Podcasts about The Family Stone

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Best podcasts about The Family Stone

Latest podcast episodes about The Family Stone

Thoughts on Thoughts
107. Case Study: The Characters of "The Family Stone"

Thoughts on Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 31:27


It's time for another cozy holiday case study with the movie "The Family Stone". We love this movie and 'tis the season for fully analyzing all of the family dynamics it contains. We hope you enjoy!

Kicking & Streaming
The Family Stone or: How I Learned to Let My Freak Flag Fly

Kicking & Streaming

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 91:30


This week, Carie gives Ross a new experience by putting him through The Family Stone (2005) in which his boyfriend Durmot Mulroney brings Sarah Jessica Parker home to meet his family for Christmas before proposing to her. Carie defends family agitator, Amy, Ross unexpectedly falls for Luke Wilson, and Diane Keaton is here. Isn't life great?  SUPPORT US ON PATREON!

TRUTH IN RHYTHM
TRUTH IN RHYTHM Podcast - Rustee Allen (Sly & the Family Stone), Part 2 of 2

TRUTH IN RHYTHM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 57:52


** PLEASE SUBSCRIBE ** Brought to you by FUNKNSTUFF.NET and hosted by Scott "DR GX" Goldfine — musicologist and author of “Everything Is on THE ONE: The First Guide of Funk” ― “TRUTH IN RHYTHM” is the interview show that gets DEEP into the pocket with contemporary music's foremost masters of the groove. Become a TRUTH IN RHYTHM Member through YouTube or at https://www.patreon.com/truthinrhythm. Featured in TIR Episode 267 (Part 2 of 2): Bassist Rustee Allen, best known as bass icon Larry Graham's successor in Sly & the Family Stone. First catching on with Sly Stone protege act Little Sister, Allen would go on to be featured on Sly & the Family Stone's classic mid-1970s albums Fresh, Small Talk and High on You.  Others he has recorded and/or performed with through the years include the Edwin Hawkins Singers, Lenny Williams, the Temptations, Angela Bofill, George Clinton, Bobby Womack and Robin Trower. Having just released a funky new song called “Gonna Take More,” Allen has also launched his own YouTube show. RECORDED SEPTEMBER 2022 LEGAL NOTICE: All video and audio content protected by copyright. Any use of this material is strictly prohibited without expressed consent from original content producer and owner Scott Goldfine, dba FUNKNSTUFF. For inquiries, email info@funknstuff.net. TRUTH IN RHYTHM is a registered U.S. Trademark (Serial #88540281). Get your copy of "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk" today! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541256603/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1541256603&linkCode=as2&tag=funknstuff-20&linkId=b6c7558ddc7f8fc9fe440c5d9f3c400

TRUTH IN RHYTHM
TRUTH IN RHYTHM Podcast - Rustee Allen (Sly & the Family Stone), Part 1 of 2

TRUTH IN RHYTHM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 54:55


** PLEASE SUBSCRIBE ** Brought to you by FUNKNSTUFF.NET and hosted by Scott "DR GX" Goldfine — musicologist and author of “Everything Is on THE ONE: The First Guide of Funk” ― “TRUTH IN RHYTHM” is the interview show that gets DEEP into the pocket with contemporary music's foremost masters of the groove. Become a TRUTH IN RHYTHM Member through YouTube or at https://www.patreon.com/truthinrhythm. Featured in TIR Episode 267 (Part 1 of 2): Bassist Rustee Allen, best known as bass icon Larry Graham's successor in Sly & the Family Stone. First catching on with Sly Stone protege act Little Sister, Allen would go on to be featured on Sly & the Family Stone's classic mid-1970s albums Fresh, Small Talk and High on You.  Others he has recorded and/or performed with through the years include the Edwin Hawkins Singers, Lenny Williams, the Temptations, Angela Bofill, George Clinton, Bobby Womack and Robin Trower. Having just released a funky new song called “Gonna Take More,” Allen has also launched his own YouTube show. RECORDED SEPTEMBER 2022 LEGAL NOTICE: All video and audio content protected by copyright. Any use of this material is strictly prohibited without expressed consent from original content producer and owner Scott Goldfine, dba FUNKNSTUFF. For inquiries, email info@funknstuff.net. TRUTH IN RHYTHM is a registered U.S. Trademark (Serial #88540281). Get your copy of "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk" today! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541256603/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1541256603&linkCode=as2&tag=funknstuff-20&linkId=b6c7558ddc7f8fc9fe440c5d9f3c400

It's Me, Tinx
Ep 79 - Holiday Movie Rewind: The Family Stone

It's Me, Tinx

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 33:36


Tinx opens today's episode by expressing her outrage over the atrocious Balenciaga ads.  She also examines virtue signaling, and the expectation of influencers to use social media to comment on current events.  In a sharp left turn, Tinx then takes us through her second favorite Christmas movie, The Family Stone, and the holiday season dynamics it brings up!  Follow Tinx on Instagram and TikTok

夜のゆいろく YUIROKU of the night
映画『幸せのポートレート』彼氏の家は大家族。この難局をどう乗り越えるのか。

夜のゆいろく YUIROKU of the night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 7:25


作品情報 幸せのポートレート(Original title: The Family Stone) 2005年 アメリカ 監督 トーマス・ベズーチャ 出演  サラ・ジェシカ・パーカー、 ダイアン・キートン、クレア・デインズ、 レイチェル・マクアダムス、他 予告 YouTube https://youtu.be/ps8DhuMfScQ 本編 Amazon prime Video https://amzn.to/3VEGkCc Amazon prime Video登録 https://amzn.to/3IP4i6I Disney+ https://www.disneyplus.com/ja-jp/home オープニング曲 kc-mahjack in LABEL https://kcmah.com/ Twitter https://twitter.com/yuimaru コミュニティ https://bit.ly/3rGzfV2 Patreon https://patreon.com/yuimaru 応援メッセージのハッシュタグ #夜のゆいろく#ゆいろく 聴いてくれてありがとう

Aced Out Podcast
Episode 29: Rustee Allen & Levi Seacer Jr. [SLY/ PRINCE/PURPLE ONES]

Aced Out Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 72:21


visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more“I remember I got paid $20 for a gig, man,” says RUSTEE ALLEN, funk bassist extraordinaire, first introduced to the world via the transcendent soul staple FRESH by none other than Sly & the Family Stone. “I thought I made a ton of money!” he laughs. “I didn't even know you even got paid for playing,” agrees his good friend and fellow Bay Area legend LEVI SEACER JR., a guitarist who went from playing hardcore jazz in local clubs to touring the world with PRINCE and his New Power Generation. “That's how innocent I was about it… When I got my first check I'm like ‘What's this?'” Rustee was first spotted by the Sly camp as a youngster playing in support of local legend Johnny Talbot, much admired by all the top Bay Area funkateers at the time. Along with drummer WILLIE WILD, (who would later be part of the original lineup of Graham Central Station), Rustee was chosen to back up LITTLE SISTER, an offshoot of Sly's Fam featuring Vet Stone and piloted by Freddie Stone. Next thing Rustee knew, he was “auditioning” to join the Fam as a full-fledged member—in front of 30,000 people in Virginia! Soon after that, Rustee was in the studio for the Fresh sessions, laying down tunes in basically one take each. “The first takes are the best ones anyway,” says Rustee. As for Levi, he spent his youth gigging at spots like Earl's Solano Club in the East Bay, playing jazz with ladies such as Rosie Gaines and Sheila Escovedo. “Playing was like taking a glass of water,” says Levi. “Just natural.” His confidence and skill got him noticed by Don Cornelius of Soul Train fame, who put him to work. Then one day Levi stopped by an audition that Escovedo — now known as Sheila E — was holding for bass players. Though Levi was a guitar man, she asked him to take the gig once she had heard him play “A Love Bizarre” on the four-string. This of course put him in the same orbit as PRINCE himself— who would eventually bring him into the fold not only as a player, but also as writer and producer. Like Rustee, Levi had found himself thrust into the spotlight, breathing the rarefied air of an internationally acclaimed artist with a new band. Rustee's return to Aced Out is a pivotal moment for us, as he was our very first guest for our pilot episode just a little over four years ago. In this inspirational interview, Rustee and Levi describe what made Sly and Prince amazing bandleaders, and what it was really like within those soul circles. As well, Rustee describes why his mother told him he was her most adventurous child, and what it was like onstage and off during Sly's Lifetime Achievement Award performance at the 2006 Grammys, while Levi breaks down how Prince was like a “cool computer” and why every musician in Minneapolis hated the New Power Generation—at first, that is. If all that weren't enough, the purple brothas also bring a band in the studio to perform Rustee's single “You're the One!” Produced & Hosted by Ace AlanCohosted by Jay StoneExecutive Producer Scott SheppardWebsite and Graphics by 3chards Engineered by Grace Coleman at Different Fur Studios, San Francisco CA Video & Sound Editing + Interview Mix & Graphics by Nick “Waes” Carden for Off Hand Records, Oakland CA Video Production by Saboor BidarMusical Performance:TONY PROVIDENCE — drumsCARL WHEELER — keysMORGAN DAY – guitarCARL NORDE — vocalsLEVI SEACER JR. — guitar, vocalsRUSTEE ALLEN — bass, vocals Musical Performance Mix by Levi Seacer Jr.Rap verses by Corey the Greatan Issac Bradbury Production © 2022visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie
482: The Smooch, Marry, and Kills of December

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:29


In this episode, we share our smooch, marry, and kills of December. We discuss what you should give a shot (smooch), what you should make a commitment to (marry), and what you should just pass on by (kill) this month. Join us as we consider the new books, shows, and movies heading our way this winter. Plus we give a shoutout to PMG staffers' small businesses.MENTIONSSmall Business Saturday shoutouts: Erin's Substack, The Swipe Up | Knox's Substack | Madison's podcast Braggin' Rights | Jason Waterfalls' and Knox's podcast Over Under Achievers | Indi's Era Outfits and Taylor Swift Eras QuizSmooch Marry Kill on Instagram #PopcastSMK | Best and Worst Holiday Movies and where to watch themSmooch mentions: Guillermo del Toro IMDb | Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix) | Matilda the Musical (Netflix) and Matilda dance (TikTok) | White Noise | Violent Night | Try a new streaming service, like Peacock: Girls5Eva, Booksmart, Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris, The Family Man, Pitch Perfect: Bumper in Berlin | Flip or Flop: The Final Flip | The Whale | Banshees of InisherinMarry mentions: The Light Pirate by Lily Brooks-Dalton | Uber Facts: A blue whale is larger than a basketball court | A Coastline is an Immeasurable Thing by Mary-Alice Daniel | Screaming on the Inside: The Unsustainability of American Motherhood by Jessica Grose | Dad lights- National Treasure: Edge of History (Disney+), Puss in Boots: The Last Wish | Kill mentions: Reference- Bible Binge: What The Church Gets Wrong About Christmas | Babylon | Avatar 2BONUS SEGMENTOur Patreon supporters can get full access to this week's The More You Know news segment. Become a partner. This week we discussed:Jamie and Erin's trip to ItalyBalenciagaQuentin Tarantino said “Marvel killed the movie star”GREEN LIGHTSJamie: docuseries - Pepsi, Where's My Jet? (Netflix) | book- A Heart That Works by Rob DelaneyKnox: The Bluest Willow's The Family Stone drop (coming soon) | movie- Spirited (Apple+)SHOW SPONSORSFactor: Get 60% off your first box with code pop60 at go.factor75.com/pop60Pair: Get 20% off through Pair's holiday sale at paireyewear.comSubscribe to Episodes: iTunes | Android Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter: knoxandjamie.com/newsletterShop our Amazon Link: amazon.com/shop/thepopcast | this week's featured itemFollow Us: Instagram | Twitter | FacebookSupport Us: Monthly Donation | One-Time Donation | SwagSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beck Did It Better
119. Sly and the Family Stone: Stand! (1969)

Beck Did It Better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 96:53


SO HERE WE ARE...TALKING ABOUT SCATMAN JOHN AND CHUMBAWAMBA...ON THE BEST PODCAST ABOUT SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE AND THE 119TH GREATEST ALBUM OF ALL TIME, STAND! IF YOU'D LIKE A PREVIEW JUST IMAGINE THE MINOR KEY FUNERAL DIRGE OF SKI-BA-BOP-BA-DOP-BOP!   BEFORE WE GET TO THE MUSIC WE TAKE A VOICEMAIL FROM APPLE VALLEY'S FINEST ABOUT OUR TREATMENT OF LISTENERS AND ASKING FOR A COLLEGE TUITION DISCOUNT FOR SKIPPING MORNING CLASSES. WE ALSO TALK PLAYING DICE, STRATEGIES FOR WINNING AT THE RECORD STORE, AND MOVING WALKWAY ETIQUETTE AT THE AIRPORT. WE ALSO SPEND A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF TIME TALKING...TYPING...AND WHAT KIND OF MONSTERS USE ALL CAPS AND NO RIGHT SHIFT KEY.    THEN AT (58:00) WE SING A SIMPLE SONG FOR ALL YOU EVERYDAY PEOPLE WHEN WE COVER SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE THEIR PSYCHEDELIC FUNK ALBUM, STAND! WE DISCUSS THE INSPIRATION FOR NBA JAM CATCHPHRASES, THE BEST SONGS WITH NONSENSE LYRICS, AND AMAZING COVERS BY IKE AND TINA TURNER, DOLLY PARTON, AND MORE.   NEXT WEEK, WHEN THE FOGHORN BLOWS, YOU KNOW THE NEXT EPISODE WILL BE COMING HOME WHEN WE TAKE YOU INTO THE MYSTIC AND BECOME THE BEST PODCAST ABOUT VAN MORRISON AND HIS 1970 ALBUM, MOONDANCE.

Rockstar CMO FM
The Thanks or No Thanks, Backstage with ABM Expert Alisa Groocock and a Thanksgiving Cocktail Episode

Rockstar CMO FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 73:33


This week in the Marketing Studio, our host Ian Truscott in the spirit of the holidays, asks Jeff Clark our resident Rockstar CMO strategic advisor and former Research Director at SiriusDecisions/Forrester, if he would give thanks or no thanks to a bunch of marketing topics that have come up on the show recently. Ian then goes backstage with Alisa Groocock, who, as you'll hear, has had a fantastic career as a marketing leader and analyst, most recently as Senior Vice President at Agent3, and before that as a VP, Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, where Alisa was responsible for helping hundreds of companies to build, execute and optimize their Account Based Marketing strategies. Prior to Forrester, Alisa spent over 20 years on the client side in field marketing roles at HP, Cisco and Informatica, where she worked closely with Sales to execute key account programs. They discuss Alisa's career, ABM (Account Based Marketing) and if it's still the hot thing for B2B marketers, her latest thoughts on what's next, and she has a great nomination for our portal to marketing hell, the Rockstar CMO Swimming pool. Finally, we wind down the week in the Rockstar CMO virtual bar and get transported away with Robert Rose, Chief Trouble Maker at The Content Advisory, for a Thanksgiving cocktail and a chat about putting the story in all of your content, however mundane. Please get in touch if you have any thoughts or suggestions on the topics we discuss. Enjoy! — The Links  (if you can't see them, please stop by https://rockstarcmo.com) The people: Ian Truscott on LinkedIn and Twitter Jeff Clark on LinkedIn and Twitter Alisa Groocock on LinkedIn and Twitter Robert Rose on Twitter and LinkedIn As mentioned in this week's episode: Articles: Writing Is Writing, Right? Not If You Want To Keep Your Content Creation Team How a Spoonful of Story Helps Even ‘Boring' Content Go Down Robert's links Experience Advisors Mastodon The Content Advisory Blog Experience Advisors Podcast: This Old Marketing  Rockstar CMO: Rockstar CMO on the web, Twitter, and LinkedIn Previous episodes and all show notes: Rockstar CMO FM Track List: Piano Music is by Johnny Easton, shared under a creative commons license We'll be right back by Stienski & Mass Media – on YouTube Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) by Sly & The Family Stone on Spotify — You can subscribe to this podcast on Apple, Spotify, Amazon and all good podcasting platforms – or visit https://rockstarcmo.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That's A Gay Ass Podcast
"Adam4Adam" w/ Jeffery Self

That's A Gay Ass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 55:33


Jeffery Self (Search Party) stops by gay ass podcast with news to share, hon. In addition to his new podcast "Breakfast Buffet" with Cole Escola, we discuss:-community theater-Eric's tragic book news-The Family Stoneplus, we add the new segment "Gay Men in Black". Do you dare?*******************************************************Buy your Character Actress sweatshirt and gay ass merch at gayasspodcast.comFollow Jeffery on Instagram (@jefferyself) and listen to his new podcast with Cole Escola, Breakfast Buffet here!Follow Eric on IG (@ericwillz), Tiktok (@ericwillzTT) and Gay Ass Podcast on Instagram (@gayasspodcast)Take care of yourselves and be LOUD.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thats-a-gay-ass-podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Beck Did It Better
118. Eagles: Hotel California (1976)

Beck Did It Better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 89:51


This week's episode could be heaven or it could be hell. But either way if you're looking for the best podcast about the Eagles and Hotel California, you can find it here any time of year.   But before we get to the album we need to determine whether this podcast is historically accurate or built on a lie. We discuss adults wearing costumes at Halloween parties, tips for hosting Thanksgiving, and whether the ghosts in Pac-Man are dead Pac-Men. We also become the best Buddy Holly podcast when we talk about the smash hit Buddy Holly musical. Finally we become the best unsolved mysteries podcast when our sleuth co-hosts try to uncover what caused the brown glob on Rob's shirt.   Then at (51:00) we show you the way when we discuss the 6th best selling album of all time, Hotel California by the Eagles. We discuss why people love the Eagles, why people hate the Eagles, and whether its "the Eagles", "The Eagles", or "Eagles". We also provide a Manhattan Transfer of music knowledge when we breakdown a list of songs with the best vocal arrangements.    If this week's episode got your tickler file then we'll take you higher next week for the best Sly & the Family Stone podcast and the 119th greatest album of all time, Stand!    

Under Appreciated Movie Podcast
Episode 289 The Family Stone

Under Appreciated Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 115:52


This could possibly be the best Thanksgiving movie that I have ever seen on Veterans day while planning flag day.

One Dry Kiss: An Unofficial Rom-Com Podcast
74: Jostling Wangs & A Wannabe Thanksgiving Movie: The Family Stone

One Dry Kiss: An Unofficial Rom-Com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 103:08


We are in 'Not Sure November' where we are covering holiday movies but it's not quite clear (to us, at least) what the holiday is. This week we are doing The Family Stone which stars everyone! Everett, played by Dermot Mulroney, is bringing his uptight girlfriend Meredith played by Sarah Jessica Parker home to meet his family. But there are secrets and scandals afoot. In this episode we explain how to diffuse a tense situation by grabbing someones Ta Ta, wonder if anyone would want a reunion with the person that popped their cherry and marvel at the fact that Corinne's voice has gone '2 packs a day' husky. This movie is an adventure and we hope you join us for the ride that is The Family Stone.

All My Favorite Songs
All My Favorite Songs 041 by Josh Homme - Fill in for Jarvis Cocker

All My Favorite Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022


Joshua Michael Homme (born May 17, 1973) is an American musician, singer, and songwriter. Homme has been part of two of the most acclaimed stoner rock/metal bands of the late '90s and early 2000s, Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age. He is best known as the founder, primary songwriter, and only continuous member of the rock band Queens of the Stone Age, which he formed in 1996 and in which he sings lead vocals and plays guitar, as well as occasionally playing bass and drums. He also co-founded Eagles of Death Metal in 1998, playing drums and bass for their studio recordings and occasionally performing live with them. In this episode the full collection of songs played by Homme on Jan 2nd 2014, when filling in for Jarvis Cocker on his BBC Radio 6 radio show called Sunday Service (aired from 2010 to 2017). An eclectic two-hour mix of music from Homme's record collection, with a definite nod towards the darkside and the downright dirty. Lineup: Screamin' Jay Hawkins, WhoMadeWho, The Cramps, The Damned, Björk, Primal Scream, The Saints, The Doors, Iceage, Bill Withers, Bauhaus, Roky Erickson, Sly & The Family Stone, Savages, Komeda, Misfits, Glenn Danzig, Gnonnas Pedro et ses Dadjes, Eagles Of Death Metal, Grimes, Beck, Blonde Redhead, Cat Power, Ramones, ACDC, Iggy Pop, Arctic Monkeys, Bobby 'Boris' Pickett

Political-ish
An Icon Vanished: Searching for Sly Stone

Political-ish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 60:26


He was a genius who straddled musical genres, broke barriers, and stole the show at the greatest musical event ever: Woodstock. Sylvester Stewart, better known as “Sly Stone,” was the songwriter, arranger, producer, singer and a virtuoso on any instrument in the studio for his hand-picked group, The Family Stone. Sly shot across the musical horizon like the brightest of comets. He was omnipresent on America's cultural pages during the for 5 years, producing legendary music and songs that are STILL a mainstay on playlists. 3 #1 songs in 3 years; then he disappeared. What happened to Sly Stone? For 40 years he's been out of the public eye, a complete recluse – spoken about in hushed tones, but rarely if ever seen Michael Rubenstone is an actor and filmmaker who conceived and created a brilliant documentary, "On the Sly: The Search for the Family Stone", to achieve one goal: FIND SLY STONE. It was a multi-year ride, but what a damn ride it was!! Watch and listen as Michael Rubenstone details the years and travails spent searching for a vanished icon: Sly Stone.

Bob Sirott
How Sly and the Family Stone perfected funk

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


Author of “Sly and the Family Stone: An Oral History,” Joel Selvin, joins Bob Sirott to talk about why he decided to focus on Sly Stone’s career, the beginning of Sly’s career, and his downward spiral. He also discussed Sly’s time in jail and the hit songs from the group.

Opening Life Podcast
Are You Ready

Opening Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 43:04


Brittany and Kyle have drummer Greg Errico, from the legendary band, Sly and the Family Stone, join the podcast. Together they open two classic tunes, listening for what they said to the people that first heard them in the in the late Sixties, and what they say to our lives and world today. Join us for a marvelous musical journey, through the power of melody, lyrics and groove, into the heart of our common experiences as human beings.

Cricket, Et Cetera
Underdog

Cricket, Et Cetera

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:26


Peter and Gideon celebrate Namibia's upset win over Sri Lanka in the T20 World Cup, report the Netherlands' defeat of the UAE, and ponder whose money cricket would not pocket (Russian mafia?  Iranian asbestos?). Today's title is courtesy Sly and the Family Stone.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Whole 'Nuther Thing
Episode 702: Whole 'Nuther Thing October 9, 2022

Whole 'Nuther Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 116:01


"Sailors fighting in the dance hallOh man!Look at those cavemen go, It's the freakiest showTake a look at the lawman, Beating up the wrong guyOh man!Wonder if he'll ever know, He's in the best-selling showIs there life on Mars?"Let's find out together, shall we?It's my 4th Anniversary on 885 The SoCal Sound after 18 years on our sister station, Jazz FM KSBR.Joing us are The Blues Project, Savoy Brown, Alan Parsons Project, Badfinger, Genesis, Spanky & Our Gang,  Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd, It's A Beautiful Day, Little River Band, Foghsat, Steely Dan, Sly & The Family Stone, Three Dog Night, Seatrain, Paul Winter Consort, Todd Rundgren, Bachman Turner Overdrive and David Bowie.

Cloud Jazz Smooth Jazz
Cloud Jazz 2249 (Peter Herold)

Cloud Jazz Smooth Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 57:43


Estreno de 'Sensual Electro', el disco que acaba de publicar Peter Herold que es saxofonista de la banda húngara de Smooth Jazz Peet Project. En el repaso a álbumes recientemente editados reseñamos los de Nils, Elan Trotman, Bob Baldwin, Adrian Crutchfield y Avery Sunshine. En el bloque central recuperamos la discografía del bajista, compositor y cantante Larry Graham, componente de Sly and the Family Stone y fundador de Graham Central Station.

The Loud Spot with Sebastian
Ep #301 Interview with Mychael Gabriel

The Loud Spot with Sebastian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 32:33


Mychael Gabiel Interview on The Loud Spot! A Minneapolis-grown singer and songwriter whose bent on exploring the neverending sonic space that is music. A multi-dimensional artist in more ways than one, Mychael Gabriel is on a mission to break the barriers of what is and what could be. His unique creativity is in a constant state of evolution and innovation, guaranteeing that each new release spells an experience unlike any other. Just in case you're wondering whether he's got that out of the box creativity, he's brought along his vivid imagination for his single "Ghost In The Midnight," a more intimate look into naked truth for his single “Honesty," a call to action for us all to stand together with "Fury" and "Invictus," and the synth-pop thrill, "Sights and Sounds," embarks on a journey that is part electro-funk, part guitar anthem, part sonic bliss. Mychael Gabriel's background in the musical arena has been a colorful one: Writer, producer, arranger, engineer, mixer, musician - his extensive collaborations in the professional music arena include: Sheila E., Stevie Wonder, Ringo Starr, Hans Zimmer, Usher, John Legend, Snoop Dogg, Beck, Common, Gary Clark Jr., St. Vincent, Miguel, H.E.R., Juanes, Goapele, Earth Wind and Fire, Gloria Estefan, George Duke, George Clinton, Freddie Stone (of Sly and the Family Stone), Luis Enrique, Tony Succar, Joss Stone, Debi Nova, Israel Houghton, George Benson, Tony! Toni! Toné!, C.O.E.D., Escovedo Family, Avery Sunshine, Ellis Delaney, Kevin Ross, Johnny Gill, Peter Rafelson, Jean-Marie Horvat, Victor Wooten, Damon Castillo, MasterClass, DreamWorks Animation, ABC Network, 2007 and 2012 Latin Grammy Awards, 2016 BET Awards, Super Bowl XXVI, 2020 Grammy Awards, 2020 Grammy Salute to Prince, 2022 Summit of the Americas, 2022 World Games, and so much more...

Baywatch Watch
The Family Stone - "Thin Blood" w/ special guest Alex Franklin!

Baywatch Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 96:57


Alex Franklin rejoins the boys to talk Shania Twain, 2005 films, and, of course, Baywatch Nights. Jump in!

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
dUg Pinnick from Kings-X

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 39:26


dUg Pinnick is known first and foremost as the soulful singer and bassist for hard rockers King's X. Born in Joliet, IL, Pinnick discovered rock & roll through such greats as Sly and the Family Stone, Jimi Hendrix, and Led Zeppelin, while he borrowed from gospel for his singing style. When a gig backing up Christian guitarist Phil Keaggy broke up in the early '80s, Pinnick formed a new band with fellow ex-Keaggy member Jerry Gaskill (drums) and guitarist Ty Tabor. It would take several years of playing covers in bars throughout the South before the new band would click musically and eventually settle on a name: King's X. Signing to Megaforce/Atlantic in 1987, the trio became a favorite with the metal and progressive rock crowd; their music also contained elements of alternative in their hard rock, long before it became en vogue during the '90s. Pinnick is one of the few bassists of hard rock who uses a 12-string bass regularly, which is a major ingredient to the magical King's X sound. dUg sat down with Mistress Carrie to talk about the new Kings-X album, his musical upbringing, songwriting process, the bass, his inspiration, and so much more! This episode is a MUST for bass players!Check out the custom playlist for Episode #120Find dUg Pinnick Online:WebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagramYoutubeFind Kings X Online:WebsiteTwitterFacebookInstagramYoutubeFind Mistress Carrie Online:Official WebsiteThe Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on PatreonTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeCameoTikTok

Two Larrys and a Mic
In this episode, we're featuring Families of Music and their hits.

Two Larrys and a Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 38:25


In episode 49, we'll explain what Sly & the Family Stone, The Kinks, The Bee Gees, The Pointer Sisters and so many others have in common. Plus, Seconds Guessing, a Lynchburg-born jazz producer passes away and a salute to M*A*S*H.

The Conduit
Ozomatli

The Conduit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 58:02


Like Sly and the Family Stone, The Clash, Fishbone, and Public Enemy before them, Ozomatli follows in the footsteps of a long line of musicians who aim to effect change through their music and lead by example. Today, you'll hear from two founding members of the Grammy Award-winning group, Wil-Dog Abers and Raul Pacheco, about how they have used the universal language of music as a platform to better themselves and the world around them. Set to infectious rhythms and catchy melodies, Ozo's sound is a blend of the many cultures found in the city of Los Angeles, but the band has found commonalities across the world, thanks to their many years of touring. Whether supporting Carlos Santana on his Supernatural Tour, working with reggae dons, Sly and Robbie, contributing music to films like Happy Feet 2 and Elmo's Musical Monsterpiece, or creating their own kids' album, Ozomatli keeps striving to improve, both as a group and as individuals. In today's conversation, Will and Raul share key lessons from their time in the music business, from the importance of leveraging your label as an opportunity to be more creative to viewing your manager as a business partner, and we get first-hand insight into some of their career highlights. You'll also discover how they have used the pandemic as a chance to continue learning and growing as musicians, plus so much more! Make sure to tune in today. Key Points From This Episode: What role music played as Will and Raul were growing up and who they looked up to. How Will was introduced to music via the trombone in the LAUSD Magnet program. The influence that Raul's elementary school music teacher had on him. Insight into Raul's history with the tres, a three-course chordophone of Cuban origin. Bassists like Larry Graham and Robbie Shakespeare who shaped the way Will plays. Key lessons about the ‘business of music' that Will and Raul learned from recording for a number of different labels. The value of viewing your manager, your lawyer, and your label as business partners. How Ozomatli has used the universal language of music as a platform to affect change. Eye-opening moments from their government-sponsored international tour as cultural ambassadors for the US State Department in 2006. Raul and Will share some of the most challenging parts of being on the road. Hear how they both used the pandemic as an opportunity to educate themselves further. How they approached writing music for kids' films and creating their own kids' album. What they learned from opening for Carlos Santana on his Supernatural Tour. Ozomatli's new LP, Marching On, and their commitment to becoming better singers. Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: https://ozomatli.com/ (Ozomatli) https://www.linkedin.com/in/raul-pacheco-7b69385b/ (Raul Pacheco on LinkedIn) https://twitter.com/mrraulpacheco (Raul Pacheco on Twitter) https://www.instagram.com/raulelbullypacheco/ (Raul Pacheco on Instagram) https://www.linkedin.com/in/wil-dog-abers-b3740415b/ (Wil-Dog Abers on LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/wil_dogabers/ (Wil-Dog Abers on Instagram) https://blueelan.com/collections/ozomatli (Pre-Order 'Marching On')

Jazzmeeting
September 14 2022 – II – Interview with Emilio Castillo

Jazzmeeting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 58:52


Sly & The Family Stone – In Time – 5:47 Aretha Franklin – Son Of A Preacher Man – 3:19 The Platters – Only You (And You Alone) – 2:40 Booker T. & the M.G.’s – Green Onions – 2:53 Santana – Black Magic Woman / Gypsy Queen – 5:19 Tower Of Power – Soul […]

Another Side of Midnight with Curtis Sliwa
Be a Decider not a Divider| 09-03-2022

Another Side of Midnight with Curtis Sliwa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 323:20


Today on Another Side of Midnight, Curtis talks about Joe Biden's latest speech to America, was it too polarizing? Curtis also talks about how dirty New York City is becoming under Mayor Adam's watch. Curtis also remembers hurricane Ida and the devastation that it brought to New York City, and he also expresses his disappointment that the city hasn't done anything to prepare for the next natural disaster. Curtis and Bo Snerdley finally have it out over who's band is better, Sly and Family Stone or Earth, Wind & Fire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MPR News with Kerri Miller
MPR at the State Fair: Minnesota music trivia and The Family Stone

MPR News with Kerri Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 52:59


It's a music extravaganza on MPR Day at the Minnesota State Fair. On Friday, MPR News host Kerri Miller hosted a special live program of music and music trivia at Dan Patch Stage in front of the Grandstand. Kerri talked with members of The Family Stone, who are performing Friday and Saturday at the Leinie Lodge Bandshell at the State Fair. In 1966, saxophonist Jerry Martini and Sly Stone co-founded Sly and the Family Stone, one of the first major interracial and mixed gender bands in the country. The California band reflected the counterculture of the 1960s and laid a foundation for the street funk, soul and disco music of the 1970s. Martini and a new lineup are continuing the legacy with classics, like “Dance to the Music” and “Hot Fun in the Summertime.” Guests: Sean McPherson is the music director and afternoon host of Jazz88-KBEM and a former host on 89.3 The Current. He's also co-owner of Trivia Mafia and bassist for Heiruspecs. Sarah Alfano is a bass player and backup vocalist for the Minneapolis band Hot Freaks. Jerry Martini is a saxophonist and co-founder of the Sly and the Family Stone. Phunne Stone is Sly Stone's daughter and vocalist for The Family Stone. Russell “Swang” Stewart is lead singer for The Family Stone.

THE MISTERman's Take
#Sly and the Family Stone everybody is a star

THE MISTERman's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 4:11


#Sly and the Family Stone everybody is a star

All In with Narada Michael Walden
Episode 018 - Interview with Keni Burke

All In with Narada Michael Walden

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 80:25


Narada speaks with American singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist who began his career with four siblings in the 1970s band the Five Stairsteps. Skilled as a guitarist and bassist, Burke continued to work for the Dark Horse label as a session musician, while burgeoning a solo career of his own. During this period he contributed instrumentation to songs by a diverse range of artists such as Sly & the Family Stone, Natalie Cole, Billy Preston, Terry Callier, Curtis Mayfield, Bill Withers, Dusty Springfield, Diana Ross, and Gladys Knight and more. In 1981, Burke released his self-produced follow-up solo album, You're the Best, but it was his third album, Changes, which appeared the following year, that made a more significant impact.[2] This album included the singles "Hang Tight" and his signature hit "Risin' to the Top," a big success in Chicago.[2] The latter song has become a popular sampling choice for hip hop artists, having been borrowed by artists such as Doug E Fresh ("Keep Risin to the Top"), Big Daddy Kane ("Smooth Operator"), LL Cool J ("Around the Way Girl"), Pete Rock & CL Smooth ("Take You There"), Mary J. Blige ("Love No Limit"), O.C. ("Born 2 Live"), and Sean Price ("Sabado Gigante"), "Rising to the Top" appeared in the soundtrack for the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories, on fictional radio station Vice City for Lovers. Throughout the '80s and into the '90s, Burke continued his session and production work for artists such as Peabo Bryson, The O'Jays, The Jones Girls and Keith Sweat, and in 1998 released his last album to date Nothin' but Love, containing the hit "Indigenous Love", which was popular in the United Kingdom via the Expansion Records LabelVisit Narada at his website and socials and leave a comment, like and subscribe if you enjoyed the podcast!Website: https://www.naradamichaelwalden.com/allinpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/officialnaradaApple Music https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-with-narada-michael-walden/id1470173526

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

Bureau Buitenland
Verre Geluiden #10: Laila Frank

Bureau Buitenland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 25:49


Journalist Laila Frank neemt ons in deze Verre Geluiden mee op roadtrip door de Verenigde Staten. Want muziek en politiek, muziek en idealen zijn in ‘the States' onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden. En nu de Amerikaanse samenleving tot op het bot verdeeld is, kun je dat volgens onze gast van vandaag ook steeds meer afhoren aan de muziek. Muziek uit de uitzending: America the Beautiful - Keb' Mo' Not Ready To Make Nice - The Chicks Protestlied tegen 'gerrymandering' Everyday People - Sly & The Family Stone

The Music Box
I Scream! You Scream! We All Scream for the Drum Machine!

The Music Box

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 12:38


You've heard about the instrument families from woodwinds, to brass, to strings, even percussion, but have you explored the mean green drum machine?! On this episode of The Music Box, we'll be learning all about how musical legends like J Dilla and Sly & the Family Stone used the drum machine as a tool, and how you can too! Additional lessons and resources at musicboxpod.org. This episode is recommended for grades 3-5 and above, but all students can catch the beat with some guidance!

Designing Hollywood Podcast
Designing Hollywood & John Campea Presents! Award Winning Costume Designer Shay Cunliffe

Designing Hollywood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 64:23


Designing Hollywood & John Campea Presents!!! Award Winning Costume Designer Shay Cunliffe  Shay is best known for her designs in:  • Peacemaker (2022) 5 Episodes  • We're The Millers (2013) • The Bourne Legacy (2012) • The Bourne Ultimatum (2007) • 2012 (2019) • The Family Stone (2005) • Because I Said So (2007) Shay CunLiffe is an internationally recognized and prolific costume designer, Cunliffe most recently designed James Foley's 50 Shades Darker and the upcoming 50 Shades Freed. Other credits include Billy Ray's English language remake of the Argentinian Academy Award-winning film The Secret in Their Eyes, Lasse Hallström's A Dog's Purpose, and the comedy Get Hard, starring Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart. Earlier credits include The Bourne Legacy, directed by Tony Gilroy–the Jeremy Renner-starring sequel to The Bourne Ultimatum, directed by Paul Greengrass, for which she also designed the costumes. She has worked with an array of distinguished filmmakers, such as James L. Brooks, John Sayles, Gary Sinise, Taylor Hackford, Rob Reiner, Harold Ramis, Steve Zaillian, Brad Silberling, Amy Heckerling, David Mamet, Tarsem Singh, and Ken Kwapis. Cunliffe tapped into her musical theater roots when she teamed with Rob Marshall on the television movie version of Annie, for which she won a Costume Designers Guild Award and received an Emmy  nomination.

The Homegrown Podcast
Choosing better for your family -- stone ground flour milling with Alyssa of Better Basics Milling

The Homegrown Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 130:54


In this episode, we sat down with Alyssa of Better Basics Milling to chat all things flour, milling, real food, and family health. Alyssa shares her family's many triumphs over complex illness and how consuming freshly milled flour changed her perception of wheat entirely. Find Better Basics Milling:@better.basics.millinghttps://betterbasicsmilling.com/Get 15% off your order with the code: Homegrown15Find us on Instagram: @homegrown_education and @joeyhaselmayerShop Homegrown Resources

THE MISTERman's Take
#Larry Graham one in a million

THE MISTERman's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 4:02


#Larry Graham one in a million # one of the greatest bass players ever, member of the legendary Sly and the Family Stone band,successful career with his own band # Graham central Station # this slow jam was a hit across all the boards# songwriter Sam dees# Larry Graham deep bass voice knocked this cut out of the box# respect --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-maxxx/support

Aced Out Podcast
Ep 27: Patryce “Choc'let” Banks! [GRAHAM CENTRAL STATION]

Aced Out Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 106:50


visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more“Keepin that funk alive, to me, there's no more of an important mission.” So declares PATRYCE “CHOC'LET” BANKS, cofounder of one of the most important bands in all of funk history: Graham Central Station. “That's my mission,” she promises. “To keep the funk alive until the wheels fall off.” And she has been doing just that ever since the formation of the band's classic lineup with her former boo, uber innovative Sly & the Fam bassist Larry Graham, along with drummer Willie Wild, keyboardist Hershall Happiness, organist Robert “Butch” Sam, & guitarist David Dynamite. Together they hit the ground running from the jump. Word got out immediately that the band was superbad—folks would even get dressed up just to check out their rehearsals! Their constant practicing and performing at spots like the Orphanage in San Francisco led to the creation of their groundbreaking self-titled debut—(Choc'let's personal favorite). Yet even the most diehard funkateers might not realize that, before it was called Graham Central Station, the band was originally called HOT CHOC'LET, formed as a project for her to get down with while Larry was on the road. But after Graham had finally decided to relinquish his Family Stone membership, he joined the group, which then became his namesake. Choc'let wasn't mad about the new moniker, though. “I was with it because… how could you go wrong with Larry Graham in the group?” she says. “I think it was even my idea maybe a little bit.” Graham's breaking away from the Sly camp meant GCS could seriously get to work. “We would rehearse all the time,” remembers Choc'let. “Almost every night… And we were just getting tighter and tighter.” And audiences were easily falling in love with the band's celebratory intensity. “The music that we played was deeply infused with gospel music,” she confirms. “So that gave it the feeling of a revival… because of the way that it makes you feel and the way it gets you caught up.” In fact, audience members from San Francisco to Philly to D.C. would bring tambourines, whistles, and whatever percussion instrument they could find so they could get in on the action. “They'd be playing along with us,” she says. Choc'let's latest appearance on Aced Out—her third—is a superfunk extravaganza. In addition to another great interview, she performs not one, but TWO Bay Area funk classics live in the studio with Jay, Ace and other members of the Funkanauts fam. And in case you were wondering, the answer is yes—she brought her Rhythm King aka F-U-N-K Box. In this back-to-to school, in-person interview, Choc talks about why she thinks Sly was a better bandleader than Larry, the highs and lows of her reunion tour with GCS in the mid-90s, and why she dislikes the album version of “I Can't Stand the Rain.” She also reveals how Willie and Hershall originally came up with “The Jam” at rehearsal, how she recruited her old friend Butch to join the group, and why the Bay Area brand of funk has never been duplicated. an Issac Bradbury Production © 2022visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2276: Charlie Ingui of The Soul Suvivors ~ "Expressway to Your Heart", Philadelphia International's #1 Major Music Hit Breakthru Pt 1

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 43:41


Gamble & Huff, Philadelphia International Rock & Soul Classic  Charlie Ingui,  Original Lead Vocalist still records & tours  go check him out! ~ thesoulsurvivors.comR.I.P. Ritchie Ingui, original vocal half of the Soul Survivors. He transitioned in early 2017.Original group member Kenny Jeremiah Transitioned in December of 2020. Memorable Intro, AWESOME Classic Hit, a Kenny Gamble &Leon Huff hit that Helped launch the Legendary Philadelphia International Record Label. I am a Music Lover of All Styles, Generations. This Week I Flashback....... The Soul Survivors, originally from New York City, grew up listening to the R & B groups of the 1950's. The sounds of groups like the Moonglows, Heartbeats, and Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers had a great influence on brothers Charlie and Rich Ingui. With various street corner groups, they developed their vocal skills. While in high school, Charlie joined the vocal group from Queens, N.Y. the Dedications. When, a year later the group's lead singer decided to leave, brother Rich was recruited. While performing at clubs in the New York area, they found themselves at the mercy of various house bands and decided to find a group of musicians who would become permanent members of the group therefore creating a self contained unit. The group would be renamed THE SOUL SURVIVORS. Shortly thereafter, the group began to build a strong following, playing venues in Atlantic City and Philadelphia. Enjoying great success in Philadelphia, they attracted the attention of record producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Into the recording studio they went, emerging with " Expressway To Your Heart " a song that would climb to #3 on Billboard's R&B chart and #4 on it's Top 100 list. The success of " Expressway " became Gamble and Huff's first "crossover" hit when it began to be played on both black and white radio stations. It's success enabled Gamble and Huff to reach the large audiences they sought in order to bring their " Sound Of Philadelphia " to the mass Market. In polls taken by both the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia's City Paper, " Expressway" was voted the number one record ever to come out of Philadelphia. "Expressway " was followed by two other chart records, "Explosion In My Soul" and " Mission Impossible". Their first album, released in 1968, was " When The Whistle Blows ". A second LP, on Atco Records, called "Take Another Look" appeared in 1969. During this time, the group toured extensively throughout the U.S. appearing with many different types of artists...everyone from Jackie Wilson, Smokey Robinson and The Miracles to Janis Joplin, the Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield, Sly and the Family Stone and countless others. In 1974, the Soul Survivors reunited with Gamble and Huff to record their self titled album "The Soul Survivors" on TSOP Records. It was written and performed in a style that would define the unique sound of The Soul Survivors.The album produced "City Of Brotherly Love" which would show up on Billboard's R&B Top 100 and become the group's fourth charted outing. Through the years, the Soul Survivors have continued to provide audiences with high energy performances and music that is timeless and authentic ,appearing with 60's contemporaries Felix Cavaliere's Rascals. the Turtles,the Association, as well as fellow TSOP artists Harold Melvin's Bluenotes,Billy Paul, the Intruders, Russell Thompkins' Stylistics and others. The group's CD is called " Heart Full of Soul ", produced by Grammy nominated producers Jimmy Bralower and Johnny Gale.The Soul Survivors recorded new music and covers several years ago, most recently working with David Uosikkinen of The Hooters and his project "In the Pocket" which is paying tribute to the vast catalog of music created in Philadelphia.© 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS 

ON THE LAM WITH MARC FENTON
#29 YOUR SUMMER PLAYLIST IS HERE: HITS, SHOULD’VE BEENS, SONGS YOU LOVE TO MAKE THE SEASON EVEN BETTER

ON THE LAM WITH MARC FENTON

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 132:58


(INTRO) THEME TO A SUMMER PLACE - Percy Faith and His Orchestra, SUMMER IN THE CITY - The Lovin' Spoonful, SUMMER SAMBA (SO NICE) - Astrid Gilberto, A SUMMER SONG - Chad and Jeremy, HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME - Sly and the Family Stone, THE SUMMER - Yo La Tengo, EVERYTHING IS SUNSHINE - The Hollies, GROOVIN' - The Young Rascals, FOURTH OF JULY - Dave Alvin, MAIS QUE NADA - Sergio Mendes & Brazil 66, LONG HOT SUMMER - The Style Council, HOT CHILD IN THE CITY -  Nick Gilder, THAT SUMMER FEELING - Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers, PETER GUNN - Duane Eddy, HOW BIZARRE - OMC, CALIFORNIA SUN - The Rivieras, SUNNY AFTERNOON - The Kinks, SUMMERTIME - Ella Fitzgerald/Louis, CRUEL SUMMER - Bananarama, SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER - The Happenings, THE SHADOW OF YOUR SMILE - Astrud Gilberto, 96 DEGREES IN THE SHADE - Third World, DANCING IN THE STREETS - Martha and the Vandellas, I NEED LOVE - Luka Bloom, SUMMER FLING - K.D. Lang, ISLAND IN THE SUN - Weezer, GIRL FROM IPANEMA - Antonio Carlos Jobim, DON'T WORRY BABY - The Beach Boys, UP ON THE ROOF - The  Drifters, I WAS MADE FOR SUNNY DAYS - The Weepies, THE TIDE IS HIGH - Blondie, THE 59TH STREET BRIDGE SONG - Simon & Garfunkel, RIDIN' IN MY CAR - NRBQ, CAN I KICK IT - A Tribe Called Quest, SOUTH WIND OF SUMMER - The Flatlanders, THE SUMMER WIND - Frank Sinatra    

RiYL
Episode 531: Joan Osborne

RiYL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 39:02


Fresh off the release of a new record and suddenly unable to tour, Joan Osborne got the work. The musician dug through the closets in her Brooklyn home, pulling together live recordings from across her 30-year career. The resulting compilation, Radio Waves, paints the picture of an evolving artist often paying homage to the decades' most influential artists, from Sky and the Family Stone to Bob Dylan. It's a nice reminder of precisely how electric and essential live performances are, in an era when everything ground to a complete halt. Back on the road, Osborne took a moment to discuss her work from her early days as a NYU film student with a penchant for nightclub singing to 2020's Trouble and Strife, a biting repudiation of American political collapse. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Herstory
The Brass Section - Trumpeters

Herstory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 48:00


Let's give a shoutout to the brass section. We love that these women get to toot their own horns. Amy talks about one of the founding members of Sly and the Family Stone, Cynthia Robinson. Shelby discusses the first female trumpet player in a well-known orchestra, Susan Slaughter. Intro Song: What I Do by Kristy Krüger © ℗Just Like Freddy Music ASCAP Instagram: herstorythepodcast  

Icons and Outlaws
Michael Jackson Part 2

Icons and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 80:04


Part 2 When Thriller was released in November 1982, it didn't seem to have a single direction. Instead, it arguably sounded like many singles. But it became apparent that this was precisely what Michael intended Thriller to be: a brilliant collection of songs meant as hits, each designed for a particular audience in mind. Michael put out "Billie Jean" for the dancers and "Beat It" for the rockers and then followed each jam with amazing videos to enhance his allure and his inaccessibility. These songs had a life of their own. Thriller was almost called “Star Light”. The lyric "thriller" in the track of the same name was originally "star light". The decision to change it was down to marketing appeal.    This wonderful article from Rolling Stone says: "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" had the sense of a vitalizing nightmare in its best lines ("You're stuck in the middle/And the pain is thunder. … Still they hate you, you're a vegetable. … They eat off you, you're a vegetable"). "Billie Jean," in the meantime, exposed how the interaction between the artist's fame and the outside world might invoke soul-killing dishonor ("People always told me, be careful of what you do. … 'Cause the lie becomes the truth," Jackson sings, possibly thinking of a paternity charge from a while back). And "Beat It" was pure anger – a rousing depiction of violence as a male stance, a social inheritance that might be overcome. It also almost caught the studio on fire. When Eddie Van Halen recorded his solo, the sound of his guitar caused one of the studio speakers to catch fire. The video for “Beat It” was set in Los Angeles' Skid Row and featured up to 80 real-life gang members from the notorious street gangs the Crips and the Bloods. It cost $100,000 to make.   Thriller's parts added up to the most improbable kind of art – a work of personal revelation that was also a mass-market masterpiece. It's an achievement that will likely never be topped. It was the best-selling album worldwide in 1983 and became the best-selling album of all time in the U.S. and the best-selling album of all time worldwide, selling an estimated 70 million copies. It topped the Billboard 200 chart for 37 weeks and was in the top 10 of the 200 for 80 consecutive weeks. It was the first album to produce seven Billboard Hot 100 top-10 singles. Thriller is still the highest-selling album of all time. Want to know what the top 25 are? Subscribe to our Patreon for our video bonus on the top-selling albums ever! Billie Jean was the first video by an African-American artist to air on MTV. The video revealed Jackson's new look of a leather suit, pink shirt, red bow tie and his signature single white glove. It was a style copied by kids throughout the United States. It caused one school, New Jersey's Bound Brook High, to ban students from coming to class wearing white gloves.   Toto members Keyboardist Steve Porcaro co-wrote Human Nature, and Steve Lukather contributed rhythm guitar on Beat It.   On March 25, 1983, Jackson reunited with his brothers for Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, an NBC television special. The show aired on May 16 to an estimated audience of 47 million and featured the Jacksons and other Motown stars. Jackson had just performed a medley of greatest hits with his brothers. It was exciting stuff, but for Michael, it wasn't enough. As his brothers said their goodbyes and left the stage, Michael remained. He seemed shy for a moment, trying to find words to say. "Yeah," he almost whispered, "those were good old days. … I like those songs a lot. But especially—" and then he placed the microphone into the stand with a commanding look and said, "I like the new songs."  Then, wearing a white glove decorated with rhinestones, he swooped down, picked up a fedora, put it on his head with confidence, and vaulted into "Billie Jean." He also debuted his moonwalk dance (which became his signature dance). This was one of Michael's first public acts as a star outside and beyond the Jacksons, and it was startlingly clear that he was not only one of the most breathtaking live performers in pop music but that he could mesmerize the audience, something not seen since the likes of Elvis Presley. Michael had initially turned down the invitation to the show, believing he had been doing too much television. But at the request of Motown founder and Icon Berry Gordy, he performed in exchange for an opportunity to do a solo performance. And he killed it.    "Almost 50 million people saw that show," Michael wrote in his book Moonwalk. "After that, many things changed." At this time, Michael Jackson was obviously an immensely talented young man – he seemed shy but ambitious and undoubtedly enigmatic. Nobody knew much about his beliefs or sex life; he rarely gave interviews, but he also didn't land himself in scandals. He did, however, describe himself as a lonely person – especially around the time he made Off the Wall. Former Los Angeles Times music critic Robert Hilburn recently wrote of meeting Jackson in 1981, when the singer was 23, that Jackson struck him as "one of the most fragile and lonely people I've ever met … almost abandoned. When I asked why he didn't live on his own like his brothers, instead of remaining at his parents' house, he said, 'Oh, no, I think I'd die on my own. I'd be so lonely. Even at home, I'm lonely. I sit in my room and sometimes cry. It is so hard to make friends, and there are some things you can't talk to your parents or family about. I sometimes walk around the neighborhood at night, just hoping to find someone to talk to. But I just end up coming home.'"   Jackson's social uneasiness was probably formed by the wounds in his history; the children were insulated from others their age, and Jackson's status as a lifelong star may have left him feeling not just cut off from most people but also alienated from them – as if his experience or his vocation made him extraordinary. "I hate to admit it," he once said, "but I feel strange around everyday people." Not exactly an unusual sentiment for some highly celebrated celebrities, especially former child stars. At the same time, it's a statement full of signals: Michael didn't enjoy the sort of company that might guide him in positive ways. He probably never did throughout his life. Maybe the most troubling passage in his autobiography Moonwalk is when he talks about children in the entertainment world who eventually fell prey to drugs: "I can understand … considering the enormous stresses put upon them at a young age. It's a difficult life."   Thriller placed seven singles in Billboard's Top 10 (presently around 50 million copies). At the 1984 Grammy Awards, Michael finally claimed his due, capturing eight awards, a record he holds with the band Santana, including Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, Best Rock Vocal Performance for "Beat It," Best R&B Song, and Best R&B Vocal Performance for "Billie Jean," and he won an award for the E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial storybook. In addition, the album won Producer of the year (Quincy Jones).    At the 11th Annual American Music Awards, Michael won another eight awards and became the youngest artist to win the Award of Merit. He also won Favorite Male Artist, Favorite Soul/R&B Artist, and Favorite Pop/Rock Artist. "Beat It" won Favorite Soul/R&B Video, Favorite Pop/Rock Video, and Favorite Pop/Rock Single. In addition, the album won Favorite Soul/R&B Album and Favorite Pop/Rock Album. Thriller's sales doubled after releasing an extended music video, Michael Jackson's Thriller, seeing Michael dancing with a group of incredibly designed zombies and was directed by John Landis.   Michael had the highest royalty rate in the music industry at that point, with about $2 for every album sold (equivalent to $5 in 2021). The same year, The Making of Michael Jackson's Thriller, a documentary about the music video, won a Grammy for Best Music Video (Longform). At this time, The New York Times wrote, "in the world of pop music, there is Michael Jackson, and there is everybody else."   Oddly enough, On May 14, 1984, then-President Ronald Reagan gave Michael an award recognizing his support of alcohol and drug abuse charities.   In November 1983, Michael and his brothers partnered with PepsiCo in a $5 million promotional deal that broke records for a celebrity endorsement (equivalent to $13,603,408 in 2021).  On January 27, 1984, Michael and other members of the Jacksons filmed a Pepsi commercial. Pyrotechnics accidentally set Jackson's hair on fire during a simulated concert before a whole house of fans, causing second-degree burns to his scalp. Michael underwent treatment to hide the scars and had his third rhinoplasty shortly after. Pepsi settled out of court, and Jackson donated the $1.5 million settlement to the Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, California; its now-closed Michael Jackson Burn Center was named in his honor. Michael signed a second agreement with Pepsi in the late 1980s for $10 million. The second campaign covered 20 countries and provided financial support for Jackson's Bad album and the 1987–88 world tour.  He was making SO much money and was the most significant music star globally.   Then, months later, it was announced that Michael would be setting out on a nationwide tour with the Jacksons. He didn't want to do it but felt obligated. Clearly, Michael was bigger, better, and "badder" than his family's limitations on him. He should have been taking the stage alone at this point in his career.   Jackson's aversion to the Victory Tour was apparent when he sat looking miserable at press conferences.   The Victory Tour of 1984 headlined the Jacksons and showcased Michael's new solo material to more than two million Americans. Following the controversy over the concert's ticket sales, Jackson donated his share of the proceeds, an estimated $3 to 5 million, to charity. What controversy, you ask?    Don King (yeah, boxing promoter Don King), Chuck Sullivan, and Papa Joe Jackson came up with a way to generate extra money from ticket sales. Those wanting to attend would have to send a postal money order for $120 ($310 in current dollars) along with a particular form to a lottery to buy blocks of four tickets at $30 apiece (US$78 in 2021 dollars), allegedly to stop scalpers. Upon receipt, the money was to be deposited into a standard money market account earning 7% annual interest; it would take six to eight weeks for the lottery to be held and money to be refunded to those that didn't win. Since only one in ten purchasers would win the lottery and receive tickets, there would be more money in the bank for that period than there were tickets to sell, and they expected to earn $10–12 million in interest. Obviously, the Jacksons were all for the idea, but Michael wasn't, and he warned them that it would be a public relations disaster. The $30 ticket price was already higher than most touring acts (like Prince and Bruce Springsteen) were charging at the time and was even worse by the requirement to buy four. This put tickets out of reach of many of Michael's African-American fans who were not financially secure. At this time, Michael was already being blasted about his physical look and music separating him from his race.  That community was joined by many commentators in the media in criticizing the Jackson's over the plan. Nevertheless, it worked, and people were lining up to get their newspapers to sign up for the lottery. On July 5, 1984, after receiving a letter from eleven-year-old fan Ladonna Jones, who accused the Jacksons and their promoters of being "selfish and just out for money," Michael held a press conference to announce changes in the tour's organization and also to announce that his share of the proceeds from the tour would be donated to charity. Jones later received VIP treatment at the Dallas concert. The following is Michael's speech at the press conference: "A lot of people are having trouble getting tickets. The other day I got a letter from a fan in Texas named Ladonna Jones. She'd been saving her money from odd jobs to buy a ticket, but with the turned tour system, she'd have to buy four tickets and she couldn't afford that. So, we asked our promoter to work out a new way of distributing tickets, a way that no longer requires a money order. There has also been a lot of talk about the promoter holding money for tickets that didn't sell. I've asked our promoter to end the mail order ticket system as soon as possible so that no one will pay money unless they get a ticket. Finally, and most importantly, there's something else I am going to announce today. I want you to know that I decided to donate all my money I make from our performance to charity. There will be further press statements released in the next two weeks."   Some procedures were modified; however, the ticket price remained unchanged, and at a press conference, Don King justified the $30 fee as appropriate and that he did not blame the promoters for charging that price, adding that "you must understand, you get what you pay for." During the last concert of the Victory Tour at the Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Jackson announced his split from The Jacksons during "Shake Your Body".   His charitable work continued with the release of "We Are the World" (1985), co-written with future Icon Lionel Richie, which raised money for the poor in the U.S. and Africa. It earned $63 million (equivalent to $158,728,032 in 2021) and became one of the best-selling singles, with 20 million copies sold. It won four Grammy Awards in 1985, including Song of the Year for Michael and Lionel as its writers.    Michael collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney in the early 1980s and learned that Paul was making $40 million a year from owning the rights to other artists' songs. By 1983, Michael had begun buying publishing rights to others' songs, but he was careful with his purchases, only bidding on a few of the dozens offered to him. Michael's early buys included Sly and the Family Stone's "Everyday People" (1968), Len Barry's "1–2–3" (1965), Dion DiMucci's "The Wanderer" (1961), and "Runaround Sue" (1961).   In 1984, it was announced that the publishing rights to nearly 4000 songs from ATV Music, including most of the Beatles' material, were coming up for sale. In 1981, Paul McCartney was offered the catalog for £20 million ($40 million). Michael submitted a bid of $46 million on November 20, 1984. When Michael and Paul were unable to make a joint purchase, McCartney did not want to be the sole owner of the Beatles' songs, and did not pursue an offer on his own. At first, Michael's team couldn't figure it out and walked away, but then they heard someone else was looking to buy them. Michael's increased bid of $47.5 million (equivalent to $119,675,897 in 2021) was accepted because he could close the deal faster. His purchase of ATV Music was finalized on August 10, 1985.   So, at this time, why was Michael being questioned about his look and his music? As a child, Michael had a sweet, dark-skinned appearance; many early Jackson 5 fans regarded him as the cutest of the brothers. J. Randy Taraborrelli, author of Michael Jackson: The Magic and the Madness, has written, "[Michael] believed his skin… 'messed up my whole personality.' He no longer looked at people as he talked to them. His playful personality changed, and he became quieter and more serious. He thought he was ugly – his skin was too dark, he decided, and his nose too wide. It was no help that his insensitive father and brothers called him 'Big Nose.'" Also, as Jackson became an adolescent, he was horribly self-conscious about acne. Hilburn recalled going through a stack of photos with Jackson one night and coming across a picture of him as a teenager: "'Ohh, that's horrible,' [Jackson] said, recoiling from the picture."   The face Jackson displayed on the cover of Thriller had changed; the skin tone seemed lighter and his nose thinner and straighter. In his book, Moonwalk, Michael claimed that much of the physical overhaul was due to a change in his diet; he admitted to altering his nose and chin, but he denied he'd done anything to his skin. Still, the changes didn't end there. Over the years, Michael's skin grew lighter and lighter, his nose tapered more and more, and his cheekbones became more defined. This all became fair game for mockery to some; to others, it seemed like mutilation – not just because it might have been an act of conceit, aimed to keep him looking child-like, but worse because some believed Michael wanted to transform himself into a white person. Or an androgyne – somebody with both male and female traits.  Michael's art was still his best way of making a case for himself at that time. Then, in 1987, he released Bad, his highly-anticipated successor to Thriller. It may not have been as eventful and ingenious as Off the Wall and Thriller, but Bad was awesome.    It became the first album to produce five U.S. number-one singles: "I Just Can't Stop Loving You," "Bad," "The Way You Make Me Feel," "Man in the Mirror," and "Dirty Diana.", which you can hear our version at the end of this episode. Another song, "Smooth Criminal," peaked at number seven. Bad won the 1988 Grammy for Best Engineered Recording – Non-Classical and the 1990 Grammy Award for Best Music Video, Short Form for "Leave Me Alone". Michael won an Award of Achievement at the American Music Awards in 1989 after Bad generated five number-one singles, became the first album to top the charts in 25 countries, and the best-selling album worldwide in 1987 and 1988. By 2012, it had sold between 30 and 45 million copies worldwide. Oh, and it was considered a "flop." Oh, and The title track for the Bad album was supposed to be a duet with Prince. But the latter walked away from it due to the opening line "Your butt is mine". "Now, who is going to sing that to whom? Cause [he] sure ain't singing that to me, and I sure ain't singing it to [him]," Prince said in a TV interview with American comedian Chris Rock.   Later that year, Michael staged his first solo tour, The Bad World Tour. It ran from September 12, 1987, to January 14, 1989. The tour had 14 sellouts in Japan and drew 570,000 people, nearly tripling the previous record for a single tour. In addition, the 504,000 people who attended seven sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium set a new Guinness World Record.   In 1988, Michael released the autobiography, as mentioned earlier, Moonwalk. It sold 200,000 copies and reached the top of the New York Times bestsellers list. In October, Michael released a film, Moonwalker, which featured live footage and short films starring himself and Goodfella star Joe Pesci. In the U.S., it was released direct-to-video and became the best-selling videocassette. The RIAA certified it as eight-time platinum. In March 1988, Jackson purchased 2,700 acres (11 km2) of land near Santa Ynez, California, to build a new home, Neverland Ranch, at $17 million (equivalent to $38,950,760 in 2021).   In 1991, Michael renewed his contract with Sony for $65 million (equivalent to $129,317,127 in 2021), a record-breaking deal. Also, in 1991, he released his eighth album, Dangerous, co-produced with Mr. Rumpshaker himself, Teddy Riley. It was certified eight times platinum in the U.S., and by 2018 had sold 32 million copies worldwide. In the U.S., the first single, "Black or White," was the album's highest-charting song; it was number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for seven weeks and achieved similar chart performances worldwide, and the video featured a very young Macauley Culkin.  The second single, "Remember the Time," peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, and that video featured Eddie Murphy. At the end of 1992, Dangerous was the best-selling album worldwide and "Black or White" the best-selling single of the year worldwide at the BillboardMusic Awards.   Obviously, Michael wanted to tour in promotion of his latest album, and The Dangerous World Tour ran between June 1992 and November 1993 and grossed $100 million (equivalent to $187,583,506 in 2021); Jackson performed for 3.5 million people in 70 concerts, all of which were outside the U.S. A part of the proceeds went to the Heal the World Foundation. In addition, Michael sold the broadcast rights of the tour to HBO for $20 million, a record-breaking deal that still hasn't been broken.   Also, in 1993, Michael performed at the Super Bowl 27 halftime show in Pasadena, California. The NFL wanted a prominent musical artist to keep ratings high during halftime. It was the first Super Bowl where the halftime performance drew higher audience figures than the game. Jackson played "Jam," "Billie Jean," "Black or White," and "Heal the World." Dangerous rose 90 places in the album chart after the performance   In January 1993, Michael won three American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Album (Dangerous), Favorite Soul/R&B Single ("Remember the Time"), and he was the first to win the International Artist Award of Excellence. In addition, he won the "Living Legend Award" at the 35th Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles in February. He attended the award ceremony with Brooke Shields. In addition, "Dangerous" was nominated for Best Vocal Performance (for "Black or White"), Best R&B Vocal Performance for "Jam," and Best R&B Song for "Jam."   In June 1995, Michael released the double album HIStory: Past, Present, and Future, Book I. The album debuted at number one on the charts and certified for eight million sold in the U.S. It is the best-selling multi-disc album of all time, with 20 million copies (40 million units) sold worldwide. In addition, HIStory received a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year. The first single from HIStory was "Scream/Childhood." "Scream" was a duet with Michael's youngest sister Janet, or "Miss Jackson if you're nasty." The single reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and received a Grammy nomination for "Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals." Also, at the time, in 1995, it was the most expensive music video ever produced. It had a budget of 7 million dollars. FOR ONE VIDEO!!  His second single, "You Are Not Alone," holds the Guinness world record for the first song to debut at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In addition, it received a Grammy nomination for "Best Pop Vocal Performance" in 1995.   In November of the same year, Michael merged his ATV Music catalog with Sony's music publishing division, creating Sony/ATV Music Publishing. He kept ownership of half the company, earning $95 million upfront (equivalent to $168,941,909 in 2021) and the rights to a ton more songs.   Michael promoted HIStory with the obviously named HIStory World Tour, from September 7, 1996, to October 15, 1997. He performed 82 concerts in five continents, 35 countries, and 58 cities to over 4.5 million fans, making it his most attended tour. It grossed $165 million, or $302,346,462 today.   In 1997, Michael released Blood on the Dance Floor: HIStory in the Mix, which contained remixes of singles from HIStory and five new songs. Worldwide sales stand at 6 million copies, making it the best-selling remix album ever. It reached number one in the U.K., as did the title track. In the U.S., the album reached number 24 and was certified platinum. Yeah, a remix album going platinum.   From October 1997 to September 2001, Michael worked on his tenth solo album, Invincible, which cost $30 million to record! Invincible was released on October 30, 2001. It was his first full-length album in six years and the last album of original material he would release in his lifetime. It debuted at number one in 13 countries, sold eight million copies worldwide, and went double platinum.   In September 2001, Michael performed in two "30th Anniversary concerts" with his brothers for the first time since 1984. The show also featured Mýa, Usher, Whitney Houston, Destiny's Child, Monica, Liza Minnelli, and Slash.    On January 9, 2002, Michael won his 22nd American Music Award for Artist of the Century.   On November 18, 2003, Sony released Number Ones, a greatest hits compilation. It was certified five-times platinum by the RIAA, and nine times platinum in the UK, for shipments of at least 2.7 million units.   During this time, allegations of child sexual abuse, and the trials that followed, were all over the news. If you're unfamiliar, you can research it for yourself.  Unfortunately, Michael's finances were also coming undone; he had been spending ludicrous sums, and he'd mismanaged his money – which took some doing since he had made such a vast fortune. As a result, the biggest star in the world had fallen from the tallest height. He left the country and moved to Bahrain, where it was announced that Jackson had signed a contract with a Bahrain-based startup, Two Seas Records; nothing came of the deal, and Two Seas CEO Guy Holmes, later said it was never finalized. That October, Fox News reported that Michael had been recording at a studio in County Westmeath, Ireland. It was unknown what he was working on or who had paid for the sessions; his publicist stated that he had left Two Seas by then. After that, Michael was only occasionally seen or heard from. Nobody knew whether he could recover his name or preserve his undeniable music legacy until he announced an incredibly ambitious series of 50 concerts – which he described as the "final curtain call."    The "This Is It" shows were his first significant concerts since the HIStory World Tour in 1997. Michael suggested he would retire after the shows. The initial plan was for 10 concerts in London, followed by shows in Paris, New York City, and Mumbai. Randy Phillips, president, and chief executive of AEG Live, predicted the first 10 dates would earn Jackson £50 million, or close to 63 Million US dollars. After record-breaking ticket sales, the London shows were increased to 50 dates; over one million tickets were sold in less than two hours. The concerts were to run from July 13, 2009, to March 6, 2010. Michael moved back to Los Angeles, where he rehearsed in the weeks leading up to the tour under the direction of choreographer Kenny Ortega, whom he had worked with during his previous tours. Most rehearsals took place at the Staples Center, which was owned by AEG.   It's hard to believe that Jackson, who was so proud of his public performances and so peerless at delivering them, would have committed himself to a project he might fail so tremendously. At the same time, it is not inconceivable that Michael Jackson could have been a man half-hungry and broken in the past few years. All that is certain is that on June 25, in Los Angeles, Michael Jackson met the only sure redemption he might know in the most famous unexpected, and mysterious death in current history. That redemption didn't come because he died, but because his death forced us to reconsider what his life added up to. Less than three weeks before the first This Is It show was due to kick off in London, with all concerts sold out, I repeat; sold out, Michael Jackson died from cardiac arrest caused by a propofol and benzodiazepine overdose. Conrad Murray, his personal physician, had given Michael different medications to help him sleep at his rented mansion in Holmby Hills, Los Angeles. Paramedics received a 911 call at 12:22 pm Pacific time and arrived three minutes later. He wasn't breathing, and the medics performed CPR. Resuscitation efforts continued en route to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and for more than an hour after Michael's arrival, but were unsuccessful, and Michael Jackson, the king of pop, was pronounced dead at 2:26 pm.   News of his death spread quickly online, causing websites to slow down, crash from user overload, and put unprecedented strain on services and websites, including Google, AOL Instant Messenger, Twitter, and Wikipedia. Overall, web traffic rose by between 11% and 20%. MTV and BET aired marathons of Michael's music videos, and specials aired on television stations worldwide. MTV briefly returned to its original music video format, which is messed up that it took an Icon to die for MTV to actually be MUSIC TELEVISION, and they aired hours of Michael's music videos, with live news specials featuring reactions and interviews from MTV personalities and other celebrities.   His memorial was held on July 7, 2009, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, preceded by a private family service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park's Hall of Liberty. Over 1.6 million fans applied for tickets to the memorial; the 8,750 recipients were drawn at random, and each received two tickets. The memorial service was one of the most-watched events in streaming history, with an estimated US audience of 31.1 million and an estimated 2.5 to 3 billion worldwide. Mariah Carey, Stevie Wonder, Lionel Richie, Jennifer Hudson, and others performed at the memorial, and Smokey Robinson and Queen Latifah gave eulogies. Reverend Al Sharpton received a standing ovation with cheers when he told Michael's children: "Wasn't nothing strange about your daddy. It was strange what your daddy had to deal with. But he dealt with it anyway." Michael's 11-year-old daughter Paris Katherine, wept as she addressed the crowd. Michael's body was entombed on September 3, 2009, at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.   Oh, but wait. There's more. But of course there is. It's Michael Jackson!   His doctor was initially charged with involuntary manslaughter and was found guilty. So he was sentenced to four years. Yep... four friggin years.    After his death, Michael was still winning awards. He won 4 awards at 2009's AMA's, bringing his total AMA wins to 26, something no one else has touched.    The documentary "Michael Jackson's This Is It" came out shortly after, and I have seen it and loved it, as sad as it was knowing that he'd never get to perform those concerts. Despite a limited two-week engagement, the film became the highest-grossing documentary or concert film ever, with more than $260 million worldwide earnings.

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Shadow // Yaddo
Summer Break!

Shadow // Yaddo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 11:55


We're incredibly grateful to all who've listened and contributed to our “little podcast that could,” which began in September 2020 and now has listeners on every continent! Before we take a short summer break, we put together a highlight reel with a few favorite moments. See you in August for more Shadow // Yaddo! Contributing artists: Joseph Keckler, Sly and The Family Stone, Lauren Groff, Sheila Heti, Sarah Manguso, John Sims, Lynn Freed, Marianne Boruch, Doug Wright, James Lapine, Patricia Towers and David Sedaris.

TotemTalks
Season 4 Episode 20: TotemTalks is Everyday People!

TotemTalks

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 76:33


Welcome in to another episode of TotemTalks! We may be winding down the season, but we are certainly not winding down the THRILLING action! In today's episode, we start by hiding At Large with the Kingston Trio, we learn A Whole New Thing with Sly and the Family Stone, and we join the Lemon Parade with Tonic! Plus, find out what Nick did to THREATEN the very nature of this show forever! YOU WON'T BELIEVE IT! Enjoy! TotemTalks is a music podcast dedicated to breaking down a variety of musical artists in fun and educational ways. If that sounds interesting to you, please check it out! And if you enjoy listening, be sure to let us know by using #totemtalks, and following us on our Social Media! Peace and Love! Facebook: facebook.com/lowtotemband Instagram: low_totem Twitter: low_totem Website: lowtotemband.com Become a Member of Team Totem here: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support

Icons and Outlaws
Michael Jackson Pa