Podcasts about My Best Friend

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Best podcasts about My Best Friend

Latest podcast episodes about My Best Friend

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
How NY Times Bestselling Horror Writer Grady Hendrix Writes

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 36:21


Award-winning, New York Times bestselling author and screenwriter, Grady Hendrix, spoke with me about getting serious about horror, turning genre tropes on their head, and his latest “How to Sell a Haunted House.” Grady Hendrix is an award-winning novelist, screenwriter, and journalist best known for My Best Friend's Exorcism (adapted into a feature film by Amazon Studios), and the New York Times bestsellers The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires, and The Final Girl Support Group. His latest is How to Sell a Haunted House, an #1 Indie Next List pick, described as a “...novel that explores the way your past—and your family—can haunt you like nothing else.” The New York Times called it a “…gripping, wildly entertaining exploration of childhood horrors,” and Esquire called it “... an authentically frightening, genuinely funny reconfiguration of what a haunted house can be.” New York Times bestselling author Chuck Wendig said of the book, “A spirited nightmare story about death, but also, what comes after: grief, guilt, family secrets, and estate administration. Oh, also, did I mention the evil puppets?”  Grady Hendrix's work is currently in multiple phases of adaptation at HBO and others, for both feature film and streaming. [Discover The Writer Files Extra: Get 'The Writer Files' Podcast Delivered Straight to Your Inbox at writerfiles.fm] [If you're a fan of The Writer Files, please click FOLLOW to automatically see new interviews. And drop us a rating or a review wherever you listen] In this file Grady Hendrix and I discussed: How his novel about a haunted Scandinavian furniture store launched his fiction career Perseverance and writing what you know Stripping down the horror genre to its core The importance of sucky drafts  Why haunted house stories are always about families And a lot more! Show Notes: How to Sell a Haunted House by Grady Hendrix (Amazon) Grady Hendrix Amazon Author Page Gradyhendrix.com The Smell of Fear - How To Sell A Haunted House Candle Grady Hendrix on Facebook Grady Hendrix on Twitter Kelton Reid on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Smart Social Podcast: Learn how to shine online with Josh Ochs
Day-by-day technology decisions: MomTalk podcast

Smart Social Podcast: Learn how to shine online with Josh Ochs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 22:56


Resources in this podcast: AI Writing Tools for Students: Jasper AI, Chat GPT, and More (A Guide for Parents): https://smartsocial.com/post/ai-writing-toolsCan I Share My Password with My Best Friend? https://smartsocial.com/post/password-sharing-student-safetyBest Password Manager for Families: https://smartsocial.com/post/password-managerLife360 App: What Parents Need to Know: https://smartsocial.com/post/life360-appWatch all the MomTalk episodes here: SmartSocial.com/post/momtalkJoin the conversation: https://smartsocial.com/contactLearn from more SmartSocial resources: Join our free newsletter for parents and educators: https://smartsocial.com/newsletter/Register for a free online Parent Night to learn the hidden safety features on popular apps: https://smartsocial.com/social-media-webinar/Become a Smart Social VIP (Very Informed Parents) Member and unlock 30+ workshops (learn online safety and how to Shine Online™): https://learn.smartsocial.com/Download the free Smart Social app: https://smartsocial.com/appLearn the top 150 popular teen apps: https://smartsocial.com/app-guide-parents-teachers/View the top parental control software: https://smartsocial.com/parental-control-software/Learn the latest Teen Slang, Emojis & Hashtags: https://smartsocial.com/teen-slang-emojis-hashtags-list/Get ideas for offline activities for your students: https://smartsocial.com/offline-activities-reduce-screentime/Get Educational Online Activity ideas for your students: https://smartsocial.com/online-activitiesUltimate Guide To Child Sex Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sextortion, & Online Enticement

This is Paris
This is… Jax

This is Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 32:48


Jax and Paris have some history together and they're here to tell it all and name names. Plus get to the real Jax by hearing her inspirational story as well as the details behind “My Best Friend's Ass.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Like a Virgin
Snort Dance Fuck

Like a Virgin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 44:49


Fran & Rose discuss The Last Movie Star, Julia Roberts, her laugh, her hair and her oeuvre: from My Best Friend's Wedding to her literally small role as Tinkerbell in Hook to Erin Brockovich to Eat, Pray, Love is she the last movie star? tag our finsta @likeavirgin42069See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Best Friend’s an Engineer
53. HOW TO START A PODCAST: Lessons Learned from 1 Year of Podcasting

My Best Friend’s an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 42:00


My Best Friend's an Engineer is 1!! Tune into this episode to hear all of the tips and tricks that you need to know to start a podcast. After posting a weekly podcast for a year, BFE Podcast gals, Lexi and Libby, share all the in's and out's of starting a podcast. If you're looking for everything you need to know to start a podcast, from equipment to editing software, you need to listen to this episode. This Episode Covers: Equipment that you need to start a podcast What brand microphone to get to start a podcast What editing software to use to edit a podcast The soft skills you need to have to start and maintain a podcast How to bring guests onto a podcast Lessons learned from the first year of podcasting Be sure to leave a 5-star rating and review, and complete the google form below, to be entered in our $100 visa gift card giveaway! THE GOOGLE FORM! FREE Access to Templates: https://forms.gle/9rVaUVzXSrLRduBBA BFE Podcast Private Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1171370850336662/?ref=share My Best Friends an Engineer INSTAGRAM: @mybestfriendsanengineer Lexi's INSTAGRAM: @engineerlexi Libby's INSTAGRAM: @libbybonthelabel Lexi's TIKTOK: @engineerlexi Libby's Tiktok: @libbybonthelabel My Best Friends an Engineer YOUTUBE: @BFEpodcast

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 266: The Art of Making Horror Comedies with Damon Thomas

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 50:18


Damon Thomas is well known for making documentaries. He's documentaries includes Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs and David Beckham: A Footballer's Story. He also directed the hit shows Killing Eve (2018), Beethoven (2005) and Dracula (2020). His latest film "My Best Friend's Exorcism" is a 2022 American supernatural comedy horror film from a screenplay by Jenna Lamia, based on the 2016 novel of the same name by Grady Hendrix. In 1988 best friends Abby and Gretchen navigate boys, pop culture and a paranormal force clinging to Gretchen. With help from a mall exorcist, Abby is determined to compel the demon back to the pits of hell -- if it doesn't kill Gretchen first.The film stars Elsie Fisher, Amiah Miller, Cathy Ang and Rachel Ogechi Kanu. The film was released on Prime Video on September 30, 2022.]Enjoy my conversation with Damon Thomas.

Live From Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show
The Many Faces of Rose Abdoo: A Career in Comedy and Acting

Live From Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 53:57


From performing with Second City alongside comedy legends to bringing her unique voice to hit shows like 'Curb Your Enthusiasm' and 'Gilmore Girls,' Rose Abdoo has made a name for herself as a talented actress and improviser. Get to know the woman behind the roles and discover the inspiring journey that led her to success. My guest, Rose Abdoo and I discuss: Explore Rose Abdoo's Michigan roots and her time at Michigan State University, where a dislike of long lines led her to take theater classes. Discover how Rose joined the Second City improv troupe in Chicago, performing alongside comedy greats such as Mike Myers, Steve Colbert, and Amy Sedaris. Learn about Rose's experience working with the late Chris Farley at Second City, including their iconic "Whale Boy" sketch. Find out how Rose landed an early role on Robert Zemeckis' TV show "Johnny Bago," and her later work on "The Grinder" with Rob Lowe and Fred Savage. Hear about Rose's time on "Curb Your Enthusiasm," including her use of her mother as inspiration for her characters. Discover how Rose's ability to improvise helped her secure lines in her role in "My Best Friend's Wedding," and learn more about her humorous husband and his website, matanapkin.com. Learn about Rose's experience working with George Clooney in his directorial debut, "Good Night, and Good Luck," and her portrayal of real-life person Mili Lerner. Find out how self-tapes led to roles on "Young Rock" and "Ghosts," and how recovering from appendix cancer influenced her guest spot on "Parenthood." Hear about Rose's work with Barbara Streisand on "The Guilt Trip" and her memorable role as Selma on the Hulu show "Reboot." Learn about Rose's role as Josefina on the Amazon Prime show "Hacks," and her recognition for her work on "That's So Raven" and "Gilmore Girls." You're going to love my conversation with Rose Abdoo IMDBD Instagram Matta Napkin Follow Jeff Dwoskin: Jeff Dwoskin on Twitter The Jeff Dwoskin Show podcast on Twitter Podcast website Podcast on Instagram Yes, the show used to be called Live from Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show BIO: Rose Abdoo is a Michigan-born actress and improviser best known for her roles on popular TV shows such as "Gilmore Girls," "Curb Your Enthusiasm," and "Reboot." She began her career with the Second City improv troupe in Chicago, performing alongside comedy heavyweights such as Mike Myers, Steve Colbert, and Amy Sedaris. In addition to her successful acting career, Rose is also a skilled voice actor and has lent her talents to numerous animated series. Throughout her journey, she has used her natural wit and humor to bring life to a wide range of characters and continue to entertain audiences around the world.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Java with Juli
#230: Juli and Linda Answer Your Questions on Marriage

Java with Juli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 32:50


Juli Slattery opens the Authentic Intimacy inbox and tackles questions like: Should my spouse be my best friend? What do you do when your husband can't stop looking at porn? And, did God create sex primarily for men? Co-hosts: Linda Dillow and Yvette Maher Show notes: Juli's blog series on prioritizing sexual intimacy. My Husband Isn't My Best Friend (read the blog) or (listen to the podcast) Join an online book study

Night of the Living Podcast: Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Film Discussion
My Best Friend's Exorcism and Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Night of the Living Podcast: Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Film Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 70:42


2023 Staff Picks! The Main Attraction is Kelley's pick Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Andy reviews My Best Friend's Exorcism for Straight-to-Video Russian Roulette.    Brought to you ad-free by the Legion of Demons at patreon.com/notlp. Join the Legion to get more stuff at patreon.com/notlp! Our Beelzebub tier producers are:   Alise Kombrinck Ernest Perez Jeremy, Cassie & Gamora Burmeister Jeff L Iona Goodwin Branan & Emily Intravia-Whitehead Bill Chandler Blayne Turner Monica Martinson Paul Gauthier Brian Krause Alyssa Boehm Dave Siebert Dustin & Ace Chisam Joe Juvland Additional financial contributions by Amy & Freddy Morris “Monster Movies (with My Friends)” was written and performed by Kelley Kombrinck. It was recorded and mixed by Freddy Morris. Night of the Living Podcast's chief contributors are:  Andy Hung Kelley Kombrinck  Amy Morris Freddy Morris The podcast is produced and engineered by Amy & Freddy Morris.  Night of the Living Podcast Social Media:      facebook.com/notlp twitter.com/notlp instagram.com/nightofthelivingpodcast youtube.com/notlpcrew Connect with other listeners in the Facebook Group or on Reddit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/notlp https://www.reddit.com/r/NOTLPodcast

The Ghoul Gang
New Year, Same Ghouls: 2022 Horror Roundup

The Ghoul Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 78:05


Happy Ghoul Year! As the premiere of M3GAN and Jen Shah's prison sentencing hearing loom brightly on the horizon, Grace and Caroline are back from their respective holiday vaycays refreshed, relaxed and ready to talk through the best and worst horror content they consumed in 2022. Asides range from 2022's best Twitter moments to an exploration of niche true crime podcast drama and a quick turn into the Moscow Murders insanity. Fer auld lang syne, m'ghouls.  Grace's Picks: WORST: Matriarch, Halloween Ends, Grimcutty, The Watcher, Umma BEST: Barbarian, Stranger Things, Captive Audience, The Patient, My Best Friend's Exorcism Caroline's Picks: WORST: Halloween Kills, Men, Grimcutty, Dash Cam, Old BEST: Channel Zero: No End House, Yellowjackets, Severance, Hellraiser, Nope Do you have a topic suggestion for an upcoming episode or a scary story to share with the Ghouls? Drop us a line at ghoulgangpodcast@gmail.com or hit us up on on Twitter (@ghoulgangpod666) or Instagram (@ghoulgangpodcast). And don't forget to head on over to ghoulgangpodcast.bigcartel.com and order some Ghoul Gang merch! 

PodQuest
PodQuest 437 – Sonic Frontiers, more Mega Man X, and Best of 2022

PodQuest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 102:41


It's the last PodQuest of 2022! This week Chris talks a bit about Sonic Frontiers, Walnut runs into some trouble with Mega Man X3, and we run down our personal favorite things from the past year. Chris also talks a bit about the film My Best Friend's Exorcism, and Walnut primes us for a talk about the Free to Play game Dualyst II next week. The post PodQuest 437 – Sonic Frontiers, more Mega Man X, and Best of 2022 first appeared on One-Quest.com.

One-Quest
PodQuest 437 - Sonic Frontiers, more Mega Man X, and Best of 2022

One-Quest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 102:41


It's the last PodQuest of 2022! This week Chris talks a bit about Sonic Frontiers, Walnut runs into some trouble with Mega Man X3, and we run down our personal favorite things from the past year. Chris also talks a bit about the film My Best Friend's Exorcism, and Walnut primes us for a talk about the Free to Play game Dualyst II next week. Our next book club topic is the 1993 film Jurassic Park, available on HBO Max. We'll be discussing it on our January 5th episode! Timestamps 00:00:00 - Intro 00:05:47 - Agenda 00:06:16 - Sonic Frontiers 00:23:55 - Pokemon Sidetrack 00:28:23 - Mega Man X3 00:47:25 - My Best Friend's Exorcism (2022) 00:51:47 - Our Best of 2022 Lists 01:34:57 - Dualyst II chat coming next week 01:40:51 - Outro Support One-Quest https://www.Patreon.com/OneQuest Follow Us Email - Social@one-quest.com Twitter - @One_Quest Instagram - @One_Quest Facebook - OneQuestOnline Follow Chris on Twitter - @Just_Cobb Follow Richie on Twitter - @B_Walnuts Follow Drootin on Twitter - @IamDroot Intro and Outro music Mega Man 2 'Project X2 - Title Screen' OC ReMix courtesy of Project X over at OCRemix

My Best Friend’s an Engineer
51. How to Prepare for a Successful New Year | Habits and Routines for 2023

My Best Friend’s an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 46:30


How the heck is it already 2023?! Listen to this episode to get inspired for how to plan for your new year. The BFE Podcast girls talk all things habits and routines in this episode. Lexi and Libby reflect on the habits and routines that they had in 2022 and share what worked and what didn't work for them. They also share tips for how to implement new habits and routines in 2023 so that you can have your best year yet. HEADS UP: There will not be an episode next week due to the holiday. Enjoy some intentional time with your loved ones and we will catch you in the new year for an exciting new episode! Thanks for an awesome year of My Best Friend's an Engineer (: This Episode Covers: Wrapping up EOY projects and commitments What a SMART Goal is How to set realistic goals for the new year Recommendations for how to track your goals Habits and routines that worked for Lexi and Libby 3 Actionable tips for how to create a new habit An overview of the book, Atomic Habits, by James Clear Be sure to leave a 5-star rating and review, and complete the google form below, to be entered in our $100 visa gift card giveaway! THE GOOGLE FORM! FREE Access to Templates: https://forms.gle/9rVaUVzXSrLRduBBA BFE Podcast Private Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1171370850336662/?ref=share My Best Friends an Engineer INSTAGRAM: @mybestfriendsanengineer Lexi's INSTAGRAM: @engineerlexi Libby's INSTAGRAM: @libbybonthelabel Lexi's TIKTOK: @engineerlexi Libby's Tiktok: @libbybonthelabel My Best Friends an Engineer YOUTUBE: @BFEpodcast

We Will Rank You
Queen's Greatest Hits ranked

We Will Rank You

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 145:18


WE WILL WE WILL…. What's your most loved and least favorite song on 1981's Queen Greatest Hits?! Adam came up with a fun way to finally talk about our namesake song: kicking off a four-episode series of Greatest Hits episodes! You'll never guess where we ranked WWRY. It's only the best-selling album in UK history. You've probably never heard of it. Shockingly, none of us are huge fans, despite having so many fun stories and opinions that this became our longest show to date! One of us even needed to be reminded that they worked for Queen's record label. Three of us went to high school with guest ranker Ken Dow, who shared his amazing Queen For A Day tale with us. Finally, Adam got his old neighbor, Eber Lambert, to chat about producing another Jewish Adam from California: Queen's lead singer. Hear it at WeWillRankYouPod.com, Apple, Spotify, Youtube and your local Stomp Stomp Clap Stadium. Follow us and weigh in with your favorites on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @wewillrankyoupod . FILE UNDER/SPOILERS: Greatest Hits, Another One Bites the Dust, Freddie Mercury, Radio Gaga, Live Aid, Bohemian Rhapsody, Jellyfish, Tie Your Mother Down, harmonies, Crazy Little Thing Called Love, Wayne's World, Dragon Attack, harmonies, Killer Queen, Brian May, arena rock, News of The World, Fat Bottomed Girls, Chic, Bicycle Race, Roger Taylor, Under Pressure, John Deacon, We Will Rock You, Adam Lambert, We Are the Champions, Ken Dow, Flash, Jason Falkner, Somebody to Love, the Locust, You're My Best Friend, David Bowie, Keep Yourself Alive, Eber Lambert, Play the Game, 1981. US: http://www.WeWillRankYouPod.com wewillrankyoupod@gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/WeWillRankYouPod http://www.instagram.com/WeWillRankYouPod http://www.twitter.com/WeWillRankYouPo http://www.YourOlderBrother.com (Sam's music page) http://www.YerDoinGreat.com (Adam's music page) https://open.spotify.com/user/dancecarbuzz (Dan's playlists)

Off the Paige
Episode 29 (My Best Friend's Exorcism): A Child of God

Off the Paige

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 74:57


In this week's episode, Paige, Maribeth, and TDB Faith discuss the novel and subsequent film My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix. This story focuses on the best friendship between Abby and Gretchen and how their relationship is ultimately put to the test when Gretchen becomes possessed by a top 70 demon in satan's army. Down but never out, this tale presents the many ways in which Abby fights to bring the person she knows still has to be in Gretchen's body to the forefront - even as the demon puts her and those around her through hell. Throughout their discussion, Paige, Maribeth, and TDB Faith discuss what they did and did not like about the book as well as their own memories from childhood and beyond. Be sure to follow us on Instagram @offthepaigewithMB --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/offthepaige/support

S.H.U.D.cast
Demons and Demons

S.H.U.D.cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 140:08


We all may be in the thick of our holiday merriment, but we've got some Halloween closure to tend to (as if it ever really closes). There is an extensive list of titles that we all watched before this episode which we think makes for a pretty killer group of recommendations! And then after all of that, we head back to a country and filmmaking family near and dear to our demonic hearts – Italy. Or Germany? But maybe American? Who knows… That's correct, we're back with the Bavas and Argentos for a devilish double feature of DEMONS & DEMONS 2! 00:00 - 19:30ish Intros - We discuss our mixology talents (or lack thereof), we show you how to blind click into our podcast on your phone, how Elon Musk is an actual fool (are there Elon stans out there? Are you surprised we think he's dumb?), stuff we did in spooky season, and Be-WAUGH-nd Fest (Curtis' birthday film festival extravaganza! He even put together a trailer for it which is so painfully Curtis it hurts and you can check it out HERE).   19:30ish - 1:13:30ish - What we watched this time (be warned, it was spooky season, but there's a hell of a list here if you need recs!): Cody - Thor Love and Thunder, Black Panther Wakanda Forever (Also Lucas – and Cody and Mattie finished their Marvel rewatch, what can we say?), Spider-Man & Spider-Man 2, Halloween Ends (we all saw it!), Hocus Pocus 2 (all of us!), Dracula (‘31), King Kong (‘33), Phantom of the Opera (‘43), Orphan, Orphan First Kill, Elvira: Mistress of the Dark, Little Shop of Horrors (‘86), The Wolf Man (‘41), Smile (and Lucas), Terrifier, Terrifier 2 (and Curtis and Austin!), Spookies, Street Trash, Bloody Muscle Body Builder in Hell, My Best Friend's Exorcism, Deadstream (and Lucas and Curtis!), Night of the Demon (‘57), Tarantula (‘55), The Omen (‘76), The Orphanage, Gozu, Let the Right One In, A Tale of Two Sisters, The Haunting (‘63), Re-Animator, The Devil's Backbone, November, Nazareno Cruz y El Lobo, This Night I'll Possess Your Corpse, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, The Man Who Laughs, Dracula (Spanish), Hubie Halloween (and Curtis!), Rosemary's Baby, Cabin in the Woods, House of 1,000 Corpses, The VVitch, Mr. Vampire, Werewolf by Night (and Curtis!), Fearless Vampire Killers, and the BeWAUGHnd Fest screenings of The Guest, Scream 2, Road House, and Near Dark (w/ Curtis and Lucas), Bones and All (and Curtis!). Lucas - Barbarian. Curtis - Halloween 4, I Know What You Did Last Summer, The Curse of Frankenstein, Horror of Dracula, Dracula A.D. 1972, Halloween III, Hell House LLC, Blair Witch, Black Adam, Hellraiser (‘87), Death Becomes Her, Poltergeist (‘82), Rob Zombie's Halloween II, Resurrection, Banshees of Inisherin, and Everything Everywhere All At Once. Austin - The Descent, Army of Darkness, Jennifer's Body, Guillermo del Toro's Cabinet of Curiosities, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters, The Exorcist, Nope, Drag Me To Hell, John Carpenter's Vampire, and Bodies Bodies Bodies.   1:13:30ish - 2:04:10ish DEMONS & DEMONS 2 - SHUDdown and discussion.   2:04:10ish - End - Our next movie!

Story & Craft with Marc Preston
Dane Cook | Breathe & Believe

Story & Craft with Marc Preston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 67:34


On this episode of The Story & Craft Podcast, we sit down with actor and comedian, Dane Cook. Few comedians have reached his level of rockstar status. Beyond memorable comedy concerts, his on-camera work includes films such as Waiting, Planes, Dan in Real Life, Good Luck Chuck, Employee of The Month and My Best Friend's Girl. He's got a new comedy special called Above it All. We chatted about the show, as well as his first appearance on Saturday Night Live, living in John Belushi's old apartment, a secret Betty White shared with him, the Zen of Myspace and more! Dane has an intriguing journey and story to share, as well as an magnetic energy and vibe that always inspires.

The Horror Returns
THR Ep.#340 - Barbarian / Pearl / Terrifier (2022)

The Horror Returns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 81:35


This week, we are joined by filmmaker Gabriel Theis to catch up on some movies from the current year. We cover Barbarian, Pearl, and Terrifier 2. We also discuss Gabriel's film, The Curse of Professor Zardonicus, which you can catch streaming on Tubi, VOD, or on Blu-ray now. Cool of the Week includes The Fabelmans, The Watcher, My Best Friend's Exorcism, and Anne Rice's Interview With the Vampire. The podcast spotlight shines on Horror For Dummies and Not That Bad. Thanks for listening!

Musiques du monde
#SessionLive avec Seb Martel et le projet Saturn 63, 100% guitare

Musiques du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 48:30


À l'occasion de la sortie de Saturn 63, Seb Martel est l'invité de la #SessionLive pour raconter sa folle aventure parmi les guitares de collection au Musée de la musique à Paris. Une idée court dans le parcours et la discographie de Seb Martel, l'un des guitaristes les plus passionnants et néanmoins méconnus de la scène hexagonale. Cette idée, c'est qu'un instrument peut, et doit, continuellement réinventer une musique, déployer de nouvelles textures, amener de nouvelles nuances. C'était évident dans ses albums enregistrés en solitaire : Ragalet en 2003, Coitry? en 2007. C'était perceptible dans ses productions collectives (Vercoquin, Olympic Gramofon, Las Ondas Marteles) ou ses expériences en tant que musicien de studio (pour -M-, Alain Chamfort, Femi Kuti ou Camille). C'est tout aussi frappant à l'écoute de son nouvel album, Saturn 63, nommé en référence au dernier modèle de guitare électrique découvert lors d'une collaboration avec le Musée de la Musique. Ce troisième long-format, ouvertement porté sur l'expérimentation, est effectivement le fruit d'une longue réflexion, rendue possible à la faveur d'une collaboration entre la Philharmonie de Paris et InFiné : entamée avec «InBach» d'Arandel, celle-ci se poursuit aujourd'hui à travers un disque entièrement pensé à la guitare, un instrument relativement peu mis en avant au sein du catalogue du label français. Pendant plusieurs mois, Seb Martel a ainsi eu accès à la fastueuse collection de guitares électriques abritée par le Musée de la Musique. Là, laissé seul dans ces couloirs remplis à ras-bord d'instruments d'une grande rareté, et donc précieux, le Français a pu puiser dans les sonorités d'autres époques, d'autres continents, s'émanciper des formes convenues, bondir d'un genre à l'autre et s'associer à d'autres passionnés de la six-cordes. C'est ainsi qu'on retrouve -M-, jamais le dernier pour délaisser le format radio et aller vers des chemins moins balisés ; Vincent Ségal, dont l'éclectisme et le sens de l'exploration sonore n'est plus à prouver ; Mathieu Boogaerts, toujours partagé entre son goût pour la chanson et l'artisanat, mais aussi Martin Gamet, repéré chez Camille. La présence de ses nombreux invités ne doit pas faire oublier la belle et grande ambition de Seb Martel : mettre en lumière les nombreuses guitares qui peuplent l'obscurité des sous-sols du musée, des plus prestigieuses exhibées en vitrines aux plus humbles, en passant par les plus mal-en-point. Chaque son, chaque rythme, chaque texture de Saturn 63 provient ainsi de ces guitares, manipulées et triturées dans l'idée d'élargir les perspectives, de tourner le dos au confort des mélodies rapidement identifiables et de convoquer tout ce qu'il a pu jouer, écouter, apprendre, penser et ressentir en trente années de pratiques et de projets en tout genre. Rappelons que Seb Martel, né en 1975, s'est vu offrir sa première guitare par son père. Il avait 17 ans et se découvrait alors une passion, un perfectionnisme et des perspectives, alternant les œuvres musicales et les projets transversaux (pour du théâtre ou de la danse, notamment). Depuis, ce qu'il cherche à démontrer semble pouvoir tenir en trois points. Tout d'abord, par un procédé aussi audacieux qu'admirable : que la pratique de la guitare se doit d'être rythmée par des conceptions contrastées et exploratrices. « Comment réinventer la mélodie ? », questionnent en creux les quatorze compositions réunies sur Saturn 63. Le deuxième point est celui de la liberté. Il en a fait une ligne de vie, une ligne de fuite. Tout au long de ces cinquante minutes, le Français passe allégrement du rock à la musique industrielle, de la relecture de classiques d'Elvis Presley («Blue Suede Shoes») à des incartades pop du plus bel effet («My Best Friend»), sans se soustraire une seconde au cadre rigide des barrières stylistiques. La dernière question que pose Saturn 63, c'est celle de la filiation. Derrière la recherche de sonorités inédites, il n'est finalement question que de ça : l'héritage, tout ce legs laissé par ces guitares, chargées d'histoire et pourtant dénuées de toute nostalgie lorsqu'elles sont entre les mains d'un amoureux de la mélodie tel que Seb Martel. «Cet album n'existe que grâce à l'aide des équipes du Musée de la Musique, précise Alexandre Cazac, co-fondateur d'InFiné. Elles ont su réunir les conditions pour que Seb Martel puisse venir découvrir, puis essayer toutes les guitares du musée, mais aussi celles, nombreuses, qui sont cachées au fin fond des réserves.» Tout se passe en réalité comme si celles-ci n'avaient jamais pris la poussière, comme si la singularité de leur son était mise au service d'une ambition plus grande encore, en équilibre stable entre dissonances et richesse instrumentale, entre délicatesse et prouesses techniques, entre minimalisme et mélodies savamment orchestrées. Il faut donc savoir gré à Seb Martel d'avoir su maintenir une ligne cohérente entre ces multiples instruments et d'avoir capturé, sinon l'esprit, du moins l'ambiance de ces longues et méticuleuses semaines de recherche sans pour autant tendre vers l'abscons. Saturn 63, c'est une proposition musicale, humble et pourtant courageuse, chercheuse et pourtant accessible, mais c'est aussi et surtout l'œuvre d'un artiste qui est parvenu à mettre en forme une belle musicalité, sans prétention, ni snobisme. Pensons à Heavenly, sorte de complainte minimaliste portée par les murmures de Martin Gamet et le chant spectral de la talentueuse Sabrina Bellaouel. Pensons à Soul Kiss, une mélodie tout en contrastes, aussi épurée que saisissante, soyeuse que mélancolique : à chaque fois, il n'y a pas une seule note de trop, uniquement des pas de côté, effectués aux côtés d'interprètes de prestige (Cindy Pooch, Vic Moan, Camille), justement là pour harmoniser le propos, humaniser des intentions et des idées qui, chez d'autres, sonneraient indigestes. Il faut en effet écouter des titres comme Balulow, That Yongë Child  ou Blue Suede Shoes, nettement plus angoissante et redevable au blues que la version originale, pour mesurer la poésie des compositions de Seb Martel, jamais démonstratives, toujours expressives, perpétuellement sereines. Elles sont l'œuvre d'un artiste sensible, en quête d'épure, dont Saturn 63 vient cristalliser le savoir-faire musical en même temps que la capacité à faire naître des mélodies d'une extrême beauté, hors du temps et de ses emballements éphémères. La #SessionLive sera agrémentée d'interviewes d'Alexandre Girard-Muscagorry, conservateur au Musée de la Musique, Mr Martel père, Vincent Segal, violoncelliste, réalisées par Elodie Maillot. Titres interprétés au Grand studio - Seventy, Live RFI - Blue Suede Shoes, extrait de l'album Saturn 63 - My Best Friend, Live RFI voir le clip  - Trust, single Sabrina Bellaouel - Future Talk, extrait de l'album Saturn 63.   Line Up : Seb Martel, guitare, voix, Sabrina Bellaouel, chant Son : Jérémie Besset et Benoît Letirant. ► Album Saturn 63 (InFiné 2022).   EPK Saturn 63  Seb Martel à lire sur RFI Musique  Guitar Eros, film de Paul Ouazan.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago hollywood disney master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north record fame island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone vietnam matrix ocean tribute southern california catholic beatles mothers cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz elvis wizard finland rock and roll xmen pakistan bay area volunteers parks villains snacks garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern invention americana woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad elvis presley pink floyd newsweek belgians republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland rock and roll hall of fame miles davis peace corps spence lovin family tree triumphs buchanan carousel mixcloud tilt charlie chaplin san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt starship national endowment janis joplin headquarters ayn rand schmitt chaplin hippies slick monkees steely dan concierto bakersfield triad old west garfunkel rock music rca elektra runnin sketches buddy holly milne greenwich village white rabbit phil spector village voice get together haskell zappa byrds ravel spoonful levis jerry garcia david crosby heartbeats doris day jefferson airplane stranger in a strange land fillmore brian jones glen campbell george bernard shaw steve ditko bolero my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum superior court harry nilsson methuselah jacques brel judy collins sgt pepper ed sullivan show heinlein dryden tom wolfe buffalo springfield weavers bessie smith great society rca records robert heinlein objectivism jefferson starship altamont ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records grace slick san franciscan ditko carter family bluesman john sebastian tennessee georgia family dog abbie hoffman colonel tom parker bill thompson mercury records town criers roger mcguinn tommy oliver balin jorma charles lloyd fillmore east smothers brothers rickenbacker merry pranksters van dyke parks gary davis one flew over the cuckoo mystic arts hot tuna john wyndham milt jackson monterey pop festival jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon we built this city dave van ronk mothers of invention echoplex cass elliot monterey jazz festival mickey thomas yippies fillmore west slicks moby grape roy buchanan ian buchanan wellingtons jimmy brown jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin fred neil kantner casady surrealistic pillow all worlds jack casady blues project bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence john hammond jr billy roberts jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
The Grave Plot Podcast
Episode 207 – Barbarian/My Best Friend’s Exorcism

The Grave Plot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 173:26


Uhhhh this is your captain speaking uhhhh. We'll be taxiing the jetway for another few hours or so, uhhhh, this might be a good time to fire up the latest episode of the, uhhhh, Grave Plot Podcast. Up first is that good ol' fashioned Real World Horror, all about a group of Colombian school children who messed with a Ouija board and ended up sick and convulsing on the floor. In Horror Business, we talk about Paramount and Universal going all in on horror with new hires and a merger of genre giants. We also discuss new books based on the series Are You Afraid of the Dark? as well two small-screen horror prequels, namely Crystal Lake and Welcome to Derry. For our film reviews, we discuss the coming-of-age possession film My Best Friend's Exorcism, featuring Bash Howard as an 80s fitness guru for God as well as some teenage demon drama. Next up is Barbarian, a movie that will make you double check every inch of your next Airbnb. So as we come in for a landing, put on your sleep mask and fire up your headphones for a brand new episode of The Grave Plot Podcast.

Fictional Hangover
My Best Friend's Exorcism

Fictional Hangover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 109:34


“I will never give up because I want my friend back!”   In this episode of Fictional Hangover, Amanda and Claire talk about embarrassing realizations, power teams, their own exorcism rites, and grumpy Dobby the house elf in their discussion of My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix.

ON AIR with Ruben Jay
Replay: Friendsgiving (You're My Best Friend}

ON AIR with Ruben Jay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 48:55 Transcription Available


FOLLOW US ON YOUTUBE NOW TO HELP THE SHOW - https://www.youtube.com/c/MultiMediaMouth Follow Chase and Melody: @chasin_tomorrow + @melodynsparks + @sparks_sisters_music | Check out Chase's Bible study at The Mainplace Church: https://themainplace.com/live-stream/ | Support our podcast: https://amzn.to/32Aoat1 | Shop our “& Tacos” MERCH HERE: Tinyurl.com/shopbestfriends | Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/lifefriendshiptacos/ | ALL of our platforms: http://linktr.ee/bestfriendpodcast Happy Thanksgiving, everybody! How's your holiday week so far? This is the second Friendsgiving episode we've released (but the third we've recorded - but we don't talk about that…) We invited our friends Chase and Melody on the show to talk about their year, what's been crazy, what they've lost and come to appreciate anew. We hope you enjoy this special holiday show, with some spoilers at the end! Thanks for listening - leave us a review and let us know what you think of this week's episode on Facebook or Apple Podcasts! Follow ‘You're My Best Friend'” http://instagram.com/bestfriendpodcast http://facebook.com/thebestfriendshow https://lifefriendshiptacos.com Follow Moxy Anne: http://instagram.com/MoxyAnneMusic http://facebook.com/MoxyAnneMusic http://twitter.com/MoxyAnneMusic Follow Ruben Jay: http://twitter.com/therubenjay http://instagram.com/therubenjay http://facebook.com/therubenjay MultiMediaMouth Productions Follow MultiMediaMouth.com: http://twitter.com/multimediamouth http://instagram.com/multimediamouth http://facebook.com/multimediamouth

Welcome to Geekdom
My Best Friend's Exorcism

Welcome to Geekdom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 33:47


Travis Newton returns to discuss My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix. We talk about why we loved it, what we thought of the movie adaptation, and more.Follow Travis Newton on Instagram.Follow Deanna Chapman on Twitter and Instagram. ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Plug It Up
Solo-sode: Catching Up on Horror and True Crime

Plug It Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 18:21


Back with another solo episode! On this one I go over some of my recent horror watches, including Bodies Bodies Bodies, My Best Friend's Exorcism, Halloween Ends, and American Horror Story: New York City. I also talk about which horror movies I still need to see to round out 2022, some of which look great, and some of which give me pause. I also talk at length about the Dahmer series on Netflix and true crime as a genre in general. That's actually, like, half the episode - whoops! Keep an eye on the feed for more 2022 releases, coverage of classics, and a few holiday movies that fit Plug It Up's themes. The year's not over yet! 

How Success Happens
Dane Cook, Comedian and Actor, on Using Humor for Introspection

How Success Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 41:33


Dane Cook is a comedian and actor known for his comedy specials, stage presence, and observational humor. He has released five comedy specials and has appeared in movies such as “Good Luck Chuck,” “My Best Friend's Girl,” and “Dan In Real Life.” He was the second comedian, to sell out Madison Square Garden. Cook's upcoming comedy special, “Above It All,” was released this October via Moment, a digital platform for creators to develop unique ticketed experiences with audiences.

Entrepreneur Network Podcast
Dane Cook, Comedian and Actor, on Using Humor for Introspection

Entrepreneur Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 41:38


Dane Cook is a comedian and actor known for his comedy specials, stage presence, and observational humor. He has released five comedy specials and has appeared in movies such as “Good Luck Chuck,” “My Best Friend's Girl,” and “Dan In Real Life.” He was the second comedian, to sell out Madison Square Garden. Cook's upcoming comedy special, “Above It All,” was released this October via Moment, a digital platform for creators to develop unique ticketed experiences with audiences.

The Record Player
Where the Pyramid Meets the Eye (1990)

The Record Player

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 89:11


Author Grady Hendrix dropped in on The Record Player for what became one of our favorite chats to date. Where the Pyramid Meets the Eye: A Tribute to Roky Erickson is the album that Grady brought along to discuss with Jeff and Matt.Released in 1990, Where the Pyramid Meets the Eye features an all-star cast including R.E.M., the Jesus and Mary Chain, Poi Dog Pondering, John Wesley Harding, Julian Cope, ZZ Top, Bongwater, Butthole Surfers and many others. They all pooled their musical talents in support of Austin singer-songwriter Roky Erickson (13th Floor Elevators) who was dealing with hard times. The album helped to spark a renaissance for his career, with Erickson eventually making his return to recording and playing live. Producer Bill Bentley revisited his experiences of working on Where the Pyramid Meets the Eye in a 2017 article celebrating a vinyl release of the compilation. He went on to mount a second tribute to Erickson which was released on Light in the Attic in 2021.About Grady:Grady Hendrix used to be a journalist, which means that he was completely irrelevant and could be killed and turned into food at any time. He is one of the founders of the New York Asian Film Festival, but he is not responsible for the bad parts of it. For years he was a regular film critic for the New York Sun but then it went out of business. He has written for Playboy Magazine, Slate, The Village Voice, the New York Post, Film Comment, and Variety. He has a hard time making up his mind.He is very, very beautiful, but if you ever meet him, please do not let this make you uncomfortable. He does not judge.The New Yorker once ran a short profile of him, and this means that when the time comes and they are lining people up for the Space Arks he will be guaranteed a seat ahead of you.Okay, so you can read everything in full at Grady's website. He's a funny guy. A number of his books have been optioned for movies and television, including My Best Friend's Exorcism, which you can now watch on Amazon Prime and he's got a new book coming in early 2023, which we discuss briefly in our conversation.The Record Player:Please rate and review our podcast wherever you might be listening. It all helps and we appreciate your ears and thoughts!If you're enjoying these episodes, please consider joining our Patreon. Become a member of the Record Club to receive early access to our conversations, plus bonus interviews and additional materials related to the program. Thanks so much for your support!

Joe Watches 60 Christmas Movies in 60 Days
10 / My Best Friend's Christmas

Joe Watches 60 Christmas Movies in 60 Days

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 81:10


10. My Best Friend's Christmas If you're looking for a Christmas movie where a lady tries to destroy two lives, you'll love My Best Friend's Christmas (2019)! Ashley wants to get with her high school boyfriend. The problem is he's already in a relationship with someone. What should she do? Obviously, she should try over and over to make her ex fall for her and then kiss him in front of his girlfriend. Merry Christmas! Hear Joe get exceptionally mad at stupid mistakes in this, the tenth episode of JOE WATCHES 60 CHRISTMAS MOVIES IN 60 DAYS! Let Joe know if there's anyone's romantic life you want to destroy @joemoc on Twitter and Instagram!

Corpse Club
Episode 272: Halloween Hangover IV - Soupfest, THE LOST BOYS, MY BEST FRIEND'S EXORCISM

Corpse Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 73:24


It's "Halloween Hangover IV" on this episode of Daily Dead's official podcast! With another October coming to an end, listen as co-hosts Bryan Christopher and Derek Anderson reflect on some of their favorite Halloween season viewings and experiences, including Soupfest, a costume party, Halloween Ends, My Best Friend's Exorcism, and a theatrical screening of The Lost Boys!

Our Taste Is Trash
68. Movie Review: My Best Friend's Exorcism, Jade's Psychic Reading, and Horror Comedies

Our Taste Is Trash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:01


Happy Halloween! We review one of the newest Hulu Originals, "My Best Friend's Exorcism". Find out inside the episode if it's trash or treasure. We also discuss some of our favorite and slightly underrated horror comedies. Also, Jade reveals her absolutely unhinged psychic reading. Eat some candy and listen to us! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The New Flesh Horror Movies Horror Movie Podcast
Prey for the Devil, Run Sweetheart Run, The Lair

The New Flesh Horror Movies Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 88:53


31:55 PREY FOR THE DEVIL 51:15 RUN SWEETHEART RUN 1:08:40 THE LAIR On this week's episode of The New Flesh, Brett and Jesse tackle three movies because none of them are quite good enough to justify an entire main feed episode. PREY FOR THE DEVIL, a throwback 2010s-style PG-13 exorcism horror movie with a 2022 twist! RUN SWEETHEART RUN, a movie that debuted at Sundance in January 2020, was bought by Amazon, partially re-shot, and now debuting on Amazon Prime! THE LAIR, A Neil Marshall Movie, out now on VOD for rental. And the TERRIFIER 2 bonus episode will go live on the main feed this week, as the movie hits streaming TODAY and is now on Screambox. October is Patreon bonus awareness month, and we've got a lot planned. The New Fletch podcast is out now, as are these: Already up: Rob Zombie's The Munsters, Mr. Harrigan's Phone. Joe Avella on Terrifier 2. Deadstream and Significant Other. Hocus Pocus 2 and Spirit Halloween just went up. Coming Up: VHS 99, My Best Friend's Exorcism, The Devil's Workshop, House of Darkness, Bring It On Cheer or Die, and all the Guillermo Del Toro Netflix movies. Before that, tons of horror and movie industry news: Terrifier 2's insane box office run continues, Jigsaw returns in SAW X, NATTY KNOCKS, CLOWN IN A CORNFIELD, VENOM 3, and a Sydney Sweeney nunsploitation film. The New Flesh podcast is the best horror podcast about horror movies, scary movies, and all things tangentially related to horror, horror movies and the horror lifestyle. Horror franchises, new horror releases, and all the horror news and movie industry news that's fit to print! Subscribe to the New Flesh Patreon for weekly bonus content and more www.patreon.com/newfleshpodcast Subscribe to Brett's new show 'Roger and Me,' a show celebrating Roger Ebert through weekly rewatches of 'At The Movies' with Siskel and Ebert as well as a weekly round-up of reviews of all the new releases out in theaters. It's available wherever you listen to podcasts or you can watch the video feed on YouTube. Apple: apple.co/3PvqgA0 Spotify: spoti.fi/3Pyv1Zl YouTube: bit.ly/3PyD6gG Stitcher: bit.ly/3J5rS0L

Fishnet Flix
Designing Authentic '80s Looks With My Best Friend's Exorcism Costume Designer Ariyela Wald-Cohain

Fishnet Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 54:23


Happy Halloween! To celebrate, we have a bonus episode featuring costume designer Ariyela Wald-Cohain who's behind the looks for My Best Friend's Exorcism! Ariyela spills all of the costume design secrets for the movie, and what it was like designing a totally rad and totally authentic 1980s teen vibe, how she sourced a lot of the pieces and accessories from Etsy and Depop, plus fun Easter eggs to look for when you watch the film. Ariyela also talks about designing the iCarly reboot, Sherman's Showcase, Waitress, Insidious 3, and more. Tune in now, give her a follow, and put My Best Friend's Exorcism on your Halloween marathon list tonight, ‘cause if you love the ‘80s, friendship, and demons, you'll love this movie!  Follow Ariyela on Instagram! For visuals of the costumes, follow us on Instagram at @fishnetflixpod and TikTok @fishnetflix ! DM or email your movie requests at info@fishnetflix.com! We love hearing from you! Don't forget to rate, subscribe, and leave a review on iTunes and wherever you listen to the show! 

B Movies and Beyond!!!
295 - My Best Friend's Exorcism & Look Both Ways

B Movies and Beyond!!!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 23:03


In this episode of B Movies and Beyond, Peter is joined by his lovely wife, Danielle to fill in for Ryan why is out on assignment. They discuss her favorite scary movie, the trailer for Creed III, and Black Adam reviews. Movies reviewed are My Best Friend's Exorcism (2022) and Look Both Ways (2022). Enjoy!

Scene-It Movie Reviews
#073 | Black Adam, The School for Good and Evil & My Best Friend's Exorcism Movie Reviews

Scene-It Movie Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 199:54


Brooke and Quinton join Kova, Stephanie and Spoiler Steve  to discuss Prime Video's My Best Friend's Exorcism, Netflix's The School for Good and Evil and Black Adam! 00:01:19 – Intro | Smile, Spiral, Halloween Ends & The Box Office 00:23:25 – My Best Friend's Exorcism 00:58:56 – The School for Good and Evil 01:38:42 – The Banter Corner | Fifteen and Pregnant, Abbott Elementary, Black Mirror, House of the Dragon, Black Mirror, Oats Studios, Family Guy, SNL, Tár, Ticket to Paradise, Triangle of Sadness, The Peripheral, Werewolf By Night, Terrifier 2,The Circle, Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story and Friend of the Family 02:22:12 – Black Adam Support us on Patreon HERE **NEW SHOWS ARE COMING TO OUR PATREON** Read Stephanie's review of Top Gun: Maverick HERE Listen to Stephanie on the StarkCast here Listen to Spoiler Steve on the StarkCast here Listen to Kova on the StarkCast here Listen to our seventeenth episode of The Blindspot reviewing Donnie Brasco here Listen to our twenty-third episode of Back to the Movies covering the second and third acts of Catch Me If You Can here Listen to the sixth episode of Back to the Shire covering the third act of Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers – Extended Edition here Send us emails and feedback to info@sceneitcast.com Check out our website sceneitcast.com Check out Michael H. Cannon's work at @artildawn

The New Flesh Horror Movies Horror Movie Podcast

2:40 BLACK ADAM 39:40 BLACK ADAM CONTINUES On this week's episode of The New Flesh, Brett and Jesse are calling an audible to discuss Dwayne The Rock Johnson's BLACK ADAM aka TETH ADAM! The hierarchy of the D.C. universe just changed. Did you feel it? Brett and Jesse also recap the 7th Annual Brooklyn Horror Festival and what movies to look forward to. October is Patreon bonus awareness month, and we've got a lot planned. The New Fletch podcast is out now, as are these: Already up: Rob Zombie's The Munsters, Mr. Harrigan's Phone. Joe Avella on Terrifier 2. Deadstream and Significant Other. Coming Up: VHS 99, My Best Friend's Exorcism, Hocus Pocus 2, The Devil's Workshop, House of Darkness, Bring It On Cheer or Die, Spirit Halloween the movie Before that, tons of horror and movie industry news: Terrifier 2's insane box office run continues, The Conjuring 4, The Nun 2, David Gordon Green's The Exorcist starts shooting, Jordan Peele's Nope to Peacock, M3GAN release date shift. The New Flesh podcast is the best horror podcast about horror movies, scary movies, and all things tangentially related to horror, horror movies and the horror lifestyle. Horror franchises, new horror releases, and all the horror news and movie industry news that's fit to print! Subscribe to the New Flesh Patreon for weekly bonus content and more www.patreon.com/newfleshpodcast Subscribe to Brett's new show 'Roger and Me,' a show celebrating Roger Ebert through weekly rewatches of 'At The Movies' with Siskel and Ebert as well as a weekly round-up of reviews of all the new releases out in theaters. It's available wherever you listen to podcasts or you can watch the video feed on YouTube. Apple: apple.co/3PvqgA0 Spotify: spoti.fi/3Pyv1Zl YouTube: bit.ly/3PyD6gG Stitcher: bit.ly/3J5rS0L

The Bad Movies Podcast
#216 - My Best Friend's Exorcism

The Bad Movies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 74:49


A new book to screen review! My Best Friend's Exorcism was an incredibly fun novel that I thoroughly enjoyed. The movie, however, has been divisive to say the least. This week we'll try to determine what may have gone wrong or right in the adaptation process. Enjoy!    Featuring:   www.patreon.com/badmoviescast    Social Media:    Donate to support: https://secure.actblue.com/donate/ms_blm_homepage_2019   https://blackvotersmatterfund.org/take-action/    https://www.weareplannedparenthood.org/onlineactions/2U7UN1iNhESWUfDs4gDPNg2?sourceid=1000063&_ga=2.197280616.698543566.1656270013-678700622.1656270013  

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #534 - The Maestro of Head Trauma Returns

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 182:35


A chain-smoker loses his dark glasses and can't see, finds a guide in an escapee from Arkham named Josh. Together they will track down a dangerous producer who wishes to silence them. On Episode 534 of Trick or Treat Radio we are joined by regular guest of the show, Arkham Josh to discuss Dark Glasses, the latest film from Dario Argento streaming on Shudder! We also talk about yogurt association, the ending of one continuity, and we leave plenty of room for giallo! So grab your prescription lenses, be on the lookout for creepy white vans, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Dario Argento, Rock and Shock, MonstahXpo, Rough House Publishing, Brian Paulin, Morbid Vision Films, CJ Graham, Mark Patton, Patton and Patton, Eddie Vanhalla, Van Halen, Roni, Hellraiser, My Best Friend's Exorcism, yogurt association, GLOW, COVID killers, Las Vegas, Mindhunter, Lucky McKee, Old Man, Cobra Kai, The Secret of Skinwalker Ranch, Wellington Paranormal, Our Flag Means Death, She-Hulk, Andor, John Byrne, Werewolf By Night, Hawkeye, Squirrel Girl, Pip the Troll, Reservation Dogs, Atlanta, Black Friday, Megadeth, the ending of the old continuity, Franco Ferrini, Sergio Stivaletti, Giallo Biafra, Cemetery Man, Deep Red, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, The Cat o' Nine Tails, Four Flies on Grey Velvet, Phenomena, Inferno, Suspiria, Lucio Fulci, George Romero, Dawn of the Dead, Dark Glasses, Goblin, style vs substance, V/H/S/99, David Bruckner, Halloween Ends, Maniac Driver, Your Highness, Halloween 3: Season of the Witch, David Gordon Green, The Exorcist III, Strange Behavior, the best cinematic Halloween parties, Jimmy Olsen, EF's mind blowing revelation, Cenobites, Death by DVD, Ravenshadow's Spider-Man Lullaby, Watch/Skip+, GGTMC, chuffed, Jesus Christ Jiminy Olsen, and the next end of continuity. Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show