights.pdf   *The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050* by Joel Kotkin https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/298866/the-next-hundred-million-by-joel-kotkin/9781101195703   *Fertility, Mortality, Migration, and Population Scenarios for 195 Countries and Territories from 2017 to 2100: A Forecasting Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study* by Stein Emil Vollset et al. https://www.thelancet.com/article/S0140-6736(20)30677-2/fulltext   *Clashing over Commerce: A History of US Trade Policy* by Douglas Irwin https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/C/bo24475328.html   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Sam Bell on Fed Policy, Personnel, and Politics in 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 50:44


    Sam Bell is the policy director of Employ America, a think tank dedicated to having the economy run at full employment levels. Sam is also known on FOMC Twitter as an influencer when it comes to nominations for the Board of Governors. Sam returns to Macro Musings to talk about what 2021 likely has in store for the Fed. Specifically, Sam and David discuss Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida’s vision for temporary price level targeting, the prospects of Jay Powell and Lael Brainard (and others) for the next Fed chair, the significance of Janet Yellen’s treasury secretary appointment, and the political pressures facing the Fed in 2021.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Sam’s Twitter: @sam_a_bell About Employ America: https://employamerica.org/about/   Related Links:   *Monetary Policy Strategies for a Low-Rate Environment* by Ben Bernanke, Michael Kiley, and John Roberts https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/pandp.20191082   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Caleb Watney on *Cracks in the Great Stagnation* and How to Boost Economic Growth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 55:49


    Caleb Watney is the director of innovation policy at the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) and he joins Macro Musings to talk about his recent piece, *Cracks in the Great Stagnation* and the reasons why we should all be techno-optimists. Specifically, David and Caleb discuss greater skilled immigration, further government R&D spending, innovative energy solutions, and more as ways to help repair an economy plagued by secular stagnation.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Caleb’s Twitter: @calebwatney Caleb’s PPI profile: https://www.progressivepolicy.org/people/caleb-watney/   Related Links:   *Cracks in the Great Stagnation* Caleb Watney https://www.agglomerations.tech/cracks-in-the-great-stagnation/   *The Egghead Gap* by Caleb Watney https://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-egghead-gap   *Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?* by Nicholas Bloom, Charles Jones, John Van Reenen, and Michael Webb https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.20180338   *Is the Rate of Scientific Progress Slowing Down?* by Tyler Cowen and Ben Southwood https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cEBsj18Y4NnVx5Qdu43cKEHMaVBODTTyfHBa8GIRSec/edit   *The Productivity J-Curve: How Intangibles Complement General Purpose Technologies* by Erik Brynjolfsson, Daniel Rock, and Chad Syverson https://www.nber.org/system/files/working_papers/w25148/w25148.pdf   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Scott Sumner on the Princeton School of Macroeconomics and Overcoming Inflationary Fears

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2021 59:03


    Scott Sumner is the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center and a returning guest to Macro Musings. He joins the podcast today to talk about his ongoing work on the Princeton School of Macroeconomics as well as his thoughts on monetary policy in 2021. Specifically, David and Scott discuss the economic contributions of various different Princeton economists as well as how the central bank can overcome inflationary fears and establish further institutional credibility.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Scott’s automated Twitter: @MoneyIllusion Scott’s blog: https://www.themoneyillusion.com/ Scott’s Mercatus profile: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/scott-sumner   Related Links:   *It’s Baaack: Japan’s Slump and the Return of the Liquidity Trap* by Paul Krugman, Kathryn Dominguez, and Kenneth Rogoff https://www.brookings.edu/bpea-articles/its-baaack-japans-slump-and-the-return-of-the-liquidity-trap/   *Great Expectations and the End of the Depression* by Gauti Eggertsson https://www.jstor.org/stable/29730131?seq=1   *The Zero Bound on Interest Rates and Optimal Monetary Policy* by Gauti Eggertsson and Michael Woodford https://www.brookings.edu/bpea-articles/the-zero-bound-on-interest-rates-and-optimal-monetary-policy/   *Methods of Policy Accommodation at the Interest-Rate Lower Bound* by Michael Woodford https://kansascityfed.org/publicat/sympos/2012/mw.pdf   *Bernanke’s No-arbitrage Argument Revisited: Can Open Market Operations in Real Assets Eliminate the Liquidity Trap?* By Gauti Eggertsson and Kevin Proulx https://www.nber.org/papers/w22243   *Japanese Monetary Policy: A Case of Self-Induced Paralysis?* by Ben Bernanke https://www.princeton.edu/~pkrugman/bernanke_paralysis.pdf   *Implementing Optimal Policy through Inflation-Forecast Targeting* by Lars Svensson and Michael Woodford https://www.nber.org/papers/w9747   *Escaping from a Liquidity Trap and Deflation: The Foolproof Way and Others* by Lars Svensson https://www.nber.org/papers/w10195   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth


    Josh Galper on Dealing with Climate Risk and Its Potential Impact on US Financial Markets

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2021 52:30

    Josh Galper is the managing principal at Finadium, an independent consultancy in capital markets, and is deep in the trenches of the money markets, as well as the financial regulatory space. As a returning guest to the podcast, Josh rejoins Macro Musings to talk about some of the big changes we might see in financial regulation, especially as it relates to climate issues under the new Biden administration. David and Josh also discuss the prospects of negative interest rates in the US, the influence of the Financial Stability Board, and how to deal with Treasury and repo market stress in the future.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Josh’s Twitter: @Finadium Josh’s Finadium profile: https://finadium.com/josh-galper-mba/   Related Links:   *Fed Joins Central Bankers Backing Paris Climate Goals* by Martin Arnold https://www.ft.com/content/008a12d2-7736-4db0-af9c-e063a0bcdd7a   *Managing Climate Risk in the U.S. Financial System* by the Climate Market Risk Subcommittee, Mark Risk Advisory Committee of the CFTC https://www.cftc.gov/sites/default/files/2020-09/9-9-20%20Report%20of%20the%20Subcommittee%20on%20Climate-Related%20Market%20Risk%20-%20Managing%20Climate%20Risk%20in%20the%20U.S.%20Financial%20System%20for%20posting.pdf   *Fixing Financial Data to Assess Systemic Risk* by Greg Feldberg https://www.brookings.edu/research/fixing-financial-data-to-assess-systemic-risk/   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

    Macro Musings Producer Special – Recapping 2020 and Looking Ahead to the Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2020 41:19


    As a tumultuous, virus-stricken 2020 comes to an end, David is joined by Macro Musings producer Marc Dupont to discuss the highlights of the show throughout the past year. Specifically, they talk about the big macroeconomic themes and takeaways from the last 12 months, which guests and topics were most popular among listeners, what 2020 may have in store for monetary policy, and more.   A special thank you to all of the Macro Musings listeners around the globe who continue to tune in to the show week in and week out, especially during these tough and uncertain times. Stay tuned for more exciting content as we turn a new page in 2021.   David’s blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth   Marc’s Twitter: @marc_c_dupont   Related Links:   Top 10 Macro Musings Episodes in 2020:   Adam Tooze on Dollar Dominance, the Eurozone, and the Future of Global Finance - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/adam-tooze-on-dollar-dominance-the-eurozone-and-the-future-of-global-finance   Jim Tankersley on the State of the Middle Class and How to Boost Economic Growth - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/jim-tankersley-on-the-state-of-the-middle-class-and-how-to-boost-economic-growth   Eric Sims on New Keynesian Modelling and the Future of Macroeconomics in a Low Interest Rate Environment - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/eric-sims-on-new-keynesian-modelling-and-the-future-of-macroeconomics-in-a-low-interest-rate-environment   Paul Schmelzing on the ‘Suprasecular’ Decline of Global Real Interest Rates - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/paul-schmelzing-on-the-suprasecular-decline-of-global-real-interest-rates   Nathan Tankus on Public Finance in the COVID-19 Crisis: A Consolidated Budget Balance View and Its Implications for Policy - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/nathan-tankus-on-public-finance-in-the-covid-19-crisis-a-consolidated-budget-balance-view-and-its-implications-for-policy   Brad Setser on Addressing the Global Dollar Shortage and COVID-19’s Implications for Worldwide Trade Imbalances - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/brad-setser-on-addressing-the-global-dollar-shortage-and-covid-19s-implications-for-worldwide-trade-imbalances   Matthew Klein on Global Trade, Inequality, and International Conflict - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/matthew-klein-on-global-trade-wealth-inequality-and-international-conflict   Jim Bianco on Policy Responses to the Coronavirus: Details, Implications, and Concerns Moving Forward - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/jim-bianco-on-policy-responses-to-the-coronavirus-details-implications-and-concerns-moving-forward   Jon Sindreu on Global Financial Flows and the Balance of Trade - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/jon-sindreu-on-global-financial-flows-and-the-balance-of-trade   Scott Sumner on How Central Banks Should Respond to the Coronavirus Threat - https://macromusings.libsyn.com/scott-sumner-on-how-central-banks-should-respond-to-the-coronavirus-threat


    Jeanna Smialek on the Year-End Review of 2020 Financial Markets, the Fed, and US Monetary Policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 53:58

    Jeanna Smialek covers the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times, and joins Macro Musings to recap and summarize the highs and lows of US monetary policy during 2020. Specifically, David and Jeanna discuss the recent histories of Federal Reserve rate hikes and the persistence of low inflation, the nascent optimism about the economy at the start of 2020, the Fed’s policy response to COVID, and what lessons the Fed will be taking into the future.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Jeanna’s Twitter: @jeannasmialek Jeanna’s New York Times archive: https://www.nytimes.com/by/jeanna-smialek   Related Links:   *Janet Yellen's Lift Off (CMFA Working Paper No. 001)* by George Selgin https://www.alt-m.org/2020/12/04/janet-yellens-lift-off-cmfa-working-paper-no-001/   *Measuring the Natural Rate of Interest: International Trends and Determinants* by Kathryn Holston and Thomas Laubach https://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/wp2016-11.pdf   David’s Twitter: @DavidBeckworth David’s blog: http://macromarketmusings.blogspot.com/

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