Podcasts about National bank

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Best podcasts about National bank

Latest podcast episodes about National bank

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 11/15/22 - A Bit More than a Con: Nickel and Coining You

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 120:01


The implosion of crypto-giant FTX is nothing new. In fact, it's like an Enron situation with even the restructuring specialist John J. Ray III of Enron taking control of FTX now. Back in February, 2022, Ukraine's Parliament passed a law legalizing crypto currency. President Zelenskyy signed the law and set up a few weeks later ‘Aid for Ukraine', a website to accept crypto donations to fight the war against Russia and to buy bullets and bandages. It was instantly successful, raking in an initial $48-100 million dollars. This digital currency was then transformed into fiat money and put into the National Bank of Ukraine by FTX in an official partnership. The funds kept flowing along with hundreds of billions additional from the United States and largely from the Democratic Party. Much of this money then disappeared. FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried put a backdoor into the system to transfer ten billion to a trading firm, Alameda, run by his girlfriend. Upwards of 2 billion dollars of client money is also missing on top of that. Large sums of money was then dumped back into the Democratic party making SBF the second largest campaign contributor to the party. Furthermore, his mother Barbara Fried is a professor at Stanford who believes in disruptive justice and new property theory, both of which come from the Saul Alinsky and his rules for Radicals, and the World Economic Forum, which scrubbed their website of any relation to FTX. This money laundering operation in Ukraine, with its cousin in the work of Hunter and Joe Biden, is just a bit of the con. It's all part of a process to nickel and coin you until you have nothing and enjoy it.

Victor Media Group
Natalia Warren: Her Journey to Patient Advocacy

Victor Media Group

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 33:41


Natalia Warren was studying for her second master's degree when a painful medical condition changed the course of her life and led her to patient advocacy. She currently serves as the chair and co-founder of the Not A Dry Eye Foundation, the only patient-driven, non-profit foundation focused on raising awareness of Dry Eye Syndrome. Listen and learn from Natalia Warren's experience with dry eye, as well as her perspective on the conflict in Ukraine, the need for patient advocacy in the American healthcare system, and her advice for non-profit organizations. 01:22 -- Guest intro, discussion of Your Dry Eye Mystery Solved 10:00 -- Backstory, what it means to be Ukrainian 14:58 -- Professional journey, becoming a patient advocate 25:43 -- Natalia Warren's Crummer experience 29:31 -- Advice for non-profits Books Your Dry Eye Mystery Solved by Steven L. Maskin and Natalia A. Warren -- https://tinyurl.com/37xvauub Resources Crummer Graduate School of Business -- https://www.crummer.rollins.edu/ Not A Dry Eye Foundation -- notadryeye.org Come Back Alive (Ukrainian Army Charity Fund) -- savelife.in.ua National Bank of Ukraine -- bank.gov.ua Dr. Steven L. Maskin -- drmaskin.com Amazon Smile -- smile.amazon.com Credits Guest -- Natalia Warren, https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalia-warren-9733241/ Production by Victor Media Group, Inc. -- https://victormediagroup.co/ Creator / Host -- J.B. Adams Executive Producer -- Gerard Mitchell Technical/Production Design -- Angel Colon Technical/Production Assistance -- Hao Do Video and Audio Editing -- Anna Hughes

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Student Careers Panel

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 29:42


Students at all levels and institutions were invited to this careers panel where practitioners in various Middle East-related fields will talk through their career paths. Reza Afshar is the Executive Director of Independent Diplomat, a non-profit non-governmental organisation founded in 2004 by British former diplomat Carne Ross to give advice and assistance in diplomatic strategy and technique to governments and political groups. Previously, Reza was head of the team responsible for Syria policy at the UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). During his time at the FCO, Reza also served as head of the Middle East, Asia and Europe Team at the UK Mission to the United Nations (2009 to 2012). He was awarded an OBE in 2012 for his work as lead negotiator on Libya in the UN Security Council. During his 13 years of service, Reza also worked on Iraq (2003-2004), Zimbabwe (leading the UK Foreign Office's crisis team in 2008), and negotiated new arms control protocols relating to cluster munitions and landmines. Hind Hassan is an award winning international correspondent for VICE News covering conflicts, humanitarian crisis and the biggest developing stories from around the world. Since joining VICE News, Hassan has reported on wars and uprisings across the globe including the post-ISIS legacy in Syria, Lebanon's blast demonstrations and the battle over Nagorni-karabakh where her team became the first journalists to independently confirm the use of cluster munitions against civilians in Azerbaijan. Most recently Hassan travelled to Ukraine where she documented war crimes and the devastation caused by Russian bombs in the city of Kharkiv, just 30 kilometres from the Russian border. She was also part of a team that investigated the essential oil industry's frankincense supply chain, uncovering allegations of abuse made against a multi-million dollar American wellness company. Hassan embedded with the Taliban in Afghanistan just months before the group's takeover of Kabul and was on the ground in Jerusalem and Gaza ahead of the military offensive on the Strip. Prior to joining VICE News, Hassan worked as a reporter for Sky News. Ahmed Tabaqchali is a Visiting Fellow at the LSE Middle East Centre and a capital markets professional with over 25 years' experience in US and MENA markets. He is the Chief Strategist of the Asia Frontier Capital Iraq Fund. Ahmed is a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Regional and International Studies (IRIS), and non-resident Senior Fellow with the Atlantic Council - Iraq Initiative. He is a board member of Capital Investments, the investment banking arm of Capital Bank-Jordan. Previously, he was former Executive Director of NBK Capital, the investment banking arm of the National Bank of Kuwait, Managing Director and Head of International Institutional Sales at WR Hambrecht + Co., Managing Director at KeyBanc in London and Director & Head of Capital Markets & Institutional Sales at Jefferies International in London. He started his career at Dean Witter International in London. At the LSE Middle East Centre, Ahmed is researching Iraq's economy and political economy with a specific focus on the economic aspects of the relationship between the GoI (Government of Iraq) and the KRG (Kurdistan Regional Government). Michael Mason is Director of the LSE Middle East Centre. He is also Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environment and Associate of the Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and the Environment. His research interests encompass environmental politics and governance, notably issues of accountability, transparency and security.

MRN Classic Races
MRN Classic Races - 1982 Va National Bank 500

MRN Classic Races

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 137:42


The MRN broadcast of the 1982 Virginia National Bank 500 from Martinsville Speedway Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Customer Experience Conversations
Driving Culture Change in Banking Through VoC, With Mona Ibrahim

Customer Experience Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 30:08


COVID-19 has left a drastic impact on the relationship between digital and face-to-face banking. Mona Ibrahim, Specialist in Service Quality and Voice of Customer at the National Bank of Egypt, explores this change through the area of customer feedback, with insights into the best practices, approaches to complaints, categorisation tactics and data metrics.    Connect with Mona - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mona-ibrahim-98339918b/

Al Ahly Pharos
Pre-Trading Thoughts

Al Ahly Pharos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 6:48


Egypt's foreign reserves were effectively unchanged at nearly USD 33.2 bn in September.The CBE is working on designing onshore non-deliverable forwards (NDFs) and options to hedge against the risk of currency depreciation. The National Bank of Egypt and Banque Misr are now offering 5.30% on three-year CDs and 5.15% on five-year deposits, up from 2.15-2.25%. At least four banks (CIB, HSBC Egypt, Banque Misr, and FAB Egypt) have introduced withdrawal limits on foreign currency for debit and credit cards used abroad.Some local banks have reportedly ramped up FX markup fees for using debit and credit cards abroad, now charging as much as 6% from a prior 3%.Egypt's current account deficit narrowed by 10.2% to USD 16.6 bn in FY 2021-2022. The World Bank expects Egypt's economy to grow at a 4.8% clip in FY 2022-2023.The usage of the Russian Mir payment system and accepting Russian Rubles in Egyptian banks and tourist resorts will become effective over the coming few weeks. Bulgaria is interested in importing liquefied natural gas from Egypt.Some 63k tons of French wheat arrived at Safaga port yesterday. EGX and FRA Head will head on a marketing roadshow for Egypt's capital markets in mid-October. FRA has issued its regulations for future flow securitization.EFIH plans to invest in startups and fintech companies that offer synergies to the Group's subsidiaries.RAYA plans to IPO its subsidiaries Aman Holding and maybe Raya Trade on EGX in 2023.  FWRY is planning to launch its EGP400 million consumer finance business in 1Q23. EGAL started the rehabilitation process for some manufacturing cells in recent weeks, to meet local demand which increased 20% and export demand.Al Babtain Power & Telecom Egypt signed two contracts worth a combined USD52 million with SWDY and Giza Cable Industries.SWDY- Arab Contractors consortium finalized the construction works of Tanzania's Dam. OPEC+ decided to cut crude oil production by two million barrels per day, in a move to support Brent prices. Qatar Investment Authority (QIA) is studying the purchase of a majority stake in PACH by 4Q2022. Tashawer Medical Consultancy Group is in negotiations with UK funds to finance healthcare investments and projects in Egypt's New Administrative Capital and New October.The Minister of Health is eyeing cooperation with the Italian “San Donato Hospital Group” to support the healthcare projects and services offered by the Ministry.MNHD is planning a securitization bond issuance of over EGP1.0 billion within the next six months.MICH will distribute cash dividends of EGP 1.50 per share on two installments (DY11.66%).MCQE  is to distribute a cash DPS of EGP0.50 for FY2021 (DY of 3.4%) on October 25 for shareholders of record on October 20. EKHO converted two million shares' trading-currency into EGP.  

Geldcast: Geldpolitik mit Fabio Canetg
Update | SNB: Mehr Geld für die Banken, weniger für den Staat

Geldcast: Geldpolitik mit Fabio Canetg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 7:11


Die Nationalbank überweist neu mehrere Milliarden Franken pro Jahr an die Banken. Das tut sie, um die Zinsen nach oben zu drücken. Die Folge: Es bleibt weniger Geld übrig für den Bund und die Kantone. Pikant dabei ist, dass die Nationalbank ihr Zinsziel auch mit weniger hohen Zinszahlungen an die Banken erreichen könnte. | Die Inflation in der Schweiz ist mit 3.5 Prozent so hoch wie zuletzt 1993. Die Nationalbank hat deshalb ihren Leitzins im September um 0.75 Prozentpunkte erhöht auf neu 0.5 Prozent. Gleichzeitig schwimmen die Banken noch immer im Geld. | Wie schafft es die Nationalbank, dass die Banken trotzdem bereit sind, neuerdings wieder für Geld zu bezahlen? Weshalb muss sie dafür selbst tief in die Taschen greifen? Und weshalb könnte die Nationalbank ihr Zinsziel auch mit weniger hohen Zinszahlungen erreichen? Das und mehr erfahren Sie im neusten Geldcast Update. Stichworte: Geldmarkt, Gewinnausschüttungen, interest on reserves, SNB Bills, reverse repurchase operations, reverse tiering.

Uncaged Show
UNCAGED With Karl Block & Steve Hanke

Uncaged Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 35:38


Steve Hanke is a Professor of Applied Economics and Founder and Co-Director of the Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise at The Johns Hopkins University; Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute; Distinguished Professor at the Universitas Pelita Harapan in Jakarta, Indonesia; Senior Advisor at the Renmin University of China's International Monetary Research Institute in Beijing; Special Counselor to the Center for Financial Stability in New York; member of the National Bank of Kuwait's International Advisory Board; member of the Financial Advisory Council of the United Arab Emirates; contributing editor at Globe Asia magazine. Karl Block is currently a Partner at Loeb & Loeb where he has worked as a corporate attorney for the last 13 years. Often requested to find solutions for problems that internal legal and business teams cannot solve, Block works closely with counsel, senior management, investors, and boards concerning matters of conflict, strategy, and impediments to growth.

4x4 Podcast
«Politik bedeutet, dass man für etwas kämpft, das richtig ist»

4x4 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 26:02


Die Jungen in der Schweiz haben keinen Bock mehr auf die EU: Gerade mal 6,5 Prozent der 18- bis 34-Jährigen sind heute noch für einen Beitritt. Wie lässt sich das erklären? Fragen wir einen, dessen Herz immer noch für die EU schlägt. * Sparen lohnt sich wieder, Schulden machen nicht... Die Zeit der Negativzinsen ist vorbei. Die Schweizerische Nationalbank hat den Leitzins gestern erneut erhöht – er beträgt nun 0,5 Prozent. Damit will die Nationalbank die weiter steigende Inflation bekämpfen. * Das ist mal ein Spagat. Im Ukraine-Krieg gibt sich der türkische Präsident Erdogan einerseits als Vermittler. Diese Woche hat die Türkei einen Gefangenenaustausch verhandelt. Auf der anderen Seite positioniert sich Erdogan auch mit dieser Aussage: Er erwarte, dass Russland die besetzten Gebiete in der Ukraine zurückgebe, sobald ein Frieden hergestellt sei. * Italien wählt am Sonntag ein neues Parlament. Der Wahlkampf geht langsam zu Ende, heute findet in Rom noch eine grosse Schlusskundgebung statt. Die Parteien haben ihren Wahlkampf aber nicht nur auf der Strasse geführt, sondern auch in den sozialen Medien. Erstmals haben sie auf Tiktok gesetzt. Sie wollen damit jene erreichen, die erstmals im Leben wählen gehen. Ob die Taktik aufgeht, ist allerdings fraglich.

Bloomberg Surveillance
Surveillance: Global Hike Race With Abby Joseph Cohen

Bloomberg Surveillance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 29:43


Danny Blanchflower, Dartmouth Professor & Former BOE Policy Committee Member, warns of an economic disaster ahead. Lisa Shalett, Morgan Stanley Wealth Management Chief Investment Officer, assesses the recent carnage in the markets. Abby Joseph Cohen, Columbia Business School Professor & Retired Goldman Sachs Partner, sees more credit market damage ahead. National Bank of Ukraine Deputy Governor Serhiy Nikolaychuk discusses signs of recovery in Kyiv, the challenge to maintain a focus on monetary policy amid war with Russia, and the need for further funding from the International Monetary Fund.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Børsen Morgenbriefing
Nyt stort rentehop i USA, Nationalbank-direktøren vil stramme op, New York sagsøger Trump

Børsen Morgenbriefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 6:22


USA's centralbank satte igen renten op med 75 basispoint og aktierne tog en rutschetur. Nationalbankdirektør vil have regeringen til at stramme finanspolitikken og advarer om prissprial. New Yorks justitsminister har sagsøgt Donald Trump for svindel. Vært: Lasse Ladefoged (lala@borsen.dk)  

Info 3
Nationalbank beendet Zeitalter der Negativzinsen

Info 3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 14:35


Jetzt sind die Negativzinsen in der Schweiz Geschichte: Die Schweizerische Nationalbank SNB hat am Donnerstag ihren Leitzins um 0,75 Prozentpunkte angehoben und ihn damit wieder in den positiven Bereich gehievt. Was bezweckt die SNB damit und was für Folgen hat das? Weitere Themen: Der Ständerat berät am Donnerstag den sogenannten Mantelerlass für erneuerbare Energien. Das Ziel: Wasserkraft, Wind und Solarenergie sollen stärker und schneller gefördert werden. Die Vorschläge von Bundesrat und Ständerat umfassen rund 100 Seiten. Russland hat im Rahmen eines Gefangenenaustauschs 215 Ukrainer und ausländische Staatsbürger freigelassen. Kiew liess im Gegenzug unter anderem den prorussischen Politiker und Putin-Vertrauten Viktor Medwedtschuk frei. Es ist der grösste Gefangenenaustausch seit Kriegsbeginn.

ZIB2-Podcast
Zu Gast: Robert Holzmann, Gouverneur Nationalbank

ZIB2-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 13:33


Thema: Reicht die Erhöhung der Zinsen gegen die Inflation?

The Community Bank Podcast
Mike Fernandez, CEO of Texas National Bank on How They are Serving Other Bankers

The Community Bank Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 39:19


This week we sit down with Mike Fernandez, CEO of Texas National Bank in Sweetwater, Texas.  We talk about his thoughts on FinTech, the future of community banking, and how they launched a new division aimed at serving other bankers.  The views, information, or opinions expressed during this show are solely those of the participants involved and do not necessarily represent those of SouthState Bank and its employees.  SouthState Bank, N.A. - Member FDIC

Finding Love In The City
Having A Strong Why/ Interview with Emily Lyons

Finding Love In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 22:25


In this episode, I chat with Emily Lyons. Emily Lyons dropped out of high school aged just 16. After a stint working as a nanny in Australia, she moved to Toronto, Canada discovered entrepreneurship. Now, 13 years later, she has launched and scaled multiple businesses, including the leading events agency Femme Fatale Media (over 15,000 staff nationwide), luxury matchmaking agency Lyons Elite, clean beauty company True Glue Beauty, and membership platform The Lyons Den (over 1500 active monthly members). Under Emily's leadership, the companies have received awards and nominations such as the Consumers Choice Award, Top Choice Award, Women Of Influence, and many more. Emily's success and ventures have been featured extensively in business-related pieces in Forbes, Huffington Post, Bloomberg, Entrepreneur, Dr. Oz, and many more. Emily has also garnered the business of massive brands, including Google, Audi, Warner Bros., The National Bank, Dior, and celebrities like Justin Bieber, Jennifer Lopez, Kevin Hart, and Drake. Emily's social media networks total over 250,000 followers. https://www.instagram.com/emilylyoness/ https://www.instagram.com/mindyourbusinesspodcast/ https://linktr.ee/msemilylyons

The Embodied Healing Self with Jen Mons
Ep 151 The Art of Transformational Coaching with Jared Bull

The Embodied Healing Self with Jen Mons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 77:01


Jared Bull is a transformational executive coach and entrepreneur. He works with other coaches, executives, and entrepreneurs from around the world both online and offline to give them the inner tools and external resources to help them bring inner visions to life. He builds company cultures, coaches teams and leaders, and champions a diverse and inclusive world.     His true life started after experiencing heavy combat twice in Afghanistan as a marine where his company was hit with a 50% casualty rate losing many friends. His healing of trauma and inner wounds led him into the transformational executive space. His work has been showcased on 5 different continents, on a YouTube channel of 24 thousand, and also has consulted within Fortune 500 companies such as Principal Financial Group and National Bank of Canada. He is dedicated to showing executives, employees, and companies how to be successful, both internally and externally, despite the volatile environments around them. His worked has been featured across 5 different industries both public and private and within over 15 companies across 13 different countries.   Key Notes: What is the art of transformation How we're driven by curiosity and exploration When and what is the right time to jump right into your full creative effort   Show Notes: (02:02) Jen introduces this week's guest (05:48) Jared shares how his transformation started and how he got where he is right now (07:57) Jared shares how his body going to sleep but his awareness is still fully online (14:30) What mastering the art of transformation looks like (21:40) Jared talks about how he stays neutral state (24:22) How human experience is changing in an exponential rate (32:38) Jared shares what his mantra is (41:45) How we are a force of the human condition and moving the human evolution forward (47:38) How he navigates the time space and how it works (55:38) Jared shares the framework and key concepts of transformation (1:09:36) How you got to get used to not being perceived the correct way and still keep an open heart (1:!2:33) What bliss means   Quotes: (22:19) Language is a validating tool (22:45) Human experience evolves as a culture evolves and grows (53:01) Anything you could ever want is already present to the planet (1:09:16)  The perception can be overwhelming sometimes (1:08:46) The human ego doesn't like to be told what it is, what it isn't and what it is becoming   Connect with Jared: Website: https://transformationalcoaching.co Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetransformationalcoach/ Coaches Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/409709916742083  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TransformationalCoaching  Transformation Class (Mastering the Art): https://bit.ly/3snJNHE   Resources: Website: https://www.jenmons.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JenMonsCoaching  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jen.mons/  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXFG_uyCRg9nxM43jS9mvUg  Prosperity: https://www.jenmons.com/prosperity  13 Moons of Devotion: https://www.jenmons.com/13moons-of-devotion  Meditation Bundle: https://jenmons.simplero.com/meditation-bundle 

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Rejected Early Drafts of Newcomb's Problem by zahmahkibo

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 5:11


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Rejected Early Drafts of Newcomb's Problem, published by zahmahkibo on September 6, 2022 on LessWrong. Discovered inside an opaque box at the University of California and shared by an anonymous source, please enjoy these unpublished variations of physicist William Newcomb's famous thought experiment. Newcomb's Advanced Problem If Omega predicted that, when presented with this exact scenario in a hypothetical context, you would lie about your intentions because you think that somehow matters to an omniscient godlike entity, Box B contains lethal poison gas. Newcomb's Market Before your arrival, Omega created questions for your decision on each of the ten leading prediction markets. If Omega predicted you will one-box, Box B contains one million dollars multiplied by the maximum arbitrage between those markets due to insufficient liquidity. Newcomb's Auction Before making your decision, you must auction off the rights to your winnings via the mechanism of your choice. Box B contains $1,000,000 if Omega predicted that your auction will be won by economist Paul Milgrom. Newcomb's Paradox: Director's Cut Extended Edition (2011 Blu-ray re-release) This four-disc set contains 190 minutes of never-before-seen footage, including: the legendary original "three-box" ending, unaired behind-the-scenes interviews with director John Carpenter and creature designer Stan Winston, a remastering of the 1996 Christmas special, four commentary tracks, and one unsimulated sex scene. Newcomb's Nonfungible Problem If Omega predicted you will one-box, Box B contains a piece of paper with the words "Omega paid [your name] $1,000,000." Newcomb's Condorcet's Paradox Omega's opening explanation quickly derails into a rant at the innumerable evils of first-past-the-post winner-take-all voting systems. If you listen politely for 45 minutes, a world-weary Omega will just give you the money. Newcomb's Prob7em (1995 film) Box B contains Gwyneth Paltrow's head. Fast Times at Newcomb High Box B is always empty, but if you one-box, Omega will think you're cool. Newcomb's Problem (3rd level enchantment spell) Casting Time: 1 actionRange: 60 feetComponents: Verbal, Somatic, Material (two small glass cubes, one quartz and one obsidian)Duration: 1 round A creature of your choice that you can see within range must make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the target takes 3d8 psychic damage and is stunned until the end of its next turn as its mind is overwhelmed by the implications of retrocausality. The spell has no effect if the target is undead or evidentialist. Newcomb's Basilisk If you one-box, Omega will donate the remaining $1,000 toward the creation of a malevolent AI that seeks to torment one-boxers. RE: RE: RE: RE: Newcomb's Paradox Dear Friend, I have decided to contact you regarding a matter that requires your confidentiality and discretion. This is urgent, confidential and profitable Business for both of us to the degree of One Million United State Dollars ($1,000,000 USD). I have placed these Funds in the National Bank of my country and require a trusted Beneficiary to secure their deposit for foreign investments. With your Cooperation I will withdraw these funds into your personal account. I require only $1,000 to satisfy the transfer and processing duties to secure my escape. Sincerely, Crown Prince Agemo The Legend of Newcomb's Gold If you made any friends along the way, Box B is empty. Otherwise it contains $1,000,000. Newcomb's Information Hazard Box B contains $1,000,000 only if Omega predicts that why are you still reading? Omega knows you saw the title and this giant block of text after it. Omega predicts that you already know Omega is going to pull some meta-bullshit and say you only get the money if you skipped over this section as soon as you saw the words "information hazard" or...

Peeling Back the Layers of Your Life®
106: Meres J. Weche - Be Open To The Experience

Peeling Back the Layers of Your Life®

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 56:41


ALL THE WAY FROM SAUDI ARABIA!!! Black Men Living Abroad Series #blackmenlivingabroad My name is Meres J. Weche, and I came of age as an '80s kid in Montreal, Canada. My parents moved to Canada with my younger sister and I from my native Haiti, in the Caribbean, during the 1970s, when I was four years old. Back then, I could only speak Creole and French, but I started learning English when I was 12 by listening to Micheal Jackson's Thriller album. After spending my summers throughout my teenage years in New York City with relatives (the Bronx ... where I 'may' have come across J-Lo at some point in the 6 train on my frequent trips to Manhattan), I became completely fluent by 16. I later called Ottawa and Toronto home. After shocking my family at 17 with a 2-year stint in the Canadian army reserves between school semesters as a Grenadier Guard (yeah, with the red suit and black bearskin hat), I first got the travel bug when I jetted off to London, England at 19 for a 4-month working holiday, followed by a backpacking tour of Europe. Before long, I started feeling the wanderlust calling again. So, I decided to write to the Chairman of the National Bank of Egypt, entirely out of the blue, successfully asking for a summer internship in Cairo, Egypt, at 21 while in university. Sometimes, you just have to ask. www.meresofarabia.com       Peeling Back the Layers of Your Life® Podcast Creator, Host, and Producer:  Loronda C. Giddens  www.lorondacgiddens.com

SRF Börse
Börse vom 31.08.2022

SRF Börse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 2:27


Der starke Franken macht dem Zughersteller Stadler Rail zu schaffen: Der Reingewinn des Konzerns ist um rund 23.9 Mio. CHF gesunken. Konzernchef und Verwaltungsratspräsident Peter Spuhler meint, die Nationalbank hätte einen günstigeren Zeitpunkt für die Bekanntgabe der Zinserhöhung wählen können. SMI: -0.3%

IBJ‘s The Freedom Forum with Angela B. Freeman
The Freedom Forum: Rafael Sanchez, Executive Vice President, Chief Impact Officer & Indianapolis Market President at Old National Bank

IBJ‘s The Freedom Forum with Angela B. Freeman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 79:38


Rafael Sanchez is Executive Vice President, Chief Impact Officer & Indianapolis Market President at Old National Bank. In this episode host, Angela B. Freeman talks with Rafael about diversity, equity, and inclusion from a unique and authentic vantage point as a LatinX male executive in the banking and lending industry, and all the creative ways he and Old National Bank are trying to address so many historical challenges to achieve equitable lending and other inclusive workplace practices.  

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Are You Diluting Your Team's Focus With Too Many Services?

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 35:37


Do you offer too many agency services? Are you trying to be a jack-of-all-trades, making you the master of none? Does your broad service offering dilute your team's focus? Today's guest is an e-commerce expert whose agency works exclusively with one e-commerce platform he believes is better than the rest. In this interview, he talks about what's next in e-commerce and what you should look to improve in your website. Guillaume Le Tual is the Founder and CEO of MageMontreal, an agency committed to building powerful e-commerce websites to increase clients' sales. They work exclusively with the Magento platform. Why? According to Guillaume, the agency tried working with other platforms and found Magento is the best open source e-commerce platform on the market. In this episode, we'll discuss: Narrowing your agency's service offering. Hiring for culture fit and values. Niching down to avoid diluting your team's focus. Sponsors and Resources E2M Solutions: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by E2M Solutions, a web design and development agency that has provided white label services for the past 10 years to agencies all over the world. Check out e2msolutions.com/smartagency and get 10% off for the first three months of service. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Podcast Takeover!! Get to know your Smart Agency Guest Host:  Dr. Jeremy Weisz is the co-founder of Rise25, an agency that helps companies launch and run podcasts profitably. He followed Jason's podcast and eventually joined the mastermind and has been a guest on the podcast before. Today, he's helping Jason bring something new to the Smart Agency podcast audience by interviewing a special guest and bringing a new perspective to the show. Narrowing Your Service Offering and Focusing on a Horizontal Niche Guillaume started his career as a visual artist building background art for clients like The National Bank of Canada and Warner Bros. He gained experience in web design, digital marketing, and e-commerce and eventually decided to start his agency, MageMontreal. According to Guillaume, he and his team tried dozens of other e-commerce platforms before settling on working exclusively as a Magento agency.  They offer complete e-commerce website design and development, maintenance, and integration of Magento with third-party software. Now, they are one of very few Magento-certified agencies in Canada and can see the best decision for their business was focusing on one very specific niche and cutting down on their service offering to be the very best at just one. Remember, a niche can be a specific market (vertical niche) or a specific skillset (horizontal niche). What's Next in E-Commerce? Guillaume says we're still a long way from truly developing AI to what we've seen in movies. Most companies are not at a point where they are truly using AI. However, it is used in for things like product recommendations. Using Adobe Sensei, for example, users can get product recommendations based on shopper behavior, popular trends, and product similarity. If a suggestion does not convert into a sale, next time it will make a different suggestion, which indicates that the machine is learning. That would be the low-hanging fruit available right now. It can also be used to improve the search bar, for example, to get more relevant search results. It's really a step-by-step process to integrate this technology into your company. It requires prior steps like cleaning up your data and standardizing your processes to be able to implement this. After implementing marketing automation at every step of your email process and onboarding process, the next level would be using AI to help you run that. There's also some interesting work done with progressive web apps (PWA). Basically, this is a hybrid between a native app and a website so you get the benefits of both. So even though it's a website, in terms of maintenance you don't have to constantly download the latest version of the app. It's a website, so you always have the latest content. It also has some limited offline capabilities. And it includes push notifications for marketing like you would have with a native app. Hiring For Values and Resourcefulness When it comes to his hiring process, Guillaume prioritizes the agency's values. He recommends not overcomplicating it and having a list of three or four things the candidates must comply with. “Do not compromise when it comes to your values,” he advises. Whether it's sales or HR, if the candidate does not meet these requirements, they're not the right fit for your agency. Also, take your time with the process if you have to because rushing leads to mistakes. Above all, he prioritizes a strong work ethic and desire to provide the best possible service. He asks candidates to provide examples of times they feel they provided excellent customer service. He also looks for resourcefulness. Sometimes it can be an issue when an employee comes from a big company to work at a smaller agency. They might be accustomed to having more resources, and it's important to Guillaume the employees show they can figure out creative solutions without those resources. Replacing Yourself in the Daily Agency Operations He recently hired a Head of Project Management, an operations role not yet running without him. Originally, he was going to hire from within but was surprised to find an outside person who fit this role. After making sure it was a good fit for the agency, he delegated tasks and immediately saw a difference. It was a game changer between when he organized everything a having a person with operational expertise. With someone in charge of organizing the pile of things to do and delivering on all of it, he completely removed himself from the client services process. Stop Diluting Your Team's Focus and Be an Expert Do you offer a very wide set of services? Looking back, that was MageMontreal. They handled everything from website building and design, SEO, pay-per-click, social media, IT support. At one point, Guillaume checked Apple's website and realized he offered more services than Apple. He decided at that point this needed to change because doing too much was diluting his team's time and focus. You can successfully offer such a wide variety of services, but you need a staff of hundreds in order to do it properly. So, he decided to cut down his offering and focused on just their expertise. Overall, his agency helps clients with website building and some consulting. However, for other services like marketing and hosting they usually refer clients to their partner agencies. Want the Support of Amazing Digital Agency Owners? If you want to be around amazing agency owners that can see you may not be able to see and help you grow your agency, go to the Digital Agency Elite to learn all about our exclusive mastermind.

Purpose-Driven Wealth
Episode 37 - Developing Master-Planned Communities and Workforce Housing

Purpose-Driven Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 50:28


In this episode of Purpose-Driven Wealth, your host, Mo Bina, and Matt Smock discuss what it takes for investors and developers to find success in master-planned communities. Zenith Development LLC is a boutique development company with nine employees, hundreds of contractors, and many more partnering bodies. Here, Matt explains why he considers real estate a local-focused industry, why they take so much interest in Utah, and their overall process and approach to developing master-planned communities. In this episode, Matt talks about: In real estate, what works here may not work there Utah is like Los Angeles Why do some master-planned communities fail Matt on their process of development Investors must always hold transparency to a high degree and so much more! About Matt Smock:   Mr. Smock is an experienced and successful fund manager, real estate developer, banker, and short-term lender, who has participated in the finance and development of over $2.0 billion in projects in the western US and Europe. Mr. Smock has worked for RBH-NCP, Zenith Swiss Partners, Nation West Capital, National City Bank, CFC, Franklin Bank, Mount Royal Partners, and National Bank of Canada.   Follow Matt Smock on:   Website:          https://www.zenithpartners.org/ Email:              matt@zenithpartners.org   Connect with Mo Bina on:   Website:          https://www.high-risecapital.com/ Medium:          https://mobina.medium.com/   For more information on passive investing in commercial real estate, please check out our free eBook — More Doors, More Profits — by clicking here: https://www.high-risecapital.com/resources-index      

Fired Up
Sunday, August 14: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:32


Sunday, August 14: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

serve national bank firedup network
Fired Up
Sunday, August 14: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:41


Sunday, August 14: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

Fired Up
Sunday, August 14: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Final

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:21


Sunday, August 14: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Final by FiredUp Network

serve national bank firedup network
Fired Up
Sunday, August 14: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Final

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:32


Sunday, August 14: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Final by FiredUp Network

Fired Up
Saturday, August 13: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 0:36


Saturday, August 13: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

serve national bank firedup network
Fired Up
Saturday, August 13: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 0:41


Saturday, August 13: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

Fired Up
Friday, August 12: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 0:56


Friday, August 12: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

serve national bank firedup network
Fired Up
Friday, August 12: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 1:05


Friday, August 12: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

Fired Up
Thursday, August 11: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update Toronto

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 1:33


Thursday, August 11: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update Toronto by FiredUp Network

Fired Up
Thursday, August 11: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 1:09


Thursday, August 11: The Serve Men's National Bank Open Update by FiredUp Network

serve national bank firedup network
Fired Up
Wednesday, August 10: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update Toronto

Fired Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 1:18


Wednesday, August 10: The Serve Ladies National Bank Open Update Toronto by FiredUp Network

Good Show
Ailish Hour: Bianca Andreescu on Serena Williams' Retirement and the National Bank Open

Good Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 49:14


Michelle Beadle, host of the What Did I Miss? podcast, joins Ailish to discuss Kevin Durant presenting an ultimatum to Nets owner Joe Tsai and the Raptors' outlook for next season. Then, Canada's own Bianca Andreescu stops by to discuss Serena Williams announcing her decision to retire after this year's US Open, her long-awaited return to the National Bank Open, and the challenges of overcoming injuries over the past few years (25:33). Afterwards, Jonathan Osorio, midfielder for Toronto FC and Team Canada, checks in to discuss Toronto FC's playoff push, the buzz surrounding the club since the additions of Lorenzo Insigne and Federico Bernardeschi, and his strong MLS campaign (36:02). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate.

Good Show
Hour 2: Merrifield Early Returns, TFC Wins Again, and National Bank Open Primer

Good Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 51:25


Julia Kreuz, Blue Jays reporter for MLB.com, joins Ailish and Justin to discuss the overturned call at the plate on Sunday, early impressions of Whit Merrifield, George Springer's durability concerns, and Mitch White's debut over the weekend. Then, Peter Galindo, soccer writer for Sportsnet, weighs in on Toronto FC's 4-3 win over Nashville on Saturday and Richie Laryea's return to the club (27:16). Later, Jesse Levine, former ATP pro and current Sportsnet analyst, checks in from Montreal to discuss the start of the National Bank Open, Leylah Fernandez's return from injury, and Felix Auger-Aliassime taking the court in his hometown (39:58). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate.

Good Show
Ailish Hour: World Juniors in August?! + Carly Agro Previews the National Bank Open

Good Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 48:10


Carly Agro, courtside reporter for Sportsnet at the National Bank Open, joins Ailish to discuss the buzz surrounding this year's tournament, Bianca Andreescu's tumultuous journey since winning the 2019 US Open, the Williams sisters being in Toronto, and Leylah Fernandez's return from injury. Afterwards, Scott Wheeler, NHL Draft and prospects writer for The Athletic, stops by to chat about the Maple Leafs' 2022 draft picks, the tenor surrounding this summer's World Juniors tournament, and Connor Bedard's growth since the World Juniors were initially postponed back in December (26:31). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate.

OverDrive
Masters on the Hockey Canada allegations, new additions to the World Junior team & teeing up the National Bank Open

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 12:59


TSN Reporter Mark Masters joined OverDrive to chat about the allegations within Hockey Canada, the effect it has on the current World Junior roster, the new and old additions to the team, leadership needed from McTavish for this year's tournament and his expectations for Canadian Tennis stars at the National Bank Open.

Weaver: Beyond the Numbers
Dark Clouds on the Horizon.... Where does Real Estate go in the Current Environment?

Weaver: Beyond the Numbers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 27:42


On this episode of Location Cubed, Rob Nowak and Howard Altshuler sit down to discuss recent economic news. They focus on JP Morgan's earnings as well as the Fed's release of the Beige Book and what those insights tell us about the real estate industry.To preface it all, Altshuler said, “real estate is always still local. We have to look at it from the standpoint that each market is going to be different.” The conversation turns to cracks that are showing in the façade of the real estate market. “One is home sale contract cancellations, which are up,” said Nowak. Due to an increase in interest rates, negotiated home contracts are increasingly being canceled. The contracts, which determine a certain price, may be beyond the buyer's means due to the hike in interest rates. “That tells me that people may have overextended themselves,” said Nowak. According to the Washington Post, interest rates averaged 2.88% in July 2021 and were averaging 5.3% in mid-July 2022. “A good rate is 5-6%, a few months ago it was 3-4%,” said Altshuler. Altshuler predicts that some buyers who were ready to leave multi-family homes are now staying, which shows a promising turn for that sector of the market.The episode continues to explore what the reports mean for other sectors of the economy. “The question isn't ‘is there going to be a recession? Is there going to be a decrease in value?' That's probably a given. The question becomes, ‘how much?'” said Altshuler. “The National Bank said, ‘We're starting to reserve for consumer credit.' A consumer credit crisis will drag on the housing market.” said Nowak.Subscribe to the Location Cubed podcast on Apple Podcasts and Spotify for the next episode of this series.Learn about upcoming real estate webinars and subscribe to Weaver's event invite list.©2022

Brandon Baxter In The Morning
AMS w/ Brandon & Kelly - 08/03/22 | The One With Coach Butch Jones

Brandon Baxter In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:48


*** Top Golf coming to Little Rock *** Arkansas' Morning Show High Five - Southwest intros first mother/daughter co-pilot team *** CMA Fest airs tonight on ABC *** Brandon gives a shout out to his idol Dane Cook, on his recent engagement *** KFIN BREAKFAST CLUB powered by Families Inc: *** Coach Butch Jones: Head Coach A-STATE Football - Training Camp *** Elea Allen - 1st National Bank hosting: Annual Golf Tournament for Arkansas State Police Foundation *** Jerrica Fox - American Red Cross: Future blood drives and the need for O+ and O- blood types *** Rodney Poff - Occasions Magazine: Jonesboro Event Roster *** Wet Nose Wednesday w/ Dr. Kevin Reed: Pet care with Vetcare ***

Info 3
Nationalbank im Minus: Kantone haben wohl das Nachsehen

Info 3

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 13:32


Die Schweizerische Nationalbank hat im ersten Halbjahr 2022 einen Verlust von fast 100 Milliarden Franken gemacht. Für die Kantone ist das keine gute Nachricht. Sie erhalten ihren jährlichen Zustupf in Milliardenhöhe durch die SNB nämlich nur, wenn diese genügend Gewinn macht. Weitere Themen: Vielerorts muss der 1. August in diesem Jahr ohne Feuerwerk gefeiert werden. Wegen der Trockenheit und der Waldbrandgefahr haben viele Gemeinden ein Verbot verhängt. Der Feuerwerksbranche bereitet das Sorgen. Ihr bricht ein Grossteil des Jahresumsatzes weg. In der Schweiz mangelt es zunehmend an Wohnungen, vor allem in den Städten, aber immer öfters auch in der Agglomeration. Experten gehen davon aus, dass sich die Situation in nächster Zeit noch verschärfen wird.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E47 - This Month In The Apocalypse with Margaret, Brooke, and Casandra

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022


Episode Notes Episode summary In this new monthly segment, members of the Strangers Collective discuss current events as they relate to community preparedness. If you're watching the news and wondering what's going on with inflation, supply chain shortages, the heat "wave", or Q'anon talking about space lasers and the black holes that are causing all of this, tune in. The group breaks down the mechanics of inflation, why prices are what they are, why we're seeing shortages, and ways you can prepare now for when things get worse. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript This Month In The Apocalypse Margaret 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcast for feels like the times. I'm one of your hosts, Margaret killjoy, because joining me today are two other co-hosts if y'all want to introduce yourself. Casandra 00:28 I'm Cassandra. Brooke 00:30 I'm Brooke. Margaret 00:32 And today, we are starting a new, a new fun series talking about all the fun stuff that's going to be coming your way soon. It's called This Month In The Apocalypse, because we've realized that on this podcast, we talk a lot with different people about how to do different skills, about different specific issues, but there's so much happening these days that it seems worthwhile to kind of keep track of this as it happens, all the different things that are happening, I don't know, does that decent description of what the hell we're trying to do? Casandra 01:09 Yeah. Margaret 01:11 And you will be excited to know that this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts, and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Jingle song 01:24 It's going down, and you're invited for what they sell it. We buy in, there is no running. There is no hiding. There's only fighting or dying. It's going down, and you're invited for what they're selling, we aint buying. There is no running. There is no hiding. There's only fighting or dying. Jingle Host 01:53 It's going down is a digital Community Center from anarchists, Anti-Fascist, autonomous, anti-capitalist and anti-colonial movements. Our mission is to provide an autonomous and resilient platform to publicize and promote revolutionary theory and action. Jingle Host 2 02:10 Go to itsgoingdown.org for daily updates, check out our online store for ways to donate and rate and follow us on iTunes if you like this podcast Margaret 02:27 We're back from the jingle. I'm used to having another podcast where there's actual ads, which sucks. And so I don't know how to talk anymore. So, nothing really happened this month and everything is continuing as it should. I believe there's no major supply chain interruptions nothing forecasted bad to happen. Does that that match with the yall's understanding? Brooke 02:54 Yeah, good done, end of pod. Move on with our lives. Margaret 03:01 What do we want to talk about first? Want to talk about shortages? All the stuff there's shortages of? Brooke 03:09 Sure. Casandra 03:10 Yeah, I was looking at a list. And it's it's just everything. They're shortages in everything. Margaret 03:16 Give me some example. Casandra 03:17 It started out like meat, dairy, eggs. And then it was like produce, aluminum for packaging things, plastic packaging things, fuel to get things to places. Margaret 03:27 Yeah, one of the things I was trying to think about was like, you know, when I was looking through, it seems like some of the things that they're shortages of there's shortages of from a supply chain point of view, sort of a temporary point of view, right? Like, like one of them is like pet food. I saw that one and I like freaked out. It's like I have a pet. You know, do I need to fill my basement with like a like a ball pit, but just full of kibble? Brooke 03:52 Ongoing forumla shortage issues. Margaret 03:55 Yeah. Well, but and what's interesting is to try and figure out which of these things are....the pet food issue, at least as I saw was a little bit different than some of the other ones. It actually more is about there's increased demand, because locked down got more people to decide to become closer buds with different creatures that aren't human that eat pet food. And, I guess there's a word for those. And so... it'sprobably in the word pet food. Food. People decided to become friends with different food. Shit, I'm supposed to be the vegan on this podcast. Okay, so.... Brooke 04:30 We're off to a banging start. Margaret 04:34 Hell yeah. So pet food, it seems like the shortage is, at least at the moment more just that like there's a lot more demand for pet food. And, so therefore, like people are rushing to keep up. Kind of like the mask shortage at the beginning of the pandemic wasn't like, "Oh God, we're out of the capacity to produce masks." They just were like, "Oh, we need to like ramp up our infrastructure." And so there's like some of it like that. But, then it seems like some of the other shortages are a little bit more because there's not the capacity to either create the thing, or distribute the thing. I don't know, you all know more about this. Casandra 05:09 Or even there's...I think about crops, like there's the ability to create the thing, but not to actually harvest and process the thing. It's seems like every step along the way, is having issues. Brooke 05:23 Right. And if you've got issues with plastic and aluminum, then you can't package the thing. So, maybe you could make it and maybe you even can ship it, but you pack it up. But, there's also then lots of problems with actually transporting it from place A to B. Margaret 05:40 One of the things...Okay, I was reading a list too. And I came up with this clever segue. So I'll just draw too much attention to the fact that I planned this ahead of time. One of the things that there's a supply chain shortages of, I was like, looking through this list, and one of them was garage doors. And that's not something that I think about on a regular basis. I just don't think about whether or not I could go down to the store and buy a garage door today. Right? But it has all of these like, cascading effects. And like, I don't know, you all were having this interesting conversation that I'm trying to trick you into having, again, about housing and the ability to construct homes and all that shit. Casandra 06:21 Oh, I thought you were referencing the conversation about how I actually need a new garage door. And I was like, "Oh, I don't think that's useful. I don't think that's useful on this podcast, Margaret." Margaret 06:30 I was just gonna embarrassingly admit that I have two garage doors, because I live rurally and there's multiple garages on the property. So, I just feel like I'm kind of like, you know, I'm stealing doors. Casandra 06:44 Rich in doors! Brooke 06:46 Well, I mean, technically, Cassandra and I also both have two garage doors, because we have two car bays in our garage and each has a separate door. So we are all two garage door people. Casandra 06:57 Door Priviliege. Door Privilege. Yeah, no, what you actually asked me about was much more useful. Margaret 07:02 Okay. Casandra 07:06 Brooke, please help. Brooke 07:09 Yeah, well, I feel like it came up, because you know Cassandra, you are renting your current house and would love to buy it and have wanted to buy it for a while. And so, you and I keep having these conversations about everything going on with the housing market. Margaret 07:27 So let's talk about that. Casandra 07:28 Right before Covid, it seemed like a good time to buy a house. And then six months later, it seemed awful. And it seems like it's just getting worse. Brooke 07:38 Yeah, that's super accurate. And for just a whole bunch of different reasons. I mean, housing has been overpriced for a while and has gotten just exponentially more so. The cost of housing is outrageous. But then the bigger kicker in the last year is interest rates on mortgages have doubled. So you know, they went from a place where they were at like 3 or 4%, which is actually really pretty reasonable. And now they're up between, like closer to 6%, on average, most of the time, which is not a good interest rate. And one of the things that we saw before the fall of the housing market back in '08, was these super high interest rates, you know, 7-8%, or some of the really predatory lending stuff, people will have them at 10-12%. And we're not quite seeing that. But we are seeing with things like the 6,7,8% interest rates right now, which is not good. Margaret 08:33 Does that mean we're heading for similar places as 2008? Like, how does the how do these compare? I feel like you know, a little bit more about this. Brooke 08:39 Yeah, the the underlying factors that are causing our current bubble, are very different from what we saw in 2008. The ultimate outcome will be a lot the same in a housing crash, and people not being able to afford their mortgages and all the ripples through the economy and whatnot. But, the underlying causes are different. One of them is that the inflation has been on the rise. And so mortgages, you know, we tend to think of a mortgage as a thing that we have in order to buy our house. But from a bank's perspective, a mortgage is a commodity, it's a product that they're buying and selling. So anytime you see prices for products on the rise, mortgages are going to be one of those products that become more expensive. Margaret 09:24 How does this affect renters? Like I would guess, sort of maybe rudely that most of our listeners are renters, and, you know, is it like is that just kind of cause rents to go up if the fact that like if if mortgages are getting harder and harder for landlords like... Casandra 09:40 Well, rents are already going up, at least here. I guess I wonder how much that's related, though. Margaret 09:47 No, I don't know. Is it just going up because of inflation? Casandra 09:49 Yeah, i think it's just general inflation. Yeah. Margaret 09:51 Which is interesting, though, right? Because one of the advantages of homeownership, it seems to me is that it's slightly more inflation resistant, because If your interest stays the same as locked in of whatever you bought it at, you know, and so...and the amount you owe, the bank doesn't go up to match interest. So the landlords have any excuse at all for jacking up rents? Because it's not like they're not like their mortgages have gone up, you know, the same amount is as interest. Brooke 10:21 Well, if they're requiring, if they're using the mortgage payment that you're making in order to fund their life that's their source of income is the profit, you renting the house. Then their costs for all of their other goods in life are going up, so they need to make more money off of the thing that pays them, i.e. the renter, Margaret 10:42 It doesn't seem like a good system, the idea that someone can just make money off of someone else's work instead of their own work. That doesn't that doesn't sound right. That sounds like Communism. It doesn't actually sound like Communism. But that is what people claim. Brooke 11:01 It's incredibly problematic. Margaret 11:04 So landlordism, not not a good... Casandra 11:07 Not great. Margaret 11:09 Hot take. Brooke 11:10 I do not stand. I do not stand the landlords. Casandra 11:13 I hope my landlord doesn't listen to this podcast. Brooke 11:17 If he's the kind of person who listens to this podcast, he should just give you your house. Casandra 11:21 It's true. Shout out to my landlord. Margaret 11:23 And if you're a landlord listening to this, sell your houses to your renters at reasonable rates. Casandra 11:32 Right? Margaret 11:32 Or just give them if you can afford it. Brooke 11:35 Yeah, we were talking about the interest rate the other day, Cas, I think you had some good questions about...you had a bunch of good questions the other day that I would love to talk about here on the pod to if you want. Casandra 11:47 Oh shit, I wonder if I can remember what my questions were. The other day, it was a long time ago. Brooke 11:54 Understood. And also, you know the answers, so you're not wondering anymore. Casandra 11:59 Yeah. Or I just got confused and forgot, which is also possible. Margaret 12:05 That's what I would have done if someone explained many things to me. Casandra 12:08 Yeah, that's generally what my brain does as well. That's why Brooke's here. Thank you, Brooke! Brooke 12:13 Sorry, I guess we should have done in the introduction why I'm relevant too. Margaret 12:19 Yeah, okay. Well, so like, so folks who've listened, if you've listened before, you've probably met me. You might have met Casandra. Casandra has been on a few more times recently. Brooke, who are you? Brooke 12:35 I am a baby anarchist with the pronouns "she" and "her", living in Oregon, relatively near to Casandra. And I have a background in economics and accounting, because before I was an anarchist, I was a capitalist. I'm sorry. And I thought that capitalism was good and fine. And I did a whole lot of time studying and learning about it. And now I like to use all of that knowledge and understanding to talk about how bad capitalism is. Margaret 13:09 I mean, the person who did the most work researching capitalism was Karl Marx. Like, as far as I understand, like, a lot of capitalists were like, "Ah, yeah, that that's what we're doing," you know, after he like, actually wrote down how capitalism works. Just had different takes about whether it was good or bad. So, you know, I dunno. Yeah, so, so we've been talking about...and Brooke is part of Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, the publishing collective that puts out this podcast as well as other good things, like a podcast with it's the name Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness that you can listen to also. And so we just, we've been having a lot of conversations amongst ourselves about like, "Well, what the fuck we going to do as people as all this crisis happens?" And then we were like, "Oh, right, we should, we should talk about this stuff more." So... Casandra 14:02 l remember. Margaret 14:04 Great. Casandra 14:06 Thanks for that, giving me time to remember. So, I asked about your interest rates. The last time they were this high was 1984. And theoretically they're hiking up interest rates to help deal with inflation, which doesn't make sense to me. But Brooke, you had you understood that? Brooke 14:33 Yeah, because when you mentioned the thing about the interest rates, I was like, "Wellllll, not actually." Because the interest rate that we hear about a lot in the news is the Federal Funds rate, which is set by the Federal Reserve, which is the National Bank that we have in our system. It's basically the bank that our banks use, so all of your US banks and Chases and all of that, they bank at the Federal Reserve. And that's the interest rate that we're talking about is the Federal Reserve's rate that they pay to banks to store money with them. So you're a bank, and you are legally required to have a certain amount of your cash saved at the Federal Bank. It's like 10% of your holdings have to be there. And then the government says, "Thanks for letting us sit around and hold on your money, here's some interest." And to incentivize banks to save more of their money, they've raised that interest rate. So that's the one that you've heard about that's higher than it's been since 1984. Margaret 15:39 Oh, interesting. Brooke 15:40 And it's not directly tied to the other types of interest rates, like loan interest rates, you know, mortgages and credit cards and cars and stuff. But it definitely influences them, because when you look at it from a bank's perspective, like you walk down to your neighborhood bank, and you want to take out a loan from them, they have the choice to get a certain guaranteed interest rate from the Federal government, which is super secure, they're gonna get their money back, they're gonna get their interest, you know, think safe over there, or to loan you a consumer money and gain interest from you. And they only want to give you money, if they can make more on it than they would by loaning it to the Federal government, especially because you as a consumer might be taking it out for like, a mortgage loan, which is going to be 30 years, let's say, so the banks not going to get their money back for a much longer period of time. Whereas with the Federal government, they can go anytime and say, "Hey, I need some of my money," and get it right then. But you as the consumer, they can't. So, they charge you the consumer higher level of interest. So, whatever the federal interest rate is, the bank is going to then want to set its interest rates that it charges to people higher, so it can make more money. And if you can't afford to pay that higher interest, the bank is like, "Fine, I can load my money to the government, and still make still make money off it." Margaret 17:05 So how does this relate to inflation? How does this relate to everything costing more money now and like, you know, you're saying that they were like, they're doing this to solve it, it sounds like it would make it worse to me, I don't know shit about shit. But... Brooke 17:20 Yeah, so they're trying to make money more valuable. So right now, because inflation is high....Let's say you have $1 in your pocket, and you go buy a banana today, and that banana costs $1. So your dollar equals a banana. Let's say you decide to buy a banana tomorrow, and you still only have $1, but the price of the banana has gone up to $1.10. You no longer have one bananas worth of money, in this situation, Margaret 17:51 92% of a banana or something. Brooke 17:55 It's too high for a banana, but that was the first thing that came to mind. Anyway, so they want to curb that inflation so that tomorrow you can still buy your banana for $1. But in order to do that, they have to make your money more valuable, in a sense. And they do that by removing some of the money that's out there in the world. Casandra 18:18 It's...is it possible I'm an anti-capitalist just because the shit can.... Brooke 18:21 Doesn't make sense? Casandra 18:22 Yeah. Brooke 18:23 Yeah, you have to stop thinking about money, the way that we as normal human beings think about it as like, "I give you this stupid thing and you give me something good and useful." And think about it in terms of a bank that thinks of it as a product. So their money is a product that they can buy and sell and get value for. So when you decrease the amount of a product that's available, what's left becomes more valuable. Casandra 18:48 I'm glad this isn't a visual recording so people can't see my like trying to grasp face. Brooke 18:53 This is very helpful to me to know whether or not I am making any fucking sense at all. Casandra 18:59 I'm sure you're making sense. I just...yeah, my brain shuts down when I think of all this stuff, which is why I'm glad you're here. Margaret 19:07 Yeah, and it's like, I want to understand this stuff, but I've also have a little bit of a like, yeah, part of why I'm anti capitalist is I'm like, "This just seems needlessly complicated." And then I'm like, but then I turned around, and I'm like, "Okay, so a federated model, where you have all of these different autonomous groups, and the spokes go to this other thing. And then those make decisions by consensus, except in some cases where they use majority vote, except people have a block, but then as it goes to this other level, and then this is the way they communicate." And so then I'm like, okay, I'm not actually afraid of complicated organizational structures. Casandra 19:45 But that's...Complicated is different than bureaucratic, you know? Margaret 19:49 Okay. Okay. Brooke 19:50 Yeah. I find myself living in this weird place of like, all of this is just ridiculous and unnecessary and most really bad. But also, this is how the thing works, and I'm a pretty big opponent and like, understanding how the thing works, especially when you want to dismantle the system, Margaret 20:11 Yeah. No, and like, I actually just want to appreciate you and people like you, you know, I remember I had a conversation with someone once recently, or they're like, "Oh, I don't think the anarchists would like me. I like spreadsheets too much." And I'm like, "No, we need you.... Casandra 20:25 We love you! Casandra 20:25 We need you more than we need other people." Brooke 20:28 Yeah. For the listeners at home, every time the word "spreadsheet" comes up in the Strangers' group discussions for work, I'm always like, "Me! Me?, do I get to do it? Can I have a spreadsheet?" Margaret 20:39 Whereas I'm like, I've been doing it? And I'm like, I don't know, I'm just beating my head against these things. Casandra 20:47 Well Brooke, you mentioned wanting to understand like, how, how things work. And I'm wondering, so we talked about that the fact that there is inflation, but I'm wondering what the factors are contributing to that, like, why it's continuing to go up at such a rapid rate, because we haven't really... Brooke 21:08 inflation? Casandra 21:09 Yeah. Brooke 21:09 Why it's gone up so much? Casandra 21:11 Yeah. Brooke 21:11 Inflation is a complicated beast. We know that a portion of it is just straight up corporate greed and fucking capitalism being capitalism, you know, of companies saying, "Oh, we can, we can raise prices and have great profits. And people will just like, do that, and we get more money? Yay!" So, and because it's happening in real time, there's not like great data to say, "Oh, half of the reason of inflation..." or whatever, like, we don't know exactly how much that specific action is contributing to it. But it's some large portion of inflation is just because companies are awful greedy, terrible. But, a couple of other factors that are leading into it are fuel prices, like everything in the world is basically affected by fuel prices to move things from A to B, and the creation of so many things, you know, incorporate some amount of petroleum. And...there was a third thing that just fell in my brain. But that actual cost is on the rise. So like it is more expensive to create products. So, that's contributing to it. And then also, the shortages in the supply chain, like we were just talking about that anytime there's less of something, it becomes more valuable. So like, how you see price gouging, when there's an emergency, you know, like, like, if the city's water shuts off, suddenly bottled water becomes more expensive. It's because there's less of it, then they can start to charge more, because people who will afford it can still buy it, and people who can't, then too bad for that. And again, it's all just because capitalism is evil and bad. Margaret 22:57 So, in terms of like solutions, one of the things we talk about when wee want to talk about all the bad stuff and then we want to talk about what people can do, at least as individuals and communities to combat it. Right? And like, and I'll say that for my own sake, and I don't know that this is actually a you know, I actually, I've talked to some of my friends who actually work in finance, and they're a little bit like, "That's not what I would have first thought of," but that's...I guess that makes some sense. You know, one of the things I've been thinking about, right is like, I don't know, like, if you can get in things that hold value, right? You know, this is in the sort of traditional prepper sense, this is where you like run out and buy gold, right? Not because gold is an investment, it doesn't become necessarily more valuable, but it because it like, is more likely to hold its value as inflation goes up. But I would argue the same is true of hard liquor, which does not go bad. I don't even drink hard liquor, but I have a bunch of it.Ammunition. Eh Eh? Okay, this is gonna be where everyone's giving me the "We let this wingnut prepper on." But ammunition does go up and down in value. But overall, I will argue that it will stay valuable and therefore continue to hold its value against inflation. And then also like, this is where my financial friends get really mad at me. I'm like, "Basically like spend it if you've got it," because like, because money is becoming less and less valuable. So like, cash in your pocket is just losing money when it stays in your pocket. Its value goes down every day, you get fewer and fewer bananas. Brooke 24:32 Bananas. Margaret 24:32 Yeah, you have fewer bananas every day. The longer that you hold on to it. Casandra 24:36 This is making me hungry. Margaret 24:38 Yeah, I kind of want a banana. I need to go to the grocery store. But okay, so this is like for example, this is like why I'm like, "Alright, well fuck it," like, get tools. Get stuff if you can, right? Obviously, this is like kind of annoying advice for anyone who I mean like right now I think most of the money issue that people have right now is not having enough money for their basic necessities that they meet on a regular basis. But even like, like I was like, I don't know, as I try to explain someone to be like, Alright, look, if you're going to go out if you're going to spend X amount of money on canned chili over the next three months, buying it now, instead of later, if you can afford it will literally get you more chili, because the prices of everything are just going to go up. And so as you're able to fucking cans of chili are better than cash right now is my my claim, especially the good vegan chili with the little TVP in it. Brooke 25:39 Yeah, if you've got a spare dollar in your pocket today, it's going to be less valuable tomorrow. It's going to be less valuable the day after that. It's just going to keep getting less valuable as long as we're in this cycle of this high inflation. So as much as I tend to be like a saver, it does make more sense at the moment to go buy things preferably things that are like durable, useful, and will last then to... Casandra 26:08 That's still saving. Brooke 26:10 Yeah Margaret 26:11 Yeah, you're just transferring the value into a different form. Brooke 26:14 Yeah, buy some seeds. Casandra 26:15 [At the same time] My favorite form is seeds. Yeah, that's my preferred one. Margaret 26:19 Yeah. Brooke 26:20 How To books. Casandra 26:22 Like oh, I just got I got all my spring seeds for next year. Brooke 26:25 Oh, wow. Casandra 26:25 Well, yeah, just last week, because I knew they'd be way more expensive next year, and they're just in the fridge in plastic bags. Waiting. Brooke 26:34 Very smart. That's a genuinely a good investment, especially given the food supply shortages that we've got going on right now. Casandra 26:43 Yeah, what a good segue Margaret 26:44 [At that same time] What a good segue.[Everyone laughing] Hope you all like this new format of friends chatting. We'll work on it. Casandra 26:56 We're doing great! Brooke 26:57 Yeah, no, it's gonna be exactly this great every time. Margaret 27:02 Food shortages. What do you mean food shortages? That sounds like a bunch of wing nut talk. Casandra 27:11 There are no food shortages. Brooke 27:13 There's no such thing as food. Buy guns. Casandra 27:20 Eat ammo. Brooke 27:22 That's exactly what I was thinking when you said ammo and gold and I was like that's good. Those are things you can eat. We'll be fine. Margaret 27:29 Yeah, yeah. [Everyone laughing] Casandra 27:30 I think there's something to be said about the fact that you and I both have kids, Brooke. So, when I'm like oh...You know if I have 20 extra bucks, what am I putting it into? It's like it's food. Margaret 27:41 It's not whiskey? Brooke 27:45 Pretty much all the time or the next size of clothing for my child that doesn't stop growing. But But yeah, food shortages. So, that's like a really interesting and again very complicated topic. So, I work part time for a local farm as well. And here in Oregon, our spring was especially wet like it's it's...Oregeon is a fairly wet place and we get a fair amount of rain in the spring, but it was like a lot more than usual. And it stayed cold for longer. So this farm, which usually opens up the first week of June and starts selling produce had to delay by a week its start date, because there just was there weren't crops and then they're battling larger infestations of problems and new and different ones so they've had funguses, and mold, and bugs, different kinds of bugs, and greater quantity of bugs attacking their crops, and they've been sending like... Margaret 28:44 Larger bugs. Brooke 28:44 Yeah. Casandra 28:45 Yeah, the pest have gone wild up here. Margaret 28:46 Like bugs the size of cars. Brooke 28:48 Yes. Yeah, they've been sending almost weekly samples to the state, the Oregon State Extension office which is our...they do a bunch of farming program things anyway they... Casandra 29:01 OSU? Brooke 29:02 Yeah, OSU. A lot of states have extension services from their state university, anyway that that analyze like "What is this blight? What is this fungus? Why is this thing turning yellow? Why...what is causing this?" So they... Margaret 29:17 What is this language it's speaking to me and why are its eyes rotating sideways from its head. Brooke 29:22 Yeah, they test for that kind of thing too. E.T. For sure. You know, they would usually send maybe a couple of samples in a season and they've had to send like almost weekly samples for two or three months and then you know devising on the fly--because organic farm, you know, safe organic practices to combat these things. And it's, you know, required a lot of extra time and investment and attention to the farm and the crops that are going in it just to to get a healthy crop out of it. Casandra 29:56 And we're not even experiencing you know, the heat wave here that they're experiencing what, like Western Europe right now. Margaret 30:05 Yeah. And parts of the southern and central United States also. But like. Casandra 30:10 Yeah, and North Africa. Margaret 30:12 Yeah. Casandra 30:13 I was reading that in Portugal. It's so hot that farm equipment is setting dried crops on fire as they're like trying to harvest things. Brooke 30:25 Oh, wow. Casandra 30:26 Like things are that hot and dry. Growing food is becoming more difficult. That seems to be the moral of the story. Margaret 30:36 Well fortunately, I believe the biggest breadbasket of the world, or at least of Europe, is doing just fine and isn't currently being invaded by a megalomaniac, and certainly huge chunks of what's left aren't supporting someone who would invade such a place, so....Or, as I doubt this is news to anyone who is listening, but maybe it is, you know, the the war in Ukraine is fucking up well will fuck up remarkably, the harvest in Ukraine of wheat, and I believe, like it's them in the US maybe are the biggest exporters of wheat in the world. I should have looked up my actual.. I'm learning so much about how I'm gonna do this next time. Casandra 31:22 I was just reading percentages, and they fell out of my brain, but it's big. Brooke 31:27 The combination of Ukraine and Russia and it's mostly Ukraine on this, they provide 12% of the world's wheat supply. Or to put it in other terms, Ukraine's wheat feeds 400 million people a year. So like, the for scale, the population of the US, like one year's worth of wheat. So yeah, it's, it's a lot. And they're basically going to have essentially zero harvest coming out of Ukraine this year in terms of wheat. Casandra 32:01 And it's not just like not having flour on the shelf, but if you're a meat eater, you know, grain fed, grain finished...My brain just died. Brooke 32:15 Animal feed. Casandra 32:16 Thank you. Fuel and animal feed. Brooke 32:20 Cows in particular, yeah, all the little things that the grain goes into, yeah, it's very bad. And, you know, we in the US might not experience as much of that being a wealthy country that's more insulated. Like one of the readings I was doing was talking about how, of course, Africa will be one of the most impacted continents by all of this because it has the highest rate of imports of food from other places, because so much of its inhospitable to growing or growing large quantities of food. And they often get the short end of the stick when there's global supply chain issues. Margaret 32:56 And it's not just the US' position as wealthy. It's that we grow...I think I, I think we're the largest exporter of food in the world, I again, really have learned so much about the kind of stuff I'm going to look up before I start recording next time. Brooke 33:12 Yeah, California, grows like some percentage of the entire world's...just California State of California alone grows an appreciable percent of the world's food supply. Margaret 33:25 Not to just drive home the animal agriculture point, but wow, it sure takes so much more grain to feed a cow to then turn around to feed a person than to just feed the grain to the person. Whooa! Anyway, if I'm gonna get accused of propaganda. Casandra 33:44 But Margaret, I can't eat grain. Margaret 33:46 Yeah, no, I know. That's actually why I don't believe in, everyone should do X. There's very few things I would say everyone should do, and that certainly, certainly applies to diet more than almost anything else. People should do, what they need and what their bodies want. And also what their, you know, local environment sustains most effectively and all those things. Casandra 34:14 I was listening to a podcast yesterday about food shortages that I'm going to forget the name of now. Brooke 34:19 There are other podcasts? Casandra 34:21 There are other podcasts like this? Wild. Margaret 34:24 Cool People Who Do Cool Stuff? Casandra 34:26 No, it wasn't that one, I'm sorry, Margaret. Margaret 34:28 Wait, there's a third podcast? Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness? Casandra 34:33 Is it Behind The Bastards? Is that the? Margaret 34:35 Oh, yeah, I guess they do technically... Brooke 34:37 Are they still allowed to have a podcast? I thought we shut that down. Casandra 34:42 Anyway, Margaret 34:44 So you can't start with another podcast because it takes too much grain. Casandra 34:49 Noooo! Brooke 34:52 That's the title of this episode now. Margaret 34:57 It's called interrupting Casandra. That's the name of the podcast. Brooke 35:01 I love you, Casandra. I'm sorry. Casandra 35:03 You guys, my brain can't hold a thought for that long. Brooke 35:06 Understood. Casandra 35:08 Okay, so I was listening to this, what I would call like a progressive podcast. And I'm usually really annoyed with the like, "We can solve climate change and world hunger by eating locally." But when we're talking about, you know, International food shortage crises, that does seem like one of the more manageable solutions. And we were talking in the chat prior to this episode noticing that I feel really grateful for my CSA share this summer. Because I paid for it, you know, months ago, which means that, you know, if we're going back to the banana analogy, Margaret 35:52 The value hold on. Brooke 35:53 I mean, that is very accurate. You know, we've got, we've got eggs included in the CSA that I work on. And, you know, we do a small markup on that just to cover all the logistics of getting the eggs from the egg supplier. But she had to raise prices at the start of the season. And we'll probably have to raise them again, like in the fall. But if you signed up for the CSA, and that included eggs in your particular box, your price gets to be set, right where it is. Casandra 36:26 Yeah, it's hard, though, right, because especially when we're talking about prepping like one of...I get annoyed with prepping conversations, because oftentimes, people either don't have the space to store large quantities of things or the money to buy things in bulk. And I would consider paying for a CSA ahead of time buying a thing in bulk, or similar, you know, similar impact. And it's hard because a lot of people can't do that. Like, I was hurting for a few months, because the payment came out. I was like, "Oh, yeah, that thing I said I'd pay for." I'm glad I did it. But... Margaret 37:06 Okay, but. [Brooke interupts] Go ahead....Okay, so there is a community solution to this, though. So you can't eat ammunition. But if you have enough ammunition and friends....This thing that happened in history, that should never happen again, because it was violent, during the Spanish Civil War, people collectivized all the farms. Brooke 37:32 Wrong podcast. Wrong podcast. Margaret 37:34 No, but see, see, this is... Casandra 37:36 Did they do it with dinosaurs? Margaret 37:39 I've heard that dinosaurs were involved. They...I at least read one story about that. But, you know, it...I means it's funny to me, right? Because it's like, on some level, okay, so individual solutions are complicated, because they involve certain types of resources. A lot of community solutions are good. And they're working to set up different kinds of like small scale agriculture that you can do within a community and mutual aid organizations that can take care of people and help fill in some holes and different people's, like, dietary needs and stuff like that. But it's like, it's so frustrating, because honestly, like, like, a lot of the solutions to these problems are destroy the existing infrastructure and build an infrastructure, well, not even the infrastructure, the systems that control the current infrastructure, and enter them into a more reasonable and equitable method of distribution. But obviously that has some risks associated with it. So I don't know, I guess, I guess sometimes I get like, frustrated, because it's like, you know, we're all like, kind of trying to be like, "Okay, how do we deal with these issues in this issue," and it's like, and we should figure out how to do it on these, like, smaller scales, but it's like, so frustrating because I think so many people like, kind of have a sense of like, what the grander solution is, and just don't know how to fucking do it. Casandra 39:01 Yep. Margaret 39:01 Including me, I don't know how to do it. Although in 1936...Anyway. Casandra 39:07 Were you gonna say something, Brooke? Brooke 39:10 One way to help solve the problem of food supplies in a very small way, amongst you and your friends: We grow things more efficiently when we focus on growing one thing at a time. So we've talked about on the pod growing, starting a garden, even a single container on your balcony kind of thing. But ,if you have a friend or a couple of friends that can also do a little gardening, maybe talking amongst yourselves and have each of you grow a specific thing or a couple of specific things. And they have each of the three of you be different. And that way you can focus on doing a good job of growing a couple of things. And they can do a good job growing their couple of things and then you can exchange the produce as it starts to ripen because it'll be more than you want. Casandra 40:01 I like that. When you said one thing my brain was like, "But polyculture!?" Brooke 40:06 Yeah, sorry, I'm thinking of like, if I can get everyone on my street to, you know, grow something in their backyard, and we all had one different crop, you know, just this whole weird place that my brain goes to that would be beautiful. But the other thing about the the food shortages, the crop growing problems, and all of that that I wanted to point out is how much this is an immediate future problem. Like, right now we're having all of these problems growing things and creating the food. And what we're eating for a lot of the part is if you're eating dry foods, packaged foods and stuff that was grown maybe last year in a previous growing season. So where we're going to start to see this pinch, even worse is going to be later this year and into next year, when we're going to buy things that were grown in a previous season. Except they weren't, because Ukraine didn't export any grain or because all of the black bean crops failed, or what have you. So it's going to get worse very soon, because of that kind of problem. Margaret 41:15 Yay. Yeah. Brooke 41:20 Thinking about growing a thing, like right now before that problem really hits home, and then you'll suddenly have some food growing on your back porch, or whatever. Casandra 41:29 That also makes me grateful for...this is probably an option in other areas, not just where we are, but Brooke and I are part of a co op. And we can purchase things through companies at wholesale prices. So like, I just put in an order for like 10 pounds of salt and 25 pounds of beans and, you know, makes me grateful for options like that. Brooke 41:59 Yeah, bulk buying. Margaret 42:02 And that's like, kind of the origins of food co ops, as far as I understand it is that, you know, now we have this conception. And I feel like most people are like, "Why would a food co-op be cheaper food co-ops are more expensive, because like food co-op is like practically just like, a way of saying super bougie independent grocery store with natural food. And the origin of food cooperatives is basically people pulling together and saying like, well, "We want to buy a bunch of food. So let's act like we're a store and go to the distributor, and put in orders together." And those do still exist in various places. And also, not everything that call itself a food Co-Op is just bougie and shitty and like, some of them are very good. Brooke 42:44 I would say ours isnt...wasn't. At least that's from my very biased perspective. Margaret 42:50 Wasn't good or wasn't bad? Brooke 42:52 Wasn't bougie wasn't bougie. Margaret 42:54 Ah.Yeah. Brooke 42:56 Can I go back to Casandra, you mentioned, the heatwave stuff happening in Europe and crops catching on fire. I had read last week about this heatwave that was coming in Europe and some of the problems they anticipated having but I have not had time this week to like catch up on what actually happened. And I think both of you guys have been paying more attention to that news. And I'm curious if you want to enlighten me and perhaps our listeners about the actual effects of that heatwave in addition to farming equipment catching crops on fire. Which is bad. Casandra 43:29 Part of a glacier collapsed in Italy. Margaret 43:34 They still have glaciers there? Casandra 43:36 Apparently. Margaret 43:38 You ever get depressed, you ever go to Glacier National Park and just been sad, because you're like, it's just full of signs that are like, "There used to be a glacier here." and you're like, "This sucks." Brooke 43:48 That would be depressing. Margaret 43:49 It's really beautiful. Anyways. Brooke 43:51 What is what does it mean, the glacier collapsed, like a portion fell over? Casandra 43:55 Like an avalanche, like a portion of this glacier collapsed and it killed 11 people, but it's just also a testament to how hot it was. Iran was like 126 degrees. Casandra 43:59 There was something about the railways, the rail lines that so was having problems. Margaret 44:17 Yeah. So, TERF Island is this island off of the coast of Europe. That is ruled by, it's still a monarchy, and it's ruled by J.K. Rowling, Queen of the TERFS. But unfortunately, most of her subjects actually wish they didn't live on a place called TERF Island, and wish that they could go back to just being embarrassed about having colonized most of the world. That's also worth being embarrassed about anyway, yeah, England, TERF Island, is pretty fuck right now, and I mean, the same as the rest of Europe, right. But, England is normally a dreary, overcast place and that's why everyone has turned their head against so many people. And so they are...And so their their rail infrastructure is designed, you can build railways for cold, and you can build railways for heat, but it's like actually kind of hard to build railways for both. Because you have these, like, long chunks of steel, these rails, right, and they warp. And as people want to go faster and quieter, they are now continuous rails that are welded into like one continuous thing. Which means that when they distort in the heat or contract in the cold or whatever, it's a bigger issue, right? So, their rail system, at least as we record right now is just like fucked. And like, a lot of the rails aren't running or if they are running, they're running really slowly to not, like, I believe, cause additional heat and cause additional problems. I actually don't remember exactly why going slowly is the solution to this. But it's like such as like a clear example....And then they're having this thing where, and I'm sure this happens everywhere. But they're particularly good at being like, cozy during crisis that's like part of the national character as far as I can tell. And so they're like, "Oh, this isn't a big deal." And like, they had this heatwave in 1976. And so they're all like, "Oh, this is just like 1976." But and 1976 was bad, right? But there hasn't been like more and more heat more and more times, right? That was a little bit of an outlier year. Whereas they're constantly breaking all these records. And it's just, it's fucking everything up. And I hate...I want...I sort of hate that I know more about this than I know about some of the stuff that's going on in Iran, or I know that very recently, India has had really massive heat waves that have caused a lot of problems. I know... Casandra 46:35 China. Margaret 46:36 Yeah. Yeah. And, but there's this sort of like, I don't know, at least by the way, people are talking about it who are not in England. I almost feel like there's this like, Oh, thank god if this happens to the English and to the white Americans, like maybe something will start happening. And because like just seen as like these like centers of power or whatever, but people are very resistant to actually believing anything's wrong. But it's really obviously something wrong. Casandra 47:06 Oh my gosh. But, you know what people are willing to believe is wrong? Margaret 47:12 What? Casandra 47:14 People are willing to believe that our globalist overlords at CERN have shifted our dimension multiple times and opened a gateway to Hell, and summonned Satan. And that's why everything's bad. Margaret 47:33 Please Explain. Casandra 47:34 It can't be climate change, it has to be a Stranger Things portal...run by the Jews. Margaret 47:43 I was about to ask if the Jews were involved. I thought you all were busy with the space laser. Casandra 47:48 Always. God, if only we had an actualy space laser. Margaret 47:53 I know! You all multitask so well, like you're busy running the space laser. I mean, I guess thats.. Casandra 47:59 It's because we rest one whole day a week that we have all this energy. Brooke 48:02 Hey, wait a minute, Mormons do too, but we do not have space lasers. So.... Casandra 48:07 You have like alien and tablets and shit. Margaret 48:08 Yeah, Catholics don't rest. Wait, so please explain more. So there. Okay. So CERN is the the miniature black hole creator, right. [Brooke and Casandra laugh skeptically] Wait, at that point. I thought I wasn't even lying. I thought that was what it does. Like it investigates...Am I wrong? Casandra 48:29 It's, it's.... Brooke 48:31 It's a particle accelerator. Margaret 48:32 Yeeah Casandra 48:33 No, it's not. It's a group. It's a group. CERN isn't even the thing itself. CERN is the like group that does the research. Margaret 48:39 Oh, like the Zionist Cabal or whatever. Casandra 48:44 Yeah, and it's been around since the 50s and they do like particle physics shit that I don't understand. You know, finding new particles, researching antimatter, potentially creating mini black holes, apparently. Margaret 49:00 Do you think antimatter gets mad at regular matter? Like kind of like an Antifa versus FA kind of thing? Brooke 49:08 Well, matter wins over antimatter. So I mean, it can get mad all it wants. It loses the battle. Casandra 49:13 So they're trying to find, you know, proof of like the Big Bang and doing all these....But then, so it's been around for a long time. It's been around since the 50s I think. But, I want to say the facility, the particle collider...this is gonna be the funniest explanation because none of us understand it fully. But, apparently the facility is like 17 miles wide, and most of its underground and it looks very like you know, Stranger Things, Sci Fi, space AG. Brooke 49:52 It's that wide because it's a giant metal circle. So it's not actually like taking up 17 miles, but like you're able to go from one end of this metal tube to the other like it is that far apart. Margaret 50:03 Yeah, it's like a roller derby rink. Brooke 50:07 Yeah, more or less. Margaret 50:10 Or it will be. Casandra 50:10 Yeah, so all these conspiracy theorists for years now I think particularly since 2012, have decided that the reason things continue to be bad is that...there are multiple theories, but one is that the world actually ended in 2012. Another is that each time they turn on this particle collider, we like shift timelines. So that's happened in like, 2012, 2016. And then just this last July 5, apparently. It's just fascinating to me, the lengths people will go to to explain bad shit happening rather than just like, accepting climate change. Margaret 50:53 Yeah. Casandra 50:54 Or like, pausing to understand capitalism and its function. And it's like, "Nope, it's gotta be a black hole to Satan." Brooke 51:03 This is especially funny to me, because the, the collider literally takes like, the like, the tiniest little bits of matter. Like it tries to get down to like a single atom, and then sends it through this giant tube to smash into each other. And I'm like, Yeah, so you're telling me that like, two oxygen molecules smashing into each other, is what's opening multiple timelines? Casandra 51:29 And it's stuff that's like, only comprehensible and interesting to physicists, as far as I can understand. Like, if you look at their list of achievements, none of that makes sense to a normal human being. You know? Margaret 51:45 I kind of like some of that stuff. But I read a lot of science fiction. Casandra 51:49 Yeah, I have an ex who's like, really into both space and physics, and is really fascinated by some of the work they've done. But yeah, it doesn't make sense to me at all. And it doesn't make sense to the conspiracy theorists either. Brooke 52:07 Okay, so we're running out of food. Europe's on fire. Casandra 52:13 Not just Europe, apparently North Africa, China, India, the southern United States, Brooke 52:18 Most of the world in the last two years has burned down in one way or another. We're opening black hole portals. No one can buy a house. Casandra 52:27 What's that, Margaret? Margaret 52:29 Oh, just always the wrong parts of it are burning down. Casandra 52:32 Right Margaret 52:33 I mean, well with the exception of the Third Precinct. Brooke 52:35 Yes. Margaret 52:36 Notable. Notable Exception. Casandra 52:39 We're still figuring out how to aim the space laser. Margaret 52:44 Okay, okay. So it was actually you all. It wasn't actually Dark Biden. Casandra 52:48 Oh, no. Marjorie Taylor Greene blamed the wildfires. Margaret 52:52 On the space lasers? Casandra 52:53 That's how the spacel laser thing started. Margaret 52:55 Oh, my God. Really? Why would you burn down the forest? Is her claim that you all don't know how to aim it? Casandra 53:06 Let me find this was... Margaret 53:08 What is your [Marjorie's] rationale for why the Jews have decided to start forest fires? It it seems to me that even if I....There are other targets that I could imagine, as an anti-semitic conspiracy theorist that I would imagine that the Jews would point the space laser at. Casandra 53:26 Right? Let me try to...let me see if I can find the exact tweet because it was really funny. Oh, all I can find is spoof tweets in my quick search. Brooke 53:35 I feel bad for you having to read through Marjorie Taylor Green's tweets right now. That's a punishment you do not deserve. Casandra 53:42 The like wingnut anti-Semites kind of crack me up. I don't know why she would blame it on that. I have no idea. It's... Casandra 53:49 I mean, Q'anon ties into the whole thing. Margaret 53:50 Well, let's come up with it. Margaret 53:51 Oh, yeah. Brooke 53:53 Casandra, do your people hate forests? Casandra 53:57 Forests? Brooke 53:58 Yes. Casandra 53:59 No, of course not. We actually have a whole holiday dedicated to trees. Margaret 54:05 Whoa, that's cool. Casandra 54:06 Tu BiShvat. We liked the trees. Margaret 54:15 Well, maybe you are trying to....No, I don't even want to. I'm trying to come up with anti-semetic conspiracy theorists. But I don't want to do it. I can't do it. Brooke 54:25 Here's a news thing that we didn't talk about in our briefing. And I don't know if we care to right now. But, are y'all paying any attention to the whole January 6th committee things? They just had one last night. Margaret 54:36 Yeah, a little bit. Casandra 54:37 No, I didn't read about last night. Brooke 54:40 I am mostly not paying attention as well, except that I see these tweets of people being like, "Oh my gosh, did you know blah, blah, blah." And most of it's like all along I feel like yeah, that's been reported on already. We already knew about that. Why is this news? Margaret 54:54 That's kind of how I feel about it. I like maybe maybe it's not fair. Bu,t I kind of just say this political theater at this point like we we all know what they did. We watched it. And we all know what their organizations look like. Anti-fascists have done the infiltration work and released all of the...like everything anyone has ever said to each other that's a fascist in the United States has been released by anti-fascists, not the government. And so in some ways, I'm a little bit like...and maybe it's not right, maybe, maybe I should care more about it. But in my mind, I'm a little bit like, I've moved on to the next news cycle issue in my head, and it feels like kind of like...remember how we were like waiting forever for them to impeach Trump? And they're like, "We swear we're going to impeach Trump soon." And I'm like, is this whole thing just a way for The Washington Post to sell newspapers? And that's more...again, more than is fair, how I how I feel a little bit about January, 6th, it's just like, Okay, y'all found something that you can milk for? I don't know.... Casandra 56:05 I mean the too little too late sort of encapsulates our response to most things, right. Margaret 56:12 Yeah. Casandra 56:12 Whether it's climate change or insurrection. Brooke 56:15 Now the one good thing that did that did come out of last night's was little video of Senator Josh Hawley running away from the rioters. And then all the people on Twitter who use that little video and set it to various pieces of music. Casandra 56:33 Finding moments of joy. Margaret 56:35 He's the guy who supported....he's the guy who was supporting them beforehand, right? Brooke 56:40 Yeah, he's the one with like the really well known fist raised in support picture rightbefore they started destroying everything. Margaret 56:47 I never thought that the leopards eating people's faces party would eat my face...Well, does that seem like a decent spot to end it for July? Nothing bad can happen in the next week.There's gonna be like at least a.... Casandra 57:06 I think we wanted to give people more hope you know, like more tools, or ideas? Or even just like... Margaret 57:16 Oh, right. Buy whiskey. Build a bunker. Hole up Brooke 57:19 Tanks are bad. Casandra 57:20 If you live in wildfire country like we do those plastic windows... Brooke 57:26 Blame the Jews. Casandra 57:27 Blame the Jews. We can say that because I'm a Jew. I want to make that really clear. Before we put this podcast out. No, buy those plastic windows sealer kits and fresh filters for your air filters. Margaret 57:45 Yeah, do it before they're needed. That's part of the supply chain stuff. Brooke 57:50 Plant a zucchini, Casandra 57:51 Planted zucchini with your neighbors and trade them with each other. Margaret 57:57 What if everyone just grows zucchini? Casandra 58:00 Zucchini's really versatile. You know. Brooke 58:01 Zucchini and potatoes. Margaret 58:02 That was the main thing that my mom grew. My mom grew mostly zucchini. And so it was just like nothing, nothing, nothing and then everything is made out of zucchini for like two weeks. And I actually loved it because we ate so much zucchini bread and it was so good. Casandra 58:17 Yeah. Brooke 58:18 They're relatively easy, like if you haven't gardened before and you need something to garden that'll make you feel really good and successful. Like they're easier to grow you know a little harder to kill than, and then when they start producing like you get these big zucchinis and like if you completely ignore them, you can get these like just monstrous beasts and it's just really satisfying to grow zucchini. Casandra 58:41 I never grow zucchini because I always have friends who grow zucchini and have too much. Brooke 58:45 Yes. As zucchini does. Casandra 58:49 Anyway. Brooke 58:50 Grow zucchini. Margaret 58:52 This podcast is brought to you by zucchini. Okay, what's another hopeful? Don't rush out and buy a garage door right now if you can avoid it. Turn your basement fear into a kiddie pool full of kibble. Casandra 59:15 If your garage door privileged you can just like revel in that. Margaret 59:18 Yeah. Brooke 59:20 Genuinely you know, pet food is an example of a thing where if you're gonna go if you have some extra money and you're gonna go invest it quote unquote, in something pet food will hold up and your pet will need food. So instead of bananas buy pet food. Margaret 59:34 If you do buy bananas, you have to put them in you have to peel them and put them in the freezer if you want them to last and then you've turned them into smoothies. Casandra 59:43 That's the only good way to eat a banana anyway. Controversial take Brooke 59:48 I do not agree. Margaret 59:50 Yeah, I just...Huh, I thought we I thought we were friends. Casandra 59:58 I just lost to friends. Brooke 1:00:05 I just know not to bring bananas over your house. They won't be safe. Margaret 1:00:09 Well they are safe. Casandra 1:00:09 You can use them perfectly for smoothies and banana bread. How do we end this? Margaret 1:00:21 We we like can do this, right? Like all this like bad shits happening, but like the reason to talk about all this bad shit that's happening is to stare soberly into the face of what's coming. Not so that we like, give up and like, it's not the part in the movie where the "Run there's a monster," and then the monster eats everyone. It's the part where you're standing on the bulwark of the--I watch love fantasy movies--the bulwark of the castle and you look out and there's the gathering storm and the hordes of usually poorly racially designed enemies...is coming...now I just feel bad about using this analogy. I love Lord of the Rings, but i was not... Casandra 1:01:03 The new Lord of the Rings is about to come out. Margaret 1:01:05 Yeah. Casandra 1:01:05 Apparently it's more racially fair and equitable and diverse. Margaret 1:01:09 Yeah. That's good. And I personally more than I probably should think Tolkien would have listened to some of this criticisms since he like, like, when the Nazis came to Tolkien, and were like, "Hey, we love your story, are you Aryan?" and he got really fucking mad. And he was like, they like he was like, "If you're asking if I'm Jewish, I am sad to say that I am not, but fuck all of you forever." So anyway. he's not a perfect man. Casandra 1:01:43 Comrade Tolkien. Margaret 1:01:45 But I think he, I think he meant, well, we all know that intentions are what matters. Okay. So but this is the part of the movie where you're staring out at the, you know, the bad thing is coming, right? And it is a big, bad thing. And we can't just all go back to bed and be like, "Oh, the government will take care of this for us, right?" Because the government is one of the things that's out there gathering and the big fucking mass. Well parts of it, because governments are made out of people. And some parts of it will probably stop being part of the government when bad things happen. But... well like the National Guard like gives food to the like mutual aid groups and like that they're supposed to give to Red Cross, like this has happened sometimes. They're like, "Oh, shit, y'all actually put things where they're supposed to go." And they like help the anarchists instead of the bureaucracies, because they're people. But, we can do this. We can look, we can see what's happening, we can face it, we can communicate with other people about what we're facing. We can work together to get through this. And, and I genuinely believe that and that's why I do this podcast. And that's why my basement is full of kibble. And um... Casandra 1:02:54 We're all gonna come swim in it. Margaret 1:02:55 Yeah, totally. Yeah, it's probably gonna be full of rats by that time, but you know. Margaret 1:03:01 Yeah! Brooke 1:03:01 Rats are food...too. Margaret 1:03:01 I'm like a rat farmer in my basement. That's a turn you never expected from Ol' Margaret. Brooke 1:03:01 Rats need food too. Casandra 1:03:14 Vegan turned rat farmer. Margaret 1:03:17 That's still vegan. Brooke 1:03:21 Okay, so this segment is... Casandra 1:03:24 Devolving. Margaret 1:03:25 Alright. And, so thank you all so much for listening. If you enjoy this podcast, please tell people about it. You can tell people about it on the internet. And you can tell people about it not on the internet. And both of those things are good, because not in person. Because on the internet is good because of algorithms and in person is good because that's a better way to live your life. She said while living alone and on the top of a mountain. And also, if you want to support us more directly, you can do so by sponsoring our Patreon. We are published by Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is a anarchists collective that is dedicated to creating culture and good stuff. Sometimes we do theory, but that's like not our thing. It's like almost like we try and kind of do the other stuff around. And you can support us by following us on Patreon or by supporting us on Patreon patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. If you sponsor us at $10 or more a month, we will send you a zine anywhere in the world for free every month. If you sponsors at all, you'll get access to the digital copy, even before other people get access. I think usually we're good at that. Sometimes. Most of the time. We're still getting our shit together. But there's lots of good content. We have bunch of books coming out. We have another podcast you can check out called Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is the monthly zine, but it is available to everyone and then it also follows with an interview with the Creator talking about their process. It's really good. You should check it out. Do either of you to have anything to plug before I? Casandra 1:04:58 I just got this book in the mail that I did the art for that you might know about. Margaret 1:05:03 Yeah, what is it? Casandra 1:05:06 It's your book. Margaret. Margaret 1:05:07 I have a book? Casandra 1:05:08 Yeah. You have a book coming out. Margaret 1:05:09 Is it called "We Won't Be Here Tomorrow. I have a book of short stories that's coming out called "We Won't Be Here Tomorrow." It comes out September 20. From AK Press, which is a collectively run anarchist publisher, which rules and if you order it now you get art print made by Casandra. Well, drawn by Cassandra. It's probably made by a printer somewhere. The prints part of it anyway, and it illustrates one of my stories and also Casandra did the cover art, and it's really beautiful. So, you should check it out. And in particular, we want to thank some of our Patreon backers. We want to thank Hoss the dog, Chris, Sam, Micaiah, Kirk, Natalie, Eleanor, Jenipher, Staro, Cat J, Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Oxalis, Paige, and SJ. Thank you so much for for making this possible. And yeah, I hope you all are doing as well as you can with everything that's going on. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

ZIB2-Podcast
Zu Gast: Nationalbank-Gouverneur Robert Holzmann

ZIB2-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 9:31


Thema: Überraschend starke Erhöhung des Leitzinssatzes durch die EZB.

Take It To The Board with Donna DiMaggio Berger
To Lend or Not To Lend with Brewster Cole, First Vice President, Valley National Bank

Take It To The Board with Donna DiMaggio Berger

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 44:46


Florida community associations always need money for maintenance, repair, and capital improvement projects, but especially now with new safety laws in place, and Brewster Cole, First Vice President of Valley National Bank, is “the man with the money." Brewster has spent 16 years lending money to condominiums, co-ops, HOAs, and country clubs, and has carved an impressive niche for himself and Valley National in this sector of the lending market. He and host Donna DiMaggio Berger discuss the ins and outs, and the ups and downs, of when to lend and to whom.Highlights include:Florida community associations need hundreds of millions of dollars for immediate repair and maintenance projects. Does the fact that many of them need loans to address deferred maintenance or to cure code violations make them less attractive borrowers?Is it possible that the State of Florida might offer low interest loan programs in the post-Surfside landscape?What does a lender look for when evaluating an association as a prospective borrower? Will the current property insurance crisis in Florida play a role? How about the number of leased units? Do lenders take pending litigation into account?How long does the approval process typically take?Association loans can range from a few hundred thousand dollars to millions. How does a lender determine the limit for a particular association?What types of loans are available for community associations? Other than construction loans for particular projects, what other types of financing options are there?How does a line of credit typically work when the association is taking one for a construction project? How do capital improvement projects and/or milestone inspections affect credit?What is the difference between lines of credit and traditional loans?What type of collateral is required for association loans?How important is it to establish and maintain personal relationships between borrowers and lenders?Once upon a time it was very difficult for cooperative purchasers to obtain financing. What has changed?Will lenders start seeing older coastal buildings as unacceptably risky borrowers?Helpful links:Becker Lawyers | Legal and Business StrategistsFlorida Condo & HOA Law Blog | Powered by beckerlawyers.com Becker's Online Class LibraryBecker's Online Class Library: Construction Road Map for Community AssociationsReal Estate Law Blog  | Powered by beckerlawyers.comSuccessful Community Association Living Starts With the Purchase Decision with Marisa DiLenge, Founder of DiLenge Real Estate Team (Part I)Take It To the Board: Successful Community Association Living Starts With the Purchase Decision with Marisa DiLenge, Founder, DiLenge Real Estate Team (Part II)

Mujeres In The Know Podcast
Mujer In The Know: Edna De Saro, EVP and Marketing Director at Lone Star National Bank

Mujeres In The Know Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 29:53


For this episode, Natalie has a conversation with EVP and Marketing Director for Lone Star National Bank, Edna De Saro. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mujeresintheknow/support

Leader of The Pack Podcast
#27. The Definition of Creating Success. From Financials to Founding a Syrup Company with President and CEO of National Bank of Commerce and Co-Owner of Burgess Family Sugarhouse, Steve Burgess.

Leader of The Pack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 62:13


An inspiring Zoom sit-down conversation with Northlander, Steve Burgess, President and CEO of National Bank of Commerce and Co-Owner of Burgess Family Sugarhouse. Steve shares about his farming roots and his original intentions of taking over his family's farm business. He wound up going to college with no initial intent of graduating, however, Steve excelled within the financial and accounting focused classes. After exploring options within financial careers, Steve landed an opportunity working at a bank and never looked back. At the age of 28 years old, Steve became the President and CEO and quickly became a leader and steering his team and company to huge milestone successes. With nearly 40 years in the banking industry, Steve shares his knowledge, experience, the importance of relationship building with his clients, and managing his time between 21 different organizations he has been a part of and has served. As a dreamer and visionary, Steve wasn't done making moves. With the help of his wife, Kathy, they created Burgess Family Sugarhouse and began tapping trees on their 80 acres in the Duluth, Minnesota region. Due to success and demand of their side hobby, it turned into a thriving family business, and they share the tricks of the trade about tapping and the pure maple syrup making process. Enjoy this week's episode of Leader of the Pack; a podcast by Duluth Pack. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/duluth-pack/support

Vanished Chicagoland Stories
Episode 147: The 1st National Bank Of Chicago And Past Posts From Vanished Chicagoland Facebook Page.

Vanished Chicagoland Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:02


Episode 147: I will discuss The 1st National Bank of Chicago and past posts from Vanished Chicagoland Facebook Page. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pete-kastanes/message

Kopi Time podcast with Taimur Baig
DBS Kopi Time 080 - Serey Chea on Central Banking and FinTech for Good Podcast

Kopi Time podcast with Taimur Baig

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 64:01 Transcription Available


Serey Chea, Assistant Governor at the National Bank of Cambodia, joins to Kopi Time to provide an incisive view on central banking geared toward financial development and inclusion. She talks about the government's role during the pandemic to support the population through a series of financial measures, including the tricky job of keeping ATMs going even as banknote sourcing faced global mobility restrictions. We then delve into Bakong, a blockchain-based peer to peer payment system for financial sector participants in Cambodia. Ms Chea talks about the genesis, use case, outcome, challenges, and potential with clarity and depth, flagging ideas that would be useful for many developing economies. She adds a human dimension to central banking by referring to her personal experience in seeing people struggle with lack of financial inclusion or financial literacy. Truly inspirational. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
[Top Agency Series] How to Make Your Website Sell With Guillaume Le Tual of MageMontreal

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 39:33


Guillaume Le Tual Is a multimedia technologist with a career spanning 15 years. Earlier in his career, he worked as a professional visual artist for clients such as Volkswagen, Discovery Channel, The National Bank of Canada, and Warner Bros.  He gained experience working in web design and digital marketing, and his expertise in the Magento e-commerce platform led him to start his own company, MageMontreal, an agency that works exclusively on the Magento platform to build e-commerce websites. Guillaume is also the Host of the Ecommerce Wizards Podcast.  In this episode… If you're an e-commerce entrepreneur, you know how important it is to have your website, irrespective of the number of marketplaces you're on. But the problem is that many e-commerce business owners struggle to sell websites.  Do you have enough traffic? Does that traffic convert? Does your product have proper product-market fit, and how efficient is your operation? When you answer these questions, you realize that you can turn your website into a sales machine. Here's how it starts…  Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz featuring Guillaume Le Tual, the CEO and Founder of MageMontreal. They discuss the low-hanging fruits of e-commerce websites, the use of AI in e-commerce, making your website sell, and more.

Chasing What Matters
CWM - Brian Townley

Chasing What Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 52:52


Our guest today is Brian Townley.  Brian - began a 26 year banking career at The National Banks of Central Texas which later became (NationalUnited), where he served as a Senior Vice President. There he began to help other banking executives discover their talents and motivation.  Soon he began doing it on an international stage. Brian has published leadership training videos – as well as authored 3 books on Leadership. Brian still speaks to a wide variety of audiences – and now in a partner in a real estate firm,  In his spare time, he still supports his local community and gives back to ministries and organizations than make a difference. Brian TownleyChasing What Matters Website

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1495 National Bank

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 54:26


David speaks with President Jefferson about the "original argument" between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton concerning whether or not the United States should have a national bank. Jefferson felt this was in a sense unconstitutional and Hamilton believed we needed a flexible constitution. This program originally aired in June of 2017. Mentioned on this episode. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our merch. You can find Clay's books on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.