Podcasts about Slovenia

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Country in central Europe

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Best podcasts about Slovenia

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Latest podcast episodes about Slovenia

Interdependence
The Cold War For Information Technology with former Director of Iskra Delta Janez Skrubej

Interdependence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 78:02


 In conjunction with this years Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts titled "Iskra Delta "curated by Tjaša Pogačar we interviewed Janez Skrubej, the author of "The Cold War For Information Technology: the Inside Story". Inside indeed, as Janez was the former CEO of Iskra Delta, a major contender on the world stage for not only personal computers, but also large scale networked IT systems. Based within Tito's Yugoslavia it was caught in the crosshairs in the cold war, working between the US, Soviet Union, China, and India, with each corresponding intelligence agency pushing their own agenda. Janez was the managing director during this time, and was personally paid visits by the presidents of the Soviet Union, China and India, as well as the CIA and KGB. Ultimately the conflicting interests overpowered the small IT company and it closed, leaving Europe without a major contender in the global IT race. It's a treat to speak to Janez about this extraordinary situation, and to imagine an alternative history where Iskra Delta might have had a fighting chance.Read The Cold War for Information Technology: The Inside Story: https://www.amazon.com/Cold-War-Information-Technology-Inside-ebook/dp/B00C1NWL2EFollow Janez Skrubej updates: http://sbpra.com/janezskrubej/We cannot wait to see this film! http://senca-studio.si/en/portfolio/sparks-in-time/Check out the Ljubljana Biennale of Graphic arts, with contributions by Other Internet, John Akomfrah, Simon Denny, Josh Citarella, us and more!: https://34.bienale.si/en/  

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
Winners of this year's Ptuj festival - Zmagali na Ptujskem festivalu

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 12:29


This year, the young folk entertainment ensemble Upanje won the Ptuj Festival, which is the most prestigious and oldest festival of folk music in Slovenia. The song Unreachable (Nedosegljiva) was composed by Peter Oset, Miha Vitovc and Franjo Oset. We spoke with the accordionist and leader Niko Zorko. - Mlad narodno-zabavni ansambel Upanje je letos zmagal na Ptujskem festivalu, ki je najprestižnejši in najstarejši festival narodno-zabavne glasbe v Sloveniji. Skladbo Nedosegljiva so ustvarili Peter Oset, Miha Vitovc in Franjo Oset. Ansambel je predstavil harmonikar in vodja Niko Zorko.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
Slovenian pianist second at Chopin's competition - Slovenski pianist drugi na Chopinovem tekmovanju

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 3:54


On August 7 this year, we hosted a young Slovenian-Italian pianist, Aleksandar Gadžijev, who won this year's competition in Sydney. On Thursday, we were delighted by the news that Aleksander won second place at the prestigious Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, where he represented Slovenia and Italy, which he shares with a competitor from Japan. He also won the Krystian Zimmerman Award for Best Sonata Performance. Listen to SBS Slovenian, every Saturday, from 12-1pm. Follow us on Facebook SBS Slovenian and listen to our podcasts by clicking here. - 7.avgusta letos smo v oddaji gostili mladega slovensko-italijanskega pianista Aleksandra Gadžijeva, ki je zmagal na letošnjem tekmovanju v Sydneyu. V četrtek pa nas je razveselila novica, da je Aleksander na prestižnem Chopinovem klavirskem tekmovanju v Varšavi, kjer je zastopal Slovenijo in Italijo, osvojil drugo mesto, ki si ga deli s tekmovalcem iz Japonske. Osvojil je tudi nagrado Krystiana Zimermana za najboljšo izvedbo sonate.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
This week's news in Slovenia - 23rd October - Novice iz Slovenije 23.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 4:49


Wrap up of the latest news from Slovenia prepared this week by Aleš Lednik.Listen to SBS Slovenian, every Saturday, from 12-1pm.Follow us on Facebook SBS Slovenian and listen to our podcasts by clicking here. - Novosti tedna v Sloveniji je pripravil Aleš Lednik.

Italian Wine Podcast
Klet Brda Cooperative | On The Road Special Edition

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 28:08


Welcome to another episode of On The Road Special Edition with Stevie Kim. This week she sits down with the Klet Brda Winery, established as a cooperative in 1957. Before telling you more about our great episode we want to give a shout out to our new Sponsor Vivino! the world's largest online wine marketplace - The Vivino app makes it easy to choose wine. Enjoy expert team support, door to door delivery and honest wine reviews to help you choose the perfect wine for every occassion. Vivino - Download the app on Apple or Android and discover an easier way to choose wine! Find out more about by visiting: https://www.vivino.com/IT/en/ or download the app: https://www.vivino.com/app About today's guests: Neja from the Marketing Department, Enologist Darinko Ribolica & CEO Sylvan Persolja represent this Coop in this interview. The Cooperative represents 400 families. Klet Brda is a winery in the Brda region of Slovenia. Established as a cooperative in 1957 by local growers, the winery produces, cellars and markets wines both domestically and internationally. Over 400 families are now members. Their vineyards cover more than 1,000 hectares (2,500 acres). 70 percent of these are dedicated to white varieties - particularly Rebula which is native to both Slovenia and neighbouring northern Italy. Other key varietals grown include Merlot, Chardonnay, Sauvignonasse and Cabernet Sauvignon. The vineyards are mostly planted on steep slopes in the Brda hills. This means the grapes generally have to be picked by hand and are therefore carefully selected. Many of the wines from Brda are said to have a certain mineral quality attributed to a distinctive type of marl soil called opoka. The winery is an underground operation underneath Dobrovo Castle. The winery was built in 1957, alongside the restoration of the nearby vineyards. The large underground cellars house over 100,000 old vintages. Find out more about Klet Brda visit: https://klet-brda.si/ More about the host Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

Coleman Had A Dream
Slovenia And Estonia Preview

Coleman Had A Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:14


Dai and Ruth return to look at the big games coming up this week, and look back at the big game which happened over the last weekend - Cardiff losing to Swansea in the South Wales Derby. We begin by looking at the Women's World Cup Qualifiers as Wales take on Slovenia and Estonia. The Slovenia away games looks a tough one, and the pair look at their most recent performance against France as evidence of that. Attention the turns to the home game against Estonia. Tactics, predictions and a look at the opposition. We move on to discussing Cardiff and Swansea, and how big a win for the jacks this was. Both look to be moving in very different at the moment, and we discuss which way both are heading. We finish with a mention of David Brooks and Dan Barden. Good luck to them both in their fight against cancer.

77 Minutes in Heaven: A Podcast About the Dallas Mavericks
Slovenia Special talking all things Luka Doncic & Mavericks with special guests Dvokorak

77 Minutes in Heaven: A Podcast About the Dallas Mavericks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:37


We've got our own Sons of Slovenia, the Dvokorak podcast joining us on a NEW 77 Minutes with Tim Cato as Tim and his guests Luka (not that Luka), Matija & Tilen give their hometown perspective of their local legend and what they think Luka needs to win an NBA title. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Elis James' Feast Of Football
Episode 192: Derby delight and despair

Elis James' Feast Of Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:09


Elis, Danny and Iwan discuss the south Wales derby and look ahead to Slovenia v Wales.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
News from homeland 16.10.2021 - Novice iz Slovenije 16.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 6:58


Listen to this week's news from Slovenia. - Prisluhnite novicam iz domovine.

Badass Digital Nomads
What It's Like to Work Online and Travel with Remote Year

Badass Digital Nomads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:22


Feeling exhausted and uninspired at work? Maybe it's time for you to take a one-week, one-month, or one-year work-travel "workcation!" Sam Pessin is the Co-Founder and CEO of Remote Year, a community-based work and travel company on a mission to help online professionals live and work from 30+ countries around the globe. Having grown up as a global citizen, traveling the world with his parents, Sam knows a thing or two about the power of experiencing new cultures and stepping outside your comfort zone. In Episode 129 of Badass Digital Nomads, Kristin and Sam talk about everything Remote Year has to offer, from week-long retreats helping you recover from work-related burnout to year-long remote work and travel programs. You'll gain insight into how Remote Year chooses the best locations for digital nomads, Sam's favorite travel destinations around the world, and how he stays productive while running an international online business. As Sam so wisely says, “People who are in more inspiring locations and enjoying their day-to-day life and weekends… will be more productive at work.” Whether you're interested in a 1-week, 1-month, or 1-year remote work-travel program, Remote Year has options for you. Tune in to find out which experience is right for you! Get a $100 marketplace credit when you join Remote Year through Badass Digital Nomads. (Note: You must use this link and fill out a referral form upon arrival to qualify for the credit.)   EPISODE 129 TOPICS DISCUSSED: Remote Year Retreats: Escape work life for a week with their workless travel programs. [1:52] The inspiration behind Remote Year. [6:24] What it's like to grow up in several different countries. [12:07] Common concerns and hesitations people have when considering a remote work and travel lifestyle. [17:13] How to get approval from your boss to work while traveling & How Remote Year can help. [19:13] Use corporate retreats as a way for your company to reconnect, build culture, and build strategies with your employees. [22:28] How Remote Year chooses ideal travel destinations for remote workers. [30:39] Cities and countries you can travel to with Remote Year. [33:11] Combatting the expat bubble + the power of getting out of your comfort zone with other digital nomads. [33:57] The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Remote Year and other travel companies. [40:59] Tips for staying organized, focused, and productive as an online business owner. [46:32]   QUESTIONS ANSWERED: What is Remote Year? [1:00] What's a typical day in the life on a retreat compared to a work program? [5:05] What countries have you lived in and how has that changed your global perspective and your lifestyle? [10:31/12:07] What is your earliest travel memory? [13:30] What types of people sign up for Remote Year programs? [15:47] Do coworkers, friends, or families often travel together in groups? [22:28] How do you get reliable internet and data connectivity abroad? [25:27] Do you work with locals of the countries you travel to? [38:41] And much more!   LIGHTNING ROUND:  Favorite country for remote working. Favorite country for rest and relaxation. Most underrated destination. Tips for staying focused, organized, and productive while traveling.  Favorite notes and productivity apps.    RESOURCES Get a $100 Remote Year marketplace travel voucher when you join Remote Year through Badass Digital Nomads. (Note: You must use this link and fill out a referral form upon arrival to qualify for the credit.) ► Start your first side hustle with online freelancing: Use code QUITYOURJOB for $100 off Kristin's online course, Freelance to Freedom.  Related Videos: How I See the US After Living Abroad for 15 Years [CULTURE SHOCK]  How to Get Paid $10k to Work From Home Digital Nomad Visas EXPLAINED: The Best (and Worst) Remote Work and Travel Permits   Related Podcasts: How to Travel the World Full-Time with Remote Year Founder, Greg Caplan Quitting Your Job to Start an Online Business with Mitko from That Remote Life How to Make Money Blogging on Medium with Tom Kuegler   Productivity Apps: Evernote Slack Things WorkFlowy   Sam's Favorite Travel Destinations Sharm El Sheikh, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt Croatia Spain Ljubljana, Slovenia   Connect with Sam & Remote Year: Visit Remote Year's Website (Mention Badass Digital Nomads for a free $100 travel voucher.) Follow Remote Year on Instagram Connect with Sam on LinkedIn   Connect with Kristin:  Follow on Instagram Subscribe to Traveling with Kristin on YouTube  Subscribe to Digital Nomad TV on YouTube Follow on Medium Follow on Clubhouse @KristinWilson Join the Badass Digital Nomads Facebook Group Search All Podcast Episodes on www.badassdigitalnomads.com ........................................................................................... Special thank you this week to Dave Bowman who bought us 3 coffees! Support the Badass Digital Nomads Podcast: Buy Me a Coffee Become a Patron Leave a 5* Review Buy Official Merch  PayPal Tip Jar ........................................................................................... Thank you to our Traveling with Kristin/Badass Digital Nomads 2021 Patrons: Teklordz, Walt, Shawn, Richard Y, RZ, Craig S, Colin, Heather, Karen, Kiran, Scott, Michael and Annie, Issac, Mike M, Yasmine, Erick M, Yohji, Gary R , Ron, Gary, Ray, Henry L, Kelly, Alejandra, Keith, Stephen, Henry M, Warren, James, Daniel, Javier, Gary B, Emily, Rich, Aisha, Phil, Anthony, Anna, Jennifer, Kathleen, Natalie, Dave, Brian, Christopher, CJ, David, Mike, Kathleen, and Chip. Special welcome to our newest Patrons from September/October 2021: Shelly, Paul, Ron, and Andy  ❤️ Become a Patron for $5/month at Patreon.com/travelingwithkristin ........................................................................................... Podcast descriptions may contain affiliate links of products and services we use and recommend at no additional cost to you. 

Dreams of Consciousness
198: Dickless Tracy

Dreams of Consciousness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Dreams of Consciousness Podcast Episode 198 features an interview with Ivan Cepanec of Dickless Tracy. Slovenian trio Dickless Tracy have been nestled in the underground since the late Nineties. Now, as the band gets ready to celebrate 25 years as a band, they're primed to break through to a largeer audience with their most accomplished material to date. I spoke with Dickless Tracy drummer Ivan Cepanec about the band's history, and the metal scene in Slovenia. We also talked about the stylistic shift from grind to death metal songs on their latest album, Grave New World, and why the band's earliest recordings are so difficult to find. My thanks to Ivan for speaking with me, and to all of you for listening. Music In This Episode: "Promised For Eternity" taken from the album Halls Of Sickness "Pathetic Descendant Of Apes" "Morphing Into Maelstrom" taken from the album Grave New World "The New Domination " taken from the album Paroxysm Of Disgust Thanks for listening! Interviews, reviews, and more at www.dreamsofconsciousness.com

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
This week's news in Slovenia - 9th October - Novice iz Slovenije 9.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 4:02


Wrap up of the latest news from Slovenia prepared this week by Žan Dolajš. - Novosti tedna v Sloveniji je pripravil Žan Dolajš.

The Greek Current
The Western Balkans and the stalled prospect of EU membership

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 14:32


On Wednesday EU leaders tried to reassure Western Balkan countries they could eventually join the EU if they met its standards, but the leaders failed to provide a credible signal that the bloc's enlargement process will be relaunched in the near future. Instead, it looks like membership is slipping further into the future, to the frustration of candidate countries. The EU has spent many years and billions of euros preparing Balkan countries to join the bloc. This is also an effort supported by the US, which hopes it will spread stability in the volatile region and counter Russian and Chinese influence. Laurence Norman joins our host Thanos Davelis to discuss the EU summit in Slovenia on the issue, why the bloc's Balkan expansion has stalled, and what's at stake for the region.Laurence Norman is the Deputy Bureau Chief of the Brussels Bureau for The Wall Street Journal covering the European Union and its foreign policy.Read Laurence Norman's latest article in The Wall Street Journal here: EU's Balkan Expansion Plans StallYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here: EU leaders fail to give Balkan nations a membership timelineSlovenia summit: Balkan leaders look to EU to open up clubCyprus FM urges Lebanon to implement reforms to unlock aidExploratory talks between Greece and Turkey conclude amidst controversial statementsTurkey renews call for demilitarization of islands in letter to UN

SBS World News Radio
Clashes between anti-vaccine protesters and police continue in Slovenia

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:05


Protests erupt for the third time in a month in Slovenia's capital, on the eve of a major European Union summit.

Monocle 24: The Urbanist
Tall Stories 277: Cukrarna, Ljubljana

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 6:39


We visit a new art gallery, which is built in a derelict sugar refinery and forms part of a riverside revival going on in Slovenia's capital. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Did That Really Happen?
Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 61:55


This week we travel back to 18th century France with Portrait of a Lady on Fire! Join us as we talk about female artists, Vivaldi's Four Seasons, herbal abortifacients, flying ointment (aka "the armpit scene") and more! Sources: Female Painters: Laura Auricchio, "Eighteenth-Century Women Painters in France," The Met Museum (October 2004), https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/18wa/hd_18wa.htm Cath Pound, "The great women artists that history forgot," BBC (19 October 2016), https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20161019-the-great-women-artists-that-history-forgot Heidi A. Strobel, "Royal "matronage" of Women Artists in the Late-18th Century," Woman's Art Journal 26:2 (2005-2006): 3-9. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3598091 Catherine R. Montfort, "Self-Portraits, Portraits of Self: Adelaide Labille-Guiard and Elisabeth Vigee Lebrun, Women Artists of the Eighteenth Century," Pacific Coast Philology 40:1 (2005): 1-18. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25474166 Laura Auricchio, "Self-Promotion in Adelaide Labille-Guiard's 1785 Self-Portrait with Two Students," 89:1 (March 2007): 45-62. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25067300 The Four Seasons: Betsy Schwarm, "Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm," TED-Ed YouTube (24 October 2016), https://youtu.be/Xcpc8VDsv3c "VIVALDI: "Four Seasons" Sonnets texts in Italian & English," https://www.baroquemusic.org/vivaldiseasons.html https://www.charlottesymphony.org/blog/vivaldis-four-seasons-poems/ Film Background: Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/portrait_of_a_lady_on_fire Ela Bittencourt, "Portrait of a Lady on Fire: Daring to See," The Criterion Collection (23 June 2020), https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6991-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-daring-to-see Mark Kermode, "Portrait of a Lady on Fire review - mesmerised by the female gaze," The Guardian (1 March 2020), https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/mar/01/portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-review-celine-sciamma "The Fine Brushstrokes Of 'Portrait Of A Lady On Fire'" NPR https://www.npr.org/2020/02/24/809112455/the-fine-brushstrokes-of-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire Hilary Weaver, "Portrait of a Lady On Fire Is A Queer Survival Guide To Self-Isolation," ELLE (28 March 2020), https://www.elle.com/culture/movies-tv/a31965622/portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-self-isolation-coronavirus-guide/ Carlos Aguilar, "Love Dialogue: Celine Sciamma on Portrait of a Lady on Fire," (12 February 2020) https://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/love-dialogue-c%C3%A9line-sciamma-on-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire Drew Gregory, "Celine Sciamma on "Portrait of a Lady on Fire," the Lesbian Gaze, and Queer TV That Gives Her Hope," Autostraddle (12 February 2020), https://www.autostraddle.com/celine-sciamma-on-portrait-of-a-lady-on-fire-the-lesbian-gaze-and-queer-tv-that-gives-her-hope/ https://www.telerama.fr/ecrans/regardez-le-brulant-portrait-de-la-jeune-fille-en-feu-de-celine-sciamma-sur-arte.tv-6966315.php Herbal Abortifacients: Boyce Rensberger, "Pharmacology," Washington Post, 25 July 1994, available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1994/07/25/pharmacology/573a3a65-8038-482c-9097-0cf992d72929/ Londa Schiebinger, "Agnotology and Exotic Abortifacients: The Cultural Production of Ignorance in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 149, 3 (2005) John M. Riddle and J. Worth Estes, "Oral Contraceptives in Ancient and Medieval Times," American Scientist 80, 3 (1992) John m. Ridde, J. Worth Estes, and Josiah C. Russell, "Ever Since Eve. . . Birth Control in the Ancient World," Archaeology 47, 2 (1994) Lucille F. Newman, "Ophelia's Herbal," Economic Botany 33, 2 (1979) BTM, "Early Abortifacients," Pharmacy in History 35, 2 (1993) Flying Ointment: Karsten Fatur, "Peculiar Plants and Fantastic Fungi: An Ethnobotanical Study of the Use of Hallucinogenic Plants and Mushrooms in Slovenia." PLOS One 16 (1) 2021 David MJ Carruthers, "Lines of Flight: An Enquiry Into the Properties of the Magical Plant, It's Literature and History," Mosaic, an Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 48, 2 (2015) Clive Harper, "The Witches' Flying Ointment," Folklore 88, 1 (1977) Michael Ostling, "Witches' Herbs on Trial," Folklore 125, 2 (2014) Danielle Piomelli and Antonino Pollio, "In Upupa O Strige: A Study in Renaissance Psychotropic Plant Ointments," History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16, 2 (1994)

Locked On Mavericks - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Mavs
The Crazy Offseason for Luka Doncic

Locked On Mavericks - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Mavs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 37:43


Isaac Harris (@IsaacLHarris) is joined by Iztok Franko of D Magazine and Mavs Moneyball. They talk about Iztok's latest piece in D Magazine about Luka Doncic's trainer, his offseason schedule, and three weeks of training. They also discuss Slovenia's relationship with Doncic, Porzingis at the four and much more about the upcoming 2021-22 Dallas Mavericks. You can read Iztok's latest piece on Doncic here. Subscribe to our Youtube Channel: Locked On Mavericks Follow/Subscribe Anywhere: linktr.ee/LockedOnMavs Follow Locked On NBA: linktr.ee/LockedOnNBA Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! | Offers from our sponsors: lockedonpodcasts.com/offers SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG - There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Detailed on Mic
My Red Star Belgrade Nightmare | Self Confidence, Family, Staying True to Myself with Josh Parker #53

Detailed on Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 87:05


We sat down with Josh Parker to discuss his rollercoaster life story! From growing up in Slough in a single-parent household and meeting his father in interesting circumstances. To joining QPR in his mid-teens and earning a professional contract. He then leaves the UK to play in Slovenia before ending up in Serbia playing for the footballing giants Red Star Belgrade, what happened next is a horror story, to say the least...Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/detailedonmic/https://www.instagram.com/doms_matrix/https://www.instagram.com/abs1506/https://www.instagram.com/j23parker/

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
Sport 02. october - Šport 02.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 4:23


Tomaž Ambrožič prepared a look at sport in Slovenia over the last fortnight. - 14-dnevni športni pregled je pripravil Tomaž Ambrožič.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
This week's news in Slovenia - 2nd October - Novice iz Slovenije 02.oktobra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 4:37


Wrap up of the latest news from Slovenia prepared this week by Aleš Lednik. - Novosti tedna v Sloveniji je pripravil Aleš Lednik.

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 221】#605 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【中歐集團 ft. 塞爾維亞 > 打死不歡迎移民;美國的難民危機;歐盟鍾愛 USB-C;中國拍賣戰備儲油 > 黨撐著不怕!】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:38


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Slovenia ngưng sử dụng vắc xin Johnson and Johnson

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 6:27


Một trường hợp tử vong tại Slovenia dẫn đến việc ngưng sử dụng vắc xin Johnson and Johnson, trong lúc nhà cầm quyền mở cuộc điều tra. Trong khi đó tại Mỹ, các cuộc tranh luận về việc bắt buộc tiêm chủng vắc xin vẫn tiếp tục.

Dreams Not Memes Podcast
Episode 304: Jazz and Composition: A Conversation with Jernej Bervar

Dreams Not Memes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 27:12


Jernej Bervar is an award-winning musician, guitar player, composer, arranger, and producer, living in New York City and a native of Slovenia. Jernej discovered his passion for music at early age of 4. Coming from a classical background, he soon developed interest in jazz. In 2012, Jernej was awarded the scholarship to attend Berklee College of Music and has moved to Boston to study jazz guitar. Jernej won several notable awards, including John Laporta Jazz Award and Performance Division Award. In 2014, he won first prize at the international Wilson Center Guitar competition in Milwaukee, USA. Jernej is performing at concerts nationally and internationally in Europe, USA, Africa, and Asia, including festivals such as the prestigious Montreux Jazz festival. He has been featured on numerous albums, released in Europe, USA, Japan, and China, and has worked with leading artists such as Divinity Roxx, Victor Wooten, Nona Hendryx, Ali Caldwell, Cory Henry, and Sharay Reed, among others. Jernej and I speak together about his journey as an artist and his future goals. Tune in today on the next episode of Dreams Not Memes. Socials https://www.youtube.com/user/jernejbguitar https://jernejbervar.com/

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes
#549 Pregnant in Slovenia

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 85:47


Katy has type 1 diabetes. Show notes for people who are Bold with Insulin Find out more about the Dexcom CGM Get a FREE Omnipod Demo today  Learn about Touched By Type 1 Gvoke Glucagon  CONTOUR NEXT ONE smart meter and CONTOUR DIABETES app Add your voice to the T1DExchange A full list of our sponsors  How to listen, disclaimer and more Apple Podcasts> Subscribe to the podcast today! The podcast is available on Spotify, Google Play, iHeartRadioRadio Public, Amazon Music and all Android devices The show is now available as an Alexa skill. My type 1 diabetes parenting blog Arden's Day Listen to the Juicebox Podcast online Read my award winning memoir: Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal: Confessions of a Stay-At-Home Dad The Juicebox Podcast is a free show, but if you'd like to support the podcast directly, you can make a gift here. Thank you! Follow Scott on Social Media @ArdensDay @JuiceboxPodcast Disclaimer - Nothing you hear on the Juicebox Podcast or read on Arden's Day is intended as medical advice. You should always consult a physician before making changes to your health plan.  If the podcast has helped you to live better with type 1 please tell someone else how to find the show and consider leaving a rating and review on iTunes. Thank you! Arden's Day and The Juicebox Podcast are not charitable organizations.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
This week's news in Slovenia - 25th September - Novice iz Slovenije 25.septembra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 4:53


Wrap up of the latest news from Slovenia prepared this week by Žan Dolajš. - Novosti tedna v Sloveniji je pripravil Žan Dolajš.

The Derek Loudermilk Show (The Art of Adventure)
Lucy Pringle | The Science of Crop Circles: Healing, Geometry, Consciousness

The Derek Loudermilk Show (The Art of Adventure)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 63:09


"You often get a wonderful, joyous feeling after going into the crop circles" - Lucy Pringle Lucy Pringle is one of the worlds leading crop circle researchers. She has been visiting, photographing and studying crop circles for decades. She is the author of The Energies of Crop Circles: The Science and Power of a Mysterious Intelligence She is a Founder member of the Centre for Crop Circle Studies. She is widely known and is an international authority on the subject and the pioneer researcher into the effects of electromagnetic fields on living systems. This includes the physiological and psychological effects reported by people after visiting or being in the vicinity of a crop formation. She has also studied animal behaviour, remote effects, luminosities, mechanical failures and audio effects from crop circles. Her research shows measured changes in the human hormones following short exposure to the circles, also changes in brain activity. She also writes, appears on TV and broadcasts extensively on the crop circle phenomenon. She has been a guest on BBC and Meridian Television and The Big Breakfast Show. The BBC has recently produced a programme on her research which was shown on Inside Out. She has also appeared on many US programmes including William Gazecki's 'Quest for Truth', The Discovery, Learning and History Channels, and TV programmes in Germany, Japan, France, Italy, Spain, Slovenia, Mexico and Canada. She was a guest on Libby Purvis's Mid-Week programme on Radio 4 and the BBC World Service. What you'll learn in this episode: How crop circles formWhat people experience when walking into a crop circleHow to tell a real from a fake (hoax) crop circleWhat happens to the crops (grain) in the crop circleHow History, Geography, Science, Astronomy, Geology, Music, Art, and Spirituality converge in the crop circle phenomenonMore about the earth electromagnetic grids and telluric fieldsHow crop circles effect the human biofield How Crop circles fit in with electric universe theory Quotes "I have experienced every single type of feeling that you can feel in the crop circle. You'll never know how people are going to react ."-Lucy Pringle"There seems to be a magnetic connection between the earth energy lines and crop circles"-Lucy Pringle"There are all sorts of different measurable energies within the circle."-Lucy Pringle"There are certain things that are happening within the sphere and it's beyond our common understanding."-Lucy Pringle"To study crop circles, You have to be open-minded; think outside the box. Today, scientists are more open minded. "-Lucy Pringle"We have the largest crop circle data set - over 800 reports of people's reactions from their crop circle experience"-Lucy Pringle"There are 68 countries where crop circles appear."-Lucy Pringle Continue the adventure: Lucy Pringle Lucy's book: The Energies of Crop Circles: The Science and Power of a Mysterious Intelligence Temporary Temples You'll also love these episodes: Eileen Day McKusick | Tuning The Human Biofield, The Electric Universe, Biomimicry Business Models, and more! Darin Olien | Superfoods, Sustainability, Sovereignty, Systems, and More Dr. James Hardt | Brainwaves, The Force, Creativity, Kundalini, ESP and more Jim Fortin | Transforming your Life with Brain Science, Ancient Wisdom, and Psychology Dawson Church | How Consciousness Creates Material Reality, EFT Tapping, Eco Mediation, and more Michael Thornhill | Founder of Casa Galactica, Ayahuasca Retreat Center, on Healing Trauma and Channeling Interdimensional Beings Ashley Wiegand | Using Neurofeedback for Peak Performance Robert Waggoner | The Wild World of Lucid Dreaming

Coaching Call
East Meets West, Viva la evolution!

Coaching Call

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 72:25


My guests today are David and Eli Labuschagne, David is a Health Professional and Applied Physiologist with a MAppSc degree in Exercise Physiology. Together they've established a great union to help those who need it most. In addition to clinical work, he's worked in medical journalism and conducted research in exercise physiology, biomechanics and ergonomics on behalf of tertiary and corporate institutions. His career includes extensive involvement over 40 years as an instructor in the fields of movement therapies (Tai Chi, Qigong and Yoga), meditation, acupressure, massage and martial arts. David's wife and partner, Eli, holds Master's degrees in Science and Education; has extensive teaching experience in the fields of adult, child and health education; and is an instructor of Tai Chi, Qigong and meditation. Together they've established companies in Slovenia and Australia specializing in programs for the management / prevention of chronic & aging-related health issues, physical rehabilitation and personal optimization. In addition, David and Eli have recruited and trained a team of therapists and instructors. Contact David and Eli Emial:david@kinergetix.com If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large: I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

Coleman Had A Dream
Kazakhstan And Estonia Review

Coleman Had A Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 61:13


With Ruth unfortunately ill this week, Dai was joined by former Wales international, and BBC pundit, Gwennan Harries. The pair discuss the convincing win over Kazakhstan and the battling victory over Estonia. Everything from tactics, to the goals and the wider context of the wins and other results in the group get discussed. We finish with a reminder of the next games in October, including the massive game against Slovenia. Gwennan expects nothing less than 6 points from the double header. Enjoy the pod, and let us know what you think!

The Rouleur Podcast
Rouleur Conversations - Lora Klinc on Primož Roglič, and Cattle Auction from Issue 106

The Rouleur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 31:46


Slovenia is a cycling superpower - with two out of the three Grand Tour winners this year and an Olympic time trial gold for Primož Roglič. A new book by Roglič's partner Lora Klinc was designed to explain the mysteries of the international peloton to Slovenia's legion of new cycling followers, and the English-language version is surprisingly informative for even the most knowledgeable fan. Also on this episode, Daniel Stewart's examination of xenophobia in bike racing from Rouleur Issue 106. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
09/22/21 Wednesday, Hour 2: They Lyin' on Jesus!

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 60:00


Homeless Jesus…; Nathan from Canada asks Jesse when is it ok to rebuke his father. Elijah from California asks if America is so racist why are people coming here. Rosa from The Netherlands moved out and dropped out of school but her thoughts are making her doubt herself. --- Back to Rosa… Daniel Craig…; Six foot rule fake…; Christian from Slovenia speaks on the coronavirus madness going on in Slovenia.

Tutti Convocati
Pecco e Pippo fanno il bis

Tutti Convocati

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021


Ancora una domenica bellissima di sport per l'Italia tra Bagnaia che vince la seconda gara di fila, stavolta in casa Misano, e Ganna che si conferma campione del mondo di ciclismo nella crono individuale. Ne parliamo con Marco Melandri voce di DAZN per il motomondiale e con il nostro Pier Augusto Stagi. Con Massimo Paganin e Andrea Di Caro (Gazzetta) torniamo sulle partite di ieri, dal 6-1 dell'Inter sul Bologna all'1-0 dell'Atalanta sulla Salernitana. Invece, con Massimo Caputi, ci prepariamo a Lazio-Cagliari e Verona-Roma delle ore 18:00. Ampio prepartita Juve-Milan con Mario Ielpo, il direttore di Tuttosport Xavier Jacobelli e gli ospiti di Pierluigi Pardo in collegamento dagli LBA Celebrity Games di Bologna. Ma il menù della cena, non prevede solo Juve-Milan, c'è anche l'Italia che si gioca la finale degli Europei di volley contro la Slovenia. Sentiamo cosa si aspetta coach Andrea Anastasi. Per chiudere, appuntamento con Var Anatomy di Luca Marelli.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
"Writing has been my life" - "Pisanje mi je vse življenje v oporo"

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 10:48


Poet, writer and author Cilka Žagar, who comes from Lightning Ridge in NSW, recently published a new book about her life and the history of our homeland Slovenia. She also inspired her students to write, and they still write letters to her today. - Pesnica, pisateljica in avtorica Cilka Žagar, ki prihaja iz kraja Lightning Ridge v NSW-u, je pred nedavnim izdala novo knjigo, ki govori o njenem življenju in zgodovini naše domovine Slovenije. Za pisanje je navdušila tudi svoje učence, ki ji pišejo pisma še danes.

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
News from homeland 18.9.2021 - Novice iz Slovenije 18.septembra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 6:56


Listen to this week's news from Slovenia. - Prisluhnite novicam iz domovine.

Brown Bag Bets
Brown Bag Bets - September 16th

Brown Bag Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 16:56


It's Thursday so we have Thursday Night Football! On paper the Giants-Football Team may not seem great, but Alex and Andy will dive in and look at the game and give out some first TD prop bets. The PGA Tour season starts today (who knew?) and Andy has some first round head-to-head bets. Alex has a tennis play to give out from the Slovenia coast and we'll look ahead to the week's slate in college football.

How to Fix Democracy
Danilo Türk

How to Fix Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 48:51


Democracy delivering results | On the occasion of the International Day of Democracy, host Andrew Keen sat down with Danilo Türk, former President of Slovenia and currently President of Club de Madrid for a review of the challenges facing democracies around the world today. The basis of liberal democracy, they discuss, must be reinvented, not just reinterpreted or revived. From electoral systems to the interaction between the economy and politics, Türk argues that international collaboration is important to the evolution of democracy.

In The Moment podcast
105. Milenko Matanovič with Steve Scher: Everyday Democracy

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 67:21


For over 30 years, the Pomegranate Center was an organizational force that helped convene communities and build over 60 art-filled gathering spaces across the globe. Beyond helping communities imagine and build physical spaces, the Seattle-area organization developed a tried-and-true process for collaboration: the Pomegranate Method became a teachable, step-by-step structure for any kind of collaborative process. And it was all born from founder Milenko Matanovič's vision to strengthen human bonds and build trust through positive shared energy. Milenko says, “Our method was to work with community members throughout the entire journey. In the end, not only did we create a project where many people said ‘I did this,' but we also changed habits, where community members asked more of one another.” In our 105th episode of In the Moment, Steve Scher talks with Milenko about his experiences working beyond the narrow definition of art, bringing neighbors of all ages and backgrounds together toward a common goal, and empowering communities as a means to improve society. Milenko Matanovič is an artist and musician with a life-long practice of collaboration. Born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, he is an internationally known convener of public processes, a social innovator, public speaker, and educator who believes that empowering communities is the most efficient, foundational way for us to improve society. He is the author of four books and has received numerous awards and honors for his work. Steve Scher is a podcaster and interviewer and has been a teacher at the University of Washington since 2009. He worked in Seattle public radio for almost 30 years and is Senior Correspondent for Town Hall Seattle's In The Moment podcast. Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation online click here. 

198 Land med Einar Tørnquist
31: Slovenia med Bjørn Einar Romøren

198 Land med Einar Tørnquist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 56:37


Denne uken vender vi nesa øst over når turen går til lomme-kalkulatoren, hjulet og Melania Trumps hjemland, Slovenia. Einar har rotet rundt i arkivet og stiller med en bråte mer eller mindre kvalitetssikrede fakta, og ukens gjest er tidligere skihopper og nåværende markedssjef i Norges skiforbund, Bjørn Einar Romøren. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Versatilist
Episode 247: Versatilist with Tomaz Amon

The Versatilist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 30:05


In this episode, I speak with Tomaz Amon about his work "Experience with the usage of virtual reality worlds about natural history in Slovenia."For more about Tomaz's work, check out the following materials:Here is his other website : www.aftercovid.siHe is also the president of the Slovene Chinese Friendship Association : www.fonsr.org

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian
This week's news in Slovenia - 11th September - Novice iz Slovenije 11.septembra

SBS Slovenian - SBS Slovenian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 4:37


Wrap up of the latest news from Slovenia prepared this week by Aleš Lednik. - Novosti tedna v Sloveniji je pripravil Aleš Lednik.

Italian Wine Podcast
Caroline Gilby MW | On The Road Special Edition

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 19:34


Welcome to another episode of On The Road Special Edition hosted by Stevie Kim. Today she interviews Caroline Gilby in Brda, Slovenia! Stevie has traveled here to take part in the Masterclass “Grand Vertical Tasting of the Finest Rebula Wines”. Since there were plenty of wine producers, influencers, writers and educators present at the event, Stevie was able to sit down with several fascinating characters to get their take on wine and culture in this region! More about Caroline Gilby MW Caroline Gilby MW is a freelance writer and consultant, specialising in Central and Eastern Europe. Among others, she currently contributes to Hugh Johnson's Pocket Wine Book, The Oxford Companion to Wine, and the World Atlas of Wine, and has previously written for Dorling Kindersley's Wines of the World, The Wine Opus, and Tom Stevenson's Wine Report. Prior to her career as a writer, Gilby spent seven years as a senior wine buyer at Augustus Barnet off-licences, where she became the first major buyer to import Hungarian wines to the UK. She initially studied plant biology, in which she holds a doctorate, but abandoned life behind the microscope for a career in wine soon after winning the Decanter-Macallan Malt Whisky Taster of the Year Award while still a student. Gilby passed her MW in 1992 and has been visiting and tasting the wines of Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia and Romania for over 20 years. Byrda is the home of Rebula aka Ribolla Gialla! Brda has been home to Rebula since the Middle Ages and records show that right here, on the terraces carved from the "opoka" soil, where the Alpine and Mediterranean climates meet, the deal conditions exist for this grape variety to thrive. This mix of unique terroir combined with a grape variety with deep historical roots in the area produces authentic and expressive wines wiht a distinctive mineral character. Combining an original and modern approach to vinification with the experience of past generations; the ambitious winemakers of Brda make wines from Rebula which are imbued with a special quality, unique to this region. If you want to learn more about today's winery, you can by visiting: More about the host Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.09.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 64:30


Eating a plant rich diet reduces risk of developing COVID-19 King's College London, September 8, 2021 A recent study, published in Gut, by researchers from King's and Harvard Medical School, examines data from nearly 600,000 ZOE COVID Study app contributors. Participants completed a survey about the food they ate during Feb 2020 (pre-pandemic), making it the largest study in this space. 19% of these contributors contracted COVID-19. People with the highest quality diet were around 10% less likely to develop COVID-19 than those with the lowest quality diet, and 40% less likely to fall severely ill. This is the first longitudinal study of diet and COVID-19 and the first to show that a healthy diet cuts the chances of developing the disease in the first place. Rather than looking at specific foods or nutrients, the survey was designed to look at broader dietary patterns which are reflective of how people actually eat. The survey produced a 'diet quality score' that reflected the overall merit of each person's diet. Diets with high quality scores were found to contain plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, as well as oily fish, less processed foods and refined carbohydrates. A low diet quality score is associated with diets high in ultra processed foods and low amounts of plant based foods. The researchers found that people who ate the highest quality diet were around 10% less likely to develop COVID-19 than those with the least nutritious diet and 40% less likely to become severely ill if they developed COVID-19. The relationship between diet quality and COVID-19 risk still remained after accounting for all potential confounding factors. Factors included age, body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, smoking, physical activity and underlying health conditions. Mask-wearing habits and population density were also considered. The impact of diet was amplified by individual life situations, with people living in low-income neighborhoods and having the lowest quality diet being around 25% more at risk from COVID-19 than people in more affluent communities who were eating in the same way. Based on these results, the researchers estimate that nearly a quarter of COVID-19 cases could have been prevented if these differences in diet quality and socioeconomic status had not existed. This further highlights that improved access to nutritious, healthier food could be substantive for bettering public health, especially among the underprivileged members of the community. Professor Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at the School of Life Course Sciences, says that "these findings chime with recent results from our landmark PREDICT study, showing that people who eat higher quality diets (with low levels of ultra-processed foods) have a healthier collection of microbes in their guts, which is linked to better health. You don't have to go vegan, but getting more diverse plants on your plate is a great way to boost the health of your gut microbiome, improve your immunity and overall health, and potentially reduce your risk from COVID-19."   Targeting the gut to relieve rheumatoid arthritis University College London, September 6, 2021 UCL researchers have shown that damage to the lining of the gut plays an important role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis, paving the way for a new approach to treating the disease. In the pre-clinical study, which used mouse models and patient samples, the research team propose that restoration of the gut-barrier could offer a new therapeutic approach to reducing the severity of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptoms. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that causes joint pain, swelling, and inflammation. Despite understanding of some of the genetic and environmental factors that might be involved in the development of arthritis, scientists still do not completely understand what initiates disease and how it accelerates. Recent research in this area is exploring how the bacteria in the gut might be involved in the development of arthritis, with researchers suggesting that growth of 'bad' bacteria in the gut might play a part in initiating the disease. Co-lead author, Professor Claudia Mauri (UCL Division of Infection & Immunity), said: "We wanted to know what was happening in the gut and whether changes to the intestinal lining—which usually acts as a barrier to protect the body from bacteria—are a feature of the disease and contribute to its development." Using pre-clinical mouse models and patient samples, the team found that blood markers of gut damage were raised compared to healthy people even at the earliest stages of arthritis, and that these markers of damage got higher the more the disease progressed; and, unexpectedly, there were distinct signs of inflammation, as might be seen in inflammatory bowel disease. The team also showed that the lining of the gut became 'leaky,' potentially allowing the passage of bacteria to cross the gut lining into the body, enhancing inflammation both in the gut and potentially in the joints. "Our findings suggest that the intestinal lining is a therapeutic target. Importantly, we found that using existing drugs that restore the gut-barrier integrity i.e., prevent the gut from becoming leaky or inhibit inflammatory cells from moving to and from to the gut, could reduce the severity of arthritis in pre-clinical models," says Professor Mauri. "Current treatments for rheumatoid arthritis don't appear to correct the problems in the gut and so may leave the patient susceptible to reactivation of disease from the continuing inflammation in that area. Going forward, we need to evaluate the therapeutic impact of treating the intestinal lining of rheumatoid arthritis patients in addition to their joints. Maintaining gut health both through diet and pharmacological intervention may be a valuable new strategy."   Body fat mass percentage reduced among trial participants who received melatonin supplements Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (Iran), September 3, 2021 According to news reporting originating from the Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dieteticsby research stated, “Obesity, as the most common metabolic disorder in the world, is characterized by excess body fat. This study is aimed at determining the effects of melatonin supplementation on body weight, nody mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and body fat mass percentage (BFMP) in people with overweight or obesity.” The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics: “Thirty eight overweight or class-I obese adult individuals were recruited in the study (8 men and 30 women). Participants prescribed a weight-loss diet and then randomly were allocated to melatonin or placebo groups. Participants received either a 3-milligram melatonin or placebo tablet per day for 12 weeks. In order to assess differences at the significance level of 0.05, repeated measure ANOVA and paired t-test were used. According to the results, a significant reduction was found in participants' body weight, WC, and BMI in both groups (p=0.001). However, for the last six weeks, significant reductions of these parameters were observed only in the melatonin group (p=0.01).” According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “The BFMP of participants in the melatonin group showed a significant reduction at the end of the study compared to the initial measurements (p=0.008). Nevertheless, the results of the present study alone are not sufficient to conclude on the effects of melatonin consumption on anthropometric indices, and it seems that further studies are required in this regard.”   Boom in social stress may contribute to population decline UMass Amherst scientist has new hypothesis for changes in reproductive behavior and physiology University of Massachusetts, September 7, 2021 A University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist has developed an “overlooked hypothesis” to help explain the projected global population decline beginning in 2064: social stress. Stress from social media and other largely empty or overwhelming social interactions may be leading or contributing to changes in reproductive behavior and reproductive physiology, suggests Alexander Suvorov, associate professor in the UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences.  In a review article, published in the journal Endocrinology, he examines various theories surrounding previous human population decline as models predict a “remarkable” decrease from 9.7 billion people in 2064 to 8.8 billion by 2100. Some countries' populations already have peaked and are projected to decline by 50% by the end of the century. “A unique feature of the upcoming population drop is that it is almost exclusively caused by decreased reproduction, rather than factors that increase rates of mortality (wars, epidemics, starvation, severe weather conditions, predators, and catastrophic events),” he writes. Suvorov outlines a hypothesis that connects reproductive trends with population densities, proposing that density reflects the quality and frequency of social interactions.  “Rising population numbers contribute to less meaningful social interactions, social withdrawal and chronic stress, which subsequently suppresses reproduction,” the manuscript states. Over the past 50 years, a 50% decrease in sperm counts has occurred. Stress is known to suppress sperm count, ovulation and sexual activity, Suvorov notes. While changes in reproductive physiology are usually attributed to the effects of endocrine-disrupting pollutants, Suvorov believes it is not the only factor. “Numerous wildlife and laboratory studies demonstrated that population peaks are always followed by increased stress and suppressed reproduction,” Suvorov says. “When a high population density is reached, something is happening in the neuroendocrine system that is suppressing reproduction. The same mechanisms happening in wildlife species may be at work in humans as well.” Suvorov points to several changes in reproductive behavior that contribute to the population drop, including people having fewer children and waiting longer to start families or choosing to be child-free. But he says biological changes are likely happening as well. More research is needed, he says, such as studies to determine cortisol levels in human blood, an important measure of stress.  “A better understanding of the causal chain involved in reproduction suppression by population density-related factors may help develop interventions to treat infertility and other reproductive conditions,” Suvorov writes.  He hopes his hypothesis offers up an enticing area of research that scientists from different fields will be interested in exploring. “The goal of this paper is to attract attention to a completely overlooked hypothesis – and this hypothesis is raising more questions than it is giving answers,” Suvorov says. “I hope it will trigger interest of people from very different domains and that after additional studies we will have a much better picture of to what extent population density is connected with social stress and how social stress is connected to reproduction, and what we can do about it.” A common-sense place to start, he suggests: “Back off social media.”     Vitamin D cuts asthma exacerbation by 74% in children: Review Anhui Medical University (China), August 30 2021 Vitamin D supplementation may cut the risk of asthma exacerbation in children but it does not impact respiratory infections in healthy children, a review has found. The review of seven randomised controlled clinical trials weighed up "inconsistent" findings on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the prevention of childhood acute respiratory infections (ARI).  Published in the British Journal of Nutrition, it found overall there was not a statistically significant reduction in the risk of ARI, all-cause mortality or the rate of hospital admission due to respiratory infection in healthy children. However, in children previously diagnosed with asthma, vitamin D supplementation resulted in a 74% reduction in the risk of asthma exacerbation. "Our findings indicate a lack of evidence supporting the routine use of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of ARI in healthy children; however, they suggest that such supplementation may benefit children previously diagnosed with asthma." Potential impact  According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) about 235 million people suffer from asthma, which is particularly common in children. It cited asthma as one of the major non-communicable diseases facing the world today. The condition means air passages of the lungs become inflamed and narrowed.   The causes of asthma are not completely understood but it is thought to be a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental exposure to irritants like allergens, tobacco smoke and air pollution. ARI refers to the infection of the sinuses, throat, airways or lungs usually caused by viruses or bacteria. They can be particularly dangerous for people with asthma. According to a 2013 paper , an estimated 11.9 million episodes of severe ARI and three million episodes of very severe ARI in young children resulted in hospital admissions in 2010 globally. Meanwhile a separate paper from the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group of WHO and UNICEF  found almost two-thirds of the 7.6 million children worldwide who died within the first five years of life died of infectious diseases. Within these two-thirds, pneumonia was the leading cause for a total of 1.396 million deaths.  WHO has said in the past that further research on vitamin D supplementation and the possible decrease in frequency and severity of respiratory infections in children was needed before specific recommendations could be made. The Chinese researchers wrote in their review: "Although vitamin D is widely recognised for its importance in calcium metabolism and bone health, researchers have spent several years focusing on its growing number of possible non-calcaemic health effects. "One of the more promising areas of study is the relationship between vitamin D status and respiratory infection. Recent research has indicated that vitamin D may play a role in protecting against ARI by increasing the body's production of naturally acting antibiotics." The review was conducted by researchers at the Anhui Medical University, Shaoxing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Huzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Anhui Institute of Schistosomiasis Control and the Anhui Provincial Family Planning Institute of Science and Technology in China. It included trials in Japan, Afghanistan, India, Poland and Mongolia that compared vitamin D supplementation with either placebo or no intervention in children younger than 18 years of age.  Source: British Journal of Nutrition     CoQ10 may improve facial wrinkles: RCT Institute of Cosmetics ( Slovenia), September 9, 2021 High dose co-enzyme Q10 supplementation may improve wrinkles around the eyes and other parts of the face, says a new study. Scientists from the Institute of Cosmetics in Ljubljana, Slovenia report that 150 mg per day of CoQ10 (Q10Vital) for 12 weeks were associated with reduced wrinkles around the eyes, and around the mouth and lips, compared with placebo. On the other hand, no photoprotection or effects on skin hydration or thickness were observed, according to findings published in Biofactors . “In the present study, the administration of a dietary supplement containing CoQ10 over a 12-week period showed several anti-ageing effects as it reduced wrinkles, improved skin smoothness and microrelief as well as skin firmness. It also helped the skin combat seasonal changes since it prevented negative viscoelasticity seasonal changes during winter,” they wrote. CoQ10, a substance similar to a vitamin, is found in every cell in the body and is a key part of cells' energy production machinery.  Levels of CoQ10 have been shown to decline with age and in particular with statin use, which can account for some of the muscular pain and weakness that some users experience as a side effect of the drugs.  CoQ10 also functions as an antioxidant, and while it is used in many dietary supplement, functional food ans cosmetic products, evidence to support its benefits for the skin is “scarce”, said the Slovenian researchers. To test this, they recruited 32 healthy people with an average age of 53 to participate in their randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study. The participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Placebo, low dose CoQ10 (50 mg per day), or high dose CoQ10 (150 mg per day), for 12 weeks. Results showed that, while the anti-wrinkle benefits around the eyes were observed for both CoQ10 groups, the high dose produced additional reductions in wrinkles around the mouth, nose and lips (nasolabial folds, corner of the mouth lines and upper radial lip lines). “It should be noted that some baseline skin parameters are quite variable and it would therefore be beneficial to perform a study on a higher number of subjects to allow clearer conclusions regarding some parameters,” wrote the researchers. “For example, the study was under-powered for dermis parameters (intensity, thickness). Supplementation over a longer period and several seasons would also be worth testing as this study was conducted during winter, and also, 12 weeks is quite a short time to detect nutritional effects on skin, considering the length of the skin regeneration cycle. “Considering this, a longer study period would also provide valuable insights into dose-response relationships. While we were unable to show such a relationship in our study, such an effect might (or might not) be observed if supplementation were to be done over more skin cycles.”

Get A Grip On Lighting Podcast
Episode 252: Starving for Darkness #21 - Acceptance Comes With Understanding

Get A Grip On Lighting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 58:43


Samyukta is an advocate with the International Dark Sky Association, and a member of their International Committee. She currently works in Slovenia, designing experiences to help people connect with darkness and the night sky. Have you ever heard of Forest Bathing?  Well Samyukta can design a dark sky experience where you can go “Star Bathing.” Give this a listen and you'll learn about “archeoastronomy” and “ethnoastronomy.”

21st Century Freak
Violeta Bulc - From EGO to ECO with Former European Commissioner of Transport and Deputy Prime Minister of Slovenia

21st Century Freak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 144:33


Edward sits down with Former European Commissioner of Transport and Deputy Prime Minister of Slovenia, Violeta Bulc. Buckle in and hold on tight as a tsunami of life force hits your eardrum and Violeta uncovers her road from socialist Yugoslavia to capitalist Silicon Valley, the birth of a new nation, becoming Deputy Prime Minister of Slovenia and EU commissioner of Transport. Today, she... I mean, WE, are creating an Ecocivilisation.  "More than just hope, more than just a dream, more than just you and I. It is just possibly a ticket for our existence." www.ecocivilisation.eu

Denise Griffitts - Your Partner In Success!
Simona Spilak - 3 Things to Know As a First Time CEO

Denise Griffitts - Your Partner In Success!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 63:00


As an Executive Leader, you have everyone's back. But who's got yours? My guest Simona Spilak is an executive coach to world-class leaders who need a coach and confidant to help them successfully navigate their world of responsibilities, opportunities, and high-stakes decision-making. She has more than 20 years experience working in the corporate world at a senior level and began her own entrepreneurial journey in 2016. Now she spends her time running an executive search firm in the Central and Eastern Europe region and providing executive coaching services to C-suite leaders and executives, a business that she built from scratch. Her insights on how top leaders can navigate their careers and the far-reaching consequences of their decisions - at work and at home - have been featured in various business magazines and podcasts for leaders and entrepreneurs. Simona helps powerful business leaders and executives make a big impact in both their organization and community, without compromising their personal values or their confidentiality. In addition to two decades of corporate and entrepreneurial business experience, Simona holds a Masters of Science in Economics and is an Erickson Coaching International certified coach, a Saville Assessment® certified coach using Saville performance profiling tools, and a Process Communication Model certified coach for PCM personality profiling. For the last 15 years, Simona has been a guest lecturer on the International Business course at the School of Economics and Business, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. She is also a steering committee member for the International Business MBA at the University of Ljubljana, School of Economics and Business. Website | LinkedIn  

The Cycling Podcast
163: Stage 17 | Unquera - Lagos de Covadonga | Vuelta a España 2021

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 49:00


It was arguably the performance of his career. Primoz Roglic won the seventeenth stage of the Vuelta a España to take a commanding overall lead into the final few days of the Spanish tour, and The Cycling Podcast was roadside to witness it. We hear from some of the fans – from Spain and Slovenia – as well as the atmosphere of the roadside experience as Richard Moore and Daniel Friebe watch and analyse a defining stage. Although Roglic was the winner, Egan Bernal was the other protagonist and the rider who lit the touchpaper – we hear from him and from Roglic in this episode. The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com For 25% off all your SiS products, go to scienceinsport.com and enter the code SISCP25 at the checkout.

Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat
Elizabeth Day - Magpie, the Greatest Friendships, and Exploring the Writing Process

Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 47:50


Today's guest is Elizabeth Day, once again. I know nobody is complaining about that, as her prior episode on Slo Mo is one of the most downloaded of all time. And I absolutely adore this woman and she's one of my favorite people in the world. Like last time, we recorded this on Instagram Live, so please forgive any audio issues.As many of you know, I appeared on Elizabeth's podcast, How to Fail,  earlier in 2020, and the episode was a massive hit. Since that time, she and I have become close friends, and I truly treasure our friendship. Today, we're talking about her new book, Magpie, which is a must read, and running a special promo for those who pre-order it (see below).Elizabeth is an author, journalist and broadcaster. Her memoir, How To Fail: Everything I've Ever Learned From Things Going Wrong is a Sunday Times top 5 bestseller and has been described as ‘life-changing' by critics. Her chart-topping podcast, How To Fail With Elizabeth Day, is a celebration of the things that haven't gone right and has been nominated for two British Podcast Awards. Her seventh and latest book is Magpie, available September 2, 2021.If you pre-order the book and send a screenshot of the order confirmation to win@mogawdat.com, you will enter a sweepstakes to win a signed copy of my books. By the way, this same promotion applies to my new book, Scary Smart, too, releasing September 30, 2021, but if you can only buy one, I'm totally fine if you go with Magpie because when Elizabeth is happy, I am happy.Listen as we discuss:Why I'm in Slovenia right now.How Elizabeth needs to write to stay sane.Writing to find out more about herself and her own experiences.Her latest book, Magpie, a psychological thriller already getting rave reviews.Politeness in British society and how it makes for suspenseful reading.My bet with Elizabeth that her book will be on the charts in the first week.The differences between my and Elizabeth's writing styles.Our never ending feud about the best romcom of all time.A discussion on the meaning of true love.Her next, next book, focusing on friendship.Ali's continued gifts to the world.Instagram: @mo_gawdatFacebook: @mo.gawdat.officialTwitter: @mgawdatLinkedIn: /in/mogawdatConnect with Elizabeth Day on Instagram @elizabday, Facebook @elizabethdayauthor, on Twitter @elizabday, and on her website, elizabethdayonline.co.ukDon't forget to subscribe to Slo Mo for new episodes every Sunday and Thursday. Only with your help can we reach One Billion Happy #onebillionhappy.

All The Kings Men
2021 Draft Evaluation: Francesco Pinelli w/ Mike McKenzie

All The Kings Men

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 26:17


The LA Kings traded up to select Francesco Pinelli 42nd overall in the 2021 NHL Entry Draft. The 18 year old forward played in Jesenice, Slovenia during the 2020-21 season after his rookie season (2019-20) with the Kitchener Rangers of the OHL. Mike McKenzie, head coach of the Rangers, joins host Jesse Cohen to discuss Pinelli's evolution and what kind of NHL player he might develop into. Stream or subscribe today at LAKings.com/podcast.

IF YOU DON'T LIKE THAT WITH GRANT NAPEAR
Grant's Rant: 8-11-21 Luka And The Mavs Going Overboard

IF YOU DON'T LIKE THAT WITH GRANT NAPEAR

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 3:06


What a scene in Slovenia yesterday as the Dallas Mavericks  Luka Doncic signed a 5 year extension worth $207 million.    Luka said he had no doubt in his mind he'd sign the deal.  Yeah no kidding!  Mavs owner Mark Cuban couldn't control himself in gushing over Wonder Boy....but that's the way it is now.  Ya just can't sign a player, you now have to kiss their ass!  Here's what I do know...I haven't seen Luka win a playoff series yet.  Rick Carlisle is gone, there is a new front office and there are no more excuses.  Yes Luka is a great talent, but it's time he starts winning on the NBA stage!

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
08/10/21 DPS Best Of

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 38:54


On Today's Dan Patrick Show, DP talks to Houston area radio host Sean Salisbury, who discusses whether Deshaun will be traveling to Green Bay for the Texans 1st preseason games. The guys discuss NFL o/u win totals which tail spins into confusion and hilarity. And ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski calls in and explains why so many of the Mavs' elites went to Slovenia to get Luka extended. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com