Podcasts about Cadbury

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British multinational confectionery company

  • 470PODCASTS
  • 601EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 1, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Cadbury

Latest podcast episodes about Cadbury

IVM Likes
What's With That Ad? feat. Ambi Parameswaran

IVM Likes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 58:20


On this episode, Antariksh is joined by fellow producer Vishal, and Ambi Parameswaran, host of 'The Sponge podcast', co-host of 'The Last Brand Standing' podcast, Founder of Brand-Building.com, brand strategist, veteran ad-man with over 35 years of experience, and a fellow pop-culture nerd! Antariksh and Vishal pick Ambi's brain about the most controversial ads, what makes an ad supposedly controversial, some famous ads that were not taken to well, like the famous Tuff Shoes print ad with a naked Milind Soman and Madhu Sapre, the Tanishq ad from earlier this year that got twisted by trolls, Myntra's troubles in a similar regard, and lots more. Ambi also talks about working with Doordarshan back in the day, the famous 'United Breaks Guitars' song, why it seems like some companies like Zomato like to court controversy, and tons more. They also discuss some of their favurite ads ever - like Indica v2, Happydent, the recent Cadbury gender swap cricket ad, the Bisleri ad with camels, and more.Also, don't miss some awesome recommendations where Ambi recommends the Tamil movie 'Sarpatta Parambarai', the tv series 'Navarasa', and author Sujata Massey's books. Vishal recommends the Lallantop YouTube channel and their series called 'Duniyadaari', and Antariksh recommends 'Free Guy' starring Ryan Reynolds.Follow Ambi Parameswaran on Twitter:https://twitter.com/ambimgpFollow Ambi Parameswaran on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aparameswaranFollow Ambi Parameswaran on Instagram: https://instagram.com/ambimgp?utm_medium=copy_linkFollow Vishal Dube on Instagram: https://instagram.com/vd_hard2win?igshid=1lfdvpdraa5coFollow Antariksh Takkar on Instagram: https://instagram.com/antariksht?utm_medium=copy_linkYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://www.ivmpodcasts.com/

OTB Football
Cadbury Roadshow | Jaap Stam's dream 5 a-side team

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 27:19


Manchester United legend Jaap Stam picks his dream 5-a-side team with Nathan Murphy on the latest of our OTB Sports Roadshows In association with @cadburyireland #CadburyFC

CG Garage
Episode 343 - AJ Jefferies - CG Illustrator/Animator, MDI Digital/MoonJam

CG Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 54:31


AJ Jefferies' art is unmistakable. Whether he's indulging in passion projects or designing campaigns for companies including Cadbury's, Virgin Atlantic, and MTV, this UK-based 3D illustrator and animator's work is eye-catching, playful, and colorful — and large, sometimes up to 10K in resolution. In this conversation with Chris, AJ breaks down his career so far, from how Toy Story inspired his early adventures in computer graphics, learning 3D and illustration in Bournemouth, and joining a two-person studio in Norwich where he remains to this day. AJ also talks about the essential tools in his workflow, how V-Ray helped boost his render times, and the future of rendering technology.

OTB Football
Cadbury Roadshow | Albert Morgan | Life at Old Trafford, Working with Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona's needs

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 46:58


Manchester United legendary kit man Albert Morgan chats to Nathan Murphy about life at Old Trafford and working with some of the biggest names the game has ever produced In association with Cadbury Ireland #CadburyFC

The Awful & Awesome Entertainment Wrap
Ep 225: A Marvel-ous episode

The Awful & Awesome Entertainment Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 73:35


Timecodes00:01 - Introduction04:09 - Black Widow10:05 - Loki19:19 - Subscriber letters22:49 - Shang-Chi31:28 - Red Sparrow36:36 - Cadbury ad52:34 - Subscriber letters1:05:03 - WandaVisionTalking about the character Wenwu played by Tony Leung in the film Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings:Mansa: Tony Leung (“luhng”) is a scene stealer, pardon if I'm pronouncing his name incorrectly.Abhinandan: You are sitting with Abhinandan and you're apologising for the pronunciation? Like seriously!Inderpreet: It's Tony Leung (“loong”).Mansa: Really? He Wenwu'ed us with his performance.Abhinandan: In fact when he appeared in that other film...Mansa: He's known for his collaborations with Wong Kar-wai.Abhinandan: No no no. Leung...He did a song ya, with Deepika Padukone. Lungi dance, Lungi dance (sings). Inderpreet bursts out laughing. Abhinandan: I wish our listeners could see the look on Mansa's face. She's like “Kaha baitha diya uncle ke saath, itne bhadde joke.”This and a whole lot of other stuff awful and awesome as Abhinandan Sekhri and Newslaundry subscribers Inderpreet and Mansa enter the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the films Shang-Chi and Black Widow; and web series Loki and WandaVision. They also discuss the thriller Red Sparrow. Abhinandan is also joined by the creators of the 2021 Cadbury cricket ad, which is a remake of the 1993 advertising classic.PS: Don't miss Abhinandan's encounter with Gen Z.Write to us at newslaundry.com/podcast-letters. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Top 3
#46 Top 3: Cadbury for Snack crate

Top 3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 35:33


Paul, Anson and Josh take on Snackcrate.com again. this time it's all candies from Candies from #Cadbury Chocolates Builtbar promo code Paul: https://builtbar.com?baapp=PAUL Top 3 Discord: https://discord.gg/4GmEep9q5y Paul's Links: https://linktr.ee/paulprosise  Follow the show at @top3show on twitter, instagram and on facebook Find Paul @paulprosise, Anson @AnsonYoung and @joshnotontw1ttr  #iambuilt #Chocolate #Cadbury  #Podcast

OTB Football
Lisa Fallon | OTB Sports Remote Roadshow in association with Cadbury FC

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 28:02


Lisa Fallon joined OTB Sports for the latest in our series of remote roadshows in association with Cadbury FC.  Fallon discussed the influence of Chelsea boss, Emma Hayes on the growth of women's football in England, her role at Chelsea as game analysis and strategy coach and the path that took her into coaching. She also discussed her work as a football pundit, the reception she has received, her hopes for women's football in the future and her current role as the first-team coach at Galway United. Fallon was speaking at the first of this years' OTB Sports remote roadshows in partnership with Cadbury FC, check out cadburyfc.com for updates on promotions and giveaways.

OTB Football
Roberto Di Matteo | Lazio days | Chelsea memories | Cadbury FC remote roadshow

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 52:09


Roberto Di Matteo joined OTB Sports' for the first in our series of remote roadshows in association with Cadburys. Di Matteo discussed his formative days as a footballer at Lazio, playing against Italian giants AC Milan at the San Siro and his move to Chelsea in 1996. The Italian also talked about his FA Cup final wonder-strike, as well as his time spent as manager at Stamford Bridge and what it was like to manage a dressing room filled with larger than life characters. He recalled some of his fondest memories from their historic defeat of Barcelona at the Camp Nou, as well as their Champions League clinching win against Bayern Munich. Di Matteo was speaking at the first of this years' OTB Sports remote roadshows in partnership with Cadbury FC, check out cadburyfc.com for updates on promotions and giveaways.

Next in Marketing
Why Traditional Marketers Like Mondelez Think They Can Build an Unassailable Advantage by Investing in Machine Learning Now

Next in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 45:28


Mondelēz International's Global Vice President, Consumer Experience, Jonathan Halvorson discussed how the company behind brands like Ritz, Oreos, and Cadbury has blown up many of its core strategies by producing thousands of pieces of creative for each campaign, moving the bulk of its spending to digital channels, and investing in software that makes ad buying smarter. Guest: Jonathan HalvorsonHost: Mike ShieldsProducer: Kenya Hayes

Hoovering
Hoovering - Episode 184: David Atherton

Hoovering

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 55:56


Welcome to HOOVERING, the podcast about eating. Host, Jessica Fostekew (Guilty Feminist, Motherland) has a frank conversation with an interesting person about gobbling; guzzling; nibbling; scoffing; devouring and wolfing all up… or if you will, hoovering.This week I'm hoovering with WINNER of Bake Off 2019, author of three books no less and absolute brain box about health AND fellow Catford resident, David Atherton. He made me the loveliest afternoon tea I've ever had actually lads. In his dreamy home. Which was walking distance from my home. Christ. I'm living the dream. Everything written below in CAPITALS is a link to the relevant webpage. Honourable Mentions/ LinksYou must follow this beautiful man ON INSTAGRAMYou can and should pre-order David's beautiful sounding and looking new book MY FIRST GREEN COOKBOOK FOR YOUNG COOKS, I'm getting Rudy one. It's out on 16th September. His other books are MY FIRST COOKBOOK BAKE, MAKE AND LEARN TO COOK and the not for kids but for everyone GOOD TO EAT: REAL FOOD TO NOURISH AND SUSTAIN YOUR LIFENow - I'm free from live stuff to plug so suffice to say I'd love you to spend your spare money on this podcast, actually. Go to PATREON to see what I swap your money for ace podcast related stuff like totally exclusive content and guest recipes. It'll help me keep the podcast not just alive, but also thriving. Thanks so so so much if you've become a patron recently and/ or stuck with me since the beginning of this. Also - if you'd wanted to donate something as a one-off you can DO THAT HERE on the Acast Supporter page thing. Things we mentioned that you might be interested in from this podcast include…If you've never heard of BAKE OFF which David won, which is a huge feat. This is her. And the former contestant who put me in touch with David, whose also a former Bake off superstar is MICHAEL CHAKRAVERTYI briefly name drop BBC Radio 4's usually quite brilliant show FOOD CHAINHe talks about having aspirations of being on C4's GREAT BRITISH POTTERY THROWDOWN and considering the beautiful crockery he gave me I reckon he'd smash itHis Mum used to shop through a food collective called SUMAI toot comedians and former guests HAL BRANSON and JAMES ACASTERI mention C4 bit of fun show SNACKMASTERSAnd we're both fans of TIM SPECTOR whose books are called THE DIET MYTH and more recently, SPOONFEDThe obsolete chocolate we both miss are FUSE BARS which amazingly it look slike Cadbury only sell in India now! And also the illusive TRIPLE CHOCOLATE TWIX which it turns out he didn't just dream!Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/hoovering. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jason & Alexis
8/11 WED HOUR 1: A bat and a dream, chocolate pizza and HBO's "Small Town News"

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 44:14


Kenny's morning started with excitement...a bat! He had a dream and Dawn interpreted. He was stunned with resonance. Hard Mountain Dew is coming and so is a Cadbury chocolate pizza kit. Three people on the show love HBO Max's "Small Town News" and one hated it. Say what?

Jon & Chantel
I'll Pay for the Hologram

Jon & Chantel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 52:56


Would you pay for a hologram concert? Jon would pay extra! Plus, a brand new 2nd Date Update. A listener needs advice from Chantel. And let's go work for Cadbury! Have you checked out Jon's new podcast yet? It's called "Our Savings Starts Tomorrow". Find it on any podcast directory!Follow Jon on Instagram @JonWatkinsHostFollow Chantel on Instagram @sheischantellauren

The Jordan Harbinger Show
542: Nicole Perlroth | Who's Winning the Cyberweapons Arms Race?

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 83:49


Nicole Perlroth (@nicoleperlroth) is an award-winning cybersecurity journalist for The New York Times and bestselling author of This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race. What We Discuss with Nicole Perlroth: The startlingly simple reasons why most nation-states now resort to using cyberwarfare tactics before conventional weaponry in acts of aggression -- to increasingly devastating effect. How industries are so interconnected that there's almost no way for a cyberattack to target one victim without endangering countless others on all sides of a conflict (which is why you may have Putin to blame if there's a Cadbury chocolate egg shortage next Easter). Why leaving the security of 85 percent of its critical infrastructure up to privatization makes the United States especially vulnerable to cyberwarfare attacks. The massive amount of intellectual property that's been lost to hackers -- from the formula for Coca-Cola to information that would allow China and other rival nations to catch up with the United States in the nuclear arms race. What Nicole believes the US should do to push back against these threats and the governments that perpetrate them -- and ensure that it's not inadvertently one of them. And much more... Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/542 Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

Look What's After Happening

Back in the studio, Cillian and Colin explore the world-famous chocolate brand, Cadbury's. They touch on a ALL of the important details: The River Styx, Ground Lumps and of course, Boss Baby. Want to see some live improv? Mark, Luke and the Histrionix gang are back in Smock Alley this August! We hope you enjoy, follow LWAH on Instagram and consider sharing with a friend! As always, follow Colin and Cillian's 'handlers': Mark Cantan & Luke Benson Thanks for listening! ImprovAbú

SoBros Network
Ep. 47: Pekka Rinne Retires, Music City Grand Prix, and Snooty Nashville

SoBros Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 75:31


Stoney and Cadbury talk about Pekka Rinne's retirement, getting pelted in the face with a White Claw, the Music City Grand Prix, fireworks at Taco Bell, snooty areas of Nashville, mac and cheese ice cream, Don Cheadle, the best movies of 2021 so far, and the Scenic City Invitational.

Pool Boys Recommend
58. Cadbury Snack Block, The Shepparton Driving Range, and an Abstract Oyster Turtle

Pool Boys Recommend

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 55:14


You ever listened to a podcast with 57 episodes and just wished there was a 58th? We have good news. In this episode we hear about Australia's favourite block of soft-centre chocolate with five delicious flavours and one garbage one. Chris lets us in on the secrets to making the ball go BING, and our resident artist, Studebanksy, creates something from something else. Access a BUNCH of bonus content on our patreon! https://www.patreon.com/join/thepoolboys Check us out on socials @poolboyscomedy!

The Other Stories | Sci-Fi, Horror, Thriller, WTF Stories

Volume 66 is sponsored by the Scared To Death podcast. Find out more at https://scaredtodeathpodcast.com/This is a story about a Cadbury egg that is anything but sweet. Written by Shannon Scott Narrated by Jasmine Arch (https://jasminearch.com/)Edited by Karl Hughes (https://twitter.com/karlhughes)With music by Daniel Birch (https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Daniel_Birch)and Thom Robson (https://www.thomrobsonmusic.com/)And sound effects provided by Freesound.org The episode illustration was provided by Luke Spooner of Carrion House (https://carrionhouse.com/)Shannon Scott is an adjunct professor of English at several universities in the Twin Cities. She has contributed essays on wolves and werewolves to She-Wolf: A Cultural History of Female Werewolves (Manchester UP, 2015) and The Company of Wolves Collection (Manchester UP, 2020). She was also co-editor of Terrifying Transformations: An Anthology of Victorian Werewolf Fiction, 1838-1896 (Valancourt, 2012). More recently, her short story, “American House Spider,” came out in in Nightscript in 2019. Her novelette, “Swing a Dead Cat,” was published in Coppice and Brake: A Dark Fiction Anthology, in March 2020. Her short story, “The Bump,” will be coming out in Vastarien: A Literary Journal and her story “Dead Bread Head” was published in Oculus Sinister in November 2020. Her novella, Joyride, will be coming out in 2021 with Crone Girls Press. She can be reached at sfscott10@gmail.com Writer, poet, narrator, podcaster and all round chaos-for-brains Jasmine Arch lives in a nook of Belgian countryside with two horses, four dogs, and a husband who knows better than to distract her when she's writing. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Other Stories, NewMyths.com and Hybrid Fiction, among others. Find out more about her or her work at JasmineArch.com.You can help support the show over at Patreon.com/HawkandCleaverYou can join our Bookclub, Movieclub, and writing exercises over at Facebook.com/groups/hawkandcleaverT-shirts, mugs, posters, and comic books are available at www.gumroad.com/hawkandcleaverGet help with your short stories and your podcasts by heading to TheOtherStories.Net/services The Other Stories is a production the story studio, Hawk & Cleaver, and is brought to you with a Creative Commons – Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. Don't change it. Don't sell it. But by all means… share the hell out of it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Two Amazon Sellers and a Microphone
#118 - Off Amazon Marketing with Norm Farrar - The Beard Guy

Two Amazon Sellers and a Microphone

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 45:07


This episode is PACKED with knowledge! We chat with Norm Farrar, AKA The Beard Guy, all about off Amazon marketing strategies. You will definitely learn something new by listening to this episode. Entrepreneur and businessman Norman “The Beard Guy” Farrar stands at the forefront of the economic mega-machine known as Amazon Marketplace. As a leading expert with over 25 years of product sourcing, development, and branding expertise, Norm is a trusted advisor to many. Throughout his career, he has worked with brands including Mercedes, COKE, Dell, Microsoft, Target, Hershey, 20th Century Fox, Molson's, Cadbury and a wide variety of emerging businesses that are celebrating sudden escalation in profitability and sales as a result of taking action on his advice and proven methods. He also hosts the "Lunch with Norm" podcast. Make sure to subscribe to the podcast so that you are notified of new episodes!

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless
Billy Bakes JB, the Uber Driver Who Stole A Driver, Xavier Ellis - The Rush Hour Reheated - Monday 28th June 2021

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 17:27


Billy Bakes JB, Xavier Ellis, The Uber Driver Who Stole Billy's Driver, What's The Best Cadbury Favourites Chocolate?, Billy's Joke See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Story Box
Humble The Poet Unboxing | How To Handle Rejection & Creating Authentic Connections

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 53:01


A GUIDE TO HUMBLE THE POET"I'm a former school teacher turned creative. What began as reciting spoken word poetry in coffee shops to impress girls evolved into a creative adventure that has spanned the last 10 years; crossing genres, mediums and oceans. I'm now an author, hip-hop artist, speaker, designer, filmmaker, and creative consultant. I've made a lot of mistakes along the way and share the lessons I've learned for all those looking to have a better life. There is a common thread that flows through my work, even if it's just a strand of my beard. BEST-SELLING AUTHORMy book Unlearn: 101 Simple Truths For A Better Life has become an international bestseller. In the book, I explore simple life lessons that remind us that we gain more from letting go. In October 2019, I released my second international bestseller, Things No One Else Can Teach Us MUSICIAN/DIRECTORI write/direct/edit many of my own music videos, and have been working towards doing the same for other artists, check out my work here.SPOKEN WORD ARTISTI started as a Spoken Word artist, and perform regularly, here's a spot I did for Apple's very first "Shot on iPhone" campaign in Canada.PUBLIC SPEAKERI speak to universities, colleges, organizations, and companies, sharing my story, as well sharing ideas for others in the worlds of education, leadership and self development. Click here to get more information on booking me for your next eventINFLUENCERI've been privileged enough to work with some great bands on some awesome project, and connecting them with causes I care about. Check out this one with Cadbury, where we raised money for kids in Ghana to have bicycles to turn their long walks to school into short rides. To learn more about brand partnerships click hereCheck me out on social media:Instagram - 518K FollowersFacebook - 361.5K FollowersTwitter - 116K FollowersMighty Network - 6K+ MembersFollow The Story Box on Social MediaINSTAGRAM ► - https://www.instagram.com/thestoryboxpodcast/ TWITTER ► - https://twitter.com/jay_fantom FACEBOOK ► - https://www.facebook.com/thestoryboxpodcast WEBSITE ► - https://thestoryboxpodcast.com/SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE! Apple Podcast ► - https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-story-box/id1486295252 Spotify ► - https://open.spotify.com/show/7h8Qv3r2ZV29f7ktJOwmgM?si=FXxYC1JFSHesBv7_d1WtNQ WATCH HERE:YouTube ► - https://www.youtube.com/c/TheStoryBox If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe to YouTube & Apple Podcasts, and leave a 5-star positive rating and review over on Apple Podcasts. Share it around with your friends and family.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

5 Minutes of Mystery
DwD: Richie Rich

5 Minutes of Mystery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 96:53


In case you didnt hear, I took over Reel Comic Heroes to talk about the 90's family comedy Richie Rich. Listent to Pat, Travis, Niall and mess around in Keen Bean's lab and ride along with Cadbury.

Dave and Jeb Aren't Mean
102 - Everybody's All Liotta

Dave and Jeb Aren't Mean

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 73:46


We're adding A DASH OF LOVE (2017) and:  We're going to pass on the rolls. THEME: THEME: "Fuck You If You Don't Like Christmas," from Crudbump, by Drew Fairweather PART ONE You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel ... Brendan Penny heat check ... Barely a movie ... Wasted Gilpin ... Previously a book? ... Ecce Homo ... Real-movie themes ... Too false, weird and murky ... Cast Rundown ... Ben Wilkinson maxing out the Liotta ... The Expositional Challenge ... Nikki-Paul cassoulet meet-cute ... Deranged food/media depiction ... Leaden, arrhythmic pacing ... Lord Fox's Huron Fleet ... Is she carrying leeks into a YMCA? ... Extremely cold ... The back of a restaurant ... Sal ...  Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART TWO  Spot the Angel: No, and no community ... The Hallmark Expanded Universe: Summer Villa meets Chopt vs. Donovan Narrates The Investor in Botown ... Stan Kroenke ... "Why did you do that, Nikki?" ... Overdetermined: Not determined enough; The Patty Duke Show, Asshole Edition; intergenerational Johnny Sack; crayons make art too; cayenne pepper and relationship material ... Diner culture ... Crossover: Goodfellas, Dellucci's, when Bae texts first; Sweetbitter ...   Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART THREE The Hallmark Bechdel Test: Job talk, Delllucci's cooking talk ...  The Hallmark Voight-Kampff Test: Holly Hanson's meanness, funding, cooking and stealing ... Who's the Real Villain: Restaurant feudalism, funding and food culture ... Rating: 2 ... Brad Penny and the Large Lads ... Eat Your Heart Out: Cinnamon candy chili ... The other white meat ... Ingredient jump-scares ... Cadbury egg ... Increasingly upsetting food ... Community rolls ... Cardamom ... Skittlebrau ... Stew with root beer ... Valentine's ravioli and lamb mole ... Rachel Ray vibes ... Chawmp ... KFC ... Lavender Ham ... Split that loin ... Fighting the sensuality ... Joss Whedon's mom ... Two weeks...  Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART FOUR The Leftovers: Christie Will Wolf Appreciation Station ... From Silk Stalkings to Eric Mabius ... Identity Theft of a Cheerleader ... Slightly Single in LA ... Worst bro-bonding convo ever ... Reggie Miller and Shaq Appreciation Station ... Angry rehab-checking ... No dribbling for the sound guy ... Burst off the dribble ... Under the hoop ... Netless volleyball ... Silent Hill parent hug ... Monkey smuggling ... Cayenne in my dad ... Dad foodgasm ... Vulvular decor ... "Falling out" ... Endless Instagramming ... More Gilpin ... Atrocious coffee collision ... Mark Prior ... Fancy Food ... Merry Christmas!  All other music by Chris Collingwood of Look Park and Fountains of Wayne, except: "Orchestral Sports Theme" by Chris Collingwood and Rick Murnane and "Baker Street (loop)," by Gerry Rafferty

CUTalks by CUTEC
Denis Kaminskiy, Arcus Global

CUTalks by CUTEC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 49:59


This week on CUTalks, we are speaking to Denis Kaminskiy who is the co-founder and strategy director of the Cambridge-based digital transformation firm Arcus Global. Denis holds an MBA from the University of Cambridge and has previously held roles at Cadbury and Rolls-Royce. We spoke about how he got into Govtech, the work Arcus does for the UK government and how the UK government is doing at adopting technology.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Sweet trove of documents unearthed at Cadbury factory demolition

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 4:50


A sweet trove of documents has been unearthed during the demolition of the old Cadbury office block that will be the site of the new Dunedin Hospital. The old books are full of details about Hudson and Co. - the local family business that made yummy biscuits and chocolates, and went on to merge with the global company - Cadbury. This is what dreams are made of for archaeologist Megan Lawrence, who might have done just a little dance when they were discovered.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
2 Tips On Intelligently Navigating the Current Real Estate Market

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 20:19


As you may have noticed, the market is crazy right now, and knowing what to do can be a challenge.  Today we give a couple of quick tips on how you can make the most out of the current state of the real estate environment.  --- Transcription Michael: Hey everybody, welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by my co hosts,   Tom: Tom Schneider,   Emil: And Emil Shour   Michael: And today we're gonna be tackling what should you be doing right now given the current state of the market with interest rates, where they are and values doing what they're doing.   Alright guys, before we get into it, I just want to give a call out to all of our listeners, all of our watchers, we just launched our YouTube channel, we would love, love, love. If you came over and liked and subscribed to the channel, we've got tons of new content coming out regularly, I want to make sure everyone stays up to date. So that's a big help for us.   And as always, if there are content ideas that you want to hear an episode about, let us know drop us a line in the comment section. Wherever it is listen to your podcast. Alright guys, before we jump in today's episode, where are we at? How are things coming? Tom, you got your insurance all squared away, right?   Tom: Yes, yeah. So what I did recently was a long story short, I guess short story long. My insurance is a bit of a mess on my rental properties. I was using this third party company and they kind of dropped the ball where I paid to renew but they like sent me a refund. I mean, this I'm probably it's probably my fault. But anyways, short story long, I ended up getting lender placed insurance for like a few months. And wouldn't lender place insurance. It's not necessarily what you want, you're maybe not getting the coverage you want, you're probably paying way more than you should. So what I did through the the prodding and poking of a meal and Michael to keep me going is I did some bundling, I went to my home insurance, the company that does my house and my cars. And I added my rental properties all on on one gigantic policy, I would say you know, when it's all said and done, my costs on my insurance are probably pretty comparable to what they were but the coverages was way more expansive, with a little bit lower deductibles and just a little more, those blankets at night are a little bit warmer, the pillows a little bit softer of comfortable.   So did that finishing up refining, seeing a couple of rentals, getting them all refinance, actually under the same lender that ended up buying a bunch of my other loans. So it's there's some convenience there of having it all through the same lender first a bunch of the rentals that I have. So that's my…   Michael: Nice, Emil, what's good in your world? Emil: Tom, I just want to first say how proud I am of you that you did it, man. like six months, but you did it to there.   Tom: Yeah. There are things in this world that you know, like wouldn't take a lot of effort. But for whatever reason, it was in this like rebellious little part of you, like just doesn't want to do it. And like the moment you do it, it's like, gosh, why did I do that like a long time ago. And that kind of stuff like pops up all over the place? You just need to get through the fog and just, you know, just do I don't know. But thank you. No, thank you that positive reinforcement has me geared up to continue to do things that I for whatever reason, like the rebelliously like have a hard time finishing through on so thanks, man.   Michael: Yeah, Tom. I'm also proud of you. Nice work, man.   Tom: Michael, that sounds fake. Thanks, Emil.   Michael: Just kidding.   Emil: I'm actually proud of you. Michael is patronizing you.   Michael: I'm just frustrated how long it took. But I'm one of those people, you know, you can only take the horse to water not calling you a horse by any means.   Tom: It's about the journey, Michael. It's not about the station. Enjoy. That's true. It's very true. Yeah, that's true. Alright, Emil, what's what's going on with you?   Emil: For me? I told Mike about this earlier. So I bought a triplex last November. And when I got all the seller documents when we're doing due diligence, I noticed that the property tax was super low on the property. And I actually knew the seller of the property. And I contacted and I was like, hey, how come your tax property taxes were so low on this property? He said he had no idea why but obviously he wasn't going to complain or anything. And I figured, okay, property is going to be sold, changing hands, the city is going to reassess and it's going to bring my my property tax level much higher.   So when I when I underwrote the property did all the performance stuff. I wrote it at a much higher tax level. And so about a month ago, I got this statement from the city of St. Louis, saying, hey, it's a reassessment year, I think St. Louis reassessed his property values every other year and changes property tax accordingly. He said, it's a reassessment year, we're reassessing your property and we'll let you know of any property tax changes soon. And so I'm like, okay, here it comes. And I get I get the reassessment letter about a week ago expecting the bill to come in higher, it ended up going Up by $10. And I had underwrote it for it going up like price. 16 1700 bucks. So that was a huge win. And I'm so stoked. And I don't know why they're doing this, but I'm obviously not gonna complain. And thank you city of St. Louis. I hope you're not listening and know my property address. But thank you.   Michael: Massive win.   Emil: Yeah, yeah, I'll take it. I'll take anyone I can get right now.   Michael: Yeah, it's it's you being lucky. But also, like, the cool thing is that you underwrote and assume that it was gonna be worse, and the property still worked. So now the fact that you got this is just a total cherry on top. And granted, it's a pretty massive cherry. But it's, it's something extra, it's I mean, you weren't expecting. And so you know, good for you, man. That's awesome.   Emil: Here's the other thing, though, I find it's rebalancing everything else because I have properties and in other places where they also reassess, and they're doing it correctly. So my property tax bill has been missing all year. So I needed a break elsewhere. So happy about that.   Michael: Good. That the universe giveth and the universe taketh.   Emil: Michael, what's, what's going on? I'm sure nothing for you.   Michael: My backgrounds a little bit different today, I'm actually in my van that we had converted. So it's my wife, my dog, and I. So we're up in Lassen National Forest for a couple days hanging out up here and driving around, we're going up to Idaho, Montana, Wyoming. So doing the whole remote real estate investing from from a van is is interesting, for sure. So I've got 16 under contract to sell, which is exciting. It's getting inspected today. So I'll be curious to see what the buyer has, in terms of feedback. I have the the IRA flip is currently underway, which is exciting.   So construction started last week, hopefully three to four week time for construction, and then getting at least up and then sold as an investment property. And then looking to get a another flip as well under contract out in the Midwest, but just on the personal side of things, my wife and I want to kind of team up and do something there. So that'll be kind of an experiment for us to see what that process looks like and how, how well she can, she can tackle that. So we're really excited.     Tom: Have you guys done deals together before or you know, it, or she kind of over into the space or   Michael: She's newer into the space. But she's been involved from, from pretty early on since we started dating. And I told her kind of what my portfolio look like as we're getting closer to marriage. And I was a little ambivalent on how I wanted to have that conversation and broach the subject. So for anybody listening out there that's in a similar situation, you know, take my advice, or don't I think, you know, I easier into it and explain kind of what my situation look like. And she was very excited about that. And has always been a big proponent, and a great ideas person throughout the whole process.   Because for me, I get so in my head and I get so tunnel visioned, especially with regard to problems. And so I remember she asked me one time like, Oh, well, I was in a money crunch. I'm like, I don't know, where I'm gonna find the funds to do this. She's like, what about the HELOC you have over here, I was like, holy crap, you're a genius. So when you give people the full picture, they can better they can better assist. So it's been really great. But so this will be kind of her first deal that she's going to be partnering on and really looking to drive the ship, so to speak, because she's talking about leaving her job to do this full time. So we're gonna make sure get a proof of concept going and then see if we can make that happen.   Tom: That's awesome. I think in a future episode, that's it, I think it'd be a good thing to kind of drill in because with a lot of people in doing this type of investment, like it's, you know, you have a you have a life partner you have, you know, whatever, a wife, girlfriend, husband, you know, boyfriend, whatever, who, you know, those kind of you need to get a little bit of mindshare before moving forward. And it'd be interesting to talk to you guys about your experiences with that and Michael, you're you've fully crossed the cause the chasm and in bringing her in, you know, full, full hug. That's, that's very cool.   Michael: So we're excited to start that and see what that looks like. But we didn't come here to talk about ourselves. We came here to talk about what people should be doing right now given the market conditions with values and interest rates. And Tom you kind of touched on it nicely, I think ever so innocently in that you are finishing up your refinances. So talk to us about why you're doing that right now.   Tom: Yeah. So for you know, fortunate enough to have properties in areas that is appreciated quite a bit. And right now the rent is appreciated along with the value so what I'm doing right now with three different properties is doing a cash out refi they've you know, from the time that I bought them to where they're at now it's they're up roughly, probably close to 50% five zero.   So you know, getting my original downpayment back into my pocket to redeploy how however I see fit, and right now working on the side with Michael On on talking about, you know, the right ways to think about that either continuing to build into SF SFR, or possibly some multifamily.   So yeah, really excited about that hopefully I can close within this month and have the funds there. And man with just interest rates where they're at, it's, you know, if you have the built in equity, there's there is not a reason not to take advantage of it, it's probably cumulatively maybe five to 10 hours worth of time of getting your documents sending them over, if you don't have a lender vetting the different lenders. But I think of it this way, either the rates are either going to go up, or they're going to go down and by refinancing. Now, if they go down, I could always just refinance later, but by refinancing now, if they go up, great, I've taken advantage of that, you know, where I see right now, the bottom of the trough of where interest rates are at so highly recommended, you know, you have that the ability to do that, to take advantage of that for the refinance. So that's what I'm doing right now.   Michael: Love it. Love it. You said something that I want to dig a little bit deeper on, you said that both the actually said a couple things I want to dig deeper on. But first, you said that the properties have appreciated, and that also that the rent has gone up over time. But throughout that whole conversation, you didn't say anything about the rent. So why is that important to you?   Tom: That's important for me, because, you know, another another way to say like, I want to dig deeper that I don't know, I just thought of it. Let's double click on that. Okay, so   Michael:  I like that a lot.   Tom: What's it like office speak? You know, like synergy? Yes.   Michael: Tech tech office speak. That's good, man. Yeah, let's, let's double click on this. Let's expand the window.   Tom: Let's expand the window. Yeah. So with rent increasing, so this is important. So within a rental property, when you refinance, you're getting a bigger loan, so you're having bigger monthly debt obligation to pay that loan. So what you could do, and this is something our friend Michael Zuber would would highly advise against, you could create an alligator, an alligator is when the rent, the value of the rent that you're collecting is less than your monthly costs. So it's cash flowing negative. And alligator is just a term that Michael Zuber came up with, like it's it's eating up cash flow, the importance of the rent staying up is if I go and refinance this property, I want to make sure that it's cash flowing, that it's not like going negative.   Michael Zuber admitted, you know, early in his career, he created a couple of alligators, just to get the capital to move faster. And that's something that I think you just need to be really cautious about. But my point is that Michael double clicked on is, since the rent was able to kind of pace up a little bit, I could comfortably refinance a larger loan, take that cash out, and still with the rent that's coming in, be able to pay off that larger loan.   Michael: Awesome. Awesome. And so did you take a hit in terms of your cash flow on that property, barring the cash on cash return metric, but let's say you were bringing home 200 bucks a month, or whatever the number was, are you did you take a hit there?   Tom: Yeah, I expect to take home, you know, pro forma. And it should be pretty accurate. Just because it's been operating for a while, is my monthly cash flow is going to go from roughly 300 bucks down to 200 bucks. But I'm, I'm okay, I'm okay with that drop, just with the capital that I'm taking off. Now, I think the right way to think about this, Michael is, you know, think about it cumulatively as a portfolio. So, you know, with this capital that I'm taking out, it's going to create new cash flows, it will probably also create new new debt, because I'll get a loan with this new property, but the net cumulative cash flow, should I expect it to be a little bit higher, if not equal? more cash flow?   Michael: So would you then disagree with Michael's Zuber's alligator warning?   Tom: If we were in like a like a coaching session right now with rich Academy, I would say it's pretty dependent on where you are, and when you're trying to like access those funds. So a common investing philosophy is the later the closer you are to retirement, the more conservative you should be with those returns.   So I plan to work for a while I enjoy working, you know, so I'll have you know, cash flow coming in from, you know, a day to day job, so I'm okay being a little bit riskier, on leverage, you know, I still want to be really cognizant that I can cover my bills for whatever. But if you are in a position where you were looking to retire really soon, I would say you know, that alligator is pretty is risky. Just because over time, sure, there's, there's there there might be ups and downs with the economy but generally speaking, it's it tends to go up into the right, Especially over longer periods of time. So with that said, creating a property that is looking a little bit alligator ish, maybe like a capybara or like a crocodile. Cadbury's like a big guinea pig.   Michael: I think it's like a big guinea pig.   Tom: If we're younger, you should be okay taking a little bit more risk. But that doesn't mean like go nuts. You should still be really intentional about your about the risk profile and your ability to manage it. But we can work closer to crocodile. Well, I really just expanded that longer than it needs to be my today's   Michael: You double click the crap out of that.   Yom: I right clicked, clicked on Get Info. And then I like looked at how many bits it was so. Yeah.   Michael: That's great. All right. That's awesome. Tom, thanks. Thanks for sharing that man. A meal. Anything to add on to what Tom said in terms of what people should be doing right now. I know you just went through a cash out refi as well. Can you talk to us about why that made sense for you. Given the current conditions.   Emil: I am trying to save up a little bit more money right now I'm I'm in cash conservation mode to God and buy something a little bit bigger. But I don't want to hold all my activity, right, right now, some awesome things are happening. If you own real estate, right? It sucks. If you don't, because prices are going up. It's a very competitive market. But if you own real estate, it's awesome. Right now, values are going up rates are super low.   And so I think we did it on a past episode. But I'll go through the numbers, I have a situation very similar to Tom. So I bought a single family home back in 2017. The purchase price is 115k. My down payment and closing costs were just shy of 25k. And the rate back then was 4.625. And so I noticed that, you know, like everywhere in the country prices were going up homes in the area, were selling for about 140 to 160k. So I did the math, and I reached out to a lender and rates were 3.125. So drop a point and a half.   So I had two options. I was like okay, I can just refi and lower my monthly payment. Or I can do a cash out refi pull out all my equity. And because the rate is dropping by a point and a half, my monthly cash flow shouldn't be affected too bad. And so all said and done went through the process. We refied out that 3.125%, the home appraised at 157. So 40k more than we bought it. So I was able to pull out 26k, which is actually 1000 bucks more than what we put into it. So pull all the cash out a little bit on top as well. And my monthly payment only went up $29 a month. And this property cash flows decently. So I knew that $29 wasn't going to affect it wasn't going to turn into an alligator.   I am on the Michael Zuber side of that one I will I rather be more conservative, even if you say oh, I can go negative on this one house by $100. But I can increase my cash flow $200 by buying another property. I am very reluctant to to have a property where I'm just shelling out money every month that just pains me and I I'd rather not have that. I'm a little more conservative on that end.   But yeah, this one was like a no brainer. It's like okay, I'm still gonna be cashflow positive. rents have been going up in that area. Why not pull all the cash out and refight a low rate. So yeah, pretty awesome environment. If you own property, like Don't, don't let this amazing time, go to waste, go refi some properties, if even if you're buying, whether you're not buying whatever, just like it's such an amazing time to go make some moves right now on your existing portfolio.   Tom: We'll also add in it's like it's it's not impossible to buy right now. Like, you know, we had this in another episode, I think it might take a little bit more offers and a little bit more time and a little more diligence, but it's not impossible to buy right now. Just   Emil: Yeah, I hope I wasn't making it sound like impossible. I just mean, you know, it's it's a tougher environment, you could be a little frustrated. But for me personally, I'm just trying to save up some money to go. If I had the cash that I need to go buy something I'd be going out and making offers right now I'm just trying to save up a little more. Just saying you know, there's there's other things you can be doing, even if you're not buying right now, like you talked about, like with your insurance and your refiling properties pulling cash out. So just keep it moving, you know,   Tom: Awesome Emil. Great, great points. And man, what a good run of luck with your property taxes and for rates doing that refi and only just having that marginal increase. Awesome.   Alright, this is a good spot to end it. Thank you guys for listening. We encourage you again to check out our YouTube channel. Lots of good stuff going in there. encourage you to check out, subscribe to the podcast, give us a rating wherever you listen to podcast and also check out RoofstockAcademy.com that's where you can sync with us talk about your profile or show me your strategy, all that good stuff. So, as always happy investing.   Emil: Happy investing.

I SHAKE MY HEAD
Prepared By Others!

I SHAKE MY HEAD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 82:58


Big reveal this week on the podcast! Sam and Lisa admit to liking all things being prepared by others! This is more of a shock coming from Chef Lisa who swears she can cook....hmmm really? She feels the need to paint the picture of Sam's new glasses. The reviews are mixed, right Lisa and John? Listener's are advised to Google Harry Carey! Lisa was clothing shamed while out with the HHG last week and Sam is refusing to pay Lisa money for dud lotto tickets she didn't even know about! Lisa has discovered that she has fat elbows or felbows! She's old! Sam got her grade 10 eyebrows back and Lisa is confused like usual! Sam does her best to explain but hi it's Lisa. Mike almost involved Lisa in a pigeon hit and run on the way to work and then ‘accidently’ tries to suffocate her with Cinnapoo! The ladies get on a roll chatting about bland watermelon, Lisa the gardener, nighttime cereal(?), expired veggies, the Noom saga, icky food, FB Tuesday, no more sundae bar, Friends reunion, Piers Morgan's unsolicited opinion, new Crave binge alert, puffy or sweaty, the Cadbury secret, Lisa's question corner, Captain Stubing, insects and kids, Kate M. & mom jeans, side part and bangs, Costco samples, food trucks and buffets and things Lisa should know! The I shake my heads are personal takes on insects and online shopping! It's just a bit of ridiculous chatter but it might just make you laugh! If you love what you hear you can support the podcast by following the links below! Podbean: https://patron.podbean.com/ismhead Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/ishakemyhead You can also find us on: Twitter www.twitter.com/i_shakemyhead  Instagram www.instagram.com/ishakemyhead Buy our merchandise at www.ishakemyhead.threadless.com We are proud to be a part of www.podfixnetwork.com   

Mentally Yours
Maintaining Good Physical Health

Mentally Yours

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 33:59


Kingsley Simmons went to Iraq and Afghanistan in the army. Now, working as a Fitness Instructor and Mental Health Advocate, he is working to help people who leave the army. He even won a Local Business Award with Leeds Utd and Cadbury. Follow Mentally Yours on social media... Twitter: www.twitter.com/mentallyyrs Join our private Facebook group: www.facebook.com/groups/135088803805742 And check out Kingsley online www.twitter.com/simfit100

The SharePickers Podcast with Justin Waite
2420: 5 Things You Need To Know, Today, on Tuesday 18th May 2021

The SharePickers Podcast with Justin Waite

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 1:49


The UK is facing a shortage of Cadbury 99 Flakes after a surge in demand for soft-serve ice creams topped with the crumbly, chocolate treat. The ice cream toppers are half the size of the Flakes sold at newsagents and petrol station counters.

What The Flux
Cadbury replacing Qantas at Rugby Aus | HBO owner keen to take on Disney+ | Islamic finance booming in Aus

What The Flux

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 5:47


Cadbury has signed on as Rugby Australia’s new principal sponsor for the Wallabies - replacing Qantas after 30 years.   To take on Netflix and Disney+, the owner of HBO and CNN is exploring a merger with the owner of Animal Planet and The Discovery Channel.   Australia’s Islamic finance market is worth $250 billion - and companies are seeking banking licenses to fill the gap in the market.   ---   Save money and win cash prizes up to $250k weekly: https://bit.ly/Wintheweek Get your credit score for free: https://bit.ly/fluxcreditscore Download the free app (App Store): http://bit.ly/FluxAppStore Download the free app (Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/FluxappGooglePlay Weekly newsletter: https://bit.ly/fluxnewsletter Instagram: http://bit.ly/fluxinsta TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@flux.finance   ---   The content in this podcast reflects the views and opinions of the hosts, and is intended for personal and not commercial use. We do not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any opinion, statement or other information provided or distributed in these episodes. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

JAR Media Posdact
Disagree Toagree Agree - Corncast 42

JAR Media Posdact

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 72:49


https://www.patreon.com/jarmedia Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/jar-media-store Twitter: https://twitter.com/FourFunnies Timecodes: 00:00 Intro 01:41 Organise Area 16:06 Rubens Game Theory 30:52 Mid Break 31:38 Reddit Questions 32:16 Gravity Falling Onto These 32:53 Muffin - paper eat or paper not eat? 34:27 Cadbury 18 Roll Challenge 36:18 Quite a gross story (warning, a bit gross) 38:55 What part of the chicken is the most delectable 39:40 Aged Franchises 48:47 Ice Cream Cake or Pie 52:50 Alexs Thoughts on Current Lego Themes 56:22 Disagree To Agree 57:29 If James was a talking car 1:10:59 Is the cacodamon a dibby?

Human-Centric AI: Affectiva Asks
It Started with a Kiss: How Emotion AI Provides Full Brain Picture of Consumer Response

Human-Centric AI: Affectiva Asks

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 48:26


Today’s episode features Dr. Rana el Kaliouby and Graham Page from Affectiva talking with CloudArmy’s President / CSO Neuroscience, Thom Noble, about how Emotion AI paired with neuro implicit technologies can provide market researchers with richer and deeper insights.Affectiva is excited to partner with CloudArmy, a cloud-based neuroscience research technology company. By integrating our technologies, we’re able to deliver enhanced analytics that provide a ‘full brain’ picture of consumer response, design and creativity.Make sure you watch the kiss in the the Cadbury chocolate ad case study, which sparked some public controversy, and will be a key point during the discussion!

Marmalade Mysteries: A Murder, Mystery & Missing Persons Podcast

Lisa tells Georgia the background behind the Hollow Earther's beliefs while Georgia can't stop thinking about Cadbury eggs. 

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates
4/21 6am: Luke Bryan is back on Idol from Covid-19

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 1:42


Luke Bryan is back on Idol from Covid-19; Academy Awards will not make attendees wear masks; Cadbury has launched "Build Your Own Chocolate Bar"

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless
Billy's NQR, ANZAC Day Crowds, your favourite chocolate - The Rush Hour podcast - Monday 19th April 2021

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 30:56


Billy's NQR, All Sports Report - Sheffield Shield, AFLW, High Jumper Nicola McDermott breaks 2m, NBL, NRL, Damian Barretts good and bad from Round 5, what's the best Cadbury Favourite?, Billy's Joke See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Say Something Interesting
Buns, Bugs, + the Body of Christ

Say Something Interesting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 35:08


On this episode of Say Something Interesting, Megan, Lauren and special guest Bethany discuss Easter at EastLake. Other topics include: life changing Cadbury chocolate, world travels, and seeing parallels of the resurrection.

I'm Dead Inside
Episode 63: A Hunned Percent

I'm Dead Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 78:59


We keep a hunned this week...or a hundy...or straight 100!!!!  We discuss emoji etiquette, Georgia voting laws, the Easter holiday, backlash towards Cadbury having a gay couple portrayal in their Easter commercial (spoiler alert, it isn't the woke left trying to cancel this), DMX and the overdose that has him in a vegetative state and lastly, PETA's problem with monkey labor.   We hope you enjoy!!

Is It Just Me?
FULL EP62: CHURI GETS FIRED

Is It Just Me?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 76:15


We'll be back in a couple of weeks after a li'l Easter break! In this episode: What's the superior Easter chocolate, Cadbury or Red Tulip? (02:57) The mouse plague (08:32) Are threesomes for you? (13:51) Churi gets fired (23:30) Red Rooster reviews (29:50) TV Tingz - Newsreader suffers a migraine on air (32:31) Our "Secret Segment" ADDebrief (48:00) Follow us @coupleofmitches

Stays Krunchy In Milk
Stays Krunchy in Milk Episode 389: Efficient and Friendly: The Anti Popeyes

Stays Krunchy In Milk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2021 130:18


Sorry about the late arrival, lots of life happening this week. But we hit the ground running this week and it’s a time. We start off with condom chat, then oddly enough vodka chat. The FEMA vaccination site in Cleveland is up and running leading us to discuss our Vaccine experiences thus far. RTA Police Officer assaulted a mentally ill man. Nerf Gun disguised as a real gun found in drug raid. What are cocaine accessories? A Pittsburgh Police officer is divorcing his wife after discovering she participated in the events of January 6th at the Capitol. Shark hustler arrested in New York. Do you have any exotic animal ownership dreams? Any goes on local staycation. Box catches us up on his super busy life. While Tee steps away the rest of the crew discuss Easter Basket prep. Hershey’s Chocolate is trash and they have ruined the good name of Cadbury in America. Gabe is feeling underappreciated by his family and the gang tries to cheer him up and offer ideas.  Woody Allen should be in jail, full stop. RIP Chrissy Teigen’s Twitter, it will be missed. Tatum l TAYREL713 l Lunchbox l Gabe LISTEN l RSS l Apple Podcast l Google Play l Spotify l TuneIn l Twitter l Amazon Music I YouTube l Twitch l Stitcher l Email l Amazon Wish List l Merch l Patreon I Rate This Podcast PHONE l 216-302-8763     #Cleveland #Ohio #Podcast #LiveFromThe216 #IntlPlayersAnthem #UGK #Outkast #Three6Mafia #LambSkin #Vodka #OperationMagnus #Vaccine #PfizerBioNTech #Moderna #SideEffects #RTA #RTAPolice #Nerf #Glock19 #Divorce #Insurrectionist #Staycation #MandatoryOvertime #Hersheys #Cadbury #Fatherhood #Reddit #AITA #ChrissyTeigen #Twitter

Overnight America
#CancelCadbury

Overnight America

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 38:23


Is host Ryan Wrecker too hard on the Cadbury egg? Decide for yourself as he rolls through a ranking of top Easter candy. He also touches on President Biden’s multi-trillion dollar infrastructure plan and continues to get you set for tomorrow’s Cardinal season opener. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Makeup Your Mind Podcast
Chocolate Bunnies & Rainbow Eggs

Makeup Your Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 14:25


Hey Girl! I'm so excited to talk all things easter with you this week! Easter is week is my absolute favorite! We have finally finished up our Identity Series and I can't wait to get a new one started soon, but for now, be sure to have some Cadbury eggs and jelly beans this week!

Baconsale: Hickory-Smoked Pop Culture
Episode 296: Hoppy Eas-Tier!

Baconsale: Hickory-Smoked Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 84:33


Here comes the podcast Baconsale, hoppin’ down the bunny trail. Hippity-hoppity, tiering candy today. On this episode, we’re putting all our cards and our candy on the table regarding Easter treats. We’re ranking chocolate bunnies, jelly beans, Cadbury eggs, Peeps, Jordan almonds, Robin Eggs, and more. Plus, we’re even eating some of these sweets as we’re recording. Please pardon Kent’s chewing noises, Joel’s unconscious obsession with peanut butter, and Zack’s chocolate bottom. Press play to join us on our springtime sugar high!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 118: "Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy" by Manfred Mann

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 49:27


Episode 118 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy" by Manfred Mann, and how a jazz group with a blues singer had one of the biggest bubblegum pop hits of the sixties. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Walk on By" by Dionne Warwick. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of tracks by Manfred Mann. Information on the group comes from Mannerisms: The Five Phases of Manfred Mann, by Greg Russo, and from the liner notes of this eleven-CD box set of the group's work. For a much cheaper collection of the group's hits -- but without the jazz, blues, and baroque pop elements that made them more interesting than the average sixties singles band -- this has all the hit singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript: So far, when we've looked at the British blues and R&B scene, we've concentrated on the bands who were influenced by Chicago blues, and who kept to a straightforward guitar/bass/drums lineup. But there was another, related, branch of the blues scene in Britain that was more musically sophisticated, and which while its practitioners certainly enjoyed playing songs by Howlin' Wolf or Muddy Waters, was also rooted in the jazz of people like Mose Allison. Today we're going to look at one of those bands, and at the intersection of jazz and the British R&B scene, and how a jazz band with a flute player and a vibraphonist briefly became bubblegum pop idols. We're going to look at "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" by Manfred Mann: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Do Wah Diddy Diddy"] Manfred Mann is, annoyingly when writing about the group, the name of both a band and of one of its members. Manfred Mann the human being, as opposed to Manfred Mann the group, was born Manfred Lubowitz in South Africa, and while he was from a wealthy family, he was very opposed to the vicious South African system of apartheid, and considered himself strongly anti-racist. He was also a lover of jazz music, especially some of the most progressive music being made at the time -- musicians like Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus, and John Coltrane -- and he soon became a very competent jazz pianist, playing with musicians like Hugh Masakela at a time when that kind of fraternisation between people of different races was very much frowned upon in South Africa. Manfred desperately wanted to get out of South Africa, and he took his chance in June 1961, at the last point at which he was a Commonwealth citizen. The Commonwealth, for those who don't know, is a political association of countries that were originally parts of the British Empire, and basically replaced the British Empire when the former colonies gained their independence. These days, the Commonwealth is of mostly symbolic importance, but in the fifties and sixties, as the Empire was breaking up, it was considered a real power in its own right, and in particular, until some changes to immigration law in the mid sixties, Commonwealth citizens had the right to move to the UK.  At that point, South Africa had just voted to become a republic, and there was a rule in the Commonwealth that countries with a head of state other than the Queen could only remain in the Commonwealth with the unanimous agreement of all the other members. And several of the other member states, unsurprisingly, objected to the continued membership of a country whose entire system of government was based on the most virulent racism imaginable. So, as soon as South Africa became a republic, it lost its Commonwealth membership, and that meant that its citizens lost their automatic right to emigrate to the UK. But they were given a year's grace period, and so Manfred took that chance and moved over to England, where he started playing jazz keyboards, giving piano lessons, and making some money on the side by writing record reviews. For those reviews, rather than credit himself as Manfred Lubowitz, he decided to use a pseudonym taken from the jazz drummer Shelly Manne, and he became Manfred Manne -- spelled with a silent e on the end, which he later dropped. Mann was rather desperate for gigs, and he ended up taking a job playing with a band at a Butlin's holiday camp. Graham Bond, who we've seen in several previous episodes as the leader of The Graham Bond Organisation, was at that time playing Hammond organ there, but only wanted to play a few days a week. Mann became the substitute keyboard player for that holiday camp band, and struck up a good musical rapport with the drummer and vibraphone player, Mike Hugg. When Bond went off to form his own band, Mann and Hugg decided to form their own band along the same lines, mixing the modern jazz that they liked with the more commercial R&B that Bond was playing.  They named their group the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers, and it initially consisted of Mann on keyboards, Hugg on drums and vibraphone, Mike Vickers on guitar, flute, and saxophone, Dave Richmond on bass, Tony Roberts and Don Fay on saxophone and Ian Fenby on trumpet. As their experiences were far more in the jazz field than in blues, they decided that they needed to get in a singer who was more familiar with the blues side of things. The person they chose was a singer who was originally named Paul Pond, and who had been friends for a long time with Brian Jones, before Jones had formed the Rolling Stones. While Jones had been performing under the name Elmo Lewis, his friend had taken on Jones' surname, as he thought "Paul Pond" didn't sound like a good name for a singer. He'd first kept his initials, and performed as P.P. Jones, but then he'd presumably realised that "pee-pee" is probably not the best stage name in the world, and so he'd become just Paul Jones, the name by which he's known to this day. Jones, like his friend Brian, was a fan particularly of Chicago blues, and he had occasionally appeared with Alexis Korner. After auditioning for the group at a ska club called The Roaring 20s, Jones became the group's lead singer and harmonica player, and the group soon moved in Jones' musical direction, playing the kind of Chicago blues that was popular at the Marquee club, where they soon got a residency, rather than the soul style that was more popular at the nearby Flamingo club, and which would be more expected from a horn-centric lineup. Unsurprisingly, given this, the horn players soon left, and the group became a five-piece core of Jones, Mann, Hugg, Vickers, and Richmond. This group was signed to HMV records by John Burgess. Burgess was a producer who specialised in music of a very different style from what the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers played. We've already heard some of his production work -- he was the producer for Adam Faith from "What Do You Want?" on: [Excerpt: Adam Faith, "What Do You Want?"] And at the time he signed the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers, he was just starting to work with a new group, Freddie and the Dreamers, for whom he would produce several hits: [Excerpt: Freddie and the Dreamers, "If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody"] Burgess liked the group, but he insisted that they had to change their name -- and in fact, he insisted that the group change their name to Manfred Mann. None of the group members liked the idea -- even Mann himself thought that this seemed a little unreasonable, and Paul Jones in particular disagreed strongly with the idea, but they were all eventually mollified by the idea that all the publicity would emphasise that all five of them were equal members of the group, and that while the group might be named after their keyboard player, there were five members. The group members themselves always referred to themselves as "the Manfreds" rather than as Manfred Mann. The group's first single showed that despite having become a blues band and then getting produced by a pop producer, they were still at heart a jazz group. "Why Should We Not?" is an instrumental led by Vickers' saxophone, Mann's organ, and Jones' harmonica: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Why Should We Not?"] Unsurprisingly, neither that nor the B-side, a jazz instrumental version of "Frere Jacques", charted -- Britain in 1963 wanted Gerry and the Pacemakers and Freddie and the Dreamers, not jazz instrumentals. The next single, an R&B song called "Cock-A-Hoop" written by Jones, did little better. The group's big breakthrough came from Ready, Steady, Go!, which at this point was using "Wipe Out!" by the Surfaris as its theme song: [Excerpt: The Surfaris, "Wipe Out"] We've mentioned Ready, Steady, Go! in passing in previous episodes, but it was the most important pop music show of the early and mid sixties, just as Oh Boy! had been for the late fifties. Ready, Steady, Go! was, in principle at least, a general pop music programme, but in practice it catered primarily for the emerging mod subculture. "Mod" stood for "modernist", and the mods emerged from the group of people who liked modern jazz rather than trad, but by this point their primary musical interests were in soul and R&B. Mod was a working-class subculture, based in the South-East of England, especially London, and spurred on by the newfound comparative affluence of the early sixties, when for the first time young working-class people, while still living in poverty, had a small amount of disposable income to spend on clothes, music, and drugs. The Mods had a very particular sense of style, based around sharp Italian suits, pop art and op art, and Black American music or white British imitations of it. For them, music was functional, and primarily existed for the purposes of dancing, and many of them would take large amounts of amphetamines so they could spend the entire weekend at clubs dancing to soul and R&B music. And that entire weekend would kick off on Friday with Ready, Steady, Go!, whose catchphrase was "the weekend starts here!" Ready, Steady, Go! featured almost every important pop act of the early sixties, but while groups like Gerry and the Pacemakers or the Beatles would appear on it, it became known for its promotion of Black artists, and it was the first major British TV exposure for Motown artists like the Supremes, the Temptations, and the Marvelettes, for Stax artists like Otis Redding, and for blues artists like John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson. Ready Steady Go! was also the primary TV exposure for British groups who were inspired by those artists, and it's through Ready Steady Go! that the Animals, the Yardbirds, the Rolling Stones, Them, and the Who, among others reached national popularity -- all of them acts that were popular among the Mods in particular. But "Wipe Out" didn't really fit with this kind of music, and so the producers of Ready Steady Go were looking for something more suitable for their theme music. They'd already tried commissioning the Animals to record something, as we saw a couple of weeks back, but that hadn't worked out, and instead they turned to Manfred Mann, who came up with a song that not only perfectly fit the style of the show, but also handily promoted the group themselves: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "5-4-3-2-1"] That was taken on as Ready, Steady, Go!s theme song, and made the top five in the UK. But by the time it charted, the group had already changed lineup. Dave Richmond was seen by the other members of the group as a problem at this point. Richmond was a great bass player, but he was a great *jazz* bass player -- he wanted to be Charles Mingus, and play strange cross-rhythms, and what the group needed at this point was someone who would just play straightforward blues basslines without complaint -- they needed someone closer to Willie Dixon than to Mingus. Tom McGuinness, who replaced him, had already had a rather unusual career trajectory. He'd started out as a satirist, writing for the magazine Private Eye and the TV series That Was The Week That Was, one of the most important British comedy shows of the sixties, but he had really wanted to be a blues musician instead. He'd formed a blues band, The Roosters, with a guitarist who went to art school with his girlfriend, and they'd played a few gigs around London before the duo had been poached by the minor Merseybeat band Casey Jones and his Engineers, a group which had been formed by Brian Casser, formerly of Cass & The Cassanovas, the group that had become The Big Three. Casey Jones and his Engineers had just released the single "One Way Ticket": [Excerpt: Casey Jones and His Engineers, "One-Way Ticket"] However, the two guitarists soon realised, after just a handful of gigs, that they weren't right for that group, and quit. McGuinness' friend, Eric Clapton, went on to join the Yardbirds, and we'll be hearing more about him in a few weeks' time, but McGuinness was at a loose end, until he discovered that Manfred Mann were looking for a bass player. McGuinness was a guitarist, but bluffed to Paul Jones that he'd switched to bass, and got the job. He said later that the only question he'd been asked when interviewed by the group was "are you willing to play simple parts?" -- as he'd never played bass in his life until the day of his first gig with the group, he was more than happy to say yes to that. McGuinness joined only days after the recording of "5-4-3-2-1", and Richmond was out -- though he would have a successful career as a session bass player, playing on, among others, "Je t'Aime" by Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin, "Your Song" by Elton John, Labi Siffre's "It Must Be Love", and the music for the long-running sitcoms Only Fools and Horses and Last of the Summer Wine. As soon as McGuinness joined, the group set out on tour, to promote their new hit, but also to act as the backing group for the Crystals, on a tour which also featured Johnny Kidd and the Pirates and Joe Brown and his Bruvvers.  The group's next single, "Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble" was another original, and made number eleven on the charts, but the group saw it as a failure anyway, to the extent that they tried their best to forget it ever existed. In researching this episode I got an eleven-CD box set of the group's work, which contains every studio album or compilation they released in the sixties, a collection of their EPs, and a collection of their BBC sessions. In all eleven CDs, "Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble" doesn't appear at all. Which is quite odd, as it's a perfectly serviceable, if unexceptional, piece of pop R&B: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble"] But it's not just the group that were unimpressed with the record. John Burgess thought that the record only getting to number eleven was proof of his hypothesis that groups should not put out their own songs as singles. From this point on, with one exception in 1968, everything they released as an A-side would be a cover version or a song brought to them by a professional songwriter. This worried Jones, who didn't want to be forced to start singing songs he disliked, which he saw as a very likely outcome of this edict. So he made it his role in the group to seek out records that the group could cover, which would be commercial enough that they could get hit singles from them, but which would be something he could sing while keeping his self-respect. His very first selection certainly met the first criterion. The song which would become their biggest hit had very little to do with the R&B or jazz which had inspired the group. Instead, it was a perfect piece of Brill Building pop. The Exciters, who originally recorded it, were one of the great girl groups of the early sixties (though they also had one male member), and had already had quite an influence on pop music. They had been discovered by Leiber and Stoller, who had signed them to Red Bird Records, a label we'll be looking at in much more detail in an upcoming episode, and they'd had a hit in 1962 with a Bert Berns song, "Tell Him", which made the top five: [Excerpt: The Exciters, "Tell Him"] That record had so excited a young British folk singer who was in the US at the time to record an album with her group The Springfields that she completely reworked her entire style, went solo, and kickstarted a solo career singing pop-soul songs under the name Dusty Springfield. The Exciters never had another top forty hit, but they became popular enough among British music lovers that the Beatles asked them to open for them on their American tour in summer 1964. Most of the Exciters' records were of songs written by the more R&B end of the Brill Building songwriters -- they would record several more Bert Berns songs, and some by Ritchie Barrett, but the song that would become their most well-known legacy was actually written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich. Like many of Barry and Greenwich's songs, it was based around a nonsense phrase, but in this case the phrase they used had something of a longer history, though it's not apparent whether they fully realised that. In African-American folklore of the early twentieth century, the imaginary town of Diddy Wah Diddy was something like a synonym for heaven, or for the Big Rock Candy Mountain of the folk song -- a place where people didn't have to work, and where food was free everywhere. This place had been sung about in many songs, like Blind Blake's "Diddie Wah Diddie": [Excerpt: Blind Blake, "Diddie Wah Diddie"] And a song written by Willie Dixon for Bo Diddley: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Diddy Wah Diddy"] And "Diddy" and "Wah" had often been used by other Black artists, in various contexts, like Roy Brown and Dave Bartholomew's "Diddy-Y-Diddy-O": [Excerpt: Roy Brown and Dave Bartholomew, "Diddy-Y-Diddy-O"] And Junior and Marie's "Boom Diddy Wah Wah", a "Ko Ko Mo" knockoff produced by Johnny Otis: [Excerpt: Junior and Marie, "Boom Diddy Wah Wah"]  So when Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich wrote "Do-Wah-Diddy", as the song was originally called, they were, wittingly or not, tapping into a rich history of rhythm and blues music. But the song as Greenwich demoed it was one of the first examples of what would become known as "bubblegum pop", and is particularly notable in her demo for its very early use of the fuzz guitar that would be a stylistic hallmark of that subgenre: [Excerpt: Ellie Greenwich, "Do-Wah-Diddy (demo)"] The Exciters' version of the song took it into more conventional girl-group territory, with a strong soulful vocal, but with the group's backing vocal call-and-response chant showing up the song's resemblance to the kind of schoolyard chanting games which were, of course, the basis of the very first girl group records: [Excerpt: The Exciters, "Do-Wah-Diddy"] Sadly, that record only reached number seventy-eight on the charts, and the Exciters would have no more hits in the US, though a later lineup of the group would make the UK top forty in 1975 with a song written and produced by the Northern Soul DJ Ian Levine. But in 1964 Jones had picked up on "Do-Wah-Diddy", and knew it was a potential hit. Most of the group weren't very keen on "Do Wah Diddy Diddy", as the song was renamed. There are relatively few interviews with any of them about it, but from what I can gather the only member of the band who thought anything much of the song was Paul Jones. However, the group did their best with the recording, and were particularly impressed with Manfred's Hammond organ solo -- which they later discovered was cut out of the finished recording by Burgess. The result was an organ-driven stomping pop song which had more in common with the Dave Clark Five than with anything else the group were doing: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Do Wah Diddy Diddy"] The record reached number one in both the UK and the US, and the group immediately went on an American tour, packaged with Peter & Gordon, a British duo who were having some success at the time because Peter Asher's sister was dating Paul McCartney, who'd given them a hit song, "World Without Love": [Excerpt: Peter and Gordon, "World Without Love"] The group found the experience of touring the US a thoroughly miserable one, and decided that they weren't going to bother going back again, so while they would continue to have big hits in Britain for the rest of the decade, they only had a few minor successes in the States. After the success of "Do Wah Diddy Diddy", EMI rushed out an album by the group, The Five Faces of Manfred Mann, which must have caused some confusion for anyone buying it in the hope of more "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" style pop songs. Half the album's fourteen tracks were covers of blues and R&B, mostly by Chess artists -- there were covers of Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Bo Diddley, Ike & Tina Turner, and more. There were also five originals, written or co-written by Jones, in the same style as those songs, plus a couple of instrumentals, one written by the group and one a cover of Cannonball Adderly's jazz classic "Sack O'Woe", arranged to show off the group's skills at harmonica, saxophone, piano and vibraphone: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Sack O'Woe"] However, the group realised that the formula they'd hit on with "Do  Wah Diddy Diddy" was a useful one, and so for their next single they once again covered a girl-group track with a nonsense-word chorus and title -- their version of "Sha La La" by the Shirelles took them to number three on the UK charts, and number twelve in the US. They followed that with a ballad, "Come Tomorrow", one of the few secular songs ever recorded by Marie Knight, the gospel singer who we discussed briefly way back in episode five, who was Sister Rosetta Tharpe's duet partner, and quite possibly her partner in other senses. They released several more singles and were consistently charting, to the point that they actually managed to get a top ten hit with a self-written song despite their own material not being considered worth putting out as singles. Paul Jones had written "The One in the Middle" for his friends the Yardbirds, but when they turned it down, he rewrote the song to be about Manfred Mann, and especially about himself: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "The One in the Middle"] Like much of their material, that was released on an EP, and the EP was so successful that as well as making number one on the EP charts, it also made number ten on the regular charts, with "The One in the Middle" as the lead-off track. But "The One in the Middle" was a clue to something else as well -- Jones was getting increasingly annoyed at the fact that the records the group was making were hits, and he was the frontman, the lead singer, the person picking the cover versions, and the writer of much of the original material, but all the records were getting credited to the group's keyboard player.  But Jones wasn't the next member of the group to leave. That was Mike Vickers, who went off to work in arranging film music and session work, including some work for the Beatles, the music for the film Dracula AD 1972, and the opening and closing themes for This Week in Baseball. The last single the group released while Vickers was a member was the aptly-titled "If You Gotta Go, Go Now". Mann had heard Bob Dylan performing that song live, and had realised that the song had never been released. He'd contacted Dylan's publishers, got hold of a demo, and the group became the first to release a version of the song, making number two in the charts: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "If You Gotta Go, Go Now"] Before Vickers' departure, the group had recorded their second album, Mann Made, and that had been even more eclectic than the first album, combining versions of blues classics like "Stormy Monday Blues", Motown songs like "The Way You Do The Things You Do", country covers like "You Don't Know Me", and oddities like "Bare Hugg", an original jazz instrumental for flute and vibraphone: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Bare Hugg"] McGuinness took the opportunity of Vickers leaving the group to switch from bass back to playing guitar, which had always been his preferred instrument. To fill in the gap, on Graham Bond's recommendation they hired away Jack Bruce, who had just been playing in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers with McGuinness' old friend Eric Clapton, and it's Bruce who played bass on the group's next big hit, "Pretty Flamingo", the only UK number one that Bruce ever played on: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Pretty Flamingo"] Bruce stayed with the band for several months, before going off to play in another band who we'll be covering in a future episode. He was replaced in turn by Klaus Voorman. Voorman was an old friend of the Beatles from their Hamburg days, who had been taught the rudiments of bass by Stuart Sutcliffe, and had formed a trio, Paddy, Klaus, and Gibson, with two Merseybeat musicians, Paddy Chambers of the Big Three and Gibson Kemp of Kingsize Taylor and the Dominoes: [Excerpt: Paddy, Klaus, and Gibson, "No Good Without You Baby"] Like Vickers, Voorman could play the flute, and his flute playing would become a regular part of the group's later singles. These lineup changes didn't affect the group as either a chart act or as an act who were playing a huge variety of different styles of music. While the singles were uniformly catchy pop, on album tracks, B-sides or EPs you'd be likely to find versions of folk songs collected by Alan Lomax, like "John Hardy", or things like "Driva Man", a blues song about slavery in 5/4 time, originally by the jazz greats Oscar Brown and Max Roach: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "Driva Man"] But by the time that track was released, Paul Jones was out of the group. He actually announced his intention to quit the group at the same time that Mike Vickers left, but the group had persuaded him to stay on for almost a year while they looked for his replacement, auditioning singers like Rod Stewart and Long John Baldry with little success. They eventually decided on Mike d'Abo, who had previously been the lead singer of a group called A Band of Angels: [Excerpt: A Band of Angels, "(Accept My) Invitation"] By the point d'Abo joined, relations  between the rest of the group and Jones were so poor that they didn't tell Jones that they were thinking of d'Abo -- Jones would later recollect that the group decided to stop at a pub on the way to a gig, ostensibly to watch themselves on TV, but actually to watch A Band of Angels on the same show, without explaining to Jones that that was what they were doing – Jones actually mentioned d'Abo to his bandmates as a possible replacement, not realising he was already in the group. Mann has talked about how on the group's last show with Jones, they drove to the gig in silence, and their first single with the new singer, a version of Dylan's "Just Like a Woman", came on the radio. There was a lot of discomfort in the band at this time, because their record label had decided to stick with Jones as a solo performer, and the rest of the group had had to find another label, and were worried that without Jones their career was over. Luckily for everyone involved, "Just Like a Woman" made the top ten, and the group's career was able to continue. Meanwhile, Jones' first single as a solo artist made the top five: [Excerpt: Paul Jones, "High Time"] But after that and his follow-up, "I've Been a Bad, Bad, Boy", which made number five, the best he could do was to barely scrape the top forty. Manfred Mann, on the other hand, continued having hits, though there was a constant struggle to find new material. d'Abo was himself a songwriter, and it shows the limitations of the "no A-sides by group members" rule that while d'Abo was the lead singer of Manfred Mann, he wrote two hit singles which the group never recorded. The first, "Handbags and Gladrags", was a hit for Chris Farlowe: [Excerpt: Chris Farlowe, "Handbags and Gladrags"] That was only a minor hit, but was later recorded successfully by Rod Stewart, with d'Abo arranging, and the Stereophonics. d'Abo also co-wrote, and played piano on, "Build Me Up Buttercup" by the Foundations: [Excerpt: The Foundations, "Build Me Up Buttercup"] But the group continued releasing singles written by other people.  Their second post-Jones single, from the perspective of a spurned lover insulting their ex's new fiancee, had to have its title changed from what the writers intended, as the group felt that a song insulting "semi-detached suburban Mr. Jones" might be taken the wrong way. Lightly retitled, "Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James" made number two, while the follow-up, "Ha Ha! Said the Clown", made number four. The two singles after that did significantly less well, though, and seemed to be quite bizarre choices -- an instrumental Hammond organ version of Tommy Roe's "Sweet Pea", which made number thirty-six, and a version of Randy Newman's bitterly cynical "So Long, Dad", which didn't make the charts at all. After this lack of success, the group decided to go back to what had worked for them before. They'd already had two hits with Dylan songs, and Mann had got hold of a copy of Dylan's Basement Tapes, a bootleg which we'll be talking about later. He picked up on one song from it, and got permission to release "The Mighty Quinn", which became the group's third number one: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "The Mighty Quinn"] The album from which that came, Mighty Garvey, is the closest thing the group came to an actual great album. While the group's earlier albums were mostly blues covers, this was mostly made up of original material by either Hugg or d'Abo, in a pastoral baroque pop style that invites comparisons to the Kinks or the Zombies' material of that period, but with a self-mocking comedy edge in several songs that was closer to the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. Probably the highlight of the album was the mellotron-driven "It's So Easy Falling": [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "It's So Easy Falling"] But Mighty Garvey didn't chart, and it was the last gasp of the group as a creative entity. They had three more top-ten hits, all of them good examples of their type, but by January 1969, Tom McGuinness was interviewed saying "It's not a group any more. It's just five people who come together to make hit singles. That's the only aim of the group at the moment -- to make hit singles -- it's the only reason the group exists. Commercial success is very important to the group. It gives us financial freedom to do the things we want." The group split up in 1969, and went their separate ways. d'Abo appeared on the original Jesus Christ Superstar album, and then went into writing advertising jingles, most famously writing "a finger of fudge is just enough" for Cadbury's. McGuinness formed McGuinness Flint, with the songwriters Gallagher and Lyle, and had a big hit with "When I'm Dead and Gone": [Excerpt: McGuinness Flint, "When I'm Dead and Gone"] He later teamed up again with Paul Jones, to form a blues band imaginatively named "the Blues Band", who continue performing to this day: [Excerpt: The Blues Band, "Mean Ol' Frisco"] Jones became a born-again Christian in the eighties, and also starred in a children's TV show, Uncle Jack, and presented the BBC Radio 2 Blues Programme for thirty-two years. Manfred Mann and Mike Hugg formed another group, Manfred Mann Chapter Three, who released two albums before splitting. Hugg went on from that to write for TV and films, most notably writing the theme music to "Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?": [Excerpt: Highly Likely, "Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?"] Mann went on to form Manfred Mann's Earth Band, who had a number of hits, the biggest of which was the Bruce Springsteen song "Blinded by the Light": [Excerpt: Manfred Mann's Earth Band, "Blinded by the Light"] Almost uniquely for a band from the early sixties, all the members of the classic lineup of Manfred Mann are still alive. Manfred Mann continues to perform with various lineups of his Earth Band. Hugg, Jones, McGuinness, and d'Abo reunited as The Manfreds in the 1990s, with Vickers also in the band until 1999, and continue to tour together -- I still have a ticket to see them which was originally for a show in April 2020, but has just been rescheduled to 2022. McGuinness and Jones also still tour with the Blues Band. And Mike Vickers now spends his time creating experimental animations.  Manfred Mann were a band with too many musical interests to have a coherent image, and their reliance on outside songwriters and their frequent lineup changes meant that they never had the consistent sound of many of their contemporaries. But partly because of this, they created a catalogue that rewards exploration in a way that several more well-regarded bands' work doesn't, and I wouldn't be at all surprised to see a major critical reassessment of them at some point. But whether that happens or not, almost sixty years on people around the world still respond instantly to the opening bars of their biggest hit, and "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" remains one of the most fondly remembered singles of the early sixties.

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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 118: “Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy” by Manfred Mann

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021


Episode 118 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy” by Manfred Mann, and how a jazz group with a blues singer had one of the biggest bubblegum pop hits of the sixties. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on “Walk on By” by Dionne Warwick. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of tracks by Manfred Mann. Information on the group comes from Mannerisms: The Five Phases of Manfred Mann, by Greg Russo, and from the liner notes of this eleven-CD box set of the group’s work. For a much cheaper collection of the group’s hits — but without the jazz, blues, and baroque pop elements that made them more interesting than the average sixties singles band — this has all the hit singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript: So far, when we’ve looked at the British blues and R&B scene, we’ve concentrated on the bands who were influenced by Chicago blues, and who kept to a straightforward guitar/bass/drums lineup. But there was another, related, branch of the blues scene in Britain that was more musically sophisticated, and which while its practitioners certainly enjoyed playing songs by Howlin’ Wolf or Muddy Waters, was also rooted in the jazz of people like Mose Allison. Today we’re going to look at one of those bands, and at the intersection of jazz and the British R&B scene, and how a jazz band with a flute player and a vibraphonist briefly became bubblegum pop idols. We’re going to look at “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” by Manfred Mann: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”] Manfred Mann is, annoyingly when writing about the group, the name of both a band and of one of its members. Manfred Mann the human being, as opposed to Manfred Mann the group, was born Manfred Lubowitz in South Africa, and while he was from a wealthy family, he was very opposed to the vicious South African system of apartheid, and considered himself strongly anti-racist. He was also a lover of jazz music, especially some of the most progressive music being made at the time — musicians like Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus, and John Coltrane — and he soon became a very competent jazz pianist, playing with musicians like Hugh Masakela at a time when that kind of fraternisation between people of different races was very much frowned upon in South Africa. Manfred desperately wanted to get out of South Africa, and he took his chance in June 1961, at the last point at which he was a Commonwealth citizen. The Commonwealth, for those who don’t know, is a political association of countries that were originally parts of the British Empire, and basically replaced the British Empire when the former colonies gained their independence. These days, the Commonwealth is of mostly symbolic importance, but in the fifties and sixties, as the Empire was breaking up, it was considered a real power in its own right, and in particular, until some changes to immigration law in the mid sixties, Commonwealth citizens had the right to move to the UK.  At that point, South Africa had just voted to become a republic, and there was a rule in the Commonwealth that countries with a head of state other than the Queen could only remain in the Commonwealth with the unanimous agreement of all the other members. And several of the other member states, unsurprisingly, objected to the continued membership of a country whose entire system of government was based on the most virulent racism imaginable. So, as soon as South Africa became a republic, it lost its Commonwealth membership, and that meant that its citizens lost their automatic right to emigrate to the UK. But they were given a year’s grace period, and so Manfred took that chance and moved over to England, where he started playing jazz keyboards, giving piano lessons, and making some money on the side by writing record reviews. For those reviews, rather than credit himself as Manfred Lubowitz, he decided to use a pseudonym taken from the jazz drummer Shelly Manne, and he became Manfred Manne — spelled with a silent e on the end, which he later dropped. Mann was rather desperate for gigs, and he ended up taking a job playing with a band at a Butlin’s holiday camp. Graham Bond, who we’ve seen in several previous episodes as the leader of The Graham Bond Organisation, was at that time playing Hammond organ there, but only wanted to play a few days a week. Mann became the substitute keyboard player for that holiday camp band, and struck up a good musical rapport with the drummer and vibraphone player, Mike Hugg. When Bond went off to form his own band, Mann and Hugg decided to form their own band along the same lines, mixing the modern jazz that they liked with the more commercial R&B that Bond was playing.  They named their group the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers, and it initially consisted of Mann on keyboards, Hugg on drums and vibraphone, Mike Vickers on guitar, flute, and saxophone, Dave Richmond on bass, Tony Roberts and Don Fay on saxophone and Ian Fenby on trumpet. As their experiences were far more in the jazz field than in blues, they decided that they needed to get in a singer who was more familiar with the blues side of things. The person they chose was a singer who was originally named Paul Pond, and who had been friends for a long time with Brian Jones, before Jones had formed the Rolling Stones. While Jones had been performing under the name Elmo Lewis, his friend had taken on Jones’ surname, as he thought “Paul Pond” didn’t sound like a good name for a singer. He’d first kept his initials, and performed as P.P. Jones, but then he’d presumably realised that “pee-pee” is probably not the best stage name in the world, and so he’d become just Paul Jones, the name by which he’s known to this day. Jones, like his friend Brian, was a fan particularly of Chicago blues, and he had occasionally appeared with Alexis Korner. After auditioning for the group at a ska club called The Roaring 20s, Jones became the group’s lead singer and harmonica player, and the group soon moved in Jones’ musical direction, playing the kind of Chicago blues that was popular at the Marquee club, where they soon got a residency, rather than the soul style that was more popular at the nearby Flamingo club, and which would be more expected from a horn-centric lineup. Unsurprisingly, given this, the horn players soon left, and the group became a five-piece core of Jones, Mann, Hugg, Vickers, and Richmond. This group was signed to HMV records by John Burgess. Burgess was a producer who specialised in music of a very different style from what the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers played. We’ve already heard some of his production work — he was the producer for Adam Faith from “What Do You Want?” on: [Excerpt: Adam Faith, “What Do You Want?”] And at the time he signed the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers, he was just starting to work with a new group, Freddie and the Dreamers, for whom he would produce several hits: [Excerpt: Freddie and the Dreamers, “If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody”] Burgess liked the group, but he insisted that they had to change their name — and in fact, he insisted that the group change their name to Manfred Mann. None of the group members liked the idea — even Mann himself thought that this seemed a little unreasonable, and Paul Jones in particular disagreed strongly with the idea, but they were all eventually mollified by the idea that all the publicity would emphasise that all five of them were equal members of the group, and that while the group might be named after their keyboard player, there were five members. The group members themselves always referred to themselves as “the Manfreds” rather than as Manfred Mann. The group’s first single showed that despite having become a blues band and then getting produced by a pop producer, they were still at heart a jazz group. “Why Should We Not?” is an instrumental led by Vickers’ saxophone, Mann’s organ, and Jones’ harmonica: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Why Should We Not?”] Unsurprisingly, neither that nor the B-side, a jazz instrumental version of “Frere Jacques”, charted — Britain in 1963 wanted Gerry and the Pacemakers and Freddie and the Dreamers, not jazz instrumentals. The next single, an R&B song called “Cock-A-Hoop” written by Jones, did little better. The group’s big breakthrough came from Ready, Steady, Go!, which at this point was using “Wipe Out!” by the Surfaris as its theme song: [Excerpt: The Surfaris, “Wipe Out”] We’ve mentioned Ready, Steady, Go! in passing in previous episodes, but it was the most important pop music show of the early and mid sixties, just as Oh Boy! had been for the late fifties. Ready, Steady, Go! was, in principle at least, a general pop music programme, but in practice it catered primarily for the emerging mod subculture. “Mod” stood for “modernist”, and the mods emerged from the group of people who liked modern jazz rather than trad, but by this point their primary musical interests were in soul and R&B. Mod was a working-class subculture, based in the South-East of England, especially London, and spurred on by the newfound comparative affluence of the early sixties, when for the first time young working-class people, while still living in poverty, had a small amount of disposable income to spend on clothes, music, and drugs. The Mods had a very particular sense of style, based around sharp Italian suits, pop art and op art, and Black American music or white British imitations of it. For them, music was functional, and primarily existed for the purposes of dancing, and many of them would take large amounts of amphetamines so they could spend the entire weekend at clubs dancing to soul and R&B music. And that entire weekend would kick off on Friday with Ready, Steady, Go!, whose catchphrase was “the weekend starts here!” Ready, Steady, Go! featured almost every important pop act of the early sixties, but while groups like Gerry and the Pacemakers or the Beatles would appear on it, it became known for its promotion of Black artists, and it was the first major British TV exposure for Motown artists like the Supremes, the Temptations, and the Marvelettes, for Stax artists like Otis Redding, and for blues artists like John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson. Ready Steady Go! was also the primary TV exposure for British groups who were inspired by those artists, and it’s through Ready Steady Go! that the Animals, the Yardbirds, the Rolling Stones, Them, and the Who, among others reached national popularity — all of them acts that were popular among the Mods in particular. But “Wipe Out” didn’t really fit with this kind of music, and so the producers of Ready Steady Go were looking for something more suitable for their theme music. They’d already tried commissioning the Animals to record something, as we saw a couple of weeks back, but that hadn’t worked out, and instead they turned to Manfred Mann, who came up with a song that not only perfectly fit the style of the show, but also handily promoted the group themselves: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “5-4-3-2-1”] That was taken on as Ready, Steady, Go!s theme song, and made the top five in the UK. But by the time it charted, the group had already changed lineup. Dave Richmond was seen by the other members of the group as a problem at this point. Richmond was a great bass player, but he was a great *jazz* bass player — he wanted to be Charles Mingus, and play strange cross-rhythms, and what the group needed at this point was someone who would just play straightforward blues basslines without complaint — they needed someone closer to Willie Dixon than to Mingus. Tom McGuinness, who replaced him, had already had a rather unusual career trajectory. He’d started out as a satirist, writing for the magazine Private Eye and the TV series That Was The Week That Was, one of the most important British comedy shows of the sixties, but he had really wanted to be a blues musician instead. He’d formed a blues band, The Roosters, with a guitarist who went to art school with his girlfriend, and they’d played a few gigs around London before the duo had been poached by the minor Merseybeat band Casey Jones and his Engineers, a group which had been formed by Brian Casser, formerly of Cass & The Cassanovas, the group that had become The Big Three. Casey Jones and his Engineers had just released the single “One Way Ticket”: [Excerpt: Casey Jones and His Engineers, “One-Way Ticket”] However, the two guitarists soon realised, after just a handful of gigs, that they weren’t right for that group, and quit. McGuinness’ friend, Eric Clapton, went on to join the Yardbirds, and we’ll be hearing more about him in a few weeks’ time, but McGuinness was at a loose end, until he discovered that Manfred Mann were looking for a bass player. McGuinness was a guitarist, but bluffed to Paul Jones that he’d switched to bass, and got the job. He said later that the only question he’d been asked when interviewed by the group was “are you willing to play simple parts?” — as he’d never played bass in his life until the day of his first gig with the group, he was more than happy to say yes to that. McGuinness joined only days after the recording of “5-4-3-2-1”, and Richmond was out — though he would have a successful career as a session bass player, playing on, among others, “Je t’Aime” by Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin, “Your Song” by Elton John, Labi Siffre’s “It Must Be Love”, and the music for the long-running sitcoms Only Fools and Horses and Last of the Summer Wine. As soon as McGuinness joined, the group set out on tour, to promote their new hit, but also to act as the backing group for the Crystals, on a tour which also featured Johnny Kidd and the Pirates and Joe Brown and his Bruvvers.  The group’s next single, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” was another original, and made number eleven on the charts, but the group saw it as a failure anyway, to the extent that they tried their best to forget it ever existed. In researching this episode I got an eleven-CD box set of the group’s work, which contains every studio album or compilation they released in the sixties, a collection of their EPs, and a collection of their BBC sessions. In all eleven CDs, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” doesn’t appear at all. Which is quite odd, as it’s a perfectly serviceable, if unexceptional, piece of pop R&B: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble”] But it’s not just the group that were unimpressed with the record. John Burgess thought that the record only getting to number eleven was proof of his hypothesis that groups should not put out their own songs as singles. From this point on, with one exception in 1968, everything they released as an A-side would be a cover version or a song brought to them by a professional songwriter. This worried Jones, who didn’t want to be forced to start singing songs he disliked, which he saw as a very likely outcome of this edict. So he made it his role in the group to seek out records that the group could cover, which would be commercial enough that they could get hit singles from them, but which would be something he could sing while keeping his self-respect. His very first selection certainly met the first criterion. The song which would become their biggest hit had very little to do with the R&B or jazz which had inspired the group. Instead, it was a perfect piece of Brill Building pop. The Exciters, who originally recorded it, were one of the great girl groups of the early sixties (though they also had one male member), and had already had quite an influence on pop music. They had been discovered by Leiber and Stoller, who had signed them to Red Bird Records, a label we’ll be looking at in much more detail in an upcoming episode, and they’d had a hit in 1962 with a Bert Berns song, “Tell Him”, which made the top five: [Excerpt: The Exciters, “Tell Him”] That record had so excited a young British folk singer who was in the US at the time to record an album with her group The Springfields that she completely reworked her entire style, went solo, and kickstarted a solo career singing pop-soul songs under the name Dusty Springfield. The Exciters never had another top forty hit, but they became popular enough among British music lovers that the Beatles asked them to open for them on their American tour in summer 1964. Most of the Exciters’ records were of songs written by the more R&B end of the Brill Building songwriters — they would record several more Bert Berns songs, and some by Ritchie Barrett, but the song that would become their most well-known legacy was actually written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich. Like many of Barry and Greenwich’s songs, it was based around a nonsense phrase, but in this case the phrase they used had something of a longer history, though it’s not apparent whether they fully realised that. In African-American folklore of the early twentieth century, the imaginary town of Diddy Wah Diddy was something like a synonym for heaven, or for the Big Rock Candy Mountain of the folk song — a place where people didn’t have to work, and where food was free everywhere. This place had been sung about in many songs, like Blind Blake’s “Diddie Wah Diddie”: [Excerpt: Blind Blake, “Diddie Wah Diddie”] And a song written by Willie Dixon for Bo Diddley: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, “Diddy Wah Diddy”] And “Diddy” and “Wah” had often been used by other Black artists, in various contexts, like Roy Brown and Dave Bartholomew’s “Diddy-Y-Diddy-O”: [Excerpt: Roy Brown and Dave Bartholomew, “Diddy-Y-Diddy-O”] And Junior and Marie’s “Boom Diddy Wah Wah”, a “Ko Ko Mo” knockoff produced by Johnny Otis: [Excerpt: Junior and Marie, “Boom Diddy Wah Wah”]  So when Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich wrote “Do-Wah-Diddy”, as the song was originally called, they were, wittingly or not, tapping into a rich history of rhythm and blues music. But the song as Greenwich demoed it was one of the first examples of what would become known as “bubblegum pop”, and is particularly notable in her demo for its very early use of the fuzz guitar that would be a stylistic hallmark of that subgenre: [Excerpt: Ellie Greenwich, “Do-Wah-Diddy (demo)”] The Exciters’ version of the song took it into more conventional girl-group territory, with a strong soulful vocal, but with the group’s backing vocal call-and-response chant showing up the song’s resemblance to the kind of schoolyard chanting games which were, of course, the basis of the very first girl group records: [Excerpt: The Exciters, “Do-Wah-Diddy”] Sadly, that record only reached number seventy-eight on the charts, and the Exciters would have no more hits in the US, though a later lineup of the group would make the UK top forty in 1975 with a song written and produced by the Northern Soul DJ Ian Levine. But in 1964 Jones had picked up on “Do-Wah-Diddy”, and knew it was a potential hit. Most of the group weren’t very keen on “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, as the song was renamed. There are relatively few interviews with any of them about it, but from what I can gather the only member of the band who thought anything much of the song was Paul Jones. However, the group did their best with the recording, and were particularly impressed with Manfred’s Hammond organ solo — which they later discovered was cut out of the finished recording by Burgess. The result was an organ-driven stomping pop song which had more in common with the Dave Clark Five than with anything else the group were doing: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”] The record reached number one in both the UK and the US, and the group immediately went on an American tour, packaged with Peter & Gordon, a British duo who were having some success at the time because Peter Asher’s sister was dating Paul McCartney, who’d given them a hit song, “World Without Love”: [Excerpt: Peter and Gordon, “World Without Love”] The group found the experience of touring the US a thoroughly miserable one, and decided that they weren’t going to bother going back again, so while they would continue to have big hits in Britain for the rest of the decade, they only had a few minor successes in the States. After the success of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, EMI rushed out an album by the group, The Five Faces of Manfred Mann, which must have caused some confusion for anyone buying it in the hope of more “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” style pop songs. Half the album’s fourteen tracks were covers of blues and R&B, mostly by Chess artists — there were covers of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Bo Diddley, Ike & Tina Turner, and more. There were also five originals, written or co-written by Jones, in the same style as those songs, plus a couple of instrumentals, one written by the group and one a cover of Cannonball Adderly’s jazz classic “Sack O’Woe”, arranged to show off the group’s skills at harmonica, saxophone, piano and vibraphone: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Sack O’Woe”] However, the group realised that the formula they’d hit on with “Do  Wah Diddy Diddy” was a useful one, and so for their next single they once again covered a girl-group track with a nonsense-word chorus and title — their version of “Sha La La” by the Shirelles took them to number three on the UK charts, and number twelve in the US. They followed that with a ballad, “Come Tomorrow”, one of the few secular songs ever recorded by Marie Knight, the gospel singer who we discussed briefly way back in episode five, who was Sister Rosetta Tharpe’s duet partner, and quite possibly her partner in other senses. They released several more singles and were consistently charting, to the point that they actually managed to get a top ten hit with a self-written song despite their own material not being considered worth putting out as singles. Paul Jones had written “The One in the Middle” for his friends the Yardbirds, but when they turned it down, he rewrote the song to be about Manfred Mann, and especially about himself: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “The One in the Middle”] Like much of their material, that was released on an EP, and the EP was so successful that as well as making number one on the EP charts, it also made number ten on the regular charts, with “The One in the Middle” as the lead-off track. But “The One in the Middle” was a clue to something else as well — Jones was getting increasingly annoyed at the fact that the records the group was making were hits, and he was the frontman, the lead singer, the person picking the cover versions, and the writer of much of the original material, but all the records were getting credited to the group’s keyboard player.  But Jones wasn’t the next member of the group to leave. That was Mike Vickers, who went off to work in arranging film music and session work, including some work for the Beatles, the music for the film Dracula AD 1972, and the opening and closing themes for This Week in Baseball. The last single the group released while Vickers was a member was the aptly-titled “If You Gotta Go, Go Now”. Mann had heard Bob Dylan performing that song live, and had realised that the song had never been released. He’d contacted Dylan’s publishers, got hold of a demo, and the group became the first to release a version of the song, making number two in the charts: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “If You Gotta Go, Go Now”] Before Vickers’ departure, the group had recorded their second album, Mann Made, and that had been even more eclectic than the first album, combining versions of blues classics like “Stormy Monday Blues”, Motown songs like “The Way You Do The Things You Do”, country covers like “You Don’t Know Me”, and oddities like “Bare Hugg”, an original jazz instrumental for flute and vibraphone: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Bare Hugg”] McGuinness took the opportunity of Vickers leaving the group to switch from bass back to playing guitar, which had always been his preferred instrument. To fill in the gap, on Graham Bond’s recommendation they hired away Jack Bruce, who had just been playing in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers with McGuinness’ old friend Eric Clapton, and it’s Bruce who played bass on the group’s next big hit, “Pretty Flamingo”, the only UK number one that Bruce ever played on: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Pretty Flamingo”] Bruce stayed with the band for several months, before going off to play in another band who we’ll be covering in a future episode. He was replaced in turn by Klaus Voorman. Voorman was an old friend of the Beatles from their Hamburg days, who had been taught the rudiments of bass by Stuart Sutcliffe, and had formed a trio, Paddy, Klaus, and Gibson, with two Merseybeat musicians, Paddy Chambers of the Big Three and Gibson Kemp of Kingsize Taylor and the Dominoes: [Excerpt: Paddy, Klaus, and Gibson, “No Good Without You Baby”] Like Vickers, Voorman could play the flute, and his flute playing would become a regular part of the group’s later singles. These lineup changes didn’t affect the group as either a chart act or as an act who were playing a huge variety of different styles of music. While the singles were uniformly catchy pop, on album tracks, B-sides or EPs you’d be likely to find versions of folk songs collected by Alan Lomax, like “John Hardy”, or things like “Driva Man”, a blues song about slavery in 5/4 time, originally by the jazz greats Oscar Brown and Max Roach: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “Driva Man”] But by the time that track was released, Paul Jones was out of the group. He actually announced his intention to quit the group at the same time that Mike Vickers left, but the group had persuaded him to stay on for almost a year while they looked for his replacement, auditioning singers like Rod Stewart and Long John Baldry with little success. They eventually decided on Mike d’Abo, who had previously been the lead singer of a group called A Band of Angels: [Excerpt: A Band of Angels, “(Accept My) Invitation”] By the point d’Abo joined, relations  between the rest of the group and Jones were so poor that they didn’t tell Jones that they were thinking of d’Abo — Jones would later recollect that the group decided to stop at a pub on the way to a gig, ostensibly to watch themselves on TV, but actually to watch A Band of Angels on the same show, without explaining to Jones that that was what they were doing – Jones actually mentioned d’Abo to his bandmates as a possible replacement, not realising he was already in the group. Mann has talked about how on the group’s last show with Jones, they drove to the gig in silence, and their first single with the new singer, a version of Dylan’s “Just Like a Woman”, came on the radio. There was a lot of discomfort in the band at this time, because their record label had decided to stick with Jones as a solo performer, and the rest of the group had had to find another label, and were worried that without Jones their career was over. Luckily for everyone involved, “Just Like a Woman” made the top ten, and the group’s career was able to continue. Meanwhile, Jones’ first single as a solo artist made the top five: [Excerpt: Paul Jones, “High Time”] But after that and his follow-up, “I’ve Been a Bad, Bad, Boy”, which made number five, the best he could do was to barely scrape the top forty. Manfred Mann, on the other hand, continued having hits, though there was a constant struggle to find new material. d’Abo was himself a songwriter, and it shows the limitations of the “no A-sides by group members” rule that while d’Abo was the lead singer of Manfred Mann, he wrote two hit singles which the group never recorded. The first, “Handbags and Gladrags”, was a hit for Chris Farlowe: [Excerpt: Chris Farlowe, “Handbags and Gladrags”] That was only a minor hit, but was later recorded successfully by Rod Stewart, with d’Abo arranging, and the Stereophonics. d’Abo also co-wrote, and played piano on, “Build Me Up Buttercup” by the Foundations: [Excerpt: The Foundations, “Build Me Up Buttercup”] But the group continued releasing singles written by other people.  Their second post-Jones single, from the perspective of a spurned lover insulting their ex’s new fiancee, had to have its title changed from what the writers intended, as the group felt that a song insulting “semi-detached suburban Mr. Jones” might be taken the wrong way. Lightly retitled, “Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James” made number two, while the follow-up, “Ha Ha! Said the Clown”, made number four. The two singles after that did significantly less well, though, and seemed to be quite bizarre choices — an instrumental Hammond organ version of Tommy Roe’s “Sweet Pea”, which made number thirty-six, and a version of Randy Newman’s bitterly cynical “So Long, Dad”, which didn’t make the charts at all. After this lack of success, the group decided to go back to what had worked for them before. They’d already had two hits with Dylan songs, and Mann had got hold of a copy of Dylan’s Basement Tapes, a bootleg which we’ll be talking about later. He picked up on one song from it, and got permission to release “The Mighty Quinn”, which became the group’s third number one: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “The Mighty Quinn”] The album from which that came, Mighty Garvey, is the closest thing the group came to an actual great album. While the group’s earlier albums were mostly blues covers, this was mostly made up of original material by either Hugg or d’Abo, in a pastoral baroque pop style that invites comparisons to the Kinks or the Zombies’ material of that period, but with a self-mocking comedy edge in several songs that was closer to the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. Probably the highlight of the album was the mellotron-driven “It’s So Easy Falling”: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, “It’s So Easy Falling”] But Mighty Garvey didn’t chart, and it was the last gasp of the group as a creative entity. They had three more top-ten hits, all of them good examples of their type, but by January 1969, Tom McGuinness was interviewed saying “It’s not a group any more. It’s just five people who come together to make hit singles. That’s the only aim of the group at the moment — to make hit singles — it’s the only reason the group exists. Commercial success is very important to the group. It gives us financial freedom to do the things we want.” The group split up in 1969, and went their separate ways. d’Abo appeared on the original Jesus Christ Superstar album, and then went into writing advertising jingles, most famously writing “a finger of fudge is just enough” for Cadbury’s. McGuinness formed McGuinness Flint, with the songwriters Gallagher and Lyle, and had a big hit with “When I’m Dead and Gone”: [Excerpt: McGuinness Flint, “When I’m Dead and Gone”] He later teamed up again with Paul Jones, to form a blues band imaginatively named “the Blues Band”, who continue performing to this day: [Excerpt: The Blues Band, “Mean Ol’ Frisco”] Jones became a born-again Christian in the eighties, and also starred in a children’s TV show, Uncle Jack, and presented the BBC Radio 2 Blues Programme for thirty-two years. Manfred Mann and Mike Hugg formed another group, Manfred Mann Chapter Three, who released two albums before splitting. Hugg went on from that to write for TV and films, most notably writing the theme music to “Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?”: [Excerpt: Highly Likely, “Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?”] Mann went on to form Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, who had a number of hits, the biggest of which was the Bruce Springsteen song “Blinded by the Light”: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, “Blinded by the Light”] Almost uniquely for a band from the early sixties, all the members of the classic lineup of Manfred Mann are still alive. Manfred Mann continues to perform with various lineups of his Earth Band. Hugg, Jones, McGuinness, and d’Abo reunited as The Manfreds in the 1990s, with Vickers also in the band until 1999, and continue to tour together — I still have a ticket to see them which was originally for a show in April 2020, but has just been rescheduled to 2022. McGuinness and Jones also still tour with the Blues Band. And Mike Vickers now spends his time creating experimental animations.  Manfred Mann were a band with too many musical interests to have a coherent image, and their reliance on outside songwriters and their frequent lineup changes meant that they never had the consistent sound of many of their contemporaries. But partly because of this, they created a catalogue that rewards exploration in a way that several more well-regarded bands’ work doesn’t, and I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see a major critical reassessment of them at some point. But whether that happens or not, almost sixty years on people around the world still respond instantly to the opening bars of their biggest hit, and “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” remains one of the most fondly remembered singles of the early sixties.

tv chicago american chess black woman baseball dead history italian south africa dad uk wolf boy engineers england british cds animals cd hamburg handbags klaus band bond bbc states ike pirates beatles horses gallagher mod burgess zombies mighty quinn richmond angels supremes clowns black americans commonwealth british empire ornette coleman eric clapton jack bruce stax walk bob dylan alan lomax paul mccartney rolling stones empire rock music britain tilt stoller dreamers fool vickers trouble greenwich hammond bbc radio southeast steady motown haha elton john british tv emi kinks crystals bruce springsteen paddy yardbirds charles mingus jesus christ superstar randy newman tony roberts flamingos marquee diddy mods eps lightly manfred rod stewart john lee hooker brian jones frisco paul jones roaring muddy waters howlin john mayall willie dixon temptations bo diddley sister rosetta tharpe blind blake unsurprisingly otis redding john coltrane oh boy transcript so tina turner cadbury woe hmv mingus mcguinness whatever happened wah leiber jane birkin serge gainsbourg dave bartholomew mose allison exciters dusty springfield roy brown big three abo only fools joe brown merseybeat blues band dave clark five wipeout roosters dionne warwick pacemakers south africans uncle jack just like blinded shelly manne one way ticket high time shirelles brill building basement tapes peter asher butlin casey jones private eyes manfred mann ellie greenwich hugg labi siffre manfreds bluesbreakers earth band your song john burgess know me go now stereophonics tilt araiza greg russo five faces tommy roe glad rags what do you want summer wine klaus voorman sweet peas stuart sutcliffe sonny boy williamson big rock candy mountain marvelettes it must be love build me up buttercup surfaris john hardy springfields jeff barry come tomorrow bonzo dog doo dah band dracula ad bert berns likely lads marie knight oscar brown long john baldry mike vickers that was the week that was
The Good News Podcast
Cadbury Easter Pooch, repeat

The Good News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 7:49


From last year, to get in the spring mood, let's remember the Easter pooch!

Podcast Detroit - All Shows
Chocolate Superfood Or Junk Food Healthiest Chocolate HealingMatters 72

Podcast Detroit - All Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 22:42


Is Chocolate a Superfood Or Junk Food? What's the healthiest kind of Chocolate? What is Chocolate? In episode 72 of HealingMatters, Jason Eagle will explain how to eat Chocolate as a Superfood! Believe it or not, our beloved chocolate candy bars, chocolate chips, and chocolate truffles actually started as a plant. A cacao tree grows in tropical/rainforest regions with lots of rain and sunshine! Once the cacao tree flowers, it produces a seed pod. 20 to 50 cacao beans are within this pod. Cacao beans are loaded in antioxidants and polyphenols. Raw cacao beans are fermented or roasted before they are processed, heated, and turned into the cocoa. Cocoa is then mixed with fat, sugar, and other natural or artificial flavors yielding the mass produced chocolate we buy at the stores. Interestingly enough, global chocolate companies like Cadbury, Hershey's, and Nestle have different recipes and use different ingredients depending upon which country they are selling their product in. Local and Craft chocolatiers usually have a higher standard for ingredients that use, thus producing a superior and gourmet chocolate. Zingerman's in Ann Arbor is a great example of a craft chocolate company. David Avocado Wolfe is one of the first companies I was exposed to that made raw chocolates. When he was in town, he brought some real cacao beans with him that still had the white pith on the outside of the bean. I was shocked at how sweet this pith was, almost like a jelly bean! You can buy Sacred Chocolate on his website: www.DavidWolfe.com Yes, chocolate is a superfood as long as you consume it without the refined white sugar. It can increase energy, and it's loaded with polyphenols, minerals, and antioxidants. In general, the darker the chocolate, the healthier it is because of the ratio of cocoa to sugar. The darker the chocolate, the less sugar, milk, and other ingredients. As we know, sugar is a junk food. If you want to make your own Superfood Chocolate, I like to buy my Cacao Powder and Cacao Beans from TerraSoul Superfoods: www.TerraSoul.com It's important to help develop a child's palate while they are young. The more flavors they are exposed to the more likely they are to choose healthy, nutritious foods over processed, sugar and salt laden foods. Dark chocolate is a great food you could introduce the bitter flavor with. Did you learn something new? * Help me make more shows by purchasing supplements mentioned in today's show at www.StrategicHealing.us/shop/ * Make sure to SUBSCRIBE: http://youtube.com/jasoneagleqra?sub_confirmation=1 * Podcast: HealingMatters https://www.podcastdetroit.com/show/healingmatters/ * Support your health by becoming a Patron for as little as $1/month: www.patreon.com/JasonEagleQRA You can get even more in depth answers to your health questions answered directly by Jason. You'll also get a sneak peak into the Healing Homestead! * Join me LIVE at noon on Wednesday! www.facebook.com/JasonEagleQRA/

Bros Bibles & Beer
159. Kurt Willems (How the Humanity of Jesus Redeems Our Pain)

Bros Bibles & Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 124:38


Kurt Willems returns to the show to talk about his excellent new book, Echoing Hope: How the Humanity of Jesus Redeems Our Pain. Treat yoself and grab a copy wherever you get books. Then treat someone else by getting a copy for a loved one for Easter. Much better for them than a Cadbury egg anyway. About the book: "None of us live free of difficulties or hardships. But how can we learn to live richly in the midst of them? And ever grow spiritually because of them? The answer is found in the hopeful humanity of Jesus. Echoing Hope reveals how understanding the humanity of Jesus can radically transform our identity and empower us to step into our pain-filled world in a new way. Combining rich theological insight with personal stories and practices for response, learn how we can overcome despair and encounter the beautiful potential of our lives." Kurt Willems is a pastor, writer, and spiritual director. After several years in student and adult church ministry in Central California, he partnered with the Brethren in Christ to plant a Christian community in Seattle called Pangea Church. Kurt maintains a resource website, which hosts articles and podcasts, called Theology Curator (formerly called, The Paulcast). He is passionate about taking dense ideas and communicating them in ways that are empowering for people from all walks of life. Check out what Kurt is up to: - Theology Curator - Twitter @KurtWillems - Insta @KurtWillems - Facebook Leave us a voicemail at anchor.fm/bbbpod Subscribe to Bros Bibles & Beer on Apple Podcasts Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts! https://www.facebook.com/brosbiblesbeer https://twitter.com/brosbiblesbeer https://www.brosbiblesbeer.com Instagram: @brosbiblesbeer Email: brosbiblesbeer@gmail.com Bros Bibles & Beer is: Jeff, Scott, Zack & Andy Find us wherever fine podcasts are distributed. Oh, and tell a friend! Grace. Peace. Cheers! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bbbpod/message

Jim Lanahan and Friends
Jesus Chocolates & Name That Tune

Jim Lanahan and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 75:26


We start with updates on Scott and Toby the Cat’s surgeries! Hit play if you want to know how Scott unexpectedly wound up naked on the operating table. And who looks better in a onesie? Toby or Jim? We’ve got the answers to your probing questions. Tee hee, we said ‘probing’! Today’s Yummy Yummy is: PSL’s Easter Egg Extravaganza! Cadbury and Peeps and Nestle! Oh my! Producer Stephanie sent us a smorgasbord of Easter candy and we have a giant taste test. You might be surprised by the group’s most favorite selection. Hint: it wasn’t the watermelon peeps. Next, we play America’s hottest new Game Show: Name that Television Theme Song! It’s like Name that Tune, only bitchier and without Jane Krakowski. You will never guess who won the game in a landslide! Want to support us behind the scenes? Become a monthly contributor! Simply go to https://anchor.fm/jim-lanahan/support and choose your monthly donation level. You can contribute as little as $0.99/month or as much as you like! Every little bit helps! Thank you! Wanna be Friends with Benefits? This episode of Jim Lanahan and Friends is sponsored by Jim Lanahan on https://cameo.com/jim_lanahan. All proceeds support this pod! Your personalized video comes with a link to join our live studio audience when we record the podcast. Who knows, you might even get to be IN the podcast! Connect with us! Podcast: FB and Insta: Jim Lanahan and Friends Podcast Jim Lanahan: @jimlanahan on Insta @IamJimLanahan on Facebook Website: https://jimlanahan.com Christine Sinacore: @csinacore on Twitter and FB Insta: @christinesinacore Website: https://christinesinacore.com Doctor Jon Paul Higgins: @doctorjonpaul on Twitter, Insta, FB Website: https://doctorjonpaul.com Scott Sheldon: @scottysheldon on Twitter and FB Insta:@scottasheldon, @scottysheldontheactor Website: https://scottysheldon.com Stephanie Laffin: @chickylaff on Twitter and Insta @billytherescuepup on Insta --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jim-lanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jim-lanahan/support

The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast
The Actual Gorilla from the Cadbury Advert and Dom's Shake N' Vacs! #276

The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 97:06


Yes, you heard right! A new addition of The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast has arrived and it's JAM PACKED with Moylesy goodness! There was another shroud of mystery cast upon the team this week with ANOTHER Who Are You Guest for Chris and Dom identify. This week's was definitely what you'd call unique...Dom's sack was bulging with gifts this week, including Steamers, Shake N Vac, and Chocolate Swear Bars - nice! We know Dom particularly loves a Shake N Vac so we thought best to get him to give the Radio X carpets a good old clean. Chris was also wondering why he's not yet been asked by long time friend Gary Barlow to do one of his ‘crooner sessions' - so he decided to give it a go himself. Plus there was the incredible revelation that Dom can't whistle - and that James calls Sainsbury's “Sainos”. Yes, we think that's strange too. AND next week we have a brand new game for you...20 Seconds to 20K. Chris had a go at playing today with the team and trust us, you better make sure to be listening to the show next week… And if that wasn't enough, here's more… Thinking back to a Keith Chegwin Story Chicken And Ham Advert Marcelo Bielsa Translations Enjoy! The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Weekdays 6:30-10am

The Daily Article
Cadbury urged to drop ad featuring same-sex kiss: The courage we need and the Source of our hope

The Daily Article

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 8:57


Cadbury is being urged to drop an ad featuring a passionate same-sex kiss. Today's podcast tells this story and offers good news from culturally-engaged churches, then we turn to the necessity and urgency of spiritual courage and the hope we find in Christ alone. The Daily Article is written by Dr. Jim Denison with the Denison Forum. This podcast is narrated by Chris Nichter. To learn more, visit DenisonForum.org or email comments@denisonforum.org.

Lights Camera Barstool
LCB Ep. 335 - Best & Worst U.S. States, Barb & Star Review, Massive Marvel News, and Noah Centineo As All Four Beatles?

Lights Camera Barstool

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 119:49


|| Movie Rankings/Streaming Database: MovieRankings.net || Mandalorian Merch: store.barstoolsports.com/collections/lights-camera-barstool || (0:00) – Opening comments || (2:53) – Ad Read #1 || (5:26) – Silk Road movie is horse shit || (10:08) – Jesse Plemmons, baby! || (11:34) – New televisions and Cadbury eggs || (18:56) – Eternals & Disney+ discussion || (34:34) – Jennifer Lawrence NOT in Fantastic 4 || (38:29) – Making a fake Noah Centineo rumor || (40:51) – Train to Busan remake… but why? || (42:50 – NINJA BLEVINS || (47:27) – Ad Read #2 || (50:30) – MoviePass docuseries happening || (55:33) – Dasani and bottled water || (1:03:28) – BARB AND STAR REVIEW (SPOILERS) || (1:27:33) – BEST/WORST STATES DRAFT