Podcasts about e.t.

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Best podcasts about e.t.

Latest podcast episodes about e.t.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
UFO DISCLOSURE BIG NEWS! MARS & MOON! With Marcus Allen Nexus Magazine 11/30/22

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 94:57


Marcus Allen is the UK publisher of Nexus magazine, which he introduced to the UK in 1994. Nexus is the world's leading alternative news magazine, covering health, future science, hidden history The unexplained and UFOs. Nexus originates from Australia, and is now sold in over 100 countries including the USA and Canada.Marcus is now able to pursue his lifelong interest in The unexplained, on a full-time basis. The moon landings is just one of the many taboo subjects he has investigated, around which new questions have been raised that have yet to be satisfactory answered.He wants to be proven wrong but, in over 25 years that has not happened.Marcus can be contacted through either of these websites - www.aulis.com www.nexusmagazine.com

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Time Trave To Mars! With Andrew Basiago Replay From His First Appearance

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 93:22


Night Dreams Talk Radio
Alien Mummies Of Nazca With Dr. Robert E. Farrell 11/18/22

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 67:24


Dr. Robert E. Farrell received his Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from The Ohio StateUniversity, his MBA from Western New England College, and his Doctor of Engineering from the Universityof Massachusetts. He is now retired from Penn State University as Associate Professor Emeritus.Over twenty-five years ago, he began doing serious research for his science fiction series of novels;Alien Log, Alien Log II: The New World Order, Alien Log III: The Dulce Affair, and Alien Log IV: TheAntarctica Affair.His research has led him to believe that beyond Earth there is life which is not only technically but alsospiritually more advanced than humans. For thousands of years, people have seen highly sophisticated craftcapable of high g maneuvers and accelerations beyond 100 g's. Dr. Farrell has concluded this is only possible ifgravitational field propulsion is used. This led him to develop his lecture and book entitled, The ScienceBehind Alien Encounters as a way to enlighten laypeople about ufology.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
E.T. Contact! 2 Guest NIGHT! Andrew D. Basiago And John Yost

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 115:16


Andrew D. Basiago pronounced (Ba-shogo) like ba in front of ChicagoIs a lawyer,writer, public speaker,media personality and presidential candidate best known for serving as a US Crononaut in Project Pegasus doing the advent of time travel and in Project Mars during the advent of interdimensional travel. 11/17/22 John Yost Life Long E.T. Abductee John's prestigious career began under the jurisprudence of the US Treasury department. During that process he attained his US customs brokers license and occasionally was a paid consultant to the FBI in international trade matters. After 10 successful years, the work lost its appeal. He left his position and sought another opportunity (and childhood dream) that would equally challenge him...FILM.Within 4 years, John had a successfully earned invitation into every national arts organization: SAG- (Screen Actors Guild),AFTRA- (American Federation of Television & Radio Artist), AEA- (Actor's Equity Association), and AGMA-(American Guild of Musical Artist).Johnny eventually joined the team of RYNO production and began the foundation work that would eventually become RYNO PICTURES.In addition to the hundreds of projects that he has written and directed, he has also produced several films - ALIEN ABDUCTION: ANSWERS - is his watershed project where he finally was able to tell the true story of what happened to him as a child.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Alien Encounters Not Declassified With Bill Murphy

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 95:04


Bill Murphy is a Board Member of the J. Allen Hynek Center for UFO Studies andan Assistant News Editor for Anomalist.com, where he reviews articles on UFOsand Archaeology. After joining the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Bill served asSection and then State Director and Newsletter Editor for its Michiganorganization in the 1990s. A former college instructor in History and Archaeologyand corporate Quality facilitator, trainer, and data analyst, Bill has presented onUFOs, science, and historical topics to audiences from Cabbage Patch throughUniversity and Senior groups. He's edited corporate and professional associationnewsletters and have been published in the International UFO Reporter, Journal ofScientific Exploration, and three MUFON state newsletters.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
E.T.'S And The Moon & Mars! Mary joyce/Turking News & Music!

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 106:11


Mary A. Joyce has worked for two major metropolitan area newspapers as an artist, writer, columnist, Sunday magazine editor and feature editor. On the side, she's written magazine articles and four other books. Currently she is editor of the Sky Ships over Cashiers website which features a variety of cutting-edge topics. her website is skyshipsovercashiers.com

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Sunday Truckers After Dark PROMO Nov 13th 7pm P.S.T.

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 1:00


Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

covid-19 god america tv new york university amazon california children google english hollywood apple los angeles zoom new york times san francisco michigan chinese ohio italy japanese oregon mom african americans cancer detroit jewish abc greek hospitals respect ptsd cnn mba supreme court harvard nbc massachusetts stage sony middle east silicon valley pc captain muslims blind southern california los angeles lakers stitcher connecticut new england march madness thunder cat ambassadors montana sugar southern korean oakland pacific bill gates ebooks iv ibm behold pbs vermont new hampshire usc steve jobs mentorship peacemakers kindle ohio state polish rhode island unstoppable ipo michigan state university boston red sox judaism msnbc northern california san jose salesforce hp vatican hats ministries visionary cj hindu yellowstone national park aretha franklin abbott mark cuban liquid albany motown appeals rutgers university ann arbor grizzlies rs florida state pacific ocean leanne cancer survivors rubin palo alto hastings reaper cad converse hewlett packard us news american red cross avid uc irvine field trip uci grim reaper macintosh fenway park time warner missoula two time big house google calendar golden retrievers babson college jerry west zod northridge humpty dumpty uc santa cruz national federation pro tools e.t. chaldeans glacier national park texas instruments wonder twins grand tetons dana farber cancer institute betamax ncr framingham alumni association big brothers jewish federation connecticut college wgbh babson big sisters back bay mccaw howards sony walkman ninth circuit court arab muslims hodgkins exxon mobile noac northgate federal express scripps college fred allen burger joint south portland chief vision officer cancer institute howard brown american jewish committee american bankers association iraqi christians community calendar timberlands k pax michael hingson ncr corporation durgin american humane association oyster house lisa yeah thunder dog hero dog awards ncrs naevus
Night Dreams Talk Radio
Montauk (Camp Hero) Eeperiments With Christopher Garetano

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 94:50


Christopher GaretanoLive At 7pm P.S.T.Christopher showcases the supernatural as a film producer, director and host on the History Channel, Discovery Channel, and Travel Channel. He spent almost ten years on his independent motion picture Montauk Chronicles regarding the alleged Camp Hero experiments which inspired the Stranger Things Netflix show. The film won the “Best Documentary” award at the Philip K Dick international film festival. In his Discovery Channel series, Christopher explores the urban legend and conspiracy stories surrounding the infamous arcade game, Polybius. Christopher now shares bizarre mysteries on his podcast Off To The Witch.

Ces chansons qui font l'actu
L'identité italienne est-elle vraiment ce que chantent les Français (et aussi les Italiens) ?

Ces chansons qui font l'actu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 6:57


durée : 00:06:57 - Ces chansons qui font l'actu - par : Bertrand DICALE - Alors que la nouvelle Première ministre italienne a défendu pendant sa campagne électorale une certaine vision de l'identité nationale, la définition de l'italianité dans notre culture populaire a des couleurs perpétuellement gourmandes et romantiques.

Paranormal UK Radio Network
Aliens Revealed - Alien Experiencer Sev Tok

Paranormal UK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 56:35


Sev Tok has been an Experiencer since childhood. She's also an Author, Speaker, and Spiritual Counselor. Her first ET Contact happened at age 10 and has continued all her life. She kept it a secret for 45 years until Sept. 2107, when she came face-to-face with a Grey who burned two red X marks on her back. It prompted her to “come out” and write her book, “You Have The Right To Talk To Aliens”.

Cult Connections
Hallow-Screen

Cult Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 68:35


While Halloween in cinema is associated with horror movies there is a selection of films which celebrate the traditions in very different ways. Ian is joined by Pat Veil to see what Halloween has to do with E.T., Meet Me in St Louis and The Karate Kid

You Hate To See It
Interview with Dee Wallace (E.T., Cujo, The Hills Have Eyes)

You Hate To See It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 53:50


This week for Halloween we were joined by the phenomenal Dee Wallace! She was really a riot to talk to. You may know her as the mom from E.T. or her many other roles in horror and much more! Join our Patreon and follow us on social media at https://linktr.ee/youh82cit

RNZ: Morning Report
Employment Court ruling significant - Uber driver

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 3:17


An Uber driver says an Employment Court decision ruling he is an employee of the rideshare company, rather than a contractor, will be significant. Bill Rama is one of four drivers who were granted employment status after the case was brought by the FIRST Union and E Tū. Uber plans to appeal the decision. Rama spoke to Corin Dann. Uber declined to come on the programme.

RNZ: Morning Report
Uber planning to appeal Employment Court ruling

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 3:26


The global rideshare company Uber says it will appeal what some are calling a landmark Employment Court ruling, granting four drivers the status of employees, rather than contractors. First Union and E Tū jointly brought the case to the court, representing four drivers. They say the win could have significant implications for other Uber drivers. But the company says while they're all for contractor policy reform, they believe it should happen at parliamentary level, not through the courts. First Union's strategic project coordinator Anita Rosentreter spoke to Corin Dann. Uber declined to come on the programme this morning.

Tanguy Pastureau maltraite l'info
Bill Murray est un con (et c'est triste)

Tanguy Pastureau maltraite l'info

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 5:17


durée : 00:05:17 - Tanguy Pastureau maltraite l'info - par : Tanguy Pastureau - Quelle déception pour Tanguy ! Un acteur accuse Bill Murray, quand il avait 9 ans, de l'avoir jeté dans une poubelle…

IMPACT POSITIF - les solutions existent
REPLAY : IMPACT POSITIF L'EMISSION avec EVA SADOUN

IMPACT POSITIF - les solutions existent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 8:20


IMPACT POSITIF, l'émission sur LCI, tous les samedis à 12H45. Comment parler d'économie à l'aune de la sobriété ? C'était l'objectif des Universités d'Eté de l'Economie de Demain qui se sont tenues fin août à PARIS. Portées par le mouvement IMPACT France, elles ont attiré 2500 personnes et pas moins de 6 ministres se sont déplacés pour débattre des enjeux de transformation face à la crise sociale et climatique. Eva Sadoun, la co-présidente du mouvement IMPACT France, était l'invitée d'IMPACT POSITIF sur LCI. « Sobriété, j'écris ton nom », c'était le thème de ces Universités, un thème qui avait été choisi il y a des mois suite aux conclusions du rapport du GIEC. Aujourd'hui, il est en pleine lumière et c'est le président lui-même qui parle de sobriété. Le moment pour le mouvement Impact France –qui représente 15 000 entreprises- de formuler ses propositions au gouvernement, elles seront enrichies et remises dans les prochains jours à Elisabeth Borne. Elles sont d'ores et déjà visibles sur le site des « UEED » : 10 mesures pour engager l'économie sur le chemin de la prospérité sobre, et dix commandements pour une entreprise sobre. Parmi ceux-ci : rendre la sobriété compétitive, encourager à consommer moins mais mieux ou encore investir massivement dans les entreprises sobres. Car la difficulté réside à la fois du côté des entrepreneurs qui ne savent pas toujours comment s'y prendre pour atteindre ces objectifs de sobriété, mais aussi du côté du gouvernement. Celui-ci subit de plein fouet son impréparation. Car le constat est implacable : aujourd'hui, on ne pourra pas produire l'énergie renouvelable nécessaire pour maintenir la croissance. La réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre s'accompagnera d'une diminution du PIB de 2 à 3 %, mais comment tenir ce discours quand on est une personnalité politique ? Pour Eva Sadoun, le gouvernement n'est pas encore prêt à tenir ce discours car il n'a tout simplement pas de projet. Les entrepreneurs engagés et les acteurs d'Impact France voient plutôt cela comme quelque chose d'heureux, comme la capacité de l'économie à organiser les conditions d'habitabilité sur terre. Eva Sadoun nous parle également d'une liste de 10 start-up qui seront en mesure de devenir demain des licornes « sobres ».

In the Shed with Wes Anderson
Episode 52 Biden Makes a Whoopsie, More Football, & What Caused the Salem Witch Hunt

In the Shed with Wes Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 120:10


Topics discussed on this episode include the passing of Coolio, a grocery give-away for the community, the latest from the war in Ukraine, LinkedIn experimenting with users' data, an empathetic Kanye West, President Biden's latest gaffe, NFL and college football, NASA's recent DART Mission, a man allegedly seeing a gargoyle in Illinois, a revelation about Steven Spielberg's E.T., and what caused the Salem Witch Hunt.

Il Volo del Mattino
Sai qual è l'età più bella?

Il Volo del Mattino

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 3:44


Rádio Gaúcha
Coordenadora do Comitê de Atendimento ao Eleitor do TRE-RS, Ana Moretti

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 21:34


Últimas dúvidas para o dia das eleições, auditoria das urnas no RS e E-Título está com erro no local de votação no RS.

Hoje no TecMundo Podcast
Use Dynamic Island em qualquer Android! Pode usar bermuda pra votar? - Hoje no TecMundo 26/09/22

Hoje no TecMundo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 11:13


As principais notícias de tecnologia de hoje são: pesquisas sobre possibilidade de votar usando bermuda crescem, E-Título pode ser baixado até dia 1° de outubro, Amazon fará segundo Prime Day mês que vem e muito mais. Confira!

Night Dreams Talk Radio
UFO Photo's Are The Real? With Jason Gleaves

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 97:14


Jason Gleaves, Ufologist, Researcher, International Author @ Ufology on (Facebook, Twitter and Onstellar and Ufonly YouTube Channel) also the Outer Limits Magazine.Author of ‘UFO PHOTO' and ‘The Ufology Umbrella', and my new book, UFO Encounters, Up Close and Personal and an upcoming graphic novel on the life and extraterrestrial abduction of Calvin Parker, recently helped Peter Maxwell Slattery (ECETI) with his new book, ‘Awakening, UFO's and Other Strange Happenings'.Tv documentaries include, Multidimensional, The Pentagon Files, Paranormal Caught on Camera, aired on numerous media channels including Discovery, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Apple TV. and many more.Born 1969 - Liverpool, England U.K. he is time served Ex-Royal Air Force and British Aerospace Airbus division and has a BTEC National Diploma in Computer Aided Drafting and Design in Engineering (CAD) for the Shell Oils industry. BTEC National Diploma in Carpentry and Joinery, BTEC National Diploma in Aircraft Finishing, Electrostatic/Power Coating techniques.He has a High expertise in modern civilian and military worldwide aircraft/armaments recognition and visualisation, also contributed over the last 10 years on numerous UFO pages/media and has carried out Photographic/image/video-footage analysis on Unidentified Flying Objects and associated anomalies (UFO/UAP/USO) for many Ufologists within our community worldwide, using the latest updated imagery/computer science technology and software available.He has wrote and contributed towards British Ufologist/Paranormal Researcher Steve Mera for his training course in field operatives on image recognition and image analysis of anomalous objects and phenomena.Added to this he is mainly an advanced self taught skilled graphic computer artist/illustrator and he combines his artistic ability techniques with a modern day approach using analytical methods when analysing and illuminating UFO Cases effectively to a high professional concise conclusion and standard.The book ‘The Ufology Umbrella' follows his first book ‘UFO PHOTO' and subjectively opens up the topic of ‘Close Encounters' and the sub-categories entailed within. Ufologist and Ex-Royal Air Force Jason Gleaves reveals these fascinating categories from initial UFO Sightings to actual Extraterrestrial contact also known as CE-1 to 7, plus explaining the often unrecognised subjects that accompany, such as possible advanced space flight methods and the sightings phenomenon as a whole.Book Comments:Jason Gleaves discernment and professionalism when doing an analysis of UFO's and other phenomena is of the highest standard. The testing, scrutiny and skills he uses to find truth to the subject matter is unbeaten when concerning analysis that are done to verify truth or hoax in this field.Peter Maxwell Slattery -ECETI Australia. An insightful analysis of some classic old cases - and some new ones too. Jason Gleaves is a meticulous researcher whose attention to detail and commitment to raw data is commendable.Nick Pope, British Ministry of Defence - UFO Project (Retired) Following closely on the heels of his first book, Ufology Umbrella is a must read for anyone interested in the unexplained. Jason's honest approach to the subject matter shines through in everything that he does. A collection of strange life experiences coupled with detailed photographic analysis make this book a must read.Paul Sinclair, British Ufologist and author of Truth Proof 1, 2 & All books UFO PHOTO and The Ufology Umbrella are both available on Amazon and Flying Disk Press through Philip Mantle.New book to be released August 2022 (UFO Encounters, Up Close and Personal).The graphic novel on Calvin Parker's Extraterrestrial abduction case in Pascagoula, Mississippi is due to be released 2023 for the 50th anniversary of the case.

That's Y - Generazioni al Lavoro!
"Gener-Emozioni" con Lorenzo Fariselli 6SECONDS Italia EQBiz [Generation Defiance]

That's Y - Generazioni al Lavoro!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 24:24


Perché i giovani sono più impulsivi degli adulti?Le nuove generazioni sono più o meno sensibili alle emozioni?Con Lorenzo Fariselli, Regional Network Director Six Seconds Italia e Direttore di EQBiz, esploriamo le differenze generazionali nel mondo delle emozioni, provando a capire come cambia la centratura e l'intelligenza emotiva con l'età, e quali sono ancora i pregiudizi che si affrontano parlando di emozioni ed engagement al lavoro.Scoprendo come le emozioni possono essere un comun denominatore di dialogo tra generazioni e il dialogo uno strumento di condivisione delle emozioni.Approfondimenti: https://italia.6seconds.org/; https://eqbiz.it/SPECIAL GUEST PLAYLIST (https://spoti.fi/2Mr6bfk )La canzone suggerita da Lorenzo: "La leva calcistica della classe '68" di Francesco De Gregori (www.youtube.com/watch?v=lETVilXSfNY)FOLLOW ME! -------------> https://znap.link/thatsY IG: www.instagram.com/giulio_thatsyLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/giulioberonia FB: www.facebook.com/ThatSyouth Website: www.thatsy.net

Night Dreams Talk Radio
What Are Those Things In The Woods? Network Rplay OF 3 Great Shows!

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 296:02


Guest Lawyer Andrew D. Basiago Those Things In Thw Woods Then John Vanderventer On UFO'S And Bigfoot! Last Philip Kensella Are E.T. Evil?

Troubled Minds Radio
That Plasma Life - Aliens and the Fifth State of Matter

Troubled Minds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 161:02


Help our friend James - https://paypal.me/jamessalsido?country.x=US&locale.x=en_US or Venmo here https://account.venmo.com/u/James-SalsidoPlasma-based life is hypothetical life based on what is sometimes called the “fourth state of matter”. The possibility of such non-corporeal life is a common theme in science fiction. But what if it's real?http://www.troubledminds.org Support The Show! https://rokfin.com/creator/troubledminds https://troubledfans.com https://patreon.com/troubledminds#aliens #conspiracy #paranormalRadio Schedule Mon-Tues-Wed-Thurs 7-9pst - https://fringe.fm/iTunes - https://apple.co/2zZ4hx6Spotify - https://spoti.fi/2UgyzqMStitcher - https://bit.ly/2UfAiMXTuneIn - https://bit.ly/2FZOErSTwitter - https://bit.ly/2CYB71UFollow Algo Rhythm -- https://bit.ly/3uq7yRYFollow Apoc -- https://bit.ly/3DRCUEjFollow Ash -- https://bit.ly/3CUTe4ZFollow Daryl -- https://bit.ly/3GHyIaNFollow James -- https://bit.ly/3kSiTEYFollow Joseph -- https://bit.ly/3pNjbzb Matt's Book -- https://bit.ly/3x68r2d -- code for free book WY78YFollow Nightstocker -- https://bit.ly/3mFGGtxRobert's Book -- https://amzn.to/3GEsFUKFollow TamBam -- https://bit.ly/3LIQkFw--------------------------------------------------Plasma-based Life in the Universe: Another Look at what Can Be Called Lifehttps://anomalien.com/plasma-based-life-in-the-universe-another-look-at-what-can-be-called-life/Plasma blobs hint at new form of life | New Scientisthttps://www.newscientist.com/article/dn4174-plasma-blobs-hint-at-new-form-of-life/Could alien life exist in the form of DNA-shaped dust? | New Scientisthttps://www.newscientist.com/article/dn12466-could-alien-life-exist-in-the-form-of-dna-shaped-dust/Jay Alfred - Plasma life forms | Unexplained Mysterieshttps://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/column.php?id=111062plasma-based lifehttps://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/plasma-based_life.htmlPlasma Life Forms – Aliens From a Parallel Earth - Healthy Planetshttps://healthyplanets.net/plasma-life-forms-aliens-from-a-parallel-earth/Plasma UFOshttp://thelivingmoon.com/49ufo_files/01archives/Plasma_Ufos.html10 Scientifically Possible Extraterrestrial Life-Forms - Listversehttps://listverse.com/2019/02/19/10-scientifically-possible-extraterrestrial-life-forms/Jay Alfred - Plasma life forms – dark panspermia | Unexplained Mysterieshttps://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/column.php?id=11548810 Examples of Plasma - Form of Matterhttps://www.thoughtco.com/examples-of-plasma-608335ALIEN TYPE SUMMARY Plasma Life Forms | Truth Controlhttps://www.truthcontrol.com/forum/alien-type-summary-plasma-life-formsJay Alfred - Human energy field, subtle bodies | Unexplained Mysterieshttps://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/column.php?id=123547Dark Plasma Theory (formerly known as Plasma Metaphysics)https://darkplasmatheory.blogspot.com/Ultra-terrestrial Dark Plasma: The Source of Angels, Aliens, Old Gods, and Ghosts? (OTHER-EARTH, Part Two) - UFO Digesthttps://www.ufodigest.com/article/ultra-terrestrial-dark-plasma-the-source-of-angels-aliens-old-gods-and-ghosts-other-earth-part-two/Our Invisible Bodies: Scientific Evidence for Subtle Bodies : Jay Alfred : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archivehttps://archive.org/details/jay-alfred-our-invisible-bodies/page/n5/mode/2upHow to Identify a Dark Matter Lifeform | by Jay Alfred | Mediumhttps://jay-alfred1708.medium.com/how-to-identify-a-dark-matter-lifeform-6d362fb2ba11Plasma Cosmology - Historyhttps://www.plasmacosmology.net/history.html

Lighting The Void
MJ's Strange Experiences With UFOs, OBE's, and More

Lighting The Void

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 95:31


Live Monday-Friday Nightshttps://fringe.fm (station)https://lightingthevoid.com (show site)https://joerupe.com (members)Regular listener MJ calls in to discuss his strange experiences from childhood until now with UFOs, strange encounters, energy, out of body experiences and more!

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Tuesday Replay Of The Best On Night Dreams!

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 257:25


Overlapping Dialogue
The Place Beyond the Pines

Overlapping Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 279:09


Looking for your weekly dose of generational trauma, misdirective cinema, and grease stained Ben Mendelsohn? Luckily, The Place Beyond the Pines, 2013's crime-drama-tragedy-mini-epic, is here to save the day! Before we make our way down its dark and winding road, come with us as we make a quick pit-stop and chow down on a Blue Plate Special that leaps from a discussion of E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and its theatrical re-release in honor of the classic film's 40th anniversary to an ambivalent consideration of Three Thousand Years of Longing, the latest film from Mad Max maestro George Miller. In due course, all roads lead to Schenectady and its eclectic cast of angels and demons, prompting a wide-ranging deliberation including but not limited to the weighty yet delicate brilliance of director Derek Cianfrance, the distorted magic that inevitably sparks from pitting early 2010 stars Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper up against one another, the at once simple and tortuous structural framework at play, and a special observance for one particular line reading from Emory Cohen. Feel free to skip to 2:05:06 for the beginning of our audio commentary. As always, please like, subscribe, rate, and review us on all of our channels, which include Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and YouTube! Contact us at huffmanbrothersproductions@gmail.com with your questions, comments, and requests.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
UFO'S With Charles Lear

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 65:17


Charles Lear has many interests, of which UFOs take up more than a little ofhis time. His main interests in the UFO subject are in the documented history thephenomenon has spawned and the people who investigate it, as this book reflects.Charles' other interests are geology and paleontology and his familiarity withscience and its disciplines informs his approach to the UFO subject. Charles has livedmost of his life in New York City, where he makes his living as a union stagehandand is involved in other aspects of theatre as a playwright, producer, director andShakespearean actor.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
UFO'S AND MONSTERS With George Mitrovic

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 65:12


George Mitrovic was born in 1955 in Wagga Wagga in Australia. George is an authority on the unknown and was involved with Alternative Lifestyle publications in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s. George has written a series of books called the Atlas and History Series to do with phenomena ranging from UFOs through to Lakesmonsters to Hairy Hominoids and several other bizarre subjects. George has discovered Wormholes and how to plot their progress on the surface of the Earth and has been researching this subject since the early 1970s. George has discovered synchronicities and periodicities to a multitude of phenomena based on incidences in time and space. This is all explained in "Gateways to the Gods", also on Kindle and "Wormholes through Space and Time" available in paperback..George brings a totally different slant to the origins of many strange phenomena occurring on our planet and how they are all tied in together.George has written a history of Cataclysms and their Cosmic triggers over the last one million years. The conclusions are startling and their effects on past civilizations still influence us today. Reading about the Last Great Cataclysm changes your viewpoint on Earth's recent geological and cosmological history

En direct du monde
Au Liban, les rares plages publiques (et gratuites) sont dans un très mauvais état

En direct du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:47


durée : 00:02:47 - En direct du monde - Au Liban, 80% des plages sont privatisées par des hôtels de luxe ou des restaurants. Il existe encore quelques endroits accessibles gratuitement, mais mal-entretenues.

Histoires du monde
Sri Lanka : le retour du président déchu (et haï)

Histoires du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:08


durée : 00:03:08 - La chronique d'Anthony Bellanger - Après 7 semaines d'exil et d'errance, le président Rajapaksa est de retour au pays. Il devra affronter la colère de ses compatriotes alors que le pays subit une crise inégalée d'inflation et de pénurie.

InterNational
Sri Lanka : le retour du président Gotabaya Rajapaksa déchu (et haï)

InterNational

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:08


durée : 00:03:08 - La chronique d'Anthony Bellanger - Après sept semaines d'exil et d'errance, le président Rajapaksa est de retour au pays. Il devra affronter la colère de ses compatriotes alors que le pays subit une crise inégalée d'inflation et de pénurie.

Opinionated Monday
62. la differenza d'età, conta?

Opinionated Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 38:57


Un argomento molto discusso e che talvolta scuote un po' gli animi delle persone. In questa puntata parliamo delle POTENZIALI problematiche che si possono presentare quando c'è una grande differenza di età, soprattutto se queste relazioni accadono a persone in determinate fasce d'età tipo lui 35 lei 21. Questo discorso vale per tutte le tipologie di relazioni e per ogni genere. Generalizzeremo molto durante questa puntata e i discorsi che faremo non per forza si applicano alla TUA relazione: andremo ad analizzare un certo tipo di tendenza, ripetiamo, non per forza il contenuto di questa puntata si riferisce alla tua relazione. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/opinionated-monday/message

Movie Madness
Episode 327: The Music of John Williams (Extended Edition)

Movie Madness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 218:23


When Sergio Mims asked me to program his classical music show for WHPK Radio dedicated to composer John Williams, I knew it was a daunting assignment. How can you sum up the career of a legend in three hours? How can one convey what his compositions have meant to not only me but countless moviegoers (and even TV viewers) over the years? What follows is the journey that I went on highlighting many of the classics but also the range that followed beyond his collaboration with Steven Spielberg. It still only scratches the surface, but what I could not fit into the radio timeslot at the University of Chicago is expanded upon with 38 additional minutes of music and commentary. I hope you enjoy.

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Paranormal Things! With Doug Hajicek

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 63:33


Doug Hajicek is the presidentand founder of WHITEWOLFENTERTAINMENT, INC., a television production company specializing in non-fiction programming.With over 270 TV features under his belt, including his hit series MonsterQuest for the HistoryChannel. Hajicek has been producing television shows for national networks since 1985. He iscurrently developing a full-length movie and/or series entitled: Legend Meets Science II or theLegend Meets Science series. The release date is planned for fall 2021.In 2015, Hajicek joined forces with Les Stroud, acting as his tech director and consultant forStroud's TV series, Survivorman Bigfoot. He currently co-hosts and produces Untold Radio AMon Spotify, iHeartRadio, and Apple Podcasts. Live shows air and are recorded each Wednesday at7:00 pm CT. He has also been focusing on TV show and TV series development and is currentlyconsulting for a large cable network. Hajicek has also spent considerable time in TV show

Hurwitz's House of Horror
14. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) FEAT. James Miller

Hurwitz's House of Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 86:00


The pod gets taken over this week by James Miller and Jefferson Miller as the two turn the podcasting tables around and talk to special guest Steve Hurwitz about the 1982 horror classic, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial.When Elliot and his siblings discover that a horrifying creature from space is living in their backyard, the 3 of them try figure out how to send this monster back to where it came from. Unknown to Elliot, the alien is forming a soul sucking bond with this boy that, as time goes on, slowly starts to kill him.Disclaimer: There were some more audio issues this week so we apologize for any echoing or other weird sounding issues. LINKS:Make Steve live with an E.T. ReplicaGoFundMeJames Mark MillerWebsiteInstagramJefferson MillerWebsiteInstagram

CRUX YEAH!
54 - E.T. Bone Slow (Zak Robbins & Grant Marshall)

CRUX YEAH!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 60:14


Zak Robbins and Grant Marshall are Dallas/Fort Worth, TX based comedians. Instagram: @zak_stanktoe_robbins @grant.marshall_com

Night Dreams Talk Radio
UFO's OR UAP's Talking UFO's With Race Hobbs

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 94:17


Race has researched and investigated the UFO phenomenon for over thirty years. In 1990, while working as a Disc Jockey at KZKZ 106.3FM in Fort Smith, Arkansas, he was a witness to something very unusual over south Fort Smith. He wasn't sure what it was, but it was something that he had never seen before, and ignited his curiosity into the UFO subject. He started The Fort Smith Aerial Phenomena Research Group in 1992 and began officially investigating sightings in the river valley area. Race is one of thousands, perhaps millions, of people that have a true interest in the search for the truth regarding the UFO phenomenon and things unexplained. “I continue to look forward to the day we all know the truth about what has clearly been invading the air space, over our cities and towns, our military installations, and country sides with absolute impunity. One thing is for certain, UFOs have been here, UFOs are here, and everyday citizens from every walk of life are seeing them.”

Movies Merica
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial review

Movies Merica

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 30:13


Iconic. Legendary. Ground-breaking. Epic. Profound. Earth-shattering. Phenomenal. This movie took over the whole world in 1982 and it's the 40th anniversary of the high impact event, not just movie, but event that was E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. For this anniversary, it was essential to me that I put my thoughts out there about this movie that won me over, broke my heart. and then made me stand up and cheer. My journey of loving movies for decades started with a little alien giving a boy what he needed most: a best friend.  Support the show

Who Shot Ya?
Episode 258: 'Real Genius' with David Kittredge

Who Shot Ya?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 63:35


During this year's MaxFunDrive, we promised one lucky supporter the opportunity to choose a film for us to watch if we hit our goal. Well, hit it we did, and now (thanks to listener Andrea D.) this film is hitting our screens, and your ears! Will it be a hit with our favorite movie geniuses? Listen and learn! Plus: good news for us nerds…there will be a quiz!What's GoodAlonso - Physical Season 2Drea - Meeting Maria Lewis IRL! (nb: Tim Tam Slam)David - Lost Highway remasterIfy - Getting art framedWTIDIC “At the Movies,” New York Times, August 9, 1985“So Far, Only ‘Ghostbusters' For Christmas,” Los Angeles Times, August 30, 1985Staff PicksIfy - War GamesAlonso - Back to the BeachDrea - Dinner in AmericaDavid - Valley GirlLumi Labs: Ever tried Microdosing? Visit Microdose.com and use MAXFILM for 30% off + Free Shipping. MasterClass:Visit MasterClass.com/MAXFILM for 15% off a one-year subscription to MasterClass.***With:Ify NwadiweDrea ClarkAlonso DuraldeDavid KittredgeProduced by Marissa FlaxbartSr. Producer Laura Swisher

Messianic Apologetics
Haftarah V'et'chanan – Isaiah 40:1-26

Messianic Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 14:23


Mark Huey of Outreach Israel Ministries delivers the following message on the Haftarah reading for V'et'chanan, Isaiah 40:1-26

Messianic Apologetics
TorahScope V'et'chanan – Deuteronomy 3:23-7:11

Messianic Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 12:12


Mark Huey of Outreach Israel Ministries delivers the following message on the Torah portion for this week: V'et'chanan or “I pleaded”

JTS Torah Commentary
Never Too Late to Get Close: Va'et-hannan 5782

JTS Torah Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 9:49


The JTS Commentary for Va'et-hannan by Benjy Forester, Student, The Rabbinical School of JTS (Class of 2023)Music provided by JJReinhold / Pond5.

Streaming Things: Binge and Nerd
Favorite Alien Movies

Streaming Things: Binge and Nerd

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 72:45


Chris, Andy, and Steve list their top 3 favorite alien films of all time. Are your favorites mentioned?Also be sure to take part in the contest Chris is putting together for the app Queue. Download the Queue app and simply follow Chris @moviesaretherapy. Email streamingthingspod@gmail.com with proof that you have followed him with the subject line Queue. The randomly selected winner gets to choose a movie topic for Streaming Things to cover in a future episode! The power can be yours!Time Codes00:05:05 - Mad Libs00:07:49 - Favorite Alien Films01:06:16 - Mad Libs "Cool Whips"WE HAVE A PATREON!Please consider becoming a Patreon Producer for Streaming Things at:https://www.patreon.com/StreamingThingsLEAVE US A VOICEMAILCall: 859-757-4051Join the conversation at:streamingthingspod@gmail.comFollow us all on Twitter!@StreamThingPod for the show.@moviesRtherapy for Chris.@andymostdays for Andy.@stevemay13 for Steve.Mad Libs Section Music Credit:Mall Walker by AudionautixSupport the show