Podcasts about Homeland

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Concept of the place with which an ethnic group holds a long history and a deep cultural association

  • 1,560PODCASTS
  • 3,874EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST
Homeland

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Homeland

Show all podcasts related to homeland

Latest podcast episodes about Homeland

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
News from homeland 27.11.2021 - Novice iz Slovenije 27.novembra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 5:43


Listen to this week's news from Slovenia. - Prisluhnite novicam iz domovine.

Fuera de Series
Razones para ver... 'The Othe Two' en Comedy Central

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 21:53


C.J. Navas y Lorena Gil comentan 'The Other Two', la nueva serie de Comedy Central que se estrena el próximo martes 30 de Noviembre a las 23:50.

CooperTalk
William Sadler - Episode 884

CooperTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 62:24


Steve Cooper talks with actor William Sadler. William is best known for his roles as Heywood in The Shawshank Redemption, the Grim Reaper in Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey and Bill & Ted Face the Music, Jack McGarrett in Hawaii Five-0 and Jim Valenti in Roswell. He has also been seen in countless TV shows and movies including Die Hard 2, Iron Man 3, The Blacklist, Blue Bloods, Hunters, The Grudge, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Bull, Power, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Madam Secretary, The Flash, Homeland and many, many more. He also recently did voicework for the animated series Our Cartoon President.

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de Series del 26 de Noviembre de 2021

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 14:59


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión.Patrocinado por Hayu. Apúntate a la prueba gratuita sin compromiso en http://hayu.comSHOWNOTES:- Follow Up:- Noticias: - Nominaciones a los Feroz: https://www.informadoresdecine.es/ix-premios-feroz/ - Nueva serie de Sam Neil: https://deadline.com/2021/11/sam-neill-jurassic-park-the-twelve-australian-court-drama-series-1234880624/ - Ricky Gervais Boards TV Satire ‘Greenlight – German Genius' From WarnerMedia Germany: https://deadline.com/2021/11/ricky-gervais-tv-satire-greenlight-german-genius-warnermedia-germany-1234880651/ - Televisión Española coproduce la serie ‘Crossfire' con BBC https://www.audiovisual451.com/television-espanola-coproduce-la-serie-crossfire-con-bbc - El Top10 de Netflix: http://top10.Netflix.com - Trailers: - Primer avance de ‘Sentimos las molestias' con Antonio Resines y Miguel Rellán: https://fueradeseries.com/primer-trailer-de-sentimos-las-molestias-con-antonio-resines-y-miguel-rellan/ - Estrenos: - Gossip Girl en HBO Max - Super Crooks y F is for Family en Netflix - Viernes: Star Trek Discovery en Pluto.tv a las 21:00 - Domingo: Elfos, Venga Juan y Gloria- Buena noticia: - ‘Outlander': Starz Reveals Opening Titles For Season 6: https://deadline.com/2021/11/outlander-starz-opening-titles-season-6-1234879804/

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de Series del 25 de Noviembre de 2021

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 19:02


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión.Patrocinado por Hayu. Apúntate a la prueba gratuita sin compromiso en http://hayu.com- Follow Up: - Star Trek: Discovery podrá verse en España a través de Pluto.TV: https://intl.startrek.com/news/star-trek-discovery-season-four-lands-on-paramount-pluto-tv-internationally - Noticias: - Amazon y la Rueda del tiempo: ‘The Wheel Of Time' Makes Strong Debut As Amazon Prime Video Doubles Down On Genre With ‘Mass Effect' Adaptation & Prepares To Usher In ‘LOTR' – Deadline. 2 de Septiembre LOTR, cuya segunda temporada se rodará en UK. - ‘Billion Dollar Whale' Series Adaptation In Works From SK Global & Westward https://deadline.com/2021/11/billion-dollar-whale-series-adaptation-sk-global-westward-1234879245/ - ‘Super Pumped': Showtime Sets Premiere For Anthology Series From ‘Billions' Co-Creators: https://deadline.com/2021/11/super-pumped-showtime-premiere-date-trailer-series-joseph-gordon-levitt-1234879912/ - HBO Oral History Book Reveals ‘Game Of Thrones' Drama On & Off Screen – Deadline - ‘Hellbound' & ‘Arcane' Top Weekly Netflix Top Ten TV List https://deadline.com/2021/11/hellbound-arcane-top-netflix-top-ten-tv-lists-1234879851/ - El Top10 de Netflix: http://top10.Netflix.com - Trailers: - Estrenos: - The Beatles: Get Back, el documental de Peter Jackson - DMX: Don't Try to Understand, nuevo Music Box de HBO Max, sobre Earl “DMX” Simmons - El Corazón del Imperio - Corto De Menos de COSMO- Buena noticia: - ‘Agatha All Along', nominada a los Grammy: https://uproxx.com/music/wandavision-agatha-all-along-tv-show-grammy-nomination/

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 24 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 17:07


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión.Patrocinado por Hayu. Apúntate a la prueba gratuita sin compromiso en http://hayu.comShownotes:- Se ha muerto Miquel Barceló, responsable de Nova en impulsor de los premiso UPC https://www.xataka.com/literatura-comics-y-juegos/fallece-miquel-barcelo-fundador-coleccion-nova-ciencia-ficcion-ensayista-clave-para-genero-espana- Follow Up: Blade Runner - El Loto Negro está disponible en HBO Max- Noticias: - Martin Freeman vuelve a la televisión como un policía en Liverpool en ‘The Responder': https://fueradeseries.com/martin-freeman-vuelve-a-la-television-como-un-policia-en-liverpool-en-the-responder/ - El 7 de Marzo llegará la octava temporada de Outlander a Movistar+ - AMC Networks presenta su programación de Navidad. - Los movimientos de Hulu con el contenido de FOX Studios y el de NBCUniversal- Trailers: - Euphoria, estreno el 9 de Enero https://youtu.be/RPz_XktsEFE - Bel-Air, estreno en 2022 https://youtu.be/cKYfwATqaBc - Estrenos: - Ojo de Halcón - ‘Cousteau, pasado y futuro' - Ayer se estrenó la segunda parte de Masters of the Universe: Revelations- Buena noticia: - Hugh Dancy Joins ‘Law & Order', Anthony Anderson Set To Return For NBC Revival: https://deadline.com/2021/11/hugh-dancy-law-order-revival-anthony-anderson-reprise-role-kevin-bernard-1234879638/

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 23 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 16:18


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión.Patrocinado por Hayu. Apúntate a la prueba gratuita sin compromiso en hayu.com

Of Course.. They Make Me Crazy! The Trailer.
OMG That's Me! Living Life Like CRAZY!

Of Course.. They Make Me Crazy! The Trailer.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:03


Hey There! I’m April Norris. Thank you for joining me on the podcast Of Course, They Make Me Crazy! Joining me is Dave Mowry. He lives with bipolar disorder. He’s been a businessman, a politician, a peer support specialist, and a millionaire who lost it all. He went from being homeless in 1997 for a year to now a best-selling author in 2021. He’s also a comedian! His book is entitled OMG That's Me! It blossomed from blog posts he wrote about him living with bipolar. He quickly gained a huge following. Many of his fans would write him and say, “Omg that’s me you’re talking about!” That’s when he knew he had to write a book. His mission in life is to use humor to tell his story and shatter the stigma by making it comfortable to talk about the uncomfortable. He’s my kind of man! In this episode you will learn a new perspective about those who live with bipolar. If you’re having hard time caring for a loved one with bipolar, please listen to this. I know you need to laugh. And I know you’re hurting, and your stomach is in knots, and you feel it’s just not possible. But if Dave can find a little humor in all his pain, so can you. Laughing or even a little smile does your heart and soul good. Truthfully, I teared up listening to him talk because I know my bipolar mom who died 5 years ago would have loved his sick sense of humor. She and my grandma both had a twisted sense of humor which is where I get it from. LOL! I hope you enjoy this episode. Dave has comedy acts that he emailed to me. If you like what you hear today … just know I will be uploading more of his comedy in a couple of days. Dave has collaborated with international bestselling author Julie Fast on OMG That's Me! 2, and co-author of OMG That's Me! 3. So there’s more to come! Julie Fast was the original consultant for actress Claire Danes and her TV series Homeland on Showtime. You contact Dave by going to davemowry.com.

Fuera de Series
Fuera de Series - 22 de Noviembre de 2021

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 68:46


C.J. Navas repasa con Jorge Navas y Don Carlos la actualidad seriéfila de la semana.Patrocinado por Hayu. Apúntate a la prueba gratuita sin compromiso en hayu.com

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Think There's Nothing You Can Do to Keep the Bad Guys Out?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 53:45


Do You Think There's Nothing You Can Do to Keep the Bad Guys Out? What a week. The FBI got hacked. Homeland security supposedly is sending out emails about hackers in your network. This is what we're going to talk about to start with today. What are these new emails, and how are they trying to con you? [Automated Transcript Follows] This is a little bit concerning. We know that the FBI's email system got hacked. And for everyone sitting there saying, well, gee, if the FBI gets hacked, there's no way my business can survive an attack. Remember that the FBI is a huge, huge target. They have so many systems, so many people, and the bad guys really, really would love to send an email out as though they are the FBI. [00:00:49] And, they did, they used, they used the FBI's email servers to send out some of these fake emails. I thought that was kind of funny, but be that as it may, the FBI closed. But there are things you can do to protect yourself, to protect your email. And my wife and I have been working diligently on a guide. [00:01:13] Now, you know that I protect businesses. I work closely with the FBI, been doing cyber security for more than 30 years. I kind of hate to admit it. But, uh, you know, you know, I've been on the internet for more than 40 years. So I've been at this for a very, very long time and there are things you can do. So we're making available a guide. [00:01:38] So she's taken a lot of my teachings and is boiled it down. It looks like it's going to be 25 ish pages. And it's just the essential things, the primary things that you can do. To stop your email from getting hacked, your bank accounts, et cetera. There are some pretty simple things you can do. So we're putting that together, and we're also putting together a Bootcamp and both of these are free. [00:02:07] Okay. Absolutely free. And in the bootcamp, again, this book isn't about selling you all of the, my services and stuff. It's giving you. Actionable things you can do. Yes, you can do. You don't need to be the FBI or a cybersecurity expert to do them, but five things you can do that will, I don't know, 10 X, your cybersecurity, really? [00:02:35] It it's, it's that big a deal. And it's going to take you less than an hour to do all of this stuff. So for those people who like the boot camp, so we're going to have. And, uh, you know, one of these zoom things and we're going to do it live and I'm going to explain it to you, spleen it. And you're going to have some homework before the bootcamp, because I want you to have some skin in the game too. [00:03:02] Right. You're not paying me or anything. So I want to make sure that you've done your homework so we can quickly. Go through all of the stuff that we need to cover in the boot camp and people who are interested in kind of being the example, which means they are going to get more information than anybody else. [00:03:21] You can also say, Hey, listen, uh, yeah, please use mine as an example. So we'll look at all of these different things. We're going to focus in on that first bootcamp primarily on. The stuff with passwords, you know, what should you do? How should you do it? How can you tell if your password has been stolen? If your email accounts been compromised, all of that sort of thing. [00:03:44] And you need to be on my email list in order to find out about this stuff. Right. And in fact, when you sign. I've got three special reports that Karen and I wrote that are really going to be helpful for you. These are three that we've been using with our clients for years, but again, actionable. To do right, is not some marketing sales guy trying to sell you the latest, greatest piece of antivirus software that doesn't work. [00:04:18] So you can get that. If you go to Craig peterson.com right now slash subscribe. If you want the deep link, Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We'll go ahead and sign you up. I have a little automated sequence. It's going to send you the emails with all of the attachments. We got one, that's kind of an introduction to Karen and I, you get to see both of us. [00:04:44] And, uh, it's a really cool picture of when we're on vacation one time and you can get all of that again. It's free. This is the free newsletter. This isn't the paid newsletter. Craig peterson.com. Slash subscribe. All right. So I can help you out with all of that free content. And I have lots of it. I'm on the radio every week talking about free, right. [00:05:08] And you can avoid these things. So like, I kind of hate to bring up this FBI hack because as I discussed again with Karen this week, I, I don't want people to feel like there's nothing that they can do. I have a friend, her name's Laura and she's in one of my mastermind groups. And Laura is, was listening to me because another mastermind member got hacked and it had like, what was it? [00:05:36] $45,000 ultimately stolen from him. And we helped them out. And so I was explaining, okay, so here's the things you can do. And. Basically all she heard was, uh, I'm never going to be able to do this. And, and she's a technical person. She teaches people how to become business analysts, which is pretty technical, right. [00:06:00] There's a lot of steps involved in doing business and analyst work. And so I was really surprised to hear from her that she had. The securing herself was just too hard. You know, the FBI gets hacked, et cetera. And so that's why when I came to this realization, the bottom line is, yeah. Okay. It can be hard if you're like me and you've been in doing this for 30 years, you've got the curse of knowledge, right? [00:06:30] So you, you know, all of this stuff, this isn't for you. If, if you know everything, okay, this is for people who. Quite understand what's going on. Definitely don't understand what they should do. Don't know what they should buy. They don't know how to use the free stuff that Microsoft and apple give you and how to pull it all together. [00:06:52] That's what I want you to be able to understand, and we spend time every. Going through this and every newsletter. I have a, an opening now that is a lot about three to five minute read. If that it can be very, very quick read and is helping you to understand some of the things that you can and should do. [00:07:16] So you'll get that as part of the newsletter. Again, Craig peterson.com. That's in my free newsletter. You should see the paid newsletter. Uh, it's a big deal because it's your life. It's a big deal because it's your business. It's a big deal because it's your job on the line. And most of the time, and when I pick up a new client, it's somebody who's kind of the office manager. [00:07:42] Well, frankly, more than your office manager, sometimes the business owner, you know, owner operator says to the office manager, Hey, we got to do something about cybersecurity and then I get. Saying, Hey, can you do a cyber health assessment for us and that cyber health assessment, which we'll do for almost anybody out there will tell you the basic self. [00:08:05] Okay. Here's what you got to do. You've got to update this. You should turn off this software or you should do this and that with your firewall so that they have. I a little checklist, right. That they can run through. That's the whole idea behind one of these cyber health assessment. And then what happens is they say, okay, well, let's, let's talk some more and we go in and talk with them, talk with the owner. [00:08:32] Do they want to do, help them put together a more detailed plan and then they are off and running so they can do it themselves. They can hire someone, they can have us do it for them, whatever seems to make the most sense, but it's very important. To do it, to do something because sitting there trusting the Google's going to take care of you or apple or whomever, it is, uh, you know, trusting Norton antivirus is going to take care of. [00:09:04] I was reading a quote from John McAfee. He's the guy that started the whole antivirus industry. Now, of course, he passed away not too long ago, under suspicious circumstances, but he came out and said, Hey, listen, antivirus is. Because right now this year, these weren't his stats. These are stats published. [00:09:24] You can find them online. Just duck, duck, go them. Yeah. I don't use Google for most things. Uh, and you'll find that the antivirus is ineffective 77, 0% of the time. So, what do you need to do? Well, you need to listen to me here because I am going to help keep you up to date here. Some people are auditory listeners. [00:09:46] You need to make sure that you get the newsletter so that you get the weekly updates and you find out about these free trainings and special reports that we put together. Makes sense to you and you can attend the boot camps where we cover the basically one hour meetings on zoom, just like you're used to, and we cover one or more specific topics and we do it live and we use your information. [00:10:17] The information you want us to have a, do you want us to share? So how could that be better? And it's the same sort of stuff, but deeper dives and more interactive obviously than radio. And you can listen to me here every week. I think it's important that you do, and you understand this stuff. So anyways, ramble, ramble. [00:10:37] It all starts with email. How do you keep your emails safe? You might remember years ago, you, people were getting broken into and emails were sent out using their accounts. Well, that happened decades ago and it's still happening today. So. Right now, Craig peterson.com. I promise you. I am not a heavy marketer. [00:11:01] Okay. You're going to get good, actionable information that you can put to use in a matter of minutes, Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:11:13] Our intelligence monitoring indicates exfiltration of several of your virtualized clusters in a fist sophisticated chain attack. Your, I am trying to put on this like official voice. Right. And it didn't do so well anyways, that's what we're going to talk about, right now. [00:11:29] This is an email that came from the department of Homeland security warning about hackers in our network. [00:11:37] Okay. The subject line here, the one I'm looking at, and this is a, the justice week urgent threat. In systems read the email goes on. We tried to black hole, the transit nodes used by this advanced persistent threat actor. However, there is a huge chance you will modify as attack with fast flux technologies. [00:12:01] I don't know if that ties into a flux capacitor or not, which he proxies through. Uh, multiple global accelerators. So this is somebody who doesn't really know what they're talking about. They're just throwing up big words. We identified the threat actor to be. Somebody whom is believed to be in of course, whom wrong usage of the word here, uh, is believed to be affiliated with the extortion gang, the dark overlord, comma, uppercase. [00:12:33] We highly recommend you to check your systems and IDs monitoring. Be where this threat actor is currently working under the inspection of the MCC. I see, as we are dependent on some of his intelligence research, we cannot interfere physically within four hours, which could be enough time to cause severe damage to your infrastructure. [00:12:59] Stay safe. USDA department of Homeland security, cyber threat detection and analysis network analysis. Total control panel. So this is classic when it comes to scammers. And the classic part is that you could do. Is the grammars bad. The wording is confusing, his punctuation is wrong and he's throwing out all whole bunch of words that are used when it comes to hackers. [00:13:35] You know, there are things like advanced, persistent threats. That's one of the biggest problems in fact, businesses have today. But in reality, the way he used it, Incorrect now that's something I would notice cause I've been doing this stuff for more than 30 years, but the average person is never going to notice something like this. [00:13:59] So it's been pretty, in fact, pretty successful now, a little different than usual here. These fake messages don't have attachments. They don't have phone numbers. They don't have web links. Therefore what? Well, your email filter is not going to look at them and say, oh, these look risky. These URL links are going to risky sites. [00:14:26] I'm going to block it. Right. That's what we do. We have the advanced email filtering from Cisco that we use for our client, or that includes their amazing artificial intelligence for phishing and stuff. So an email like this is not go. To trigger those types of alarms. So they're saying don't panic, avoid contacting the FBI for further details and ignore the accusations that are made in the email. [00:14:55] This is so focused though. So is a cybersecurity company. They have, they have a lot of stuff. They have some pretty good stuff. It's not, um, there's not. But spam house is tracking it. Now, if you've ever been blacklisted, it's called black Coleen really by people who might've used your domain to send spam, or maybe you're a spammer, you've heard of spam house and I've been blacklisted before inappropriately. [00:15:25] The good news is my. That I use for emailing is about 30 years old as well. So it's got a pretty good reputation over the years, but spam house is saying now that this is a scam they've been tracking it. It's a well-known scam and it's been widely circulated. To those office managers that I said are often the people who call us when there's a cybersecurity problem, or we get calls from office managers when something doesn't look right with the emails. [00:16:01] And we have a client that had been getting these weird emails and. We were called saying, what's going on, have a look. We looked and we found all kinds of problems. Right? So that again, an office manager approaching us and thinking everything's fine because they had Norton and they had the more advanced Symantec stuff and it didn't catch. [00:16:27] Any of this really nasty stuff, but that's part of what Spamhaus does. And they're looking at it and saying, oh, okay, wait a minute. Now we're seeing these emails come out. They are definitely not coming from, uh, fbi.gov, which is what the return address is. And so spam house tags, it spam. Assassin's going to tag it and, and it's not even going to make it. [00:16:56] Anything, but a log on are our email filter. So a number of people have received it. If you've received this email, I'd love to know it because they really are trying to go after the people who are a little bit more into this now, how do they find them? Apparently? They have stolen the email addresses by scraping them from public sources. [00:17:22] So databases, uh, published by Aaron, for instance, the American registry for internet numbers. And I'm assigned my own number is CP 2 0 5 because I was so early on by Aaron they're the guys that have been managing. The basic internet domain stuff here in the U S for very long time. And it also doesn't mean by the way that Aaron had any sort of a breach. [00:17:47] And really just showing that the crooks behind this disinformation campaign have really been focusing on people who appear to be in network administration, because those are the email addresses and names that Aaron is going to have. So why are they doing this? Why are they sending it out into it's frankly, it's kinda hard to tell some of the emails have a QR code in them. [00:18:18] Now that is intriguing because here's how, again, how a lot of these basic email filters work, they look at it, they say, well, what links are in there? How many links, how much of the email is a graphic? And they understand while it's going to internet bad guys.com. There's the link right there. Forget about it. [00:18:42] I'm not going to forward this email to the intended recipient, but if there's a QR code in that email to almost every email filter out through. It only looks like a graphic. So might've been a picture of your mother as far as it knows. Most of them are not very smart. So w you getting an email, having a QR code in it and saying, oh, that's kind of interesting. [00:19:07] Let's check out that QR code. That's where the hazard com. All right. So be very, very careful fake news like this. It's not only unfair to the people who are accused in it, which is what happened here. There can be accusing your own it department. They can be accusing. People within your department, which is typically what's happening and then what they may try and do now that you don't trust your, it people, your security people, because they're mentioned by name in the email, but remember their names are probably scraped off of. [00:19:47] That you don't trust them. And now they attack you and you don't trust that you've been attacked. Right? So fake news, a term coined by Hillary Clinton during her campaign, but that's exactly what it is entirely fake. So this email, if you get one from Homeland security about threat actors in your systems, almost certain. [00:20:12] Fake fake, fake, fake stick around. We've got a lot more coming up. Don't forget to subscribe. Get my weekly newsletter. I'm going to be published and even more, I think probably starting next month. I'm going to be sending a couple emails out a week because I got to get you guys up to speed so that you're ready for the upcoming bootcamp. [00:20:35] Everybody knows about the chip shortage, right? Uh, computer chips. They're just hard to find. I'm hearing all kinds of ads from Dell lately on the radio. And they're saying just buy now. Well, they're not selling new high-end machines anymore. The white house. This is a story from the verge has allegedly kinda stepped in about Intel's plans to increase chip production. [00:21:04] And you'd think that the white house would be encouraging chip production. Considering the shortages, the justice week, it came out Tesla hasn't been delivering their electric cars. Without USB ports. Other manufacturers are no longer providing you with an electric window for your car. It's a crank window. [00:21:28] Car manufacturers did it to themselves, frankly, by stopping orders for chips during the lockdown, thinking that somehow people wouldn't need cars anymore. And yet their sales of cars went up and when they go. Yeah. Guess what happens to the price? The price goes up, right? Inflation. You have more money chasing fewer goods. [00:21:52] So they really nailed themselves. Don't feel so sorry for some of these car manufacturers. We need more chips. I mentioned one of the manufacturers of PCs, the many of us use in our offices and, and Jews in our homes. Dell is a good company. They have been for a long time. However, you gotta be careful when you're buying computers because Dell makes very low end computers all the way up through good solid servers. [00:22:22] Same. Thing's true with. P Hewlett, Packard, excuse me, Hewlett Packard. Remember those guys back in the day? Yeah. They also make everything from cheap computers that you never would buy should not buy all the way up through really good ones. It's kind of like going to Walmart, you go to the Walmart and you don't want to buy any of the computer sitting there with one exception. [00:22:48] And that is the Chromebook. If you buy a mid tier Chromebook at Walmart, you're going to get a good little computer. Doesn't run windows, doesn't run Microsoft office word, et cetera, but it can still edit those documents. And it's a very good machine that is kept up to date. Just watch the price $110 Chromebook, probably isn't going to last. [00:23:12] It doesn't have much storage on it, et cetera. A $2,000 Chromebook is probably major overhead. So go somewhere in the $400 $500 range for a Chromebook, which is by the way where they're selling some of the laptops, windows, laptops, same price point. I, again, that's why I just wouldn't buy any of that. So we need more chips. [00:23:37] We need higher end chips. They are very hard to get our hands on right now. We're talking about electrification of everything. And if you've heard me on the radio during morning drive time, you know, I've been just bemoaning how the government's putting the horse before the. They're out there saying electric, electric, electric, and shutting down pipelines and coal mining and coal power plants. [00:24:04] Although coal is one of the cleanest energy sources nowadays because of all of the scrubbing that's going on with the output of the coal plant. And also of course, they're, they've been stomping. Most of the nuclear plants from coming online, even though the new. Technology in nuclear is impossible to fail. [00:24:26] They use basic physics to make sure that these things aren't going to do a Jane Fonda, a China's syndrome thing. Okay. So it's just crazy. We don't have the electrical. Even if we put up, it would take literally millions of wind farm, our turbines, and obviously millions of rooms and fields covered with solar cells. [00:24:54] We would still need nuclear. We would still need other sources of power because the sun doesn't shine all the time and the wind doesn't blow all of the time. This is just completely backwards. People aren't thinking it through. It's again, it's the knee jerk. And of course they're investing heavily. They being the Congress, people of themselves, particularly those Congress people like the Al Gore's of the world and Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, because they are forcing a move to this technology that isn't ready for prime time. [00:25:31] And at the same time, we are trying to buy electric cars. How are we going to charge them? How are we going to run our homes? It's like Europe, people froze to death last winter in Europe. It's going to happen again this year. And the thing about what happened in Texas last year. Yes. Some of that was because they weren't prepared, but guess what else happens? [00:25:55] Sometimes the wind isn't blowing in Texas. So there's, there's just all kinds of problems. So Intel is saying, well, we got to increase our chip production. Intel's main business right now, by the way, seems to be moving towards making chips on behalf of other people, other companies, rather than making their own chips. [00:26:20] Isn't that kind of interesting. And the industry, the chip fab industry, the ones that fabricate the chips, make the chips are spending about $2 billion a week. According to the latest numbers I saw to try and expand the manufactured. Well, apparently Intel went to the white house because they want some of our tax dollars. [00:26:44] You know, the money they'd take at the point of a gun. They want some of that so that they can build their business, build it back better. And apparently some sources close to the situation told Bloomberg that Intel. Posed making silicone wafers in a Chinese factory, which could start production towards the end of next year. [00:27:12] But in a move that I agree with had the Biden white house, apparently Intel was strongly discouraged due to potential security issues. Yeah, no kidding. Some major security issues here. We don't want to give away our technology to make this leading edge stuff. Think about the U S. We were always the country that people came to for technology. [00:27:43] I mentioned this week on the radio, the cotton gin way back when look at how much labor. That, uh, that cut look at the internal combustion engine. And again, the Teamsters, the horses, the cleanup crews in New York city. Right. All of that went goodbye pretty much because of technology and people got higher technology. [00:28:10] Jobs and everyone became more efficient and that's, what's supposed to happen right now when right now based basically we have stagflation in other words, prices are going up, but we're not getting any more productivity out of it. That's a real problem. And that's why they keep talking about the problems we were having in the late seventies. [00:28:31] And I remember those well, I remember gas lines sitting there in California waiting to buy gas. It was incredible what was happening out there. So Intel thinks it needs to secure funding from the federal government in order to ramp up the production. Bloomberg announced, Orwell said that Intel currently has no plans to produce silicone wafers in China after discussing it with governor. [00:29:01] Officials and it will instead consider other solutions. Now I hope those other solutions are to make those plants, those chip fab plant here in the United States. Let's put ourselves back on a leading edge footing here. Google moved its artificial intelligence lab to China talking about. Anti American thing to do moved it to China, artificial intelligence. [00:29:31] That's something we need. The us needs to be the world leader in some of these technologies. And frankly, we're not the leader anymore. It's it frankly, a shame. So you can check this out. It's on the verge. You'll also find it up on my website. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you sign up for the newsletter so you can get all of these little trainings, you know, five minutes a weekend can make a big difference. [00:30:03] Craig peterson.com. [00:30:05] Hey, I don't want to depress anyone, but Bitcoin is now a 13 year old teenager. And back in January, 2009, Bitcoin was priced at well. Wow. [00:30:19] January 3rd, 2009 is when it was launched. And E Bitcoin was priced at you ready for this point? [00:30:30] Zero 8 cents each. Okay. So, uh, the, uh, uh, and because of that, a lot of people. I have been seen, well, you know, we, we've got to get into this and that in fact, Elon Musk has been kind of pushing up the price of another digital currency. All of the initial price increases in Bitcoin were due to fraud. [00:30:57] According to a lot of reports and we can get into those if you'd like fraud. Yeah. That's a great way to launch a whole new product. And they also played some other games. For instance, the biggest driver of Bitcoin price for a long time was crux. For ransomware. Yeah. People had to buy ransom and pay ransoms. [00:31:25] How do you pay a ransom while usually it was with Bitcoin and that meant you had to turn us dollars or other foreign currencies into Bitcoin. And as economists in the white house, don't seem to understand when there is more money tracing, a limited commodity, the price of the commodity goes up, whether it's gasoline, food, or Bitcoin, and that's exactly what happened. [00:31:58] Percentage wise, how much of an increase has there been in the value of Bitcoin? Um, uh, let me see here. You see if I can figure this out 7 billion, 750000000% increase. Isn't that something now of course we don't all have these magical glasses that let us look forward to kind of figure it out. Out, but it's based on this peer to peer electronic cash system that was written about by, uh, someone or a group of people that went by the pseudonym of Natasha Nakamoto. [00:32:42] And there've been a few people over the years who have claimed that they are the person that started it and maybe one of them is, and may be, none of them are who knows, but this was first published, October 31st, 2008. So about a month later is when it started to trade and it is just incredible here. [00:33:04] Bitcoin was really perceived initially. Threat by government and financial institutions. I think it's still perceived as a threat. My government, they are able to track Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in many cases and the way they track it as well. If you have Bitcoin, what good is it? Unless you can use the Bitcoin to either buy something or to traded for us dollars or another hard currency, that's how they're tracking. [00:33:38] Without getting into a lot of detail here, but it's interesting to look at because the Bitcoin white papers proposing a solution to prevent what they were calling double spending. And when you don't trust a third party necessarily, and that's where we got these logs, if you will, the. Uh, balance sheets that were being used to track everything. [00:34:06] And then you had the voting, you had to have 50% of these systems that were tracking all of the transactions, agree on a transaction, et cetera. And that's actually been a problem for Bitcoin because of the. Intermediaries, you have to go through or get to approve your transaction. It's a, frankly, a problem that's really slowed down transaction. [00:34:34] So you can't just go like with a credit card and pay for something that's done. It can take your day or more. Now it's interesting that we're getting close to the ultimate limit of Bitcoin offerings. The blockchains mind blocked number 707,000. Which by the way, offered a mining reward of six and a quarter Bitcoins. [00:35:01] So think about that. Well, it costs you more to mine, Bitcoins than they're worth. If you're trying to do it in the Northeast. Pretty much anywhere in the United States. So don't just run out and start doing it. My son and I, I don't know, five, eight years ago, something like that, we decided we'd start trying to do some mining and we did, and we didn't find any Bitcoins and it was just cooking some machines. [00:35:28] And so we said, forget about it. And we gave out on it. It does have a hard cap. Then it's got a ways to go. I said, it's approaching. It is, but there's 21 million Bitcoin is the hard cap and the community that maintains the software and maintains Bitcoin because it is a committed. Has it been modifying the rules as time went around at about how many Bitcoin you get when you're mining something, into solving these problems and, and how the blockchain works and how many honest and dishonest mentions were in the original Bitcoin white paper and how can they reject invalid blocks? [00:36:18] So there's a lot of technical stuff going on and it's changing. All of the time. And ultimately it's the consensus mechanism that has been slowing it. So when it costs you more to mine, a Bitcoin than you get for it. So let's do a little bit of math here. If we say that how much is a Bitcoin worth right now? [00:36:42] So we say current value of Bitcoin. I'm typing it in right now. So it's about $57,000. Per Bitcoin. If we say 57,000, uh, here we go. 57,000 times, what did I say? Six and a quarter, right? So $362,000 equivalent is what they, the person who mined this block was paying. That sounds pretty good. Doesn't it? Yeah, it really does. [00:37:17] It adds up quite, quite quickly. But when you consider that it costs more to mine, a Bitcoin than it costs, then you, then you get to paid for it. 350, $6,000. That's a lot of electricity on a lot of hardware. And because of that, China has. Down Bitcoin mining operations, because it uses so much electricity and in the United States and in some other countries, but here in the U S and in the UK, some of these Bitcoin mining operations have been buying. [00:37:54] Coal powered power plants, coal fired power plants so that they can produce their own electricity so they can make it worthwhile to mine. So things are going to change. They're going to be changing the rules. As I said, we've got a total of 21 million Bitcoin ultimately. And so far we've only just mined numbers, 707,540. [00:38:21] So the interchange, the rules, I'm going to keep an eye on this because that's kind of an interesting one. Elon Musk, his quote is Crip. Cryptocurrency is fundamentally aimed at reducing the power of a centralized government. And that by the way, can be one of the main reasons that Bitcoin hasn't been really adopted in the mainstream yet. [00:38:42] And Ilan has all kinds of tweets. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, he says, Bitcoin is my safe word. Isn't that? Something he's been primarily the guy behind Dodge coin, which is yet another crypto currency, D O G. Coyne D O G E coin doge, I guess, coin. And you can find that online. I think it has new doge even publicly traded while it's certainly traded as a crypto. [00:39:12] Okay. So doge coin right now is worth 22 cents. It's down from its month, week, and day highs. I'm looking. Here. Yeah. Yeah. So it's gone up and down. It's been worth more. Yeah. A couple of weeks ago. So that's part of the problem with it. If you don't have money that you can absolutely waste, don't buy this stuff and I'm not an investment advisor, but I've never bought any Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency. [00:39:46] And the problem is, and from my perspective that it is not real at all. Yeah, you can say, look at this, I could have made 7000000% on that. Well, you could do the same thing almost if you had, instead of buying a brand new Tesla model as, uh, you know, eight years ago, seven years ago, and paying $77,000 for that. [00:40:11] If you had bought $77,000 worth of Tesla stock, you'd be in the millions of dollars in value. Right? And so we've got the Raven company out there. I don't know if you know these guys or not. I watched a motorcycle show. They're going from the tip of south America all the way on up to San Diego. And they had this reveal and electric truck, which is really quite cool. [00:40:39] Well, they are public right now. They just won. And they have a market capitalization. In other words, a value of ribbon, which has only made a couple of dozen vehicles. That's it? Total. And they're owned by people who work for the company. Their market capitalization is 50% more. Then most of the major manufacturers out there, it's just crazy how much it is worth and why it's because people are looking at it saying, well, Tesla appreciated 7000000%. [00:41:19] Ravion's going to do the same. And by the way, they are cool cars. I love the idea behind. Uh, you know, electric vehicles. It's just that we got the cart before the horse who don't have the electricity. We're not making the hard decisions. We're just ripping stuff out. It's absolutely crazy. By the way, they had a 15% drop in the value of their shares on Wednesday. [00:41:45] Uh, it'll go up. It'll go down. But it's, uh, w it's something we got to test remember? Okay. Cryptocurrency is not it yet of Tesla. Stock is worth something will probably always be worse. Something cryptocurrency is worth something, but tomorrow may be worth zero, and don't go crazy. These market caps of startup companies that have never done anything being worth 50% more than major us auto manufacturer. [00:42:18] What that's crazy. [00:42:19] Clothing prices have been going up. In fact, apparel prices were up 4.2% in the last 12 months. That's as of August, we've got cotton going up. There's a whole bunch of things that are going up and a company out there called dress X thinks it has a solution for all of these prices. [00:42:40] Everything's been going up, I put some gas in my car the other day. I have a, you might know, of course, a 1980 Mercedes and my wife drives a nice little Ford edge, not a particularly big SUV, kind of a guess a mid-size SUV. And I put, I think it was about 15 gallon Zan and it costs me more. 55, $0. I can't believe it. [00:43:12] We used to have a little diesel little Volkswagen Passat diesel. We would drive around and we were getting pretty close to 60 miles per gallon, around town. And diesel was about a buck, a gallon, and it cost 20 bucks to fill the silly thing up. And we could drive all the way down to New York city and back on. [00:43:31] $20 worth of diesel one fill up. Okay. Uh, none of that's true anymore, is it? And we're looking at some increases. It's not like the kind of increase we've seen in certain foodstuffs or gasoline or eating oil. Apparel prices are up and there there's a company out there that thinks that maybe they have a bit of a solution for you. [00:43:56] It's called dress ex I found a video online of a young lady. Who's got a lot of followers, interesting lady. And she was trying them out. She'd tried a different dress or different clothes every day for a month. No, I did not watch all of the video, but I got the basic idea. And the idea is that people are buying digital clothes. [00:44:25] Now I think of that for a minute. Would you pay for a designer? And maybe you would, maybe you wouldn't pay for designer dress, but you know, already like, and AOC is dress that she wore, you know, the lady of the people, uh, only cost. What, w what is it? $30,000. Per seat for her to go to that banquet. And I think her dress was like five or $6,000. [00:44:53] Well, you can get a dress just like AOC. That's designed by a high-end fashion designer for somewhere between 40 and $60. Okay, but it's a virtual dress. It's not a real dress, not in the real world. It's interesting what they're doing and trying to do. If you have used some of these online sites like Instagram, they have various types of what they call filters. [00:45:21] So you can put a filter on you and there's like a makeup filter, for instance, that makes you look like you're all made up, right. That gets rid of all of the blemishes on. In, and there's other filters that do backgrounds and do different things and make you look like you're a kitty cat or whatever. [00:45:41] They'd all kinds of crazy things. Well, this company called dress ex has now come out with filters that you can use in their app. And they don't work too well right now, but people have been buying these digital close to. Now you don't wear them out. Okay. This is really like the King's new clothes. You might remember that story. [00:46:06] Right. And if all you have on are your digital clothes, you don't have anything on. However, what it does is if you're using their app and you're moving around, uh, and with their app, Paste these clothes on you. And it's a little funky right now. It's not the best, but you can bet that's exactly where it's going. [00:46:32] And it reminds me of a blues, Bruce Willis movie. Can't remember the name of it. And, uh, it's I think really bringing up a whole, a whole type of. Dysphoria that I think people are going to have more and more where you're living in this artificial life and that artificial life that you're in now that's called SIRA gets, I was just looking up as we were talking, uh, that artificial life that you're in is so nice. [00:47:05] You don't want to live. In the real world. And I'm starting to see this now with things like dress X, which you'll find online, address x.com. You can now wear anything you want. You can use the filters that are available generally to change. Parents to change your ethnicity, to change anything you want. [00:47:28] And if you ever saw Sarah gets, it was a very interesting movie. I liked it. I watched it because I generally like Bruce Willis and Rosa Mon pike, who were the two primary actors in this movie. But in the movie, everybody was just sitting there. And they were in these 3d chairs. And while you're in that chair, you could be anybody anywhere doing anything and literally anyone. [00:47:57] And so you're sitting in the chair, you can see around you, it looks real, it feels real everything about it is real, at least for the most part, but in reality, And none of it's real. And these people, they, some of them got out of those chairs and while they were out a nasty things happen to them. In fact, it was, he was a cop and they were, uh, investigating some murders of these people who were again, using what they were calling. [00:48:30] Sarah gets nowadays with what our friends over at face. Or doing, you are going to see it called something else. Uh, Facebook, in case you didn't know Facebook changed its name. Now Facebook, Facebook is still Facebook, but the parent company kind of like Google split kind of off and change the company name, uh, Facebook did the same thing. [00:48:56] They're calling it. And the idea is to have this meta universe where again, just like in surrogates, nothing is real, just like on dress ex you can wear any fashions you want to, and instead of paying thousands of dollars, you pay tens of dollars, basically. Now I mentioned that their video isn't very good. [00:49:21] At least not yet over address X, but you can go to dress X. You can take photos of yourself and send them to dress X. They will go ahead and put whatever clothes you want to be. On you it's basically. Yeah, it's Photoshopping, but they do a pretty good job in general. I looked at a whole bunch of them, but it, uh, you know, it, it looked pretty real. [00:49:48] You don't have to consider the fit. You don't have to worry about how big you are because all of these clothes adjust, infinitely a store. Doesn't have to stock a bunch of them. So we're moving. This whole metaverse idea and these digital clothes, which are really a thing nowadays is vice said, vice.com. [00:50:12] We're moving more and more to this unreal world and some real unreal fashions too. I'm looking at some of them and it's, it's hard to even describe them. It looks like there's all of these. Things growing all over the clothes that are coming out and just doing all kinds of weird things. So there you go. [00:50:36] I'm note on fashion. I'm looking right now at a picture that's right in front of the metropolitan museum of art in New York, and a lady is wearing one of the. Digital dresses. Now they tell you what you should be doing. And when you take that picture is aware of skin tight clothes so that they can match the digital close to you a little bit better. [00:51:01] But, uh, w w we'll see, she's saying that in this project, Tweet at the, in front of the mat, she's saying I just can't wait for the met gala. What it'll look like in 21, 21, because you know what, she's not wrong about this. It's really coined to change. There's some real cool stuff. Go to my website. If you want to see this, you can find it on vice, but I have a link to it. [00:51:24] Just look for this. Show notes and you'll find it right there. In fact, you're getting even search for on my website because I have everything transcribed. Just look for digital clothes because there are thing now. Hey, I also want to talk a little bit here about. The, uh, the next little article, which is what's happening right now with apple. [00:51:48] And you've probably heard about these ID cards in Austria right now, they are stopping people randomly and asking for their papers. They want your papers. If you are, have not been, they call it vaccinated. It's not a vaccine. Really. It's still funny to see the CDC change to the definition of vaccine, just so it meets their jab standards. [00:52:16] But, uh, if you're not vaccinated, there's an immediate, it's about of $3,500 fine that the police officer will issue to you. And of course, there's police everywhere. Just stopping people randomly and asking for their papers. Well, apple is making various us states that have decided they want to use a digital ID card. [00:52:43] For customer support and also for some of the technology. Now, the initial idea behind this, and Apple's been working on it for a while, is that you can have your driver's license in the iPhone wallet, app, more secure. It's certainly more convenient for most people. Sometimes you might forget your wallet, but most people don't forget their iPhones. [00:53:10] Yeah. The feature when combined with Apple's biometric security measures really could also cut down on fraud. So we've got about a half a dozen states right now that have signed up with apple and our pain part of the freight for these things. And when they pull you over and ask for your papers, you'll have them right there in your iPhone. [00:53:32] Isn't that handy stick around. We got more to talk about. Thanks for joining. Today and visit me online. Craig peterson.com. Stick around.

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 19 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:49


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión.SHOWNOTES:- Noticias: - Sigue la polémica con ST: Discovery - El tuit de Sergio Jiménez - El artículo de Deadline - Vizio y el dinero por publicidad - Película de Scorsese con Jonah Hill para AppleTV+ sobre Grateful Dead. - Netflix encarga Blockbuster - Trailers: - Spiderman: No Way Home - Emily un Paris - Pam & Tommy - Fellows- Estrenos: - La rueda del tiempo - Cowboy Bebop - Jagged- Buena noticia: La continuación Party Down- Recomendación: Lola, en Movistar+

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Homeland report in Macedonian 19 November 2021 - Извештај од Македонија 19 ноември 2021

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:44


Homeland report in Macedonian 19 November 2021 - Извештај од Македонија 19 ноември 2021

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 18 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:52


C.J. Navas te trae, como cada día en Streaming, las principales noticias, comentarios y curiosidades del mundo de las series de televisión

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
DHS Terrorism Threat Must Wake-up America

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:18


The Homeland continues to face a diverse and challenging threat environment as it approaches several religious holidays and associated mass gatherings that in the past have served as potential targets for acts of violence. Credible threat? Is this another Sept 10 type warning before the biggest terrorism attack on America's soil?

Hollywood Dream Maker with Billy Gallo
Lessons and Stories from a Hollywood Veteran with Nestor Serrano

Hollywood Dream Maker with Billy Gallo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 75:30


Are you looking for wisdom from a Hollywood veteran? Learning from those that have been where we want to be is invaluable time spent. Nestor Serrano began his acting career primarily in theatre, including Broadway. Nestor's first feature film was The Money Pit with Tom Hanks. This movie was just the beginning of Nestor's impressive career as he went on to appear in more film and television projects such as Captain America, Secretariat, Hanging with the Homeboys, Empire, Dexter, Homeland, 90210, and so many more. After initially working for The Bank of New York as a computer operator, Nestor joined the drama club at Queens College purely as a way to meet new people. This uncovered a love for the craft of acting that has since led Nestor to over 35 years of wildly impressive credits in Hollywood. In this episode, Nestor and I talk about the incredible lessons and stories he has learned throughout his time in the acting industry. Nestor describes his unique journey to acting, the stories he remembers from working alongside Hollywood greats like Robert De Niro and Al Pacino, what his approach to the acting process is, his advice for overcoming nerves in an intimidating industry, and so much more. Tune in to Episode 41 of Hollywood Dream Maker to learn a wealth of acting wisdom from veteran actor Nestor Serrano! In This Episode You Will Learn:How Nestor found his way to Hollywood (6:28)Nestor's experience working with Robert De Niro (18:25)A story of Nestor's time working alongside Al Pacino (27:32)Nestor's approach to acting (42:28)Nestor's advice for his younger self (55:38) Connect with Nestor SerranoIMDb Let's Connect: Manhattan Actor Studio Website See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast
S2 E24 - Winston's Birthday

Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 70:00


This podcast covers New Girl Season 2, Episode 24, Winston's Birthday, which originally aired on May 7, 2013 and directed by Max Winkler and was written by Brett Baer & Dave Finkel.Here's a quick recap of the episode:Jess and Nick sleep together for the first time in the last episode! Before they get a chance to talk about it, they're split apart as they prepare for Cece's wedding the next day, Bob arrives, and a new job opportunity pops up for Jess. Meanwhile, Schmidt and Elizabeth work to define their relationship and it's Winston's BIRTHDAY?!We discuss Pop Culture References such as:When talking to Jess, Cece exclaimed her Uncle Shishir “had one scene with Salman Khan in Dabangg 2, and all of the sudden he thinks he's Amitabh Bachchan in Jhoom Barab-ar Jhoom.” Salman Khan Dabangg 2Amitabh BachchanJhoom Barab-ar JhoomHenna - In preparation for her wedding, Cece got her hands painted with henna. Additional Pop Culture References such as:“It Wasn't Me” - Shaggy - In the Schmidt and Elizabeth's flashback scene, this song played. "It Wasn't Me" is the first single from Jamaican reggae musician Shaggy's fifth studio album, Hot Shot. The song features vocals from Rikrok. The lyrics of the song depict one man (Rikrok) asking his friend (Shaggy) what to do after his girlfriend caught him cheating on her with "the girl next door". Mike Tyson - When Cece got henna on her face after sleeping on her hands, she thought she looked like Mike Tyson. Michael Gerard Tyson is a former American professional boxer who competed from 1985 to 2005. Nicknamed "Iron Mike" and "Kid Dynamite" in his early career, and later known as "The Baddest Man on the Planet", Tyson is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time. He also has notable tattoos on his face. Mandy Patinkin - Shivrang mentioned that Jess told him Cece looked like Mandy Patinkin with the henna smeared on her face. Mandel Bruce Patinkin is a Tony and Emmy award winning American actor and singer. He's prominently known for his role as Inigo Montoya in Rob Reiner's 1987 film The Princess Bride and as Saul Berenson in the Showtime series Homeland, where his character had a thick beard."Until We Get There" - Lucius - When Nick and Jess were on the roof at the end of the episode, this song played. Lucius is a four-piece indie pop band consisting of lead vocalists Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, drummer and producer Dan Molad, and lead guitarist Peter Lalish.”Until We Get There” is a song featured on the band's first studio album, Wildewoman, released in 2013.We also cover the moment Schmidt goes to find Elizabeth at the restaurant as our “Schmidtism” this episode. For “Not in the 2020s” we discuss Bob referencing how he “gay[ed] his way out of Vietnam” and the way Schmidt and his coworker treated Elizabeth. We also discuss Elizabeth standing up for herself and Jess owning her own decisions to her dad as our “Yes in the 2020s” moments. Additionally, we give a quick look into Curtis Armstrong (Dr. Foster) and Mary Lynn Rajskub (Peg), the Guest Stars we feature in this episode.Also in this episode were the following guest stars who we do not discuss in the podcast: Merritt Wever (Elizabeth - Previously discussed in S2E22), Satya Bhabha (Shivrang - Previously discussed in S2E18), Rob Reiner (Bob - Previously discussed in S2E8), Maureen Sebastian (Jill), Lewis Dauber (Old Sub), Adam Sauter (Riley - Elizabeth's date), Prem Shelat (Miguel), Karlin Walker (Student #1), Eshun Melvin (Student #2), Taylar Hollomon (Student #3), and Thomas Barbusca (Young Boy).We also share this article (which contains spoilers) where we learned that the creators knew that the audience wanted more Winston and made his birthday a C-plot as a joke. We also shared how the creators wanted to avoid an episode where Jess and Nick talked about their feelings after they had sex.While not discussed in the podcast, we noted other references in this episode including:Flashcubes - When Bob is taking a picture of Jess and Nick, he mentions that he needs to get new flashcubes. These flashcubes were developed in the 1960s by Sylvania Electric Products which caused Kodak to replace the existing flashbulb technology on their series of cameras with flashcubes as the process of how they worked remained similar.Mark Twain - In this episode, Jess mentions bringing the words of Mark Twain alive when she was trying to teach the kids. Mark Twain is the pen name for Samuel Langhorne Clemens who was an American writer, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer. He was known for many famous novels like The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.This episode got an 8.5/10 rating from both Kritika and Kelly; Kritika's favorite character was Nick and Kelly's favorite was Jess.Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Episode 25!Music: "Hotshot” by scottholmesmusic.comFollow us on Twitter, Instagram or email us at whosthatgirlpod@gmail.com!Website: https://smallscreenchatter.com/

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 84:27


Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing? New stats are out this week. So what's the number one vector of attack against us? Our Firewalls. And they're failing. So, what's going on. And what can you do about it? [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:16] And of course, I'm always talking about cyber security, because if you ask me that is one of the biggest problems we have in business. [00:00:27] Today. Well, yeah, you got to find employees. In fact, uh, it's almost impossible to find them in the cyber security space as well. And it's been hard for years. So I try to keep you up-to-date here. We've got boot camps that are coming up and you are really going to like them. We've been working on some supplemental materials for it. [00:00:47] And of course these boot camps are always free, so you can join it. You can have your friends come and learn the. Basics. It's not one of these high sell things. Right. I, I got a little letter in the mail this week saying, Hey, you can come and get a free steak dinner. And of course it's kind of like a timeshare, right? [00:01:09] Jay, you have to listen to the pitch. Yes. Stay over. On us. And you are going to be sitting there for four hours listening to this crazy pitch that's going on. That's not what my bootcamps are. Anybody that's been to. One of them will tell you we work on it. I explain it. You know what you have to do, how you have to do it, the wise, the winds, the wherefores. [00:01:35] So if you would like to learn more for yourself, Make sure you sign up Craig peterson.com sign up for my newsletter. And when a bootcamp is coming up, I will be sure to tell you about it in the newsletter so that you can attend. And it's important to, to understand that this is yeah. Aimed at business, the, these boot camps, but almost everything businesses have to do or shouldn't be doing the same thing applies to you in your. [00:02:08] So, if you are a small business person, if you're someone who has some it experience, and you've been assigned to worry about cyber security, this is for you. If you are a very small business and you're kind of the Jack of all trades, and you've got to worry about cybersecurity, this is for you. And I just got. [00:02:31] This week from someone on my email list who is retired and she was talking about her husband and her, they don't have any kids, no errors. They're trying to protect their financial investments. And of course I responded saying, Hey, I'm not a financial investment advisor, but I can certainly give you some cyber security input, which I did. [00:02:53] And you can ask your questions as well. I'm more than glad to hear them. And you probably, if you've sent them in, you know, I always answer them now. My big man, a few days might take me a week, but I will get around to it. And I try and respond to the emails. Sometimes I answered here on the radio show or on my podcast, but usually it's via email me. [00:03:17] At Craig peterson.com. And of course, that's also on my website, Craig peterson.com. And that's also my name Craig Peters on.com. So let's get into the firewall thing. When you have a network, you are connecting that network to your computers, maybe. To your security cameras, to your printers that you have, maybe there's a lock system. [00:03:44] Maybe there's more, all of this stuff is interconnected and it's all rather well and good. You can have a whole lot of fun with it, but it is not as particularly good if you can't get out to the internet. So what do we do? We hook our network, whether it's home or if it's business to the internet. Now, you know, all of this stuff so far, right? [00:04:06] You're following me. The internet is actually inter connected networks. In case you didn't know, there are now millions of networks that are connected on the internet. There are core networks out there. We were my company like number 10,000. I think it was, uh, a S an R a S number autonomous system. So we were fairly early on. [00:04:32] And of course, as you know, I've been on the internet in various forums since the early 1980s and helping to develop the protocols, but it is important to remember it is an interconnected network of networks. You might ask why? Well, the bottom line is you aren't connecting your network with other networks that have malicious software on them. [00:04:58] Maybe they're just poorly configured. Maybe they're causing a denial of service attack effectively because there's so badly configured. But whatever the case may be, you are still exposed. If you look at the traffic that's coming to your router. So your router is sitting at the edge of your network connected to your internet service provider. [00:05:19] So it might be Comcast or Verizon or a whole slew of others. But your network is connected via a router. Then the router knows how do I get my data from the input to the output or from the output to the input, if you will upstream and downstream data, that's what the router is for. And if you look at the data on your router and most of us can't, but if you were able to, what you will see is hundreds of thousands of internet packets coming to, and from your. [00:05:55] Router your endpoint every day. Usually these are bad guys doing what are called scans. They do port scans. They're primarily looking for services. So what do you, do you have a firewall now in many cases, you'll get a device from your Janette service provider that has a router built in and has a firewall built in, and it has wifi. [00:06:19] All of this stuff, all built in together makes life all nice and warm and fuzzy and Catalina, doesn't it. But in reality, it's not necessarily a good thing to have it all in one, because you're definitely not going to get the best of breed and router or firewall or wifi, but that's a different story. What is that firewall for that router? [00:06:41] Of course, it's getting all this internet traffic and anything that's on the internet that is. I'm trying to get to you is going to go through the. And anything that you are trying to send up to the internet, like for instance, to try and get a web page or something is also going to go up through that router. [00:07:02] So how do you protect yourself time? Was that there wasn't really much of a way to protect yourself. And frankly, there weren't a lot of reasons. To try and protect yourself. And the internet was just this wonderful open thing, lots of fun and played around a lot. Back in the early nineties, it was, it was just a joy in the late eighties to, to be connected up to the internet and then bad guys started doing bad things. [00:07:30] We took the concept of what you have in an automobile and applied it to the. If you're driving your car, your in the passenger compartment and that passenger compartment is hopefully warm in the winter and cool in the summertime. And you are protected from that big mean nasty engine that's in front of you, or if you're driving an electric car from those mean nasty batteries that are probably below you in that car and what's between you and the. [00:08:04] Of course a firewall. And the idea is to keep the nastiness of that engine, all of the heat, the oil, the grime, the wind, everything else is associated with that engine. Keep that away from you so that you can now drive that car just comfortably in that controlled climate of the passenger compartment, that concept was then applied to the inter. [00:08:30] And in fact, I designed and implemented one of the first firewalls ever made way back when and the firewall in the internet Partland is very similar to the car in the car. You have some protrusions through that fire. Don't you, you you've got a steering wheel. How does that get up to the front of the car? [00:08:53] Well, it goes through the firewall and around that steering wheel, of course there's some EBDM, some rubber type stuff that helps stop anything from coming through right next to that steering column. Same, thing's true with the brake pedal and the gas pedal. At least it used to be. Nowadays, it's so much of this as drive by wire, that the only thing going through the firewall is a wire and there's no mechanical linkage. [00:09:24] Unlike my car, which is a 1980 Mercedes-Benz diesel. Where yes, indeed. Direct linkages to everything. So the firewall in the cars protecting you from the nastiness in the engine compartment and the firewall, when it comes to your internet is doing something very similar. Think about your house for a minute, you have a house with doors and windows. [00:09:53] I would hope. And a chimney and maybe a couple of other protrusions that are going outside of the house. Well, you have some similar problems and when it comes to the internet and when it comes to the firewall, With your house, sir. Sure. You could post a guard out front, a whole series of them. You've got a dozen guards out front and they are all guarding that front door. [00:10:19] But if no, one's watching the back door, if no one's paying attention to the windows, there's still ways for the bad guys to get in. And that's what we're going to talk about. How does the internet firewall tie into this analogy of cars and the analogy of your home? Because it's a very important point when you get right down to it. [00:10:44] We need to understand this because the number one tactic reported this week by MITRE and Cisco is exploitation of public facing application. So I'm going to explain what that is. What's your firewall can do for you and what you should do for your firewall. A stick around. We've got a lot more coming up. [00:11:09] I want to invite you to go. Of course, right now, online to Craig peterson.com. Once you're there, just sign up for mind's newsletter. Simple Craig peterson.com. [00:11:25] This week, we found out what the top five tactics are that are most frequently being used by bad guys to attack us. This is done by MITRE and Cisco systems. Number one, public facing applications. What does that mean? [00:11:42] We've been talking about this report, but really what we've been delving into is how data flows on your network, whether it's a home network or maybe it's a business network, how does this whole mess work? [00:11:58] And when miters talks about the biggest problem here, 91% of the time being what's called an exploit of a public facing application, what does that mean? We went through the basics of a firewall and a router. So all of the data coming from the internet, coming into the router, then handed to the firewall. [00:12:24] Any data going out, goes into the firewall. And then the. So that's the pretty simplistic version. And of course the firewall on your network does a similar thing to the firewall in your car. It stops the bad stuff, at least it's supposed to, but your home and your car both have different ways of getting. [00:12:48] Past the firewall in the house. It's your doors and your windows in the car. Of course, it's where the steering column goes through where the brake pedal and the gas pedal go through the clutch, all of that stuff that perch, um, permeates, it goes through. That firewall. And of course, you've probably, if you're been around for awhile, you've had leaks coming through your firewall and, uh, you know, how poorest they can be sometimes. [00:13:18] Well, we have the same type of thing on our internet firewalls. Every home has doors and what we call the doors in on the internet is similar to what they call them. On the, in the Navy, on the water, the reports. So think about a porthole in a boat, or think about a, a door, a port, which is the French word for door. [00:13:45] What happens on the internet? For instance, if you're trying to connect to Craig peterson.com, you are going to connect to a specific port on my server. So the address typically, uh, is going to be resolved by DNS. And then once it gets to the server, you can connect to port 4 43. You might try and connect to port 80, but I'll do a redirect, but that's neither here nor there. [00:14:12] So you're going to connect to that port four 40. So my firewall has to say, Hey, if somebody is coming in and wants to get to port 4 43, which is called a well-known port, that's the port that all web server. Listen on. So if someone's trying to get to my port, my web server on port 4 43, let them in. But if someone's trying to get to another port, don't let them in. [00:14:48] Now there's multiple ways to respond or not respond. I can talk about that right now. That'd be for deep dive workshop, but the idea is. Each application that you are connecting to, or that your providing has. Part of the problem that we've been seen. And this is a very big problem is that people are not changing the administrative passwords on their machines. [00:15:20] So administrative passwords mean things like admin for the username and admin for the password on your firewall. So. Your firewall, if you have what's called when admin enabled, what that means is someone on the wide area network. In other words, The internet, someone on the internet or on the, when can connect to your firewall and control it. [00:15:51] This is, as you can imagine, a very big thing, and it is something that we cover in one of our workshops, explained it all and all of the details and what to do, but most businesses and most people have not properly configured their firewalls. When we're talking about number one, problem, 91% of the time being an exploit against public facing applications. [00:16:18] What that means is they could very well just be trying to connect to the administrative interface on your firewall. Unfortunately, they will often offer. Change the software on your firewall. So they won't just reconfigure. They'll just change it entirely. And they'll do all kinds of evil things. Again, we're not going to get into all of that and what to look for and what can happen. [00:16:44] But number one thing everybody's got to do, and I saw some stats this week as well, that made me want to bring the. Most people and most businesses about two thirds have not changed the default passwords on the hardware that they have. Now it can understand sometimes the kids confusing. No question about. [00:17:07] But if you don't change the password on something that's public facing, in other words, something that can be reached from the internet or again, the wide area network. I know there's a lot of terms for this, but something that someone else can get at from outside your network. And it's the default password like admin admin, you could be in a whole lot of. [00:17:35] So check that right now, please double check that triple check that because even if you have a router from a big internet service provider, again, like the Comcast Verizon's, et cetera of the world, they will almost always have it set up. So you can change that administrative password and Jewish. Now I, again, for clients, I have some different advice than I have for, for just regular users, but make sure you change that. [00:18:09] And here's the second part of the problem. What happens if you have a business and let's say you're not hosting your own website, like I've been doing for a couple of decades and how three 30 years, I guess now. Um, and so you've got your website hosted at some. Web height site, hosting place, you know, Gator or one eye and one eye and one or GoDaddy or whatever. [00:18:35] Okay. So, okay. That's fine. So let's not inside our network. Uh, w we don't worry about the security because that's the vendor's problem. Now we're talking about, okay, what happens. My users who need to work from home. This gets to be a very big problem for so many people, because work from home is important. [00:19:00] So what are you going to do? Well, basically in most cases, unfortunately, businesses are just exposing an application to the internet. So they might, they might. Terribly configured networks, where there is a direct connection that goes right to the files. So you connect to a port on their firewall and it immediately redirects it internally. [00:19:30] Remaps it to the file server. And some people are really, really clever. Alright. Or so they think, because what they'll do is they'll say, okay, well, you know, that, that normal port number. Okay. So I'm going to move. Port number. So you're going to connect to port 17, 17 on my firewall, and it's going to connect you to the file share on my file server so that people from home can just connect to port 17, 17, and ta-da, there are all the files and yeah, we're, we're using passwords, so it'll be okay. [00:20:06] It'll be fine. Um, but, uh, guess what it isn't for a few. Different reasons are we're going to be talking about those here in just a minute. Yeah, I want to encourage you right now. Take a minute. Go online. Craig peterson.com. You'll find lots of information there. I've got 3,500 articles, all searchable, Craig peterson.com. [00:20:32] But more importantly, make sure you sign up for my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So that you can keep up to date on everything that is important in all of our lives. [00:20:51] We're talking about firewalls at home at the office, what it means to have public facing services, really applications, people working from home. How can you make it easy for them and hard for the bad guy? [00:21:15] Many businesses had to quickly change the way their computers were set up because of course the lockdown and people working from home. [00:21:26] And, um, unfortunately. Many mistakes were made. And some of this, in fact, I'm going to talk a lot of this problem up to these managed services providers break, fix shops. My, my fellow information technology contractors, if you will, because they didn't know any. Most of these people have been computer people, their whole lives, right. [00:21:55] They played with PCs when they were young and they might've taken a course or two and wow. MCSC certified. Believe me, this is not something that a straight up MCSC or. And frankly, most of the it certifications can really understand or really handle the cybersecurity can be done, but there's so many things they overlook just like what I was just talking about, exposing a file server directly to the internet. [00:22:29] I mentioned, okay. While they thought it was going to be safe because there's a username and password, but there's a couple of huge problems here. Problem. Number one. When you're exposing a service to the internet, like for instance, the files server, you are exposing software that may have exploitable, but. [00:22:54] And again, going back to those stats from earlier this week, more than half of all of the systems that are out there are not patched to date. It's so bad that president Biden just ordered the federal government agencies to apply patches some as old as three years. So what happens now? Well, the bad guy scan, and guess what they found. [00:23:23] Port that you thought was just so clever because it wasn't the standard port number for that service. Maybe it's SMB or CIFS or something else. And, uh, they found it because they scan, they look, they see what the response is that tells them what type of a server sitting there. And then they try, well, let me see. [00:23:45] There's the zero day exploits, but why bother with those? Let's just start with the good old standard ones. And unfortunately, because so many machines are not patched up at all, let alone properly patched up. You, they end up getting into the machine. It's really that simple, just because it's not patched up. [00:24:08] How does that sound? Huh? Yeah, it's just plain, not patched up. It's not available for anyone to be able to use anybody to be able to access. Right. It there it's not restricted. So the passwords don't matter if you haven't patched your systems. And then the second problem is that. Are brute force attacks against so many servers out there. [00:24:36] And most of the time, what we're talking about is Microsoft, but, you know, there's the share of bugs kind of goes around, but Microsoft and really, they get nailed a lot more than most beet, mainly because they're probably the number one out there that's in use today, not in the server community, certainly, but certainly also in the. [00:24:59] It's been, you know, small businesses, that's all they know. So they just run a Microsoft server and more and more, you kind of have to run it because I, I get it. You know, there's so many apps that depend on the various functions that are provided by the active directory server at Microsoft and stuff. So we, we do that for our customers as well. [00:25:19] So are you starting to see why the brute force against a server will often get them in and the smarter guys figure out what the business is? And then they go to the dark web and they look up those business emails. Addresses that they have that have been stolen along with the passwords that were used. [00:25:43] That's why we keep saying, use a different password on every site because that stolen password now. Is going to be tried against your service, your, your file server. That might be there. You might be trying to have a VPN service that the people are VPN in from home. You might have remote desktop, which has been. [00:26:08] Abject failure when it comes to cybersecurity, it's just been absolutely terrible. So you might have any of those types of things. And if they've got your email address and they've got the passwords you've used on other sites, which they've stolen and they try them, are they going to work? Odds are yes, because most people, I got another set of stats this week. [00:26:36] Most people use the same password for every site out there or every type of site. So they might get a second, most common is they use one password for all of their social media sites. They use another one for all of their banking sites. So we cover this in some depth in our bootcamp so that you understand how to do the whole password thing. [00:27:03] And what I recommend is a piece of software called one password. I don't recommend that you just use one password for everything. I was misunderstood by someone the other day. You mean just w w I use one password for everything. Yeah, you do. And then I talked to them a little bit more because I thought that was an odd question. [00:27:24] And it turned out, he was thinking, you just have the one password, like, like, you know, P at sign SSW, zero RD. Right? You use that everywhere. No, there's a piece of software go to one password.com. That's what I recommend as a password manager. And I show you how to use that and how to use it effectively in my bootcamp. [00:27:48] Absolutely free. Just like the radio is free. I'm trying to get the information out to as many people as possible, but you gotta be on my list. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you go there. So I've explained the basics here of what happens. We have a door open or windows, open ports on our servers, on our firewalls at home. [00:28:15] And at work. So the thing to do, particularly if you're a business, but even if your home user is check that firewall configuration. And let me tell you something that probably won't come as a surprise. Most of these internet server. The providers are in the business to make as much money as possible. And cybersecurity is very much secondary. [00:28:40] They know they talk about it and they talk about software defined networks and things that sound really cool. But in reality, what they give you is. Configured very well and is going to expose you. So make sure you go in, they will set it up. For instance, if they're providing you with television services, they'll set it up so that they can just bypass your firewall and get into the cable box that they installed in your house. [00:29:09] Yeah. Obviously that's not something they should be doing because now they are opening you up to attack. What happens when there's a cybersecurity problem with the cable box? We've seen this problem too, with television vendors where they poke a hole out through your firewall so that they can then gather statistics and do firmer updates and everything else. [00:29:34] It's insane. It really is. These vendors are not thinking about you. They're not thinking about the consequences. It is a very, very sad situation, but now you know what to do and how to do it. Okay. I explained today, firewalls. I explained router. I explained ports, which should be open, which should not be open. [00:29:58] And the reasons why I even mentioned passwords, I get into that in a lot of detail in my bootcamp, Craig peterson.com to get on that waiting list. Craig peterson.com, just subscribe and you'll be kept up to date. [00:30:14] There has been a whole lot of discussion lately about Metta. You might've heard. In fact, you probably did that. Facebook changed its name to Metta and they're aiming for something called the metaverse. So what is it exactly and what's it going to do for or to you? [00:30:32] The metaverse oh my gosh. I had a great discussion this week about the metaverse this came out in, um, and originally anyways, in this novel called the what was it now? [00:30:47] A snow crash. That's what it was 1992, Neil. Stevenson or Steffenson. I'm not sure how he pronounces it, but in this book, which was a cyberpunk model and I've, I've always thought cyber punk was cool. Uh, is the metal versus an imaginary place that's made available to the public over the world wide fiber optics network. [00:31:13] And it's projected onto virtual reality goggles sound familiar yet. And in the. You can build a buildings park signs as well as things that do not exist. In reality, such as vast hovering overhead light show, special neighborhoods were three where the rules of three-dimensional spacetime are ignored and free combat zones where people can go hunt and kill each other. [00:31:42] Great article about this in ARS Technica this week. And, uh, that was a little quote from the book and from the article. Phenomenal idea. Well, if you have read or seen the movie ready player one, and I have seen the movie, but a friend of mine this week said the book is so much better. So I'm going to have to read that book, ready player one. [00:32:06] But in it, you have these people living in. Dystopian future where everything is badly worn down, the mega cities, people building on top of each other and they get their entertainment and relaxation and even make money in. Prison time by being inside this virtual world, they can go anywhere, do anything and play games, or just have fun. [00:32:39] One of the vendors that we work with at my company mainstream has this kind of a virtual reality thing for. I kind of a summit, so people can go and watch this presentation and I think it's stupid, but they, you walk in. And it's, uh, this is just on a screen. They're not using like those Oculus 3d graph glasses, but you walk into an auditorium. [00:33:13] So you've got to make your little avatar walked on. Dun dun, dun dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, and then go to an empty seat. And then you have to make your avatar sit down. Right? I, I have never played a game like this. I never played second life. Never any of that sort of thing. It was kind of crazy to me. And then I was doing a presentation, so I had to go Dundon then, then, then the, up onto the rostrum there and stand behind the podium and, and then put my slides up on this virtual screen. [00:33:49] It was ridiculous. I have a full television production studio here in my, in my lab. Right. And that's, this is where I do the radio show. This is where I do my television appearances. This is where I do pretty much everything. Right. And so what I can do is I can split screen with my face, with the desktop. [00:34:12] You can see my desktop, I can draw on it, circle things, highlight things or whatever I want to do. Right. But no, no, no, no. I was in their virtual reality. And so all I could do is. I have the slides come up. In fact, I had prepared beforehand, pre-taped it? A, the whole presentation, but I couldn't play that video. [00:34:37] No, no, no. I had to show a slide deck, you know, death by PowerPoint. I'm sure you've been there before. It's very, very frustrating in case you can tell for me, well, we've seen this type of thing. I mentioned some of the things like that. I'm in second life. I'm sure you've heard of that before. Sims is another one you've probably heard of before. [00:35:01] These types of semi metaverses have been around a very long time. And, and in fact, all the way on back to the nineties is Habbo hotel. G I don't know if you ever heard of that thing, but it was non-line gaming and social space. I helped to develop one for a client of mine back in the early nineties. [00:35:23] Didn't really go very far. I think it was ahead of its time. It's it's interesting right now, enter. Mark Zuckerberg. Do you remember a few years ago, mark Zuckerberg had a presentation. He was going to make this huge announcement, right? They bought Oculus. What was it? It was like crazy amount of money. And then he came in the back of the hall. [00:35:50] And nobody noticed he walked all the way up to the front and nobody even saw him because they were all wearing these 3d glasses. And of course, today they are huge. They are awkward and they don't look that great, the pictures inside, but the idea is you can move your head around and the figures move as your head moves, almost like you're in the real world. [00:36:13] And that's kind of cool and people thought it was kind of cool and they didn't see Zuckerberg because they all had these things on. And the inside was playing a little presentation about what Facebook was going to do with Oculus. Well, they just killed off the Oculus name anyways here a couple of weeks ago, over at Facebook about the same time that got rid of the Facebook name and went to meta. [00:36:39] The Facebook product is so-called Facebook and it appears what they are going to be doing is taking the concept of a metaverse much, much further than anyone has ever taken it before. They're planning on there's speculation here. Okay. So, you know, don't obviously I don't get invested. I don't give investment advice, investment advice. [00:37:10] Um, but I do talk about technology and, uh, I've been usually five to 10 years. I had so take that as well. They as the grain of salt, but I think what they're planning on doing is Facebook wants to become the foundation for Mehta versus think about things like world of Warcraft, where you've got the. Gain that people are playing. [00:37:39] And it's a virtual reality, basically, right? It might be two D, but some of it's moving into the three-dimensional world. Other games like Minecraft and roadblocks, they have some pretty simple building blocks that people can use network effects and play your creativity to make your little world and the ability. [00:38:04] To exchange and or sell your virtual property. That's where I think Mr. Zuckerberg is getting really interested now because if they can build the platform that everybody else the wants to have a virtual world builds their virtual world on top of. Man, do they have a moneymaker? Now? People like me, we're going to look at this and just poo poo it. [00:38:35] I I'm sure I'm absolutely sure, because it will be another 20 years before you really think it's. You know, some of these scifi shows have talked about it. You know, you can feel someone touching you, et cetera, et cetera. Yeah. That's going to be very crude for a very long time. And now CGI is pretty good. [00:38:57] Yeah. You watch the movies. CGI is great, but that takes weeks worth of rendering time on huge farms, clusters of servers. So it's going to take quite a while. Looking at the normal advancement of technology before this really becomes real. Now there have also been us court cases over who owns what in bad happened with Eve online. [00:39:28] Second life where disagreements over player ownership of the virtual land created by the publisher, which was Linden labs. When. And I've also mentioned in the past how our friends over at the IRS have tried to tax some of the land that you own inside these virtual worlds. So ownership, do you really own it? [00:39:55] Does it really exist? What would non fungible tokens maybe it does. And these non fungible tokens are. Basically just a check, some verification, I'm really oversimplifying of some sort of a digital something rather lately. And initially it was mostly pictures. And so you had a picture of something and you owned that and you could prove it because of the blockchain behind it. [00:40:27] But I think this is where he's really interested because if he can build the base platform. Let the developers come up with the rules of what's it called it a game and come up with what the properties look like and how people can trade them and sell them and what kind of upgrades they can get. Right. [00:40:48] So let's nothing Zuckerberg has to worry about. Uh, Metta or Zuckerberg then worries about, okay. So how do we collect money for these? How do we check with the transactions? Uh, somebody wants to buy those sort of Damocles. How does that transaction work and how do we Facebook Metta? How do we get a slice of the act? [00:41:16] You got to believe that that's where things are going. And if they have the ability to make this base platform and be able to take characters from one part of a developer to another part of the developer, you could have worlds where Gandalf might be fighting bugs bunny. Right? Interesting. Interesting and Warner brothers, all these movie companies would probably be coming out with complete virtual reality. [00:41:49] So when you're watching James Bond, you're not just watching James Bond, you can look around, you can see what's happening. People sneaking up behind. And ultimately you could be James Bond, but that's decades away. I think a good 20 years. All right, everybody. Thanks for sticking around here. Make sure you go online. [00:42:11] Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my weekly newsletter. Find out about these free boot camps and other things that I have. So we can keep you up to date and keep you safe. [00:42:25] We already talked about Metta and their name, change the metaverse, but there's something else. Facebook did this last week that surprised a lot of users, something they started in 2010, but has been controversial ever since. [00:42:41] We had a pretty big announcement, frankly, this last week from our friends over at Facebook, not the one where they change their name and the. [00:42:51] Basically trying to create a metaverse platform. That's going to be the one platform that rules the world. Although those are my words by the way. But Facebook has announced plans now to shut down a decade old. Facial recognition system this month. We'll see what they do with this. If they follow through entirely, but they're planning on deleting over 1 billion faces that they have already gone through and analyzed. [00:43:26] You might remember. In 2010, Facebook had a brand new feature. It started announcing, Hey, did you know that so-and-so just posted your picture? Is this you? Is this your friend, is this sewn? So do you remember all of those questions? If you're a Facebook user back in the day? Well, they were automatically identifying people who appeared in digital photos and suggested that users or users tagged them with a click we're going to get to and admitted here. [00:43:57] Uh, and of course that then linked the Facebook account for. The picture that you tagged to the images and let that person know. And of course Facebook's ultimate goal is to get you to stay on long, as long online, as long as possible. Because if you're online, you are going to be looking at ads that are aimed primarily at. [00:44:18] Well, facial recognition has been a problem. We've seen it a worldwide. I just read through a restatement from the electronic frontier foundation, talking about facial recognition and the problems with it, how some people have been arrested based on facial recognition and held for over a day. We'll have cases where the police use to kind of a crummy photograph of them from a surveillance video sometimes also from a police car, in some areas, the police cars are continually taking video and uploading it to the internet, looking for things like license plates, to see if a car. [00:45:00] Parking ticket that hasn't been paid or it hasn't paid us registration all the way through looking at faces, who is this person? And some in law enforcement have kind of thought it would be great to have kind of like Robocop. You remember Robocop, not the ed 2 0 9. There was also in that movie. That's also very scary, but when they look at someone who's on a street at autonomous. [00:45:24] Pops up in their glasses, who it is, any criminal record, if there any sort of a threat to et cetera. And I can understand that from the policemen standpoint. And I interviewed out at the consumer electronic show, a manufacturer of. That technology, it was kind of big and bulky at the time. This was probably about six or eight years ago, but nowadays you're talking about something that's kind of Google glass size, although that's kind of gone by the wayside too. [00:45:54] There are others that are out there that you. Facial recognition. Technology has really advanced in its ability to identify people, but you still get false positives and false negatives. And that's where part of the problem becomes from they have been taking and they been private companies primarily, but also some government agencies they've been taking pictures from. [00:46:21] They can find them. We've talked about Clearview AI before this is a company that literally stole pitchers, that it could get off the internet. They scan through Facebook, Instagram, everywhere. They could find faces and they tied it all back in. They did facial recognition. On all of those photos that they had taken and then sold the data to law enforcement agencies. [00:46:49] There's an app you can get from Clearview AI. That runs on your smartphone and you can take a picture of someone in the street, clear view. AI will run that face through their database and we'll tell you who it is, what their, what their background is, where their LinkedIn page is their Facebook page, wherever it found them online. [00:47:13] Basically what they've been doing. Now Clearview had a problem here this last couple of weeks because the Australian government ordered them to delete all facial recognition, data belonging, to anyone that lives. In Australia. Now that's going to be a bit of a problem for clear view, because it's hard to identify exactly where people live just based on a photograph. [00:47:40] And the United Kingdom is also considering doing this exact same thing. Now, clear views have been sued. They violated the terms of service from Facebook and some of these other sites that I mentioned, but they did it anyway. And clear view was. To destroy all the facial images and facial templates they had retrieved about any Australian. [00:48:08] I think that's probably a pretty good idea. I don't like the idea of this data being out there. Well, if your password is stolen and we're going to be talking about that in our bootcamp, coming up here in a couple of weeks about how to determine if your username or your password is stolen. But, uh, and of course, if you want to get that. [00:48:29] Bootcamp and go to that. There's no charge for it, but you have to know about it. And the only way is to sign up. You have to make sure you're on my email list@craigpeterson.com. But what happens when your email address is stolen or your password, or both are stolen from a web. Oh, typically they end up on the dark web. [00:48:50] They sell personal identification for very little money. In some cases it's only a few dollars per thousand people's identities. It is absolutely crazy. So the bad guys are looking for that information, but you can change your password. You can change your email address, but if your facial information is stolen, Can't change your face. [00:49:18] If your eye print is stolen, you can't change your eye. I have a friend who's pretty excited because he got to go right through the security at the airport ever so quickly. Cause all they had to do was scan his eyeball. Well, that data is valuable data because it cannot be changed. And it can, in some cases be replicated. [00:49:41] In fact, the department of Homeland security and the transportation safety administration had the database of face print stolen from them in 2019. To about 200,000 people's identities were stolen, the face sprints. It's just absolutely crazy. And this was some, a vendor of us customs and border protection. [00:50:05] And it, it, you can't write down to it. I read the detailed report on it just now. And the report that came out of the federal government said, well, it went to a contractor who. Took the data, all of the face prints off site over to their own site. And it wasn't encrypted when they took it over there. But it does mention that it was taken from an un-encrypted system at customs and border protection. [00:50:34] So wait a minute. Now you're blaming the contractor that you hired because it wasn't encrypted and yet you didn't encrypt it yourself either. I, you know, I guess that kind of goes around, but they want to. They want your biometric information just as much as they want anything else. Think about your phones. [00:50:53] Nowadays, apple has done a very good job with the biometrics and the fingerprints and making sure that that information is only ever stored on the phone. It never goes to apple, never leaves the phone it's in what apple calls, the secure long term. And if you mess with it at all, it destroys itself, which is part of the problem with replacing a cracked screen yourself on an iPhone, because you're going to disturb that secure enclave and the phone will no longer work. [00:51:24] That is not true when it comes to many other devices, including most of your Android phones that are out there. It is. So if the bad guys have. Your face print, they, and they can create 3d models that can and do in fact, go ahead and fool it into letting you in that that's information they want. So why are we allowing these companies to like clear view AI? [00:51:52] And others to buy our driver's license photos to the federal government, to also by the way, by our driver's license photos, by them from other sites and also our passport information. It's getting kind of scary, especially when you look into. China has a social credit system. And the Biden administration has made rumblings about the same here in the U S but in China, what they're doing is they have cameras all over the place and your faces. [00:52:27] And they can identify you. So if you jaywalk, they take so many points off of your social credit. If you don't do something that they want you to do or be somewhere, they want you to be, you lose credits again, and you can gain them as well by doing various things that the government wants you to do. And. [00:52:49] And ultimately, if you don't have enough social credit, you can't even get on a train to get to work. But the real bad part are the users. This is a minority in China and China's authorities are using. Us facial recognition, technology and artificial intelligence technology. Hey, thanks Google for moving your artificial intelligence lab to China in order to control and track the users. [00:53:19] Absolutely amazing in the United States law enforcement is using this type of software to aid policing, and we've already seen problems of overreach and mistaken IRS. So Facebook to you're leading a billion of these frameworks. If you will, of people's faces biometrics. Good for them. Hopefully this will continue a tread elsewhere. [00:53:46] Well, we've talked a little bit today about firewalls, what they do, how your network is set up. If you miss that, make sure you catch up online. My podcast@craigpeterson.com, but there's a whole new term out there that is changing security. [00:54:03] It's difficult to set up a secure network. [00:54:07] Let's just say mostly secure because if there's a power plug going into it, there's probably a security issue, but it's difficult to do that. And historically, what we've done is we've segmented the networks. So we have various devices that. Maybe be a little more harmful and on one network, other devices at a different level of security and many businesses that we've worked with, we have five different networks each with its own level of secure. [00:54:38] And in order to get from one part of the network, for instance, let's say you're an accounting and you want to get to the accounting file server. We make sure your machine is allowed access at the network level. And then obviously on top of that, you've got usernames and passwords. Maybe you've got multifactor authentication or something else. [00:54:59] I'll make sense, doesn't it? Well, the new move today is to kind of move away from that somewhat. And instead of having a machine or a network have firewall rules to get to a different network or different machine within an organization. There's something called zero trust. So again, think of it. You've, you've got a network that just has salespeople on it. [00:55:25] You have another network that might have just your accounting people. Another network has your administrative people and other network has your software developers, et cetera. So all of these networks are separate from each other and they're all firewalled from each other. So that only for instance, at county people can get to the accounting server. [00:55:44] Okay, et cetera. Right? The sales guys can enter the sales data and the programmers can get at their programs. And maybe the servers that are running their virtual machines are doing testing on what was zero trust. It is substantially different. What they're doing with zero trust is assuming that you always have to be authentic. [00:56:11] So instead of traditional security, where, where you're coming from helps to determine your level of access, you are assuming that basically no units of trust. So I don't care where you're coming from. If you are on a machine in the accounting department, We want to verify a lot of other information before we grant you access. [00:56:38] So that information probably does include what network you're on. Probably does include the machine you're on, but it's going to all. You as a user. So you're going to have a username. You're going to have an ID. You're going to have a multi-factor authentication. And then we're going to know specifically what your job is and what you need to have specific access. [00:57:04] Because this follows the overall principle of least privilege to get your job done. Now you might've thought in the past that, oh my gosh, these firewalls, they're just so annoying. It's just so difficult to be able to do anything right. Well, zero trust is really going to get your attention. If that's what you've been saying. [00:57:23] But here's an example of the traditional security approach. If you're in the office, you get access to the full network. Cause that's pretty common, right? That's not what we've been doing, but that's pretty common where we have been kind of working in the middle between zero trust and this traditional you're in the office. [00:57:41] So you can potentially get it. Everything that's on the off. And if you're at home while all you have to do is access a specific portal, or as I've explained before, well, you are just connecting to an IP address in a hidden port, which won't remain hidden for. So maybe in a traditional security approach, the bouncer checks your ID. [00:58:08] You can go anywhere inside this club and it's multi floor, right. But in a zero trust approach, getting into the club, having that bouncer look at your ID is only the first check, the bartender or the waiter. They also have to check your ID before you could be served. No matter where you are in the club and that's kind of how they do it right now, though, they'll make a mark on your hand or they'll stamp it. [00:58:35] And now they know, okay, this person cannot get a drink for instance. So think of it that way, where every resource that's available inside the business independently checks whether or not you should have access to. This is the next level of security. It's something that most businesses are starting to move towards. [00:58:57] I'm talking about the bigger guys, the guys that have had to deal with cybersecurity for awhile, not just the people who have a small business, most small businesses have that flat network that. Again about right. The traditional security approach of all you're in the office. So yeah, you can get at anything. [00:59:15] It doesn't matter. And then you, you have the sales guys walking out with your client list and who knows what else is going on? Think of Ferris, Bueller, where he was updating his grades and miss days at high school, from his home computer. And you've got an idea of why you might want to secure. You are network internally because of, again, those internal threats. [00:59:40] So keep an eye out for it. If you're looking to replace your network, obviously this is something that we've had a lot of experience with. Cisco is probably the best one out there for this, but there are a few other vendors that are pretty good. If you want to drop me an email, I'll put together a list of some of the top tier zero. [01:00:02] Providers so that you can look at those. I don't have one right now, but I'd be glad to just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. We can point you in the right direction, but if you have an it person or department, or whether you outsource it to an MSP, a managed services provider, make sure you have the discussion with them about zero. [01:00:28] Now, when I'm looking at security, I'm concerned about a bunch of things. So let me tell you something that Karen and I have been working on the last, oh man, few weeks. I mentioned the boot camp earlier in the show today. And one of the things that we're going to do for those people that attend the bootcamp is I think incredible. [01:00:49] This has taken Karen so much time to dig up. Once she's done is she's worked with me to figure out what are the things that you need to keep tabs on. Now, again, this is aimed primarily at businesses, but let me tell you, this is going to be great for home users as well. And we've put together this list of what you should be doing. [01:01:15] About cybersecurity every week. And in fact, a couple of things that are daily, but every week, every month, every quarter, every six months and every year, it's a full checklist. So you can take this and sit down with it and, you know, okay. So I have to do these things this week and this isn't. Response to anything in particular, it does meet most requirements, but frankly, it's something that every business should be doing when it comes to the cybersecurity. [01:01:53] It includes things like passwords. Are they being done? Right? Did you do some training with your employees on fishing or a few other topics all the way on down to make sure you got some canned air and blew out the fan? In your workstations, you'd be amazed at how dirty they get. And he is the enemy of computers that makes them just fail much, much faster than, than 82, same thing with server. [01:02:22] So it is everything. It is a lot of pages and it is just check she'd made it nice and big. Right. So even I can read it. But it's little check marks that you can mark on doing while you're going through it. So we're doing some more work on that. She's got the first couple of iterations done. We're going to do a couple more, make sure it is completely what you would need in order to help keep your cyber security in. [01:02:50] But the only way you're going to get it is if you are in the BR the bootcamp absolutely free. So it was this list, or of course you won't find out unless you are on my email list. Craig Peterson.com/subscribe. [01:03:06] One of the questions I get asked pretty frequently has to do with artificial intelligence and robots. Where are we going? What are we going to see first? What is the technology that's first going to get into our businesses and our homes. [01:03:22] Artificial intelligence is something that isn't even very well-defined there's machine learning and there's artificial intelligence. [01:03:33] Some people put machine learning as a subset of artificial intelligence. Other people kind of mess around with it and do it the other way. I tend to think that artificial intelligence is kind of the top of the heap, if you will. And that machine learning is a little bit further down because machines can be programmed to learn. [01:03:54] For instance, look at your robot, your eye robot cleans the floor, cleans the carpet. It moves around. It has sensors and it learned, Hey, I have to turn here. Now. I robot is actually pretty much randomly drew. But there are some other little vacuum robots that, that do learn the makeup of your house. The reason for the randomization is while chairs move people, move things, move. [01:04:22] So trying to count on the house, being exactly the same every time isn't isn't exactly right. Uh, by the way, a lot of those little vacuums that are running around are also sending data about your house, up to the manufacturer in the. So they often will know how big the house is. They know where it's located because you're using the app for their robot. [01:04:47] And that, of course it has access to GPS, et cetera, et cetera. Right. But where are we going? Obviously, the little by robot, the little vacuum does not need much intelligence to do what it's doing, but one of the pursuits that we've had for. Really since the late nineties for 20, 25 years are what are called follower robots. [01:05:13] And that's when I think we're going to start seeing much more frequently, it's going to be kind of the first, um, I called it machine learning. They call it artificial intelligence who you really could argue either one of them, but there's a little device called a Piaggio fast forward. And it is really kind of cool. [01:05:34] Think of it almost like R2D2 or BB eight from star wars following you around. It's frankly, a little hard to do. And I want to point out right now, a robot that came out, I think it was last year from Amazon is called the Astro robot. And you might remember Astro from the Jetsons and. This little robot was available in limited quantities. [01:06:01] I'm looking at a picture of it right now. It, frankly, Astro is quite cute. It's got two front wheels, one little toggle wheel in the back. It's got cameras. It has a display that kind of makes it look like kids are face, has got two eyeballs on them. And the main idea behind this robot is that it will. [01:06:23] Provide some protection for your home. So it has a telescoping camera and sensor that goes up out of its head up fairly high, probably about three or four feet up looking at this picture. And it walks around your one rolls around your home, scanning for things that are out of the normal listening for things like windows breaking there, there's all kinds of security. [01:06:50] That's rolled into some of these. But it is a robot and it is kind of cool, but it's not great. It's not absolutely fantastic. Amazon's dubbing the technology it's using for Astro intelligent motion. So it's using location and mapping data to make sure that Astro. Gets around without crashing into things. [01:07:18] Unlike that little vacuum cleaner that you have, because if someone loves something on the floor that wasn't there before, they don't want to run over it, they don't want to cause harm. They don't want to run into your cats and dogs. And oh my maybe lions and bears too. But, uh, they're also using this computer vision technology called visual ID and that is used. [01:07:41] With facial recognition, drum roll, please, to recognize specific members of the family. So it's kind of like the dog right in the house. It's sitting there barking until it recognizes who you are, but Astro, in this case, Recognizes you and then provide you with messages and reminders can even bring you the remote or something else and you just drop it in the bin and off it goes. [01:08:08] But what I am looking at now with this Piaggio fast forward, you might want to look it up online, cause it's really. Cool is it does the following, like we've talked about here following you around and doing things, but it is really designed to change how people and goods are moving around. So there's a couple of cool technologies along this line as well. [01:08:35] That it's not, aren't just these little small things. You might've seen. Robots delivery robots. The Domino's for instance, has been working on there's another real cool one out there called a bird. And this is an autonomous driving power. Basically. It's a kind of a four wheel ATV and it's designed to move between the rows of fruit orchards in California or other places. [01:09:01] So what you do to train this borough robot is you press a follow button on it. You start walking around the field or wherever you want it to go. It's using, uh, some basic technology to follow you, cameras and computer vision, and it's recording it with GPS and it memorizes the route at that point. Now it can ferry all of your goods. [01:09:29] Around that path and communicate the path by the way to other burrow robots. So if you're out doing harvesting or whether it's apples out in the east coast, or maybe as I said out in California, you've got it. Helping you with some of the fruit orchards. It's amazing. So this is going to be something that is going to save a lot of time and money, these things, by the way, way up to 500 pounds and it can carry as much as a half a ton. [01:09:58] You might've seen some of the devices also from a company down in Boston, and I have thought that they were kind of creepy when, when you look at it, but the company's called Boston dynamics and. They were just bought, I think it was Hondai the bought them trying to remember. And, uh, anyway, These are kind of, they have robots that kind of look like a dog and they have other robots that kind of look like a human and they can do a lot of different chores. [01:10:33] The military has used them as have others to haul stuff. This one, this is like the little dog, it has four legs. So unlike a lot of these other robots that are on wheels, this thing can go over very, very. Terrain it can self write, et cetera. And they're also using them for things like loading trucks and moving things around, um, kind of think of Ripley again, another science fiction tie, uh, where she's loading the cargo in the bay of that spaceship. [01:11:05] And she is inside a machine. That's actually doing all of that heavy lifting now. Today, the technology, we have a can do all of that for us. So it is cool. Uh, I get kind of concerned when I see some of these things. Military robots are my favorite, especially when we're talking about artificial intelligence, but expect the first thing for these to be doing is to be almost like a companion, helping us carry things around, go fetch things for us and in the business space. [01:11:40] Go ahead and load up those trucks and haul that heavy stuff. So people aren't hurting their backs. Pretty darn cool. Hey, I want to remind you if you would like to get some of the free training or you want some help with something the best place to start is Craig peterson.com. And if you want professional help, well, not the shrink type, but with cyber security. [01:12:06] email me M E at Craig peterson.com. [01:12:10] Just in time for the holidays, we have another scam out there and this one is really rather clever and is fooling a lot of people and is costing them, frankly, a whole lot of money. [01:12:26] This is a very big cyber problem because it has been very effective. And although there have been efforts in place to try and stop it, they've still been able to kind of get ahead of it. There's a great article on vice that's in this week's newsletter. In my show notes up on the website and it is talking about a call that came in to one of the writers, Lorenzo, B cherry, um, probably completely messy and that name up, but the call came in from. [01:13:03] Supposedly right. Paid pals, uh, fraud prevention system. Someone apparently had tried to use his PayPal account to spend $58 and 82 cents. According to the automated voice on the line, PayPal needed to verify my identity to block the transfer. And here's a quote from the call, uh, in order to secure your account, please enter the code we have sent to your mobile device. [01:13:32] Now the voice said PayPal, sometimes texts, users, a code in order to protect their account. You know, I've said many times don't use SMS, right? Text messages for multi-factor authentication. There are much better ways to do it. Uh, after entering a string of six digits, the voice said, thank you. Your account has been secured and this request has been blocked. [01:13:57] Quote, again, don't worry. If any payment has been charged your account, we will refund it within 24 to 48 hours. Your reference ID is 1 5 4 9 9 2 6. You may now hang up, but this call was actually. Hacker they're using a type of bot is what they're called. These are these automated robotic response systems that just dramatically streamlined the process for the hackers to gain access into your account. [01:14:31] Particularly when you have multi-factor authentication codes where you're using. An SMS messages, but it also works for other types of one-time passwords. For instance, I suggest to everybody and we use these with our clients that they should use something called one password.com. That's really you'll find them online. [01:14:54] And one password.com allows you to use and create one time password, same thing with Google authenticator, same thing with Microsoft authenticator, they all have one-time password. So if a bad guy has found your email address and has found your password online in one of these hacks, how can they possibly get into your PayPal account or Amazon or Coinbase or apple pay or. [01:15:26] Because you've got a one time password set up or SMS, right? Multifactor authentication of some sort. Well they're full and people and absolute victims. Here's what's happening. Th this bot by the way, is great for bad guys that don't have social engineering skills, social engineering skills, or when someone calls up and says, hi, I'm from it. [01:15:51] And there's a problem. And we're going to be doing an upgrade on your Microsoft word account this weekend because of a bug or a security vulnerability. So what, what I need from you is I need to know what username you're normally using so that I can upgrade the right. So we don't, it doesn't cost us a whole bunch by upgrading accounts that aren't being used. [01:16:15] So once the account name that you use on the computer and what's the password, so we can get in and test it afterwards, that's a social engineering type attack. That's where someone calls on the phone, those tend to be pretty effective. But how about if you don't speak English very well? At all frankly, or if you're not good at tricking people by talking to them, well, this one is really great. [01:16:44] Cause these bots only cost a few hundred bucks and anybody can get started using these bots to get around multi-factor authentication. See, here's how it works. In order to break into someone's account, they need your username, email address and password. Right? Well, I already said. Much many of those have been stolen. [01:17:07] And in our boot camp coming up in a few weeks, we're going to go through how you can find out if your username has been stolen and has been posted on the dark web and same thing for your password. Right? So that's going to be part of the. Coming up that I'll announce in the newsletter. Once we finished getting everything already for you guys, they also go ahead and buy what are called bank logs, which are login details from spammers who have already tricked you into giving away some of this information. [01:17:41] But what if you have multi-factor authentication enabled something I'm always talking about, always telling you to do. Well, these bots work with platforms like Twilio, for instance, uh, and they are using other things as well, like slack, et cetera. And all the bad guy has to do with that point is going. [01:18:07] And, uh, say, they're trying to break into your account right now. So they're going to, let's get really, really specific TD bank. That's where my daughter works. So let's say you have a TD bank account. And the hacker has a good idea that you have a TD bank account knows it because they entered in your username and password and TD bank was letting them in. [01:18:32] But TD bank sent you a text message with that six character code, right? It's usually digits. It's usually a number. So what happens then? So the bad guys says, okay, so it's asking me for this six digit SMS

art.fully.grounded
Chris Chalk

art.fully.grounded

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:33


Chris opens up about how he gradually awakened to his deepest and truest sense of self, how he finds the spiritual in every aspect of day, and how he uses both a disciplined daily practice and consciously developed self-trust to navigate this thing we call life. He also finds time to help his old friend Janie through a tough moment. Born in Asheville, NC, Chris is an actor, filmmaker and coach currently living in LA. A near death drowning experience “woke” Chris from his productivity slumber two years into his journey in NY and he has been thriving and developing his sense of self ever since. Chris recently portrayed Paul Drake on HBO's “Perry Mason” (now filming its second season) and can currently be seen in Ava Duvernay's Netflix mini-series “Central Park Five.”   Other acting credits include “Homeland,” “The Newsroom,” “Gotham,” “Complications,” “Underground,” “Detroit,” 12 Years a Slave, and Lila and Eve starring alongside Viola Davis and Jennifer Lopez.    ⁠ Some of Chalk's theatrical credits include Roundabout's The Overwhelming, Lincoln Center's When I Come to Die, Manhattan Theatre Club's Defiance, Lynn Nottage's Pulitzer Prize winning Ruined and the Tony Award winning revival of Fences starring alongside Viola Davis and Denzel Washington, for which he was nominated for a Drama Desk Award and received a Theatre World Award.⁠   Chris just wrapped shooting “The Shining Girls” for Apple TV.⁠   His directorial feature debut, Farewell, won best first feature in 2020's Bentonville Film Festival. Chalk is currently in development for a horror anthology called Walnut Cove and a feature film revolving around America's veterans currently titled Curtis.   IG: @mynameischrischalk Twitter: @chalkchris   More on SGI Buddhism: https://www.sgi-usa.org/basics-of-buddhism/ Follow us! On IG: @art.fully.grounded On FB: @art.fully.grounded On Twitter: @AFGpod   Podcast's website: www.sweptbythewind.com/podcast  

Mark and the Millennials
Ep. 203 - Defending the Homeland

Mark and the Millennials

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:17


Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 11 al 17 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:51


CJ Navas y Álvaro Onieva, con la colaboración de Maritxu Olazabal, te traen toda la actualidad de la semana del mundo de las series de televisión.

Fuera de Series
Razones para ver | ‘Hermanos de Sangre'

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 18:52


Fuera de Series
‘Sexo en Nueva York'... y otros Placeres Culpables | Placeres Culpables

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:16


Placeres culpables es el programa de Fuera de Series que nos acerca a todas esas series que no nos atrevemos a reconocer que nos apasionan. Respaldados por Lorena Gil y Maritxu Olazabal ahora cuando te pregunten si ves una serie… ya puedes reconocer cuáles son tus placeres culpables.Nuestra serie de la semana es 'Sexo y Nueva York'. Además, repasamos lo que hemos visto en estos últimos días, lo más destacado en las redes y recordamos algunos de nuestros placeres culpables favoritos.

The Dom Giordano Program
Former Acting Homeland Secretary Chad Wolf on Biden's Handling of Illegal Immigration

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 7:56


Chad Wolf, former acting US. Secretary of Homeland Security, rejoins the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the new spending bill as Capitol Hill debates the astronomical $3.5T price tag. Specifically, Secretary Wolf, an expert on issues of the border, takes a deep dive into the implications for immigration written into the bill, including a monetary compensation for breaking the law and crossing the border. In addition, Wolf offers his predictions as to what would happen if such a bill were to be passed, and tells what he thinks the Biden administration needs to do to ease the border crisis. (Photo by Greg Nash-Pool/Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
News from homeland 6.11.2021 - Novice iz Slovenije 6.novembra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 5:11


Listen to this week's news from Slovenia. - Prisluhnite novicam iz domovine.

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 515: How to Direct Great Television with Dan Attias

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 76:27


If you have ever been interested in directing television or a series on Netflix then this is the episode for you. Today on the show we have legendary television director Dan Attias.Dan has worked as a director in the film and television industry for 37 years. As a director of series television he has received the Directors Guild of America award for outstanding direction of dramatic television and has been nominated for multiple Emmy awards for his comedy directing. He continues to work on some of the most celebrated and critically acclaimed American television shows, including Homeland, The Americans, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Billions, and The Boys.Previously he has directed The Sopranos, The Wire, Six Feet Under, True Blood, Entourage, The Killing, The Walking Dead, True Detective, Ray Donovan, Bloodline, Friday Night Lights, Northern Exposure, House, Lost, Alias, among many others. His first professional directing assignment was the feature film, Stephen King's Silver Bullet, produced by Dino DeLaurentiis. Dan started his career studying acting, then worked as an assistant director under Steen Spielberg on E.T. The Extraterrestrial, Airplane!, One From the Heart and several other feature films.He has taught acting and directing workshops in the United States, and has appeared as a guest speaker at festivals in Italy, Brazil, Greece, Mexico and Canada. Before working in the film and television industry, Dan was enrolled in a Ph.D. program in English literature at U.C.L.A., then transferred to the Theater Arts Department where he earned an M.F.A. in film production.His new book Directing Great Television: Inside TV's New Golden Age dives deep into his career, techniques and amazing behind the scenes stories of some of the best television shows in history.Sharing his own process honed over a decades-long career, Emmy-nominated director Dan Attias brings you into the actual experience of directing series television. Whether it's the high-stakes pressure of solving a last-minute problem on set, or the joy of pulling off a perfect shot by the skin of your teeth, Attias brings you right into the director's chair, sharing his knowledge and taking you through the process one challenging episode at a time.Offering a fundamental focus on story, and eschewing industry language for plain talk, Attias offers in-depth guidance how best to work with actors, how to “speak” through the camera, how to work with a showrunner, and how to be ready for the many ways a director will be challenged, large and small. Directing Great Television is a fascinating window into television's best shows, compelling to directors and non-directors alike.Attias's book transcends other filmmaking guides by detailing his journey to a surprising place of self-discovery, one with applications beyond entertainment.Enjoy my conversation with Dan Attias.

Outlook
The medical textbook that inspired me to flee my homeland

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 34:43


Dr Waheed Arian spent his early childhood in Kabul, Afghanistan during the Soviet-Afghan conflict. He and his family would often hide in cellars to escape the fighting and they were soon forced to flee to a refugee camp in Pakistan. He contracted tuberculosis and during his treatment was inspired by a doctor who gave him his first ever medical textbook and a stethoscope. Aged 15, he arrived alone in the UK and worked three jobs while studying. His hard work earned him a place to study medicine at Cambridge University, but his ambitions hung in the balance as the trauma and memories of his early life came back to haunt him. He's written a book about his life called In the Wars and his charity is called Arian Teleheal. Precious objects or artworks are at risk of theft, vandalism, even terror attacks in some cases. Protecting them is quite a task. Outlook's Alessia Cerantola went to meet one of the people doing just that - an Italian man called Alessandro Goppion who's been given the job of protecting some of the most valuable objects in the world, including the Mona Lisa painting. This report was first broadcast in February 2018. Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam Producer: Katy Takatsuki Picture: Dr Waheed Arian Credit: Dr Waheed Arian

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 4 al 10 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 51:44


CJ Navas y Álvaro Onieva, con la colaboración de Maritxu Olazabal, te traen toda la actualidad de la semana del mundo de las series de televisión.

The Cinematography Podcast
Dan Attias, Emmy-nominated director and author of Directing Great Television: Inside TV’s New Golden Age

The Cinematography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 60:10


Dan Attias has directed dozens of episodes of critically acclaimed television shows such as The Wire, The Sopranos, Homeland, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, The Americans, Billions, and many more. His years of experience led him to write the book, Directing Great Television: Inside TV's New Golden Age. The book is not only for those who want to direct, but also for fans who want to know how these shows are made. In college, Dan studied acting and had to make a short film as part of his film studies. He found he enjoyed being behind the camera as a director, and continued to study film with an eye to directing. Dan started working on several big movies as an assistant director, such as E.T., One From the Heart, Airplane! and Twilight Zone: The Movie. His first directing job was on Stephen King's Silver Bullet, a werewolf horror movie produced by Dino De Laurentiis. Dan finds the best way to approach directing a television show is to get invested in the story by finding what interests you in the script. In series television, directors often don't even get the script until a few days before they're going to direct it. If the show already exists, Dan likes to immerse himself in the show, watching several episodes and asking the production to send over past scripts. Directing one episode of a long-running show is like writing just one chapter of a novel- it needs to fit in seamlessly to the entire story, while still feeling compelling and propelling the story forward. A director of episodic TV has to balance making it their story while still executing the showrunner's vision and honoring the intention of the writers. Dan also likes to explore every scene of the episode he's directing with the writers during a tone meeting. He often asks, what is the story being told? The story isn't simply what happens, but the meaning that you give to what happens- where you're directing the audience's focus. Make sure you keep asking yourself, how does it make me feel? The director must be able to dig down with the actors and come up with an interesting subtext to the story if the scene needs a boost. Find Dan Attias: www.danattias.com Directing Great Television: Inside TV's New Golden Age is available on Amazon. WIN an autographed copy of Directing Great Television! Follow us on Instagram @thecinepod and comment on our post for this episode! Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com//ep146/ Sponsored by Hot Rod Cameras: www.hotrodcameras.com Sponsored by Assemble: Assemble has amazing production management software. Use the code cinepod to try a month for free! https://www.assemble.tv/ Be sure to watch our YouTube video of Nate Watkin showing how Assemble works! https://youtu.be/IlpismVjab8 Sponsored by Aputure: https://www.aputure.com/ The Cinematography Podcast website: www.camnoir.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCinematographyPodcast Facebook: @cinepod Instagram: @thecinepod Twitter: @ShortEndz

Fuera de Series
‘the big bang theory'... y otros Placeres Culpables | Placeres Culpables

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 59:35


Placeres culpables es el programa de Fuera de Series que nos acerca a todas esas series que no nos atrevemos a reconocer que nos apasionan. Respaldados por Lorena Gil y Maritxu Olazabal ahora cuando te pregunten si ves una serie… ya puedes reconocer cuáles son tus placeres culpables.Nuestra serie de la semana es ‘the big bang theory'. Además, repasamos lo que hemos visto en estos últimos días, lo más destacado en las redes y recordamos algunos de nuestros placeres culpables favoritos.

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep 92 - Directing Great Television featuring Dan Attias

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:07


Geoffrey chats with Director Dan Attias (The Wire, True Blood, The Boys, Homeland) about the unique differences between directing a feature film and television. Dan also discusses the importance of working with the writers of a tv show as well as keen insights into his new book.To check out Dan's incredible new book:Directing Great Television go to https://amzn.to/3wfO7ehThe Guide For Every Screenwriter is available at:https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/booksSupport the show and get access to exclusive content!--> https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/podcast

Before The Break
33. Carey Van Driest "Let Go Of The Pressure"

Before The Break

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:10


This week on BEFORE THE BREAK, the boys sit down with theatre, voice over, and on-camera actor Carey Van Driest. Carey has appeared on such shows as MacGyver, God Friended Me, New Amsterdam, Blindspot, Nashville, Homeland, and Bull. We discuss growing up between Wisconsin and Tennessee, getting her equity card before graduating college, moving to NYC to pursue theatre, finding her groove in voice over, the transition to TV/Film, diversifying her career, and questioning everything with more experience. That and much more! Follow Before The Break - on Instagram at @beforethebreakpodhttps://beforethebreak.buzzsprout.com/Follow Carey -on Instagram at @cavandriestFollow Tommy -on Instagram at @tommybeyondhttps://www.tommybeardmore.com/Follow Adam -on Instagram at @thatadamdecarlohttp://adamdecarlo.com/Don't forget to subscribe, leave a review, and give us a rating!

Fuera de Series
Watchlist: Qué nos ha dejado octubre y qué series esperamos de noviembre de 2021

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 60:20


En Watchlist, nuestra redacción, con Álvaro Onieva, Aloña Fdez. Larrechi y Maritxu Olazabal, repasan las mejores series de octubre de 2021, y las que más ganas tienen de ver en noviembre.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
News from homeland 30.10.2021 - Novice iz Slovenije 30.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 6:04


Listen to this week's news from Slovenia. - Prisluhnite novicam iz domovine.

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Persian in Oman

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 1:01


  People Group Details:  https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/14371 Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians  

Fringe Radio Network
Sarah Westall - Enemy Invasion From All Sides!

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 65:20


Victor Avila, joins the program to share what is coming at the border. As a specialist in human trafficking and Mexican cartels, he is uniquely qualified to explain how China gained control of the cartels and are using them to infiltrate Mexico and the United States. He states that the system will be overwhelmed on purpose with thousands and thousands more migrants coming on multiple fronts across the border at the same time. We have seen nothing yet; the Department of Homeland Security and the border towns will not have the necessary support to handle the shear magnitude of the situation. Incompetent and corrupt government employees need to be removed immediately to address the very real situation developing. PLEASE SUPPORT Sarah Westall and sign up for Sarah's newsletter, Ebener, Odysee, Bitchute and other platforms at https://SarahWestall.com/Subscribe See her shows on Roku, Apple TV, Google TV and more! Sign up at SarahWestall.TV – subscribers have access to many exclusives videos!

Welcome to Fatherhood
Episode 21: Back to the Homeland

Welcome to Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 50:20


The 21st episode of Welcome to Fatherhood, a podcast exploring all things about being a dad. In this episode Austin wins at Halloween trivia (kinda), travels across the Pacific with a kid, and wears his grandpa's clothes. Ryan talks the vid, updates on life, and enjoys talking with his best friend. So sit back, crack open your favorite brew, and share the next few moments of Welcome to Fatherhood!

Fuera de Series
Streaming: Agenda de series del 28 de octubre al 3 de noviembre

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:36


CJ Navas y Álvaro Onieva, con la colaboración de Maritxu Olazabal, te traen toda la actualidad de la semana del mundo de las series de televisión.

Fuera de Series
Review | ‘Dolores: la verdad sobre el caso Wanninkhof'

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 49:37


Maritxu Olazabal y Álvaro Onieva comentan, con y sin spoilers, ‘Dolores: la verdad sobre el caso Wanninkhof'.

PBS NewsHour - World
One Afghan refugee on her 'desperate hope' for her homeland, life in the U.S.

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 7:58


Thousands of Afghan refugees are now in the process of settling into American life following their evacuation from Afghanistan when the Taliban took control of the country in August. Those refugees are mostly scattered among eight military bases around the United States. But approximately 10,000 have resettled in different communities. Nick Schifrin has the story of one such Afghan refugee. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
One Afghan refugee on her 'desperate hope' for her homeland, life in the U.S.

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 7:58


Thousands of Afghan refugees are now in the process of settling into American life following their evacuation from Afghanistan when the Taliban took control of the country in August. Those refugees are mostly scattered among eight military bases around the United States. But approximately 10,000 have resettled in different communities. Nick Schifrin has the story of one such Afghan refugee. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

All In with Rick Jordan
Scale or Evolve: Grow your MSP Or Create Financial Freedom | Fred Voccola | Cyber

All In with Rick Jordan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 53:10


About Episode: Fred Voccola brings his expertise on MSPs, SaaS, and Cybersecurity to talk about the future of the MSP Space over the next decade. Learn how years of experience in the IT Channel gives Fred and Rick an interesting conversation.We Meet: Fred Voccola, CEO Of KaseyaEpisode References: EZ Pass - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-ZPassGarden State Parkway, NJ - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_State_ParkwaySaaS - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_as_a_serviceOpen System Software - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_softwareBMC - https://www.bmc.com/Kaseya - https://kaseya.comTony Robbins - https://www.tonyrobbins.com/CNN - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CNNBloomberg - https://tinyurl.com/55du3tpfApple - https://www.apple.com/Homeland - https://www.dhs.gov/Sisa - https://www.sisainfosec.com/Microsoft - https://tinyurl.com/vjap6aj8Geek Squad/ Best Buy - https://tinyurl.com/4en8xkyxLotus - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lotus_SoftwareHarvard graphics - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvard_GraphicsKelly Slater - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelly_SlaterGary Pica - https://www.linkedin.com/in/garypica/Connect:Connect with Rick: https://linktr.ee/mrrickjordanConnect with Fred: https://kaseya.comUniversal Rate & Review: https://lovethepodcast.com/allinwithrickjordanSubscribe & Review to ALL IN with Rick Jordan on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/RickJordanALLINAbout Fred Voccola: Fred Voccola is the CEO of Kaseya, a provider of IT Infrastructure management software for small and medium businesses around the world. As CEO, Mr. Voccola has led the transformation of Kaseya into the global leader in its sector with over 1300 employees worldwide, providing its industry leading solutions to over 25,000 organizations across the world. Prior to that Kaseya, Mr. Voccola has led multiple software and internet technology companies, including serving as President of Yodle for Brand Networks, which was sold to Web.com (NASDQ: WEB), Nolio, Inc., a devops SaaS company, where he drove 100% year-over-year growth and successfully sold the business to CA Technologies. Mr. Voccola also co-founded and served as president and CEO of Trust Technology Corp., the pioneer in working capital compliance SaaS solutions. Trust was successfully sold to FGI Global in 2010.Earlier in his career, Mr. Voccola co-founded and served as President of Identify Software, substantially growing the business during his five-year tenure, culminating in a sale to BMC Software. He then served as vice president of worldwide sales and services at BMC Software. In addition, Mr. Voccola has held various management and executive roles at Intira (acquired by Divine Systems) and Prism Solutions (acquired by Ardent Software/Informix/IBM).Mr. Voccola holds a Bachelor of Science in Finance from the Carroll School of Management at Boston College.

Fuera de Series
‘Leverage'... y otros Placeres Culpables | Placeres Culpables

Fuera de Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:26


Placeres culpables es el programa de Fuera de Series que nos acerca a todas esas series que no nos atrevemos a reconocer que nos apasionan. Respaldados por Lorena Gil y Maritxu Olazabal ahora cuando te pregunten si ves una serie… ya puedes reconocer cuáles son tus placeres culpables.Nuestra serie de la semana es ‘Leverage'.. Además, repasamos lo que hemos visto en estos últimos días, lo más destacado en las redes y recordamos algunos de nuestros placeres culpables favoritos.

Spies Like Us Podcast
Homeland Season One Part Three

Spies Like Us Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 40:38


Concluding discussion of the first season of Homeland, which follows a CIA officer deeply disturbed by the possibility that a recently released war prisoner may have been secretly turned by al-Qaeda.  This week we are considering the season's finale Episode 12 in detail, INCLUDING SPOILERS. Next week we return to movie discussion with The Conversation (1974) by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman.  A surveillance expert becomes obsessed with a cryptic conversation recorded on behalf of a mysterious client.     Music is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license  ‘Enter the Party' by Kevin MacLeod Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100240 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ 

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Pilots' Resistance Forces Southwest to Back Down Over Vaccinations

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 75:36


Today on TruNews, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas tested positive for Coronavirus this morning. Homeland Security spokeswoman Marsha Espinosa said the cabinet secretary is isolated and working at home. Southwest Airlines backs off on COVID mandates for the company. Rick Wiles issues a passionate plea for pitchforks in response to vaccine tyranny in America. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart, Kerry Kinsey. Airdate 10/19/21