Podcasts about Uphill

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Best podcasts about Uphill

Latest podcast episodes about Uphill

Substance Church Audio Podcast

Sun, 15 Jan 2023 19:54:00 EST https://www.substance-churc

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Jemele Hill, UPHILL: A Memoir

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 26:00


Zibby speaks to Emmy award-winning ESPN SportsCenter co-anchor and Atlantic contributing writer Jemele Hill about her beautiful and radically honest new memoir Uphill. Jemele describes the childhood traumas she revisited when writing this book, like her near-fatal car accident, her parents' drug addictions, and her mother's sexual assaults. She also talks about her early love of books (thanks to her story-reading stepfather), shares brilliant book recommendations, and reveals the projects she is working on now (like directing Colin Kaepernick's documentary alongside Spike Lee!?). Purchase on Bookshop: https://bit.ly/3H7nZsISubscribe to Zibby's weekly newsletter here.Purchase Moms Don't Have Time to Read Books merch here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

KPBS Midday Edition
California child care programs leave many families behind

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 45:47


Governor Newsom's proposed budget plan for 2023 into 2024 includes cuts to programs to close a projected $22.5 billion deficit. Among those cuts are 20,000 new child care slots intended for California's neediest families. New reporting from The San Diego Union-Tribune looks at how California's child care subsidies have fallen short, leaving many unable to afford child care at all. Then, the need for housing is impacting small businesses in a once popular hub for dining and entertainment in San Marcos. And, the state is setting aside $100 million to help Native American tribes buy back their ancestral lands. But once a tribe gets their land back, how do they restore and preserve it? Next, the American Academy of Pediatrics is changing its guidelines for how doctors should address obesity among children. They include early and aggressive treatments like surgery. And, sports journalist Jemele Hill is known for telling hard truths. In her memoir, "Uphill," she shares the story of her successes, failures and family. Finally, this year's KPBS One Book, One San Diego selection for teens is "The Magic Fish," a graphic novel by writer and illustrator Trung Le Nguyen. We speak to the author, also known as Trungles, about the novel about a second generation Vietnamese American teenager who uses fairy tales to help his mother learn English.

All Of It
Best of Resilience in 2022: Jemele Hill's Journey in Journalism

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 11:39


[REBROADCAST FROM October 26, 2022] Jemele Hill is one of the most respected voices in sports journalism. Her career changed when, in 2017, President Trump tweeted at Hill criticizing her and ESPN for the network's ratings. Soon after, Hill left ESPN. Now, she has written a memoir, Uphill, about her life before the recognition. The book touches on her early years growing up in Detroit, why she started writing, and how she broke into the sports media industry. Jemele Hill shares her story.  

Founders
#283 Andrew Carnegie

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 59:12 Very Popular


What I learned from rereading The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie by Andrew Carnegie. Subscribe to listen to Founders Premium — Subscribers can now ask me questions directly which I will answer in Ask Me Anything (AMA) episodes [1:01] 3 part series on Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick:Meet You In Hell: Andrew Carnegie Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership That Transformed America by Les Standiford. (Founders #73) The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie by Andrew Carnegie (Founders #74) Henry Clay Frick: The Life of the Perfect Capitalist by Quentin Skrabec Jr. (Founders #75) [2:00] What these guys all had in common is they were hell bent on knowing their business down to the last cent. They were obsessed with having the lowest cost structure in their industry.[2:00] Highlights from Meet You in Hell: Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership That Changed America:—Cut the prices, scoop the market, watch the costs, and the profits will take care of themselves.—Frick knows his business down to the ground.—Frick's rise from humble beginnings was obviously intriguing to him. It signaled to Carnegie that Frick was another of the fellow “fittest,” and those were the individuals with whom Carnegie sought to align himself.—Carnegie would repeat the mantra time and again: profits and prices were cyclical, subject to any number of transient forces of the marketplace. Costs, however, could be strictly controlled, and in Carnegie's view, any savings achieved in the costs of goods were permanent.—On this issue the two men were of one mind. Frick had made his way in coke by the same reckoning that Carnegie had in rail and steel: if you knew your costs down to the penny, you were always on firm ground.[6:00] Benjamin Franklin: An American Life by Walter Isaacson. (Founders #115)[7:00] A sunny disposition is worth more than a fortune. Young people should know that it can be cultivated; that the mind like the body can be moved from the shade into sunshine.[7:00] The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder. (Founders #100)[8:00] The most important judge of your life story is yourself.[9:00] You can always understand the son by the story of his father. The story of the father is embedded in the son. —Francis Ford Coppola: A Filmmaker's Life by Michael Schumacher. (Founders #242)[10:00] Invest in technology, the savings compound, it gives you an advantage over slower moving competitors, and can be the difference between a profit and a loss.[17:00] He is working from sunrise to sunset for $1.20 a week and he is ecstatic about being able to help his family avoid poverty. [18:00] Andrew Carnegie had manic levels of optimism.[20:00] Do not delay. Do it now. It is a great mistake not to seize the opportunity. Having got myself in, I proposed to stay there if I could.[21:00] I felt that my foot was upon the ladder and that I was about to climb.[21:00] Lesson from Andrew Carnegie's early life: Focus on whatever job is in front of you at this very moment and do the best you can. You can never know what opportunities that will unlock in the future.[24:00] On the miracle of reading and having free access to a 400 volume personal library: In this way the windows were opened in the walls of my dungeon through which the light of knowledge streamed in. Every day's toil and even the long hours of night service were lightened by the book which I carried about with me and read in the intervals that could be snatched from duty. And the future was made bright by the thought that when Saturday came a new volume could be obtained.[26:00] To Colonel James Anderson, Founder of Free Libraries in Western Pennsylvania:He opened his Library to working boys and upon Saturday afternoons acted as librarian, thus dedicating not only his books but himself to the noble work. This monument is erected in grateful remembrance by Andrew Carnegie, one of the "working boys" to whom were thus opened the precious treasures of knowledge and imagination through which youth may ascend.[28:00] Running Down A Dream: How to Succeed and Thrive in a Career You Love by Bill Gurley[36:00] Dark Genius of Wall Street: The Misunderstood Life of Jay Gould, King of the Robber Barons by Edward J. Renehan Jr. (Founders #258)[43:00] This policy is a true secret of success: Uphill work it will be.[46:00] Put all your eggs in one basket and watch that basket.[46:00] The most expensive way to pay for anything is with time.[48:00] The men who have succeeded are men who have chosen one line and stuck to it. It is surprising how few men appreciate the enormous dividends derivable from investment in their own business.[48:00] My advice to young men would be not only to concentrate their whole time and attention on the one business in life in which they engage, but to put every dollar of their capital into it.[51:00] The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance by Ron Chernow. (Founders #139)[52:00] Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean by Les Standiford. (Founders #247)Subscribe to listen to Founders Premium — Subscribers can now ask me questions directly which I will answer in Ask Me Anything (AMA) episodes —I use Readwise to organize and remember everything I read. You can try Readwise for 60 days for free https://readwise.io/founders/—“I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested so my poor wallet suffers. ” — GarethBe like Gareth. Buy a book: All the books featured on Founders Podcast

Bernstein & McKnight Show
Dan Wiederer thinks Bears have long, uphill climb (Hour 3)

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 45:27


In the third hour, Mark Grote and Mike Esposito were joined by Dan Wiederer of the Tribune to break down the Bears' 35-13 loss to the Bills on Saturday. Wiederer also explained why he believes the Bears have a really long, uphill climb to get back to relevancy next season.

When It Was Cool Podcast
Fly Like an Eagle - Uphill Both Ways Podcast - Episode 131

When It Was Cool Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 64:47


Uphill Both what? Oh, the retro pop-culture nostalgia podcast hosted by those proud card-carrying members of AARP? We're back, baby! Mike is almost fully recovered from his surgery a couple of months ago so it's back to the grind! The guys spend this episode catching up on things from the past couple of months, including movies, TV, and books. There's no regular feature this episode, but there IS plenty of flying by the seat of their pants. enjoy the show!

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: Young Thug And HIs Uphill Climb Against The RICO Charges

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 15:34


Rapper Young Thug is facing a life behind bars after the government dropped a host of RICO charges on him and others in his alleged organization. Young Thug had asked for bail two times previously and was denied and this time was no different. He now faces down battling these charges from behind bars.(commercial at 10:51)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/young-thug-is-denied-bail-for-a-third-time-as-he-faces-62-felony-charges-for-being-part-of-ysl-gang/ar-AA10OQLw?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=167838d2239540eee1d300c410beeb44

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: Young Thug And HIs Uphill Climb Against The RICO Charges

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 15:34


Rapper Young Thug is facing a life behind bars after the government dropped a host of RICO charges on him and others in his alleged organization. Young Thug had asked for bail two times previously and was denied and this time was no different. He now faces down battling these charges from behind bars.(commercial at 10:51)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/young-thug-is-denied-bail-for-a-third-time-as-he-faces-62-felony-charges-for-being-part-of-ysl-gang/ar-AA10OQLw?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=167838d2239540eee1d300c410beeb44

Safe Money Retirement Radio
How to keep your retirement only going uphill instead of riding the roller coaster, a way to insure against losing time

Safe Money Retirement Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 11:00


We'll explore how some people's retirement seems like they're riding a roller coaster. Up, then down, but what's next? Is there a way to insure against losing time? Is there a way to only go up and never back down? Don't you think it's time to ask the right questions and get honest answers?Join me each week for a FREE education on how to keep your retirement safe, REALLY safe!www.SafeMoneyRetirement.com 

Some Work, All Play
131. Uphill v. Downhill Pacing, Barefoot Running Benefits (Seriously), and Toughness!

Some Work, All Play

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 77:44 Very Popular


This episode had it all, with some of the most fun training and life topics! We kicked it off with a training discussion that could improve your form and strength FOREVER... and it involves barefoot running. We are not ashamed to speak our barefoot running truth! The main training discussion is on a new study looking at 16,518 race results to determine whether uphill or downhill splits are the most important for race peformance. The results may shock you! Other topics: 5 pieces of running news (including doping and race lotteries), novel approaches to tapers, podcast stats, flopping in soccer, breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and what that means for authenticity, and much more! We also talk about the performance-enhancing properties of country music. Yes, we officially reversed our position on country-pop playlists! We apologize for our past errors. You only hate the ones you secretly love. For a weekly bonus episode (and bi-weekly newsletter), make sure you're subscribed to our Patreon. We love you all! WOOHOO! Support the podcast: patreon.com/swap Try Athletic Greens: athleticgreens.com/swap

KPCW Local News Hour
Local News Hour | December 6, 2022

KPCW Local News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 48:59


Utah Avalanche Center report (1:30) Adaptive skiers say proposed Thaynes Canyon parking plan not adequate to meet needs (3:37) Summit County Council to discuss 300 percent tax increase (8:04) Park City winter transit service starts Dec. 11 (26:52) Morgan County ranch working to help veterans and their families (41:10) Uphill travel now open at Park City Mountain (47:24)

Spinning On 2 Wheels
Episode 36: Uphill Riding

Spinning On 2 Wheels

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 20:43


Hey Ya'll, I'm Peggy, and I'm The Kick-ass KnitterAn experienced knitter documenting her journey through TKGA's Master Handknitting Program, as well as other fiber fun. Peggy is a largely self-taught fiber enthusiast and Knitter with a capital K. She loves yarn, crafting, and riding her motorcycle. Questions? Comments? Feedback?!? My inbox is open at thekickassknitter@gmail.com.Show notes can always be found here.Join in on Ravelry!And, you can check out the Instagram @thekickassknitter

The GAME Recognize Game Podcast with rLj and Kev
S5:E9 - Bourbon & Books: Uphill

The GAME Recognize Game Podcast with rLj and Kev

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 43:27


The brothers discuss November's Bourbon & Books selection:  Uphill by Jemele Hill.   Follow us on Instagram @GRGrLjKev   Be LIGHT!

MSU Today with Russ White
MSU alumna and renowned journalist Jemele Hill with her new book, Uphill: A Memoir

MSU Today with Russ White

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 20:55


Hill talks about what motivated her to write the book and why now was the time to do it. She describes how therapy helped her attain a “better and deeper understanding” of who she is.  “I wasn't unhappy when I began my therapy journey because I don't think you need to be unhappy to go to therapy. Sometimes it's just a good maintenance check. It's for greater understanding of you. I hope when people read the book, they'll see that there's a commonality to all the issues I discuss in my book that should help people as they try to figure out how they want to deal with things.” Hill says she chose to attend MSU “because of its stellar journalism program. I wanted to work at the State News, too. Going to Michigan State really changed my life. I was born and raised in Detroit, but I grew up at Michigan State.” Jemele shares her views on a “very challenging” state of journalism.  “The whole point of journalism is truth. What I see a lot these days is not just the inaccuracies and bad framing, but also an inability to tell the truth by hiding behind objectivity. I know it sounds like objectivity should be a great thing in journalism. Our goal should actually be to be fair, which is different. Sometimes we have to be able to call people out and hold them accountable. That's the whole point of the phrase about journalists being the watchdog of society. The essential core of democracy can only work if there's a free and fair press. The fact that there are outlets that traffic in passing off conspiracy theories as news is very disappointing and all it does is encourage people to not necessarily seek the truth but to seek the truth they want to believe as opposed to what's actually true.” Hill shares her advice for today's journalism students to “focus on the craft. The mechanisms of how we do our jobs will always change. It's stone tablets one day and podcasts the next. But what doesn't change is the core tenets of the job.” Jemele talks about writing on the intersection of sports, race, gender, politics, and culture for The Atlantic. And she shares her views on name, image, and likeness and the transfer portal in the evolving world of college athletics. She previews project she's working on , including a collaboration with Spike Lee.  “I hope people who read Uphill understand that this is a story of resiliency and perseverance. And it's a testament to something I believe in: Your circumstances, no matter how bad, do not have to dictate the life you envision for yourself.” MSU Today airs Saturdays at 5 p.m. and Sundays at 5 a.m. on WKAR News/Talk and Sundays at 8 p.m. on 760 WJR. Find “MSU Today with Russ White” on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
Jemele Hill on ESPN: ‘They really didn't accept who we were'

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 50:28


In her new memoir “Uphill,” journalist Jemele Hill recounts her high-profile departure from ESPN, and growing up poor in Detroit to a single mother. Congressman Hakeem Jeffries has been elected as the next Democratic leader in the U.S. House. He'll be the first Black man to lead a major party in Congress. Traits and attributes that animals find appealing may not make sense in a warming world, such as a lion's dark and bushy mane or a peacock's picturesque plumage. “Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery” made $13 million during its limited one-week run in theaters. Netflix plans to stream the film starting December 23.

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

Journalist, podcaster, and author Jemele Hill joins Sarah to discuss her new memoir Uphill, which details the drug abuse and sexual violence she grew up around, how sports helped her connect with others, how she once tried to reconcile decades old scars between her mother and grandmother over Thanksgiving, and the time she may or may not have pooped herself in a hotel lobby. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Around the Horn
370: Jemele Hill

Around the Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 73:07


Journalist, podcaster, and author Jemele Hill joins Sarah to discuss her new memoir Uphill, which details the drug abuse and sexual violence she grew up around, how sports helped her connect with others, how she once tried to reconcile decades old scars between her mother and grandmother over Thanksgiving, and the time she may or may not have pooped herself in a hotel lobby. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

OTB Football
JOHN GILES: England start well at World Cup | Argentina shocked | Uphill task for Germany

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 18:54


Republic of Ireland legend John Giles is with Nathan Murphy to review the first week at the World Cup. Football on OTB with Sky.

Our Body Politic
Going Uphill and Unpacking the 2022 Midterm Results

Our Body Politic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 50:43


This week, Farai interviews Jemele Hill, contributing writer for the Atlantic and author of the new book, Uphill: A Memoir on how her upbringing informs her impassioned writing and reporting. Then we receive insights on the 2022 midterm election results from political reporters across the nation such as Alex Nguyen with the Texas Tribune, Hibah Ansari with Minnesota's Sahan Journal, and Lauren Gibbons of Bridge Michigan. And on our weekly political roundtable, Sippin' the Political Tea, Farai is joined by Kimberly Atkins Stohr, senior columnist for the Boston Globe and inaugural columnist for the Emancipator, and Sabrina Rodriguez, national politics reporter for the Washington Post.

Entrepreneurs for Impact
Climate Investing, from Gordon Gekko to the Dalai Lama — Howard Fischer, Cofounder of Gratitude Railroad

Entrepreneurs for Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 48:31


My guest today is Howard Fischer, the Chief Evangelist at Gratitude Railroad and CEO of Basso Capital Management. Gratitude Railroad's mission is to support investors in moving capital from traditional finance to impact investments that create deep social and environmental impact, without compromising financial returns. His bio on the GR website is delightful in its brevity and insight into who he is. And I quote: “Uphill over downhill; Snow over sand; Read over watch; Trees over skyscrapers; Pizza over steak; Conversation over gossip; Disagree over agree; Instinct over spreadsheets; Relationship over contract.” In this episode, we talked about: His 40 years in hedge funds How his rebirth in 2013 while not religious was like a metaphorical move from Gordon Gekko to Dalai Lama His financial reckoning during the 2008 financial crisis when his hedge fund went from $3B to $300M The risks in wearing the golden handcuffs of fat paychecks from big-brand employers How philanthropy is broken and government is not a great problem solver Why we have to move more profit-driven capital to the climate sector Examples of the climate investments they've made at Gratitude Railroad, including a focus on organic waste management His theme of “Free the Money” and related investments in Climate First Bank and First Women's Bank Why we can't ask people to eat their broccoli (sorry, you have to listen to understand what this means) Some of his favorite books, such as The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World, Soulcraft: Crossing into the Mysteries of Nature and Psyche, and The Nutmeg's Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis And lots more Hope you enjoy. And give Howard a shout-out on LinkedIn or Twitter by sharing this podcast with your people. --- Entrepreneurs for Impact is on a mission to help climate innovators grow faster with new investment capital, share best practices among peers, expand their networks, and reach their full potential. Learn more: Climate CEO Mastermind Peer Groups — Our invite-only cohorts of 12 executives catalyze personal development and business growth via monthly meetings, annual retreats, and 1:1 coaching and strategy calls. Today's highly curated Mastermind members represent over $8B in market cap or assets under management. Newsletter — A 3-minute weekly summary of climate tech, startups, better habits, and deep work. Programs are led by Dr. Chris Wedding — 3x founder, $1B of investment experience, and Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill professor, with 60,000+ professional students taught, 25 years of meditation, an obsession with constant improvement, and far too many mistakes to keep to himself. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entrepreneurs-for-impact/message

Jalen Rose: Renaissance Man
The View from the Top ft. Jemele Hill

Jalen Rose: Renaissance Man

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 39:29


Former ESPN co-anchor, journalist for The Atlantic and author Jemele Hill joins the podcast to talk to Jalen Rose about navigating the media world as a Black woman, how she spent her days as a child in Detroit and what she hopes readers take away from her new memoir, "Uphill." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keto Mom Secrets
The Road To Success Is Uphill | Ep.76

Keto Mom Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 10:17


Welcome to the Keto Mom page, my name is Stephanie. And I have some thoughts to share with you today. Today is Wednesday, give me a piece of wisdom or one thing, a sentence, or a phrase that is an incredible piece of wisdom that you read or was given to you by your grandparents or someone. A piece of wisdom from the book called "The Pursuit" by Dexter Yager "It starts with the dream that seems impossible. But when that dream is pursued and worked over time, gradually it will come true. Nothing worthwhile happens overnight. The road to success runs uphill, so don't expect to break any world records. Success takes time. Once you get your dreams going, you have to maintain their momentum. You can't afford to stop along the way, the hardest thing to do is pursue your dream, the hardest thing to do in pursuing your dream is to get the ball rolling and to get it started. You want to have to do that only once the first time". Visit our Website: https://beacons.ai/ketomom Grab your Mom Fuel Trial Packs: 3 Pack Trials: www.MomFuelTrials.com 5/10 Pack Trials: https://www.ketomomsecrets.com/shop CONNECT WITH ME: * Facebook: http://facebook.com/KetoMom * Facebook: http://facebook.com/stephy.mielke * Instagram: http://instagram.com/ketomomsecrets * Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/KetoMomSecrets * Blog: http://KetoMomSecrets.com * YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/ketomom * Email: stephanie@ketomom.com RESOURCES: Keto Mom Blog: http://www.KetoMomSecrets.com Mom Fuel Trials: www.MomFuelTrials.com Drink Ketones Challenge: https://www.ketomomsecrets.com/10-day-challenge Purchase our Mom + Dad Fuel: http://www.KetoMom.com 60 Hour KetoReboot: https://www.ketomomsecrets.com/keto-reboot More info on the Keto Lifestyle: http://www.facebook.com/KetoMom * Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-325815 -- KetoMOM was founded with a very simple philosophy. Make. People. Better. Our family hopes to provide as much value as possible by taking your questions about keto lifestyle, homeschooling, social media, entrepreneurship, and family business and giving you our answers based on a lifetime of building successful relationships, teams, and experience. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ketomom/message

Let's Red Table That
Uphill: Navigating Racism at Work (Jemele Hill recap)

Let's Red Table That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 45:04


Tracy and Cara take on this recap of Jemele Hill and her mother Denise Dennard's first ever interview together on their own because they have their own experiences to share. Tracy and Cara tell their painful stories of code switching and navigating racism at work and how they've responded when people label them as “angry Black women.” PLUS, don't miss the top five most shocking stories from Jemele Hill's book Uphill that Red Table did not cover in their episode, only on Let's Red Table That. Buy Jemele Hill's book Uphill Hosts Information: Cara Pressley @thecareercheerleader Cara's Instagram @TheCareerCheerleader Cara's Facebook @the1cheering4U Cara's Twitter @FeelinSuccessful Cara's TikTok Cara's Website Tracy T. Rowe @tracytrowe Tracy's Instagram @troweandco Tracy's Facebook @tracytrowe Tracy's Twitter @tracytrowe Tracy's TikTok Tracy's Website ---- #LRTT Listening and loving the show? Please be sure to rate and review. Have a question you want us to discuss on Let's Red Table That? Email us at: letsredtablethat@redtabletalk.com ----- LET'S RED TABLE THAT is produced by Red Table Talk Podcasts. EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Jada Pinkett Smith, Fallon Jethroe and Ellen Rakieten. PRODUCER Kyla Carneiro. ASSOCIATE PRODUCER Yolanda Chow. EDITOR AND AUDIO MIXER Stepfanie Aguilar. MUSIC from Epidemic Sound. LET'S RED TABLE THAT is in partnership with iHeartRadio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bakari Sellers Podcast
Jemele Hill on the Kyrie Irving Fallout and ‘Uphill: A Memoir'

The Bakari Sellers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 42:18


Bakari Sellers is joined by journalist and author Jemele Hill to discuss her journey from the Detroit Free Press to ESPN (1:54), the Kyrie Irving backlash following his controversial tweet (10:20), and the release of her new book ‘Uphill: A Memoir' (15:58). Host: Bakari Sellers Guest: Jemele Hill Producer: Donnie Beacham Jr. Executive Producer: Jarrod Loadholt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Red Table Talk
Uphill: Navigating Racism at Work (Jemele Hill recap)

Red Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 45:04


Tracy and Cara take on this recap of Jemele Hill and her mother Denise Dennard's first ever interview together on their own because they have their own experiences to share. Tracy and Cara tell their painful stories of code switching and navigating racism at work and how they've responded when people label them as “angry Black women.” PLUS, don't miss the top five most shocking stories from Jemele Hill's book Uphill that Red Table did not cover in their episode, only on Let's Red Table That. Buy Jemele Hill's book Uphill Hosts Information: Cara Pressley @thecareercheerleader Cara's Instagram @TheCareerCheerleader Cara's Facebook @the1cheering4U Cara's Twitter @FeelinSuccessful Cara's TikTok Cara's Website Tracy T. Rowe @tracytrowe Tracy's Instagram @troweandco Tracy's Facebook @tracytrowe Tracy's Twitter @tracytrowe Tracy's TikTok Tracy's Website ---- #LRTT Listening and loving the show? Please be sure to rate and review. Have a question you want us to discuss on Let's Red Table That? Email us at: letsredtablethat@redtabletalk.com ----- LET'S RED TABLE THAT is produced by Red Table Talk Podcasts. EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Jada Pinkett Smith, Fallon Jethroe and Ellen Rakieten. PRODUCER Kyla Carneiro. ASSOCIATE PRODUCER Yolanda Chow. EDITOR AND AUDIO MIXER Stepfanie Aguilar. MUSIC from Epidemic Sound. LET'S RED TABLE THAT is in partnership with iHeartRadio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

City Arts & Lectures
Jemele Hill

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 75:29


Jemele Hill is the Emmy Award–winning former cohost of ESPN's SportsCenter and 2018 NABJ Journalist of the Year. Hill is a contributing writer for the Atlantic, where she covers the intersection of sports, race, politics, and culture. She is also the producer of a Disney/ESPN documentary with Colin Kaepernick. She grew up in Detroit, graduated from Michigan State University, and now lives in Los Angeles. In her new unapologetic, character-rich, and eloquent memoir Uphill, Hill shares the story of her work, the women of her family, and her complicated relationship with God. Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is the author of many highly acclaimed books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, How to Be an Antiracist, and Antiracist Baby. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News racial justice contributor and host of the new action podcast Be Antiracist. On November 3, 2022, Hill and Kendi came to the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco for an onstage conversation.

Behind the Line
Jemele Hill New Book is Bomani Jones Level of Failure

Behind the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 12:46


Jemele Hill has spent the last few months...promoting her publishing debut of hew memoir Uphill. Jemele Hill has made the media rounds heavily promoting this book...securing dozens of endorsements from high-profile public figures. There's nothing but praise in the mainstream media for Jemele Hill...but what do normal people think? We reveal and react to book sales for Jemele Hill. We analyze charts and reviews from Amazon, the New York Times, and Apple Books. We also question why people like Bomani Jones and Jemele Hill continue to be given opportunities in media...without proving they can succeed. https://www.patreon.com/btlkc84?fan_landing=true

Le Batard & Friends Network
MOCO - Episode 42: Going Uphill

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 80:04


This week on Montgomery & Co., we find out the numbers that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II pulled in and more in MoCo Newsroom. Jemele Hill joins us to talk about her new memoir "Uphill." Plus, the crew get into a battle in MoCo Trivia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
MOCO - Episode 42: Going Uphill

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 80:04


This week on Montgomery & Co., we find out the numbers that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II pulled in and more in MoCo Newsroom. Jemele Hill joins us to talk about her new memoir "Uphill." Plus, the crew get into a battle in MoCo Trivia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Remotely Renee
Episode 42: Going Uphill

Remotely Renee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 80:04


This week on Montgomery & Co., we find out the numbers that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II pulled in and more in MoCo Newsroom. Jemele Hill joins us to talk about her new memoir "Uphill." Plus, the crew get into a battle in MoCo Trivia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Touré Show
Jemele Hill–I'm Living My Best Life

Touré Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 71:27


Jemele Hill is back with a spicy memoir called Uphill where she talks about growing up in poverty and her rise and fall at ESPN. We get all into the story of her SportsCenter gig and her rugged youth in Detroit. It's inspiring to see where she is now after all she's been through. Please fill out our listener survey: https://forms.gle/vSXPsDdMGcSbKrfY9 Toure Show Episode 351 Host & Writer: Touré Executive Producers: Jennifer Brown and Ryan Woodhall Associate Producer: Adell Coleman Photographers: Chuck Marcus, Shanta Covington, and Nick Karp Booker: Claudia Jean The House: DCP Entertainment Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Garage Heroes In Training
DwD 0394:  How to Capitalize on Uphill and Downhill Areas of a Track

Garage Heroes In Training

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 16:25


DwD 0394:  How to Capitalize on Uphill and Downhill Areas of a Track In past Dominating with Dawsons, we have talked about the affect that camber has on track driving.  During this episode, we go into the effect that uphill and downhill sections can have going into and coming out of turns.  We also go into how to know when you are at the limit and what Vicki is concerned about when pushing toward the limit in various section on a track.  I think we may have reached a new breakthrough for her and hopefully you! A link to the episode is: https://tinyurl.com/TheUpsandDownsofHills  If you would like to help grow our sport and this podcast: Awesome choice #1:  Subscribe to our podcast on the podcast provider of your choice and every episode will show up.  Even Better:  If you could give our podcast a (5-star?) rating Mostest Bestest:  if you would leave a podcast review We really appreciate it. We hope you enjoy this episode! PS  Are you are looking to stream or save your integrated telemetry/racing data with video? Candelaria Racing Products Sentinel System may be the perfect solution for you.  We are in the midst of installing the system in two of our cars.  If this sounds like something that may help you and your team, please use our discount code "GHIT". This will give 10% discount code to all our listeners during the checkout process. PS2  If you are looking to add an Apex Pro to your driving telemetry system, do not forget to use our discount code for all Apex Pro systems.  Please enter the code “ghitlikesapex!”. You will receive a free Windshield Suction Cup Mount for the system, a savings of $40. Vicki, Jennifer, Ben, Alan, Jeremy, and Bill Hosts and Drivers for the Garage Heroes In Training team

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Hour 2: Top 5 Athlete Names That Connote Election Day

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 44:03


Hour 2 begins with a proper laugh at all the Crypto owners in the Shipping Container before examining where player empowerment has taken from a leadership standpoint in the NBA. Then, Jemele Hill joins us to talk about her new memoir, "Uphill," and discuss how people are voting to hurt others rather than help themselves, traditional media and black voices, white supremacy, Kyrie Irving, and more before we get to Mike and Stu's "Top 5 Athlete Names That Connote Election Day." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #103: Bromley Mountain President and General Manager Bill Cairns

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 74:55


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 7. It dropped for free subscribers on Nov. 10. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoBill Cairns, President and General Manager of Bromley Mountain Resort, VermontRecorded onOctober 24, 2022About BromleyClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Joseph O'DonnellOperated by: The Fairbank GroupPass affiliations: NoneReciprocal pass partners: 1 day each at Jiminy Peak, CranmoreLocated in: Peru, VermontClosest neighboring ski areas: Magic Mountain (14 minutes), Stratton (19 minutes)Base elevation: 1,950 feetSummit elevation: 3,284 feetVertical drop: 1,334 feetSkiable Acres: 300Average annual snowfall: 145 inchesTrail count: 47 (31% black, 37% intermediate, 32% beginner)Lift count: 9 (1 high-speed quad, 1 fixed-grip quad, 4 doubles, 1 T-bar, 2 carpets - view Lift Blog's of inventory of Bromley's lift fleet)Uphill capacity: 10,806 skiers per hourWhy I interviewed himVermont is one of those states where you can see a lot of ski areas from the tops of other ski areas. I find this thrilling. I love all ski areas. Relish them. That such machines, so similar yet so distinct, could be so concentrated sparks within me some thrill of exotic immersion, of adventuring into zones dense and wild and compelling.Of these peak-to-peak views, none is more dramatic than south-facing Bromley viewed from north-facing Stratton. In Vermont, which manages sprawl better than the rest of U.S. America, your view is most often of mountains, the endless Greens, treed and rippling toward Canada, radio towers blinking against the sky. But Bromley, etched magnificently into the expanse, owns the view from its larger neighbor.Bromley and Stratton are two points of Southern Vermont's so-called Golden Triangle. The third is Magic. The three ski areas have a weird joint history. Of owning and buying and selling and sometimes closing one another. Right now they're all friends. Or so they say. They're each so different that it's hard to even think of them as competitors. Ultimate Indie Magic gets the beards and the FTW narrative. Ultimate Corporate Six-pack-a-tron Stratton gets the Ikon Pass-toting New Yorkers.And what is Bromley? Bromley is Ultimate Bromley. I'm not sure how else to describe it. And Bromley skiers ski Bromley. And they love the place. And why wouldn't they? The front side is blue square glory, fall lines straight and steady, cut New England narrow through the woods. There are chairlifts everywhere, flying in all directions from the base. Old doubles mostly. How ski areas once were before they simplified and streamlined. The Blue Ribbon side (like Pabst Blue Ribbon, like PBR – get it guys*), is a slightly shorter, black-diamond version of the frontside.All of this oriented gloriously toward the sun. When there's sun. In Vermont, in the winter, when it's a thousand degrees below zero, that matters a lot. This is not a great position for snowpack. Most North American ski areas face north for a reason: shadows block the sun, preserving snow depth. But skiing into May is not the point of Bromley, or its goal. The place gets enough snow, and has a good enough snowmaking system, that it can usually make the first weekend in April. Which is when Bromley skiers are tired of skiing.Or maybe they buy the Killington spring pass and keep going into June. In Vermont, you have options. The state has the same number of ski areas (26) as California, which is 17 times its size by area and 60 times larger by population. To succeed here, a ski area needs something compelling. Thirty miles south of Bromley lies the Hermitage Club, formerly Haystack, 1,400 vertical feet and 200 acres, a near Bromley clone size-wise. Yet the ski area has closed at least three times since its 1964 founding. No one could ever figure out how to compete with – or be little brother to – Mount Snow, the snowmaking Godzilla four and a half miles up the road. And yet Bromley, half the size of Stratton, which sits gigantic in the vista from Sun Mountain's frontside trails, has operated for 85 consecutive seasons. It's not like Bromley skiers don't know they have choices. They just don't care. Ultimate Bromley, with its little base village and its one high-speed lift and its zillion low-speed lifts and its sunshiney aspect, is home.*That sound you hear is every hipster in Brooklyn simultaneously mounting their single-speed banana-seat bicycles and riding north toward Vermont.What we talked aboutThe accidental career; Snow Valley, Vermont; Bromley in the ‘80s; the complex and interesting challenge of the ski business; where loyalty comes from; “our efforts are the same on a Tuesday in January as they are on a holiday Saturday at Christmas”; Vermont's first chairlift; the incredible puzzle of modernizing Bromley's snowmaking in the ‘90s; the importance of water pressure; “summer's always been a big deal at Bromley”; grab a PBR and pop a tab for this Bromley Mountain origin story; Fred Pabst's unlikely skiing legacy; snowmaking in the 1960s; Stig Albertsson buys the mountain; the arrival of the current owner, Joe O'Donnell, and his legacy and style as an owner; that one time Bromley owned Magic, or Magic owned Bromley, or Stratton owned Bromley, or something; why Bromley closed Magic; the return of The Golden Triangle; what happened when a fire hit Bromley 10 days before Christmas; the Fairbank Group arrives; last year's massive upgrade to the Sun Mountain Express; why Bromley upgraded rather than replaced the lift; the incredible resilience of Hall chairlifts; the biggest challenge in running a fleet of decades-old lifts; where else a detachable lift might make sense on the mountain; a thought experiment in what would make sense to upgrade the Plaza chairlift and Lord's Prayer T-bar; the utility and future of the old double-double; the incredible efficiency of modern snowmaking and the concomitant rise in lift-maintenance costs; managing snow quality with Bromley's southern exposure; the Bromley snow pocket; Bromley's lost trails; potential future glade and trail development; backcountry access now and in the future; the challenges of Forest Service expansion; “in some respects, the very best skiing at Bromley is not cut”; the base village; pricing season passes in the Epic and Ikon era and how Bromley has maintained its pricing power; rethinking the mountain's lift-ticket pricing structure; why we're unlikely to see a Bromley-Jiminy Peak-Cranmore joint pass anytime soon.         Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewThe Epic Pass hit New England like a tsunami. For decades, season pass prices had ticked upward like post-IPO Google stock. Then Vail bought Stowe, and everything instantly changed. As I wrote in March 2020 (a few days before I had something more urgent to write about), in an article headlined “The Era of the Expensive Single-Mountain Season Pass Is Over in the Northeast”:  For the 2016-17 season, the last before the Broomfield Big Boys scooped up Stowe, a season pass at that most classic of New England rough-and-tumble mountains was $2,313, according to New England Ski History. Pass prices to the other large Vermont resorts were similarly outlandish: $1,779 for Sugarbush, $1,619 for Okemo, $1,486 for Killington, $1,199 for Stratton, $1,144 for Bromley (!), $999 for Mount Snow, $992 for Mad River Glen, $974 for Jay Peak, $899 for Burke, and on and on.Granted, these were probably not early season prices, and these are presumably adult no-blackout passes. But price differential from just four seasons ago – four! – is remarkable. And none of these passes, with the exception of Killington, which gave you Pico access, came with additional days at any other mountains as far as I am aware [2022 note: the Mount Snow pass, as I'm now aware, was a Peak Pass, which would have been good for unlimited access at three New Hampshire ski areas, Hunter, and all of Peak's smaller ski areas in Pennsylvania and the Midwest]. In 2020, you can now get full unrestricted access to Stowe, Mount Snow, and Okemo for $979 on an Epic Pass [2022 note: this was the season before Vail lowered Epic Pass prices by 20 percent]. You get full Sugarbush and Stratton access for a $999 Ikon Pass, and a Beast 365 pass would be $1,344 and get you unlimited Killington and access to Sugarbush and Stratton every day of the season outside of a few blackout days.In other words, for less than the price of a Stowe season pass four years ago, you can now have season passes to six of Vermont's largest mountains. If you don't mind dealing with blackout days, you could pick up a $729 Epic Local Pass and a $699 Ikon Base Pass and ski Vermont every day of the season for $1,428 (and Okemo and Mount Snow are still not even blacked out on the Epic Local Pass). And you can further reduce this by, say, picking up a $599 Northeast Epic Pass and a (if you're renewing), $649 Ikon Base pass, which would give you blacked-out season passes to Okemo, Mount Snow, Stratton, and Sugarbush, and 10 days at Stowe and five at Killington, for all of $1,248.I could go on. There is no need to. Skiers will figure this out for themselves, and quickly. Anyone buying a season pass in Vermont just four years ago was more or less locked into that mountain for the season, as the number of ski days required to justify the pass purchase was significant, and any days invested elsewhere probably seemed excessive and indulgent. In the three-year instant it took Vail to buy Stowe and Okemo and Peak and integrate them into a regional pass, and Alterra to buy Stratton and Sugarbush and introduce the Ikon Pass and then significantly expand access in the region, the consumer expectation has shifted from season pass as an aspirational indulgence reserved for locals and second-home owners to a bargain product that offers limitless access to not one but multiple high-quality mountains, not just across the East, but in the snowy towering West.I then called out Bromley in particular:In this environment, not even the burliest mountains can stand alone. Killington just conceded that. Boyne did something similar with its New England Pass last week, tossing an Ikon Base Pass in with its $1,549 Platinum-tier product, which provides unlimited access to its standout trio of Sugarloaf, Sunday River, and Loon.All of this leaves skiers – especially mountain-hopping skiers like myself – in the best pass-shopping position imaginable. No matter which pass we buy, it will come not just with limitless days at our local mountain, but bonus or unlimited days at at least half a dozen other mountains that we can easily travel to.All of which creates a very difficult reality for independent mountains: skiers now expect access far beyond their core mountain when purchasing a season pass, and they expect those passes to be massively discounted from what they were less than one presidential election cycle ago.On both price and additional access, many independent ski areas are far behind. Bromley's season pass, for example, is $925 (all prices are for adult, no-blackout passes, unless otherwise indicated). That's early-bird pricing. It includes no free days at any other mountains, even though its parent company also owns or operates Jiminy Peak in Massachusetts and Cranmore in New Hampshire [2022 note: Bromley, Cranmore, and Jiminy Peak passes now include one day at each of their sister mountains]. It does offer some non-holiday discounts of up to half off day tickets at partner resorts, including Jay Peak.This is a completely untenable position. Bromley is a fine mountain. It is terrific for families. It has some fun terrain off the Blue Ribbon Quad. It is very easy to get to. But it is right down the road from Stratton, which is far larger, has a far more sophisticated lift network, and is on the Ikon Pass, meaning a pass to Stratton is only $74 more than a pass to Bromley and also includes a pass to Sugarbush, days at Killington, etc., etc. Unless you have a condo on the mountain and you ski there and only there and have for years and years and have no aspirations or intentions of going anywhere else ever, there is no way to justify that pass price with no access to any mountain other than your own in today's competitive ski pass environment.One of two things needs to happen in order for independent mountains to remain competitive in the season pass realm: they need to join a coalition of other independent ski areas to offer reciprocal free days at one another's mountains for passholders, or the price needs to come way down. And in most cases, the answer is probably some combination of both of those things.Well I was wrong. Bromley never joined a pass coalition and its pass price keeps increasing, and yet every year, the mountain sells more passes. So I'll own my mistake. My template was too simplistic, too focused on price and variety and size as a skier's primary motivating factors, too anchored to the assumption that all skiers were like me, seeking the most mountains for the lowest cost. It would have been like saying Whole Foods business model sucks because Kroger has larger stores and sells groceries for less money. Consumers will pay a premium for exclusivity and quality. And Bromley offers both: good snow, fewer people. A predictable, repeatable experience for a tight community of families and condo owners. These things matter more than I had supposed.Select independent ski areas all over the country are thriving in the megapass era by snubbing the trends of the megapass era: Wolf Creek, Mt. Baker, Bear Valley, Whitefish, Bretton Woods, Wachusett, Plattekill, Holiday Valley. Part of this is Epkon burnout, refugees seeking respite from the crowds. Part of it is atmosphere and community, skiers buying into a gestalt as much as a place or activity. Bromley operates in one of the toughest neighborhoods in skiing, seated within a two-hour's drive of dozens of competitors, many of them bigger and cheaper, with more terrain variety and more snowfall and more and faster lifts. And yet the Sun Mountain keeps winning. There's a reason for that, and I wanted to figure out what it was.What I got wrongI stated in the interview that Joseph O'Donnell had purchased Bromley in 1990, intimating that marked the start of his involvement with the ski area. Cairns points out that O'Donnell had worked with Bromley beginning in the 1980s.Why you should ski BromleyMount Snow and Stratton, nice as they are, tricked out as they are, have downsides. Especially on weekends. Especially midwinter. Neither does a great job managing skier volume, and neither seems particularly interested in trying. I don't know how much that really matters. It's New England, and skiers expect crowds. It's all part of the experience, like overgrooming and boilerplate and safety bars dropped on your dome before the chair is out of the barn.How to escape the human anthill ski experience? Well, you could join the Hermitage Club, which at last check-in cost $50,000 upfront and $15,000 annually thereafter. You could ski Magic, which is uncrowded but snowmaking-challenged, with just 50 percent of the mountain covered and one fixed-grip double to the top (though the Black Quad may finally be close to launch). Or you could ski Bromley, with the snowmaking and grooming firepower of its bigger corporate neighbors, but without the mosh-pit atmosphere. Unlike most of Vermont, the place is tolerable even at its busiest.And the sunshine effect is real. Stratton is often abandoned after 2:30 p.m. The sun dips, the snow bricks up, and everyone leaves. When the clouds aren't bunching heavy over New England and the wind stays down, Bromley is just a more pleasant place to be. It doesn't have the tough-guy terrain like Killington or the expanses of glades like Stratton. And it doesn't need them. Bromley, the Ultimate Bromley, is just fine being exactly what it knows it has to be.Podcast notes* We go deep on Bromley's long history, but New England Ski History has a great overview of the ski area's development, going back to the wild early days of recorded Vermont history.* Bill and I discuss the lost Snow Valley ski area extensively. Though this little spot, parked off Vermont state highway 30 between Bromley and Stratton, closed in 1984, it remains popular among backcountry skiers. Someone still maintains several runs, and the property was recently listed for sale (it was scheduled for auction in September, but I'm uncertain how that went). While it's highly unlikely that anyone could redevelop Snow Valley as a lift-served ski area, it could become New England's version of the uphill-only Bluebird Backcountry ski area in Colorado. Here's a 1982 trailmap:* Bill discusses the rising cost of everything, but point in particular to the exploding price of chairlifts. He notes that the Sun Mountain Express cost Bromley $2.7 million in 1997, and estimates that it would run $7 million to install a similar lift today. Had chairlifts followed general inflationary trends, the lift would run around $5 million today.* Bill references a 1950s trail called “Bromley Run,” that ran off the summit and didn't return to the lifts. You can see it marked as trail 10 on this “Big Bromley” trailmap from 1950:* Bill and I discuss potential terrain expansions (unlikely), and the possibility of backcountry skiing – possibly guided – from the summit down to Peru, to the east, and East Dorset, to the northwest. He also refers to the Best Farm quite a bit, which is the large circled area off highway 11. The Fairbank Group's website currently has this space scoped for real estate development. Here's the ski area in relation to these various areas:The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year-round. Join us.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 120/100 in 2022, and number 366 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

The Takeaway
Jemele Hill Shares Her Story of Trauma and Perseverance

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 18:38


Jemele Hill joins us to discuss her new memoir, Uphill, which chronicles the events of her upbringing that shaped her life and career, as well as the story behind the better-known moments of her time at ESPN.

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Jemele Hill - Hour 3 (10-31-2022)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 50:05


Rich and the guys ponder the possibility of Deion Sanders jumping ship from Jackson State to take the suddenly vacant head coaching job at Auburn. Jemele Hill joins Rich in-studio to discuss her new ‘Uphill' autobiography that digs deep into her “heavy” upbringing, weighs in (as a Michigan State alumna) on the MSU-Michigan rivalry and the ugly post-game incident that led to the suspension of several Spartans players, and says he she's transitioned from covering sports to broader topics as her career moves forward. Rich recaps the NFL's Week 8 with a special Halloween look at Sunday's “scariest” storylines including Christian McCaffrey and the 49ers, Josh Allen and the Buffalo Bills, Jalen Hurts and the Philadelphia Eagles, Derrick Henry and the Tennessee Titans, and Tony Pollard and the Dallas Cowboys. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fresh Air
Best Of: MAGA's Chinese Billionaire / Sports Journalist Jemele Hill

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 48:44 Very Popular


New Yorker writer Evan Osnos traces the path of Guo Wengui, a billionaire who fled China and insinuated himself into the MAGA inner circle. But his true allegiances are suspect.Maureen Corrigan reviews The Year of the Puppy, by Alexandra Horowitz.Former co-anchor of ESPN's SportsCenter, Jemele Hill, faced criticism in 2017 for calling Trump a white supremacist. In her memoir, Uphill, she talks about her career and her life growing up in Detroit. She spoke with contributor Tonya Mosley.

#RolandMartinUnfiltered
Courting Young Votes, Fla. Sheriff Tweets About Black People, "Uphill: A Memoir" By Jemele Hill

#RolandMartinUnfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 116:47


10.27.2022 #RolandMartinUnfiltered: Courting Young Votes, Fla. Sheriff Tweets About Black People, "Uphill: A Memoir" By Jemele Hill The focus is getting voters aged 18-29 to the polls.  Several organizations are targeting that demographic with ads. We'll talk to a board member from the Andrew Goodman Foundation to find out what they are doing to secure young voter engagement.  We'll tell you why the Nevada Supreme Court stops the hand counting of one county's mail-in ballots.  Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is ordered to hand over all flight documents related to those migrants flown to Martha's Vineyard.  And a Florida sergeant allegedly said black people are America's three biggest problems.  RolandMartinUnfiltered and #BlackStarNetwork via the Cash App ☛ https://cash.app/$rmunfiltered PayPal ☛ https://www.paypal.me/rmartinunfiltered Venmo ☛https://venmo.com/rmunfiltered Zelle ☛ roland@rolandsmartin.com Annual or monthly recurring #BringTheFunk Fan Club membership via paypal ☛ https://rolandsmartin.com/rmu-paypal/ Download the #BlackStarNetwork app on iOS, AppleTV, Android, Android TV, Roku, FireTV, SamsungTV and XBox

Morning Shift Podcast
Jemele Hill Holds Nothing Back In Her New Memoir ‘Uphill'

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 25:34


Sports journalist and cultural commentator Jemele Hill's new memoir Uphill is a thought-provoking, humorous and inspiring account of her rise to becoming an influential sports journalist and media iconoclast. Reset learns from Hill about growing up in Detroit, being a Black woman in sports media and how she found her voice as a writer and cultural critic.

The Breakfast Club
FULL SHOW: We Chat With Jemele Hill, Talk Fake Drakes, Ask Yee and More

The Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 84:07 Very Popular


Today on The Breakfast Club, we chat with TV Personality and anchor Jemele Hill about her new memoir "Uphill". Later on we talk about the lawsuit going on between Drake and the...Fake Drake. Lastly, listeners call in to get business and personal advice from YeeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Therapy for Black Girls
Session 281: Forging a New Path with Jemele Hill

Therapy for Black Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 44:11 Very Popular


The Therapy for Black Girls Podcast is a weekly conversation with Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, a licensed Psychologist in Atlanta, Georgia, about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible versions of ourselves. This week I'm joined by Jemele Hill, an Emmy Award-winning journalist, creator, and host of the podcast "Jemele Hill is Unbothered,” She's also the founder of The Unbothered Network, a groundbreaking podcast and production company. Today she joins us to talk about her newly-released memoir Uphill, which details her upbringing in Detroit, her long-time career in sports journalism, overcoming a legacy of pain, and forging a new path. During our conversation, we discussed the considerations and discussions she had while writing about her family history, her career-defining moments and how she prioritized her mental health while writing the book. Resources Visit our Amazon Store for all the books mentioned on the podcast. I'm writing a book! Get updates about Sisterhood Heals.   Where to Find Jemele Grab a copy of Uphill Instagram Twitter   Stay Connected Is there a topic you'd like covered on the podcast? Submit it at therapyforblackgirls.com/mailbox. If you're looking for a therapist in your area, check out the directory at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/directory. Take the info from the podcast to the next level by joining us in the Therapy for Black Girls Sister Circle community.therapyforblackgirls.com Grab your copy of our guided affirmation and other TBG Merch at therapyforblackgirls.com/shop. The hashtag for the podcast is #TBGinSession.   Make sure to follow us on social media: Twitter: @therapy4bgirls Instagram: @therapyforblackgirls Facebook: @therapyforblackgirls   Our Production Team Executive Producers: Dennison Bradford & Maya Cole Howard Producers: Fredia Lucas, Ellice Ellis & Cindy OkerekeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Of It
Jemele Hill's Journey in Journalism

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 24:00


Jemele Hill is one of the most respected voices in sports journalism. Her career changed when, in 2017, President Trump tweeted at Hill criticizing her and ESPN for the network's ratings. Soon after, Hill left ESPN. Now, she has written a memoir, Uphill, about her life before the recognition. The book touches on her early years growing up in Detroit, why she started writing, and how she broke into the sports media industry. Jemele Hill joins to share her story.

Fresh Air
Sports Journalist Jemele Hill

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 45:58 Very Popular


The former co-anchor of ESPN's SportsCenter faced criticism in 2017 for calling the president a white supremacist. In her memoir, Uphill, she talks about her career and her life growing up in Detroit. She spoke with contributor Tonya Mosley. Also, David Bianculli reviews Guillermo del Toro's horror anthology series on Netflix.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #101: Sun Valley Vice President and GM Pete Sonntag

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 64:45 Very Popular


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Oct. 20. It dropped for free subscribers on Oct. 23. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoPete Sonntag, Vice President and General Manager of Sun Valley, Idaho.Recorded onOctober 10, 2022About Sun ValleyClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The R. Earl Holding familyPass affiliations: Ikon, Mountain CollectiveReciprocal pass partners: Challenger Platinum and Challenger season passes include unlimited access to Snowbasin, UtahLocated in: Ketchum, IdahoClosest neighboring ski areas: Soldier Mountain (1:10); Blizzard Mountain (1:20); Chipmunk Hill (2:10); Magic Mountain (2:30); Pomerelle (2:45); Pebble Creek (3:00); Bogus Basin (3:10); Kelly Canyon (3:10) - travel times likely to vary with wintertime weather and road closures.Base elevation | summit elevation | vertical drop:* Bald Mountain: 9,150 feet | 3,400 feet* Dollar Mountain: 6,638 feet | 628 feetSkiable Acres: 2,054 acres (mostly on Bald Mountain)Average annual snowfall: 200 inchesTrail count: 122 (100 on Bald Mountain; 22 on Dollar) – 2% double-black, 20% black, 42% intermediate, 36% beginnerLift fleet:* Bald Mountain: 12 lifts (8-passenger gondola, 8 high-speed quads, 2 triples, 1 carpet - view Lift Blog's of inventory of Bald Mountain's lift fleet)* Dollar Mountain: 6 lifts (2 high-speed quads, 1 triples, 1 double, 2 carpets - view Lift Blog's of inventory of Bald Mountain's lift fleet)Uphill capacity:* Bald Mountain: 23,680 skiers per hour* Dollar Mountain: 6,037 skiers per hourWhy I interviewed himIn certain #SkiTwitter circles and ski-oriented Facebook groups, Ski's annual reader resort rankings can be polarizing. I've critiqued them myself. Readers, en masse, can lack the context of how Their Very Favorite Mountain fits into the broader ski realm. So Wachusett (nice mountain, convenient access), ends up out-ranking Stowe (legendary mountain, but cold and far), on an annual basis.*So when Sun Valley wins this trophy for the third consecutive year, as it just did, this can puzzle the Radbrahs. They wander their homes, bumping into furniture, knocking over piles of torn-off sleeves. “How Sun Valley better than Jackson. No good as rad.” The Big Groom winning the continent does not compute.But most skiers ski groomers most of the time. It's what makes skiing viable as a mass-market product. And no one out-grooms The Big Groom. I asked Sonntag how many snowcats Sun Valley rolled out nightly. He wouldn't say. But I imagine it would be a sufficient number to launch an invasion of Vermont. Or they could just move the place there. It would fit right in. Sun Valley is the most Northeast-esque mountain in the West in the way it manages trails: all grooming, all the time. Fortunately for Sun Valley skiers, the place has the elevation to hold the snow and fend off the rain that bedevils New England's best. And that vert: 3,400 feet of straight down. It may be the most beautiful pure ski mountain on the continent. And most of the time, it's empty. You can find that beautiful corduroy all day.Not that you can't rad out a bit if you want to. The new Sunrise area delivers the sort of vast treed zones that so many of us seek from a western rise. There are glades everywhere, really. See map above. Most Sun Valley skiers ignore them. All the better for you. Brah. Enjoy.*There's an important bit of historical context missing from Ski's annual list-drop: this reader survey once complemented a similar resort-ranking list in sister magazine Skiing. Editors and writers chose that list. It was a bit like the AP (writers), and coaches' polls in college football. Skiing's list would drop in August, Ski's in September. Or vice-versa, depending upon the year. If Skiing were still around (it shuttered in 2017), their top-five for 2023 would probably be far more palatable to the Radbrahs. The 2004 top-10, to choose a random issue from my archives, was 1) Whistler, 2) Alta/Snowbird, 3) Vail, 4) Palisades Tahoe, 5) Jackson Hole. In Skiing's absence, Z Rankings probably does the best job lining up resorts to the expectations of RB HQ – their current top five: 1) Jackson, 2) Telluride, 3) Snowbird, 4) Alta, 5) Vail.What we talked aboutScoring the top spot in Ski magazine's reader poll for the third consecutive year; when Dad tells you to go be a ski bum; ski teaching at West Mountain, New York; back West and working at Beaver Creek, Copper Mountain, and Keystone; watching Vail Resorts grow from within; King Whistler; the challenges of integrating big bad Whistler into the Vail Resorts portfolio; cross-border cultural differences; how Sun Valley stands out in spite of its remoteness and relatively low snow totals, even among skiing's biggest, baddest, and raddest powder dumps; the chances of Sun Valley staying independent over the long term; how Sun Valley and Snowbasin work together; staffing up for the season; the resort's updated masterplan and how it will transform the resort; wave goodbye to the Yan high-speed quads; the massive Challenger lift upgrade; why the mountain is removing Greyhawk and not replacing it; bringing back and massively upgrading the Flying Squirrel lift; why Challenger will be a D-Line lift but Flying Squirrel will not be; why Mayday and Lookout upgrades aren't coming anytime soon; “there is something to the fixed-grip that is still really valuable”; which lift upgrades are next after Challenger and Flying Squirrel; whether a six- or eight-pack chair would make sense anywhere else on the mountain; Bald Mountain upgrades beyond chairlifts; why an Elkhorn upgrade at Dollar Mountain is unlikely; long-term snowmaking upgrades at Dollar; thoughts on the proposed gondola network that would connect both ski area base areas and the town; Sun Valley's unbelievable snowmaking firepower; assessing Sun Valley's water supply; creating a more balanced mountain with the Sunrise expansion; how the expansion helped mitigate fire risk; replacing the Cold Springs double with the Broadway high-speed quad and how that's worked out; expansion potential; Sun Valley's grooming army; solving the employee-housing puzzle and where the biggest gap is; why Sun Valley left the Epic Pass and whether the mountain could ever return; whether Vail's record Epic Pass sales contributed to Sun Valley's flight; and selling a $2,000-plus season pass in the era of the $841 Epic Pass.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewSun Valley has been making moves. In March, the resort ended its three-year run with Epic Pass and, along with sister resort Snowbasin, jumped over to Ikon. The same day, the mountain returned to the Mountain Collective, which it had originally joined in 2015. Then, in August, the resort announced a massive upgrade of one of North America's most iconic lifts: the Challenger high-speed quad, the tallest top-to-bottom chairlift on the continent. The detachable quad, built in 1988, would make way for a high-speed six-pack, one of Doppelmayr' s bomber D-lines. A midstation would let skiers off near the top of the adjacent Greyhawk high-speed quad, which will also come out next summer. And last week, completely unrelated to any of these developments, Ski magazine readers ranked Sun Valley their top ski area in North America for the third consecutive year.But there's something else. We've entered the era of overdoing it. The Epic and Ikon Passes are a little too good for their own good. I'm not sure how long Colorado and Utah and Tahoe can really handle them before they crack. I mean traffic-wise and I mean liftline-wise and I mean the-price-of-everything-but-the-pass-itself-wise. I don't think the passes will fail, but I think that the interconnected systems that they impact just may. There are only so many people you can jam into the same two dozen mountain towns before everything unravels. The passes, in their current form, are probably not sustainable indefinitely.Sun Valley is not immune to this fallout, of course, and the mountain has participated in big passes for years. But it has resisted the maximalist tendencies of its peers. The mountain's remoteness helps. But so do owners who have a skiing-first philosophy, a general undercurrent of “let's not ruin this.” Sun Valley could have All the People but instead it is content to just have some of them. We saw what happened when Ikon emptied the Higgins boats onto the shores of Jackson and Aspen. The indignant gasps echoed from the 12-bathroom slopeside mansions to Mr. Beards tucked into his oatmeal sleeping bag behind tower 17. No one's exactly getting the skier balance right, but Sun Valley has found a way to stand on a megapass masthead without drawing liftlines out to the parking lot. And that's something worth talking about.What I got wrongI entered the interview with an understanding that Sun Valley's masterplan had last been updated in 2005, and that the ski area had hired Ecosign in 2020 to update that plan. Sonntag corrected me in the interview, stating that the masterplan was in fact updated.I also stated that the current Challenger lift ride time is nine minutes. I'm not sure where I picked that up from – Sonntag pointed out that it's closer to 13, but will go significantly lower once the new lift – a D-line six-pack – comes online in 2023.Why you should ski Sun ValleyThis is what you're trying to get to. On any five-turn repurposed landfill with a double chair or good-for-five-minutes New England burner laced beneath a high-speed lift. When you hook into the morning cord raw and perfectly drawn into the incline and your ski accelerates along the curve slinging you like some kind of snowbound acrobat into the next turn and you think “yes ninjas are real and I know this because I am one,” and you want that sensation to repeat forever or at least for as long as you can handle it, like sex or food or winning, this is where you're ski compass is pointing. Because at Sun Valley you can expect to ride that sensation for-basically-ever. Thirty-four-hundred feet. Like Aspen it is all fall line. Unlike Aspen it is big, spread out, with more ways down than most skiers have the endurance to last.Some big mountains are all muscle, sparring contests from top to bottom, daring you to take one more turn. Sun Valley can give you that. But it's not the point of the place. This is not Snowbird. This is magic carpets unfurled for miles. Ride them. No rush. They won't get skied off. This isn't Okemo, where the cord is eaten alive by 10 a.m. This is Idaho. There's no one here. Hook-and-sink. Repeat hundreds of times. High-speed lift back to the top. Again.Skiers use social media to ask all sorts of questions, most of which would be better answered via Google search. “I'm looking for lodging recommendations for my family of 12 for Park City over Christmas break. We don't want to spend more than $5 per night. Slopeside preferred. Hottub a must. Also we don't want to wait in any liftlines so we're wondering if we can drive our family van up the mountain instead?”Here's another common question: what's the best ski area for an advanced skier who likes long groomers all day long? If that is what you seek, there is only one answer: Sun Valley.More Sun ValleyMost of the 2005 master plan has been rendered moot by the coming Challenger upgrade and the Broadway Express, but this slide, showing the potential line of a gondola connecting the two ski areas and resort village, could still happen:In 1988, Sun Valley installed a trio of high-speed quads: Greyhawk, Christmas, and the spectacular Challenger, a marvel even 34 years later with its full-mountain vertical rise. It's impossible to overstate how thoroughly these additions transformed the experience of skiing Idaho's most-famous ski resort. Observe the tangle of lifts puttering up the incline in 1986:And just for fun, here's the 1959 trailmap:And if you think that's a party, check this version from 1945:The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year-round. Join us.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 114/100 in 2022, and number 360 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Hour 2: Jemele Hill

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 43:41 Very Popular


After another horrendous shooting performance to start the season, Anthony Davis has us reflecting on the 2020 NBA bubble and which performances were really the aberrations. Then, Jemele Hill joins the show to discuss her new memoir, "Uphill," and the healing she's had to do with her parents. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #100: Nub's Nob General Manager Ben Doornbos

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 98:01


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Oct. 15. It dropped for free subscribers on Oct. 18. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoBen Doornbos, General Manager at Nub's Nob, MichiganRecorded onOctober 10, 2022About Nub's NobClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Fisher familyPass affiliations: Indy PassReciprocal pass partners: NoneLocated in: Harbor Springs, MichiganClosest neighboring ski areas: The Highlands (4 minutes), Mt. McSauba (35 minutes), Boyne Mountain (37 minutes), Otsego (55 minutes), Treetops (1 hour), Shanty Creek (1 hour, 9 minutes), Hanson Hills (1 hour, 22 minutes), Mt. Holiday (1 hour, 26 minutes), Hickory Hills (1 hour, 41 minutes), Missaukee Mountain (1 hour, 41 minutes), Snow Snake (1 hour, 58 minutes), The Homestead (2 hours, 11 minutes), Crystal (2 hours, 14 minutes), Caberfae (2 hours, 14 minutes)Base elevation: 911 feetSummit elevation: 1,338 feetVertical drop: 427 feetSkiable Acres: 248Average annual snowfall: 123 inchesTrail count: 53 (24% double-black, 49% black, 20% intermediate, 7% beginner)Lift count: 10 (3 fixed-grip quads, 4 triples, 1 double, 1 carpet, 1 ropetow - view Lift Blog's inventory of Nub's Nob's lift fleet)Uphill capacity: 17,075 skiers per hourWhy I interviewed himWe all have those places that made us skiers, that wrecked us or rescued us, that in our private worlds are synonymous with skiing itself. For me those places are Mott Mountain, Apple Mountain, Snow Snake, Caberfae, Boyne Mountain, and Searchmont. Without those places I am not a skier, or at least I am not the particular version of a skier that's writing this newsletter. These are, in order, the first, second, third, and fourth places I skied; the place I learned to thread bumps; and the place I learned to navigate little drops and off-piste terrain. The first two are dead, the others survive in various states of modernized. In my head they all stand available at any moment for viewing, a tattered Stu-flix, a vault of skinny-ski adventures crashing through 1990s stop-animation reels.But there's a seventh ski area in my mental vault: Nub's Nob. It's a funny name, perhaps jarring if this is your first time seeing it. I happen to think it's the best ski area name in America. It's simple, memorable, intriguing, evocative of what it is: a 427-foot locals' bump with an Alta-grade following of devoted locals.That's not the same thing as having Alta-grade skiing (who does besides Snowbird)? But consider this: across the street lies The Highlands, the Boyne-owned runner formerly known as Boyne Highlands. The Highlands is larger than Nub's. It has one high-speed lift and is dropping in another next year – a six-pack so fancy that it makes the iPhone 14 look like a block of aged Roquefort. Highlands' season pass costs a bit more than Nub's, but it comes with days at Big Sky, which is like buying a microwave and getting a free car as a thank-you gift.None of it matters. Well, it probably matters to some people. But Nub's is the opposite of the endangered indie. It may be the best ski area under 500 vertical feet in the country: a big, sprawling trail layout; numerous and redundant lifts; grooming that makes an Olympic skating rink look like a Tough Mudder course; glades everywhere; and, like any Midwest ski area with a stocked trophy cabinet, an absolute flamethrower of a terrain park. Nub's is that lost treasure of Midwest skiing, rare as a 200-grade Boone-and-Crockett trophy buck: the balanced mountain. Grooming, yes, of all kinds, but bumps always on Twilight Zone, and maybe also on Chute (like many Michigan ski areas, the runs stack side by side on the trailmap, creating half a dozen that you could tuck into Park City's pumphouse). Several times per decade the ski area punches new glades into the forest. And since Nub's has one of the world's best snowmaking systems, supplemented with a reliable train of lake-effect and an ability to ninja-dodge freeze-thaw cycles, the whole mountain opens in the early season and often stays filled to the edges into April.Bad people can ruin a great ski area, of course. I can stay salty for decades over unprovoked attitude from a liftie. But I've been skiing Nub's Nob for as long as I've been skiing and I've never encountered anything other than an Extreme Welcome. The lifties chitter-chatter as you load and Patrol lets you ski where you please and the bartenders are tolerant of pitchers ordered in bulk at 11 a.m.My first day at Nub's was one of the weirdest ski days of my life. It was my sixth day ever on skis and I was geared up in sweatpants and a discount-superstore winter coat of the sort that rips when you yank the zipper open too sternly. We arrived in the snowslammed evening with tennis ball-sized flakes drifting in the wind. I did not have goggles of course and scoffed at the notion. At age 17 I had lived all my life in snowy climes and had never once needed such decorative nonsense. In a catastrophic freefall down Valley or perhaps it was Scarface I understood at last that storm-skiing sans goggles was like swimming without water: painful and really quite impossible. In the baselodge I purchased the least-expensive pair of goggles I could find, which I believe cost $25, an astonishing sum for a bagboy earning $4.50 an hour at the local Meijer superstore.Nub's excused the error. The upside of place-based defeat is the clear path to redemption. In all phases of my ski life I have returned to Nub's and it has always had something useful to say, something I couldn't exactly find anywhere else. I still can't, and I needed to poke around in the machine a bit to try and decode the trance.What we talked aboutWhen snowmaking starts at Nub's Nob; the mountain's earliest and latest openings ever; “bottom line, the ski industry in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan doesn't exist without snowmaking”; why freeze-thaw isn't really a thing for Nub's; “if you can open, you should open”; the path from $8.25-an-hour rental tech to general manager; Marquette Mountain; Nub's incredible seasonal employee retention rate; Jim Bartlett, the ski area's legendary general manager; not breaking a good thing; becoming the boss of the people who taught you everything you know; how Nub's Nob got its name; whether Nub's will stay independent over the long term; “where skiers go”; going deep on the Green lift upgrade: why it won't be a high-speed lift, when it's coming, and whether it will be green; whether the ski area considered wiping out the front-side lifts in favor of a six-pack; the tug-of-war between Fixed-Grip Bro and Detach Bro; why Orange won't be a high-speed lift either; comparing a modern fixed-grip Skytrac chair to a 1978 Riblet lift; why the new lift won't have a carpet load; why lifties need to talk to skiers; the installation and maintenance cost of a fixed-grip versus a high-speed lift; why the new lift will be the same length but occupy a smaller footprint; whether the new lift will load and unload at the same spots as the current Green lift; whether Nub's will sell the chairs; the Blue chair Killer; why the Blue lift isn't coming back; the power of the ropetow and where we could see more on Nub's; long-term plans for the Purple and Orange lifts; “there's something special about riding a double chairlift”; regional differences in safety-bar culture; “I'd like to have a super-modern lift fleet”; whether a lift from the bottom of Pintail Peak to the top of Nub's Nob South would make sense; how Nub's continues to develop new terrain on essentially the same footprint; how to access Nub's endless glade stash; why Arena and Tower glades don't continue farther skier's left along their respective ridges; the glades always open in Northern Michigan; Nub's last big expansion opportunity and what kind of terrain sits in there; keeping the parks rad Brah; the return of the halfpipe; why Nub's doesn't build earthwork features; the importance of night-skiing; considering lights on Pintail Peak; the history and secrets behind the Nub's Nob snowgun; “you can fix everything with a pipe wrench” and why the ski area is happy with a low-tech snowgun arsenal; long-live the metal wicket ticket; “we always think of technology as making our lives better, but sometimes, it's making our lives worse”; the competitive and cooperative dynamic between Nub's Nob and The Highlands, which sit across the street from one another; why Nub's finally joined the Indy Pass; the ski-industry problem that Indy Pass is solving; why Nub's is rolling with 32 Indy Base Pass blackouts; looking out for the little ski areas down the street; and how much it hurt to finally push Nub's peak-day lift-ticket prices over $100.    Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewA lot of pretty obvious reasons: the new Green Chair, the resort's decision to at last join the Indy Pass, the obvious example of another thriving indie belying the whole Megapass-Killbot theory. But we booked this pod in May, weeks before the Indy announcement (which I knew was coming), and the chairlift upgrade (which I didn't). The simple fact is that I'd had Nub's Nob on my interview-the-GM list since Storm day one, and I finally reached out and we set everything up pretty quickly.This is a good time, however, to restate something that's core to this whole operation: this podcast is for everyone. And by “everyone,” I mean every ski area of any size. If it has a lift, I'm interested. For now, that means the United States, but I will fold Canada in soon enough. That will probably remain the focus over the long-term, but if you are running a ski area of any size anywhere on Planet Earth*, consider yourself relevant to The Storm Skiing Podcast.But from a practical, logistical point of view, I have tried very hard to balance the podcast across regions. This does not mean that I will guarantee an equal ratio of Western, Midwestern, and Northeast interviews (I haven't quite gotten to the Southeast yet; I will soon, but there are only a couple dozen ski areas down there, so pods focused in the southern states will likely always be infrequent). But I will promise a consistent flow of Midwest pods. It's where I came from, where I learned to ski, and it's one of the world's greatest and most vital ski regions.When the season's ski mags would drop each August in my early ski years, I would flip through slowly, hopefully, for any nugget of writing on Midwest ski areas. It was like searching for ice cream at a hardware store. No one cared. If a ski magazine was 200 pages, the West got 195, the East got five, and the Midwest got mentioned whenever a writer noted that Big Sky was owned by the same outfit that owned Boyne Mountain. It was a different, internet-less world, of course, but I am now in a position to create the sort of immersive ski area profiles that Teen Stu longed to see about my local bumps. These will keep landing in your inbox as long as The Storm does.You can view all past and future Storm Skiing Podcasts by clicking through below:*I will also consider ski areas on other planets.What I got wrongThe opening day of Michigan's deer-hunting season is a big deal. Like day-off-from-school big deal. And I don't mean parents pull their kids out while the non-hunters press on. I mean every Nov. 15 is a school holiday like Thanksgiving or Labor Day or Christmas. Our morning announcements each fall would warn us to watch out for sugarbeets – an enormous root crop stacked in clearings to bait deer – that had bounced off transport trucks on M-30. Deer hunting in Northern Michigan is a big deal.So, during a discussion about Nub's previous years' opening dates, I told Doornbos that it was pretty bold of him to open on the first day of deer-hunting season, after I thought he'd referenced a recent Nov. 15 opening. Doornbos rolled with it, but I realized while editing the pod that he had actually said Nov. 16. Oops.Why you should ski Nub's NobMichigan has 39 active ski areas, according to the National Ski Areas Association. This is the second-most of any state, behind New York, which sports 52. About two-thirds of Michigan's ski areas sit in the Lower Peninsula. This is a useful distinction: Lower Peninsula skiers rarely hit the Upper Peninsula (UP), and UP skiers rarely ski below the Mackinaw Bridge. Geography explains this disconnect: the UP's ski areas are mostly bunched in its western portion, far closer to Wisconsin than the population centers of Michigan. Marquette Mountain, the closest non-ropetow bump, is seven hours from Detroit airport, but fewer than five hours from Milwaukee. In that time, Southeast Michigan skiers can be at Keystone (with help from an airplane).That's all background. What I'm getting to is that the Lower Peninsula only has a half dozen or so well-equipped, substantially built-out ski areas with respectable vertical drops (relative to their neigboring hills): Nub's Nob, Caberfae, Crystal, Shanty Creek, Boyne Mountain, and The Highlands. Otsego Club, a longtime private joint, recently opened to the public, but its infrastructure is a bit creaky. So if you're planning a best-of-Michigan tour, these are the six to hit.But if you only have one day to ski Michigan before an asteroid crashes into the planet and wipes out life as we know it, pick Nub's. I'm not sure that it has the best terrain of those six – Highlands, I think, is equal in its sprawling videogame-ish dimensions. Nub's isn't the steepest – Boyne Mountain has the most consistent pitch along its extended main ridge. Nub's is probably also the least-resort-ish of the six, with little onsite lodging. But, like Caberfae, another family-owned bump that is on a constant crusade to enhance the skiing, Nub's is defined less by what I can easily point to and more by what's hard to describe. By that thing called atmosphere, a sort of sense of place that collectively descends upon all who ski there. It's not a thing you can order, like a lift, or something you can streamline, like parking. It's just something that is. You'll have to go and see for yourself.Podcast notes* I make the point several times that Nub's Nob is constantly upgrading. The ski area has collated an excellent timeline, starting with the ski area's 1957 founding. Skim this page and Nub's decades-long commitment to constant, mostly subtle but always impactful improvement is obvious. I wish all ski areas would create something like this.* A 2016 obituary for longtime owner Walter Fisher, who bought Nub's Nob from founder Dorie Sarnes in 1977 and owned it until he passed away (his family continues to own the ski area). An excerpt:Jim Bartlett — who joined Nub's that same year and now serves as its general manager — noted that the ski area has added significantly to its amenities since then, expanding from about a dozen runs to 53.“The business has grown almost continuously since Walter bought it in 1977,” said Bartlett, who described Fisher as “absolutely one of the most sincere, thoughtful, kind, classy men I've ever met.” …With neighboring Boyne Highlands Resort establishing itself as a ski area with extensive on-site lodging, Bartlett said Walter Fisher decided early in his Nub's involvement to pursue another niche — wanting the property to become "the best day ski area in the Midwest."Nub's would phase out its own limited lodging options so it could channel resources toward skiing amenities, grooming and snowmaking operations and food and beverage options. The ski area's offerings have since achieved regional and national recognition on numerous occasions.* Doornbos and I also talked extensively about Bartlett, who served as general manager from 1987 until handing the job off to Doornbos in 2017. An excerpt from this excellent profile by Kate Bassett:General Manager of Nub's Nob, Jim Bartlett, is a guy who has earned a nationwide reputation as a leader and champion of the old-school-cool Harbor Springs ski resort. But that's not the reason Jim Bartlett is a person whose story is worth telling.He's on top of the hill. He's at the bottom of the hill. He's in the maintenance garage. He's in the cafeteria. He's at a chairlift on-ramp. He's in the rental area. He's in the parking lot. He's everywhere. He's Nub's Nob's JB. …In his tenure at Nub's Nob, first as area manager and then as general manager, following the death of his mentor, legendary snow maker Jim Dilworth, Bartlett has turned 14 runs into 53, four chairlifts into nine, 15 patented snowmaking guns into 292, plus added a Pintail Peak Lodge, new locker room and so much more. The most impressive part? He's done it without sacrificing Nub's signature vibe, best described as a home away from home.Bartlett's an expert in snow making techniques. A public relations superstar. A guy who understands the importance of blending tradition with new technology. He's even learned how to make peace with the Midwest's occasionally uncooperative winter weather. In short, he's like a walking, talking master's class of how to run a resort that's focused 100 percent on skiing and riding.* We go deep on the Green lift upgrade, which Doornbos announced in an excellent video last month:* Nub's Nob is The Storm's fourth podcast focused explicitly on a Michigan ski area - I've also featured The Highlands, Boyne Mountain, and Caberfae:I should have another Michigan episode coming next week - and it's a good one. Listen to the end of the pod to find out who.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year-round. Join us.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 112/100 in 2022, and number 358 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane, or, more likely, I just get busy). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

PRETTYSMART
Charge it To The Game: with Jemele Hill

PRETTYSMART

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 54:57


Jemele is an Emmy-winning sports journalist, who spent 12 years with ESPN. She's a contributing writer for The Atlantic, host of the Spotify podcast, “Jemele Hill is Unbothered” and her memoir “Uphill” will be released on October 25th. Today she's sharing: Why she never wanted to write this memoir in the first place (and the lessons she hopes people learn from it)  Why she really wanted to call her memoir something else.  How her childhood traumas and Detroit shaped her and why grit is infused in her DNA.  How reading the newspaper as a kid is what ultimately led her to where she is today. Why women need to get over the “I'm just happy to be here” mentality. Why she became a better journalist when she became a better businesswoman. Why we need to all be more transparent about our salaries. Why it's so important to her to write about the intersection of race, class, gender and sports. Why we can use sports as a mirror to what's happening in America. Why empathy is so important in writing. 

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #99: Brundage Mountain General Manager Ken Rider

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 96:54


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Oct. 10. Free subscribers got it on Oct. 13. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoKen Rider, general manager of Brundage Mountain, IdahoRecorded onOct. 3, 2022About BrundageClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Brundage Mountain Holdings LLC, which Rider describes as a collection of “Idaho families.”Pass affiliations: Indy PassReciprocal pass partners – view full list here:* 5 days at Red Lodge* 4 days at Diamond Peak* 3 days each at Loveland, Monarch, Ski Cooper, Sunlight, Mt. Bohemia, Snow King, Mt. Hood Meadows, Beaver Mountain* 2 days at Homewood* Limited tickets available at Powder Mountain* Half off lift tickets at AltaLocated in: McCall, IdahoClosest neighboring ski areas: Little Ski Hill (10 minutes), Tamarack (47 minutes)Base elevation: 5,882 feetSummit elevation: 7,803 feet at SargentsVertical drop: 1,920 feetSkiable Acres: 1,920 acresAverage annual snowfall: 320 inchesTrail count: 70 (46% black, 33% intermediate, 21% beginner)Lift count: 6 (1 high-speed quad, 4 triples, 1 surface lift - view Lift Blog's of inventory of Brundage's lift fleet)Uphill capacity: 7,900 skiers per hourWhy I interviewed himIn April, I put together a list of 11 ski areas offering bomber reciprocal season pass benefits. Since the passes I chose are inexpensive and offer free days at up to 50 partners, they've become a bit of a cheat code for the adventure set ready to break from (or supplement) Epic or Ikon - even for skiers who live nowhere near the mountain. With that wink-wink in mind, I contacted each ski area to ask whether they mailed season passes. Brundage's answer led to an email exchange that led to this podcast.Some version of that story is how around half of Storm Skiing Podcasts are booked, but the timing was fortuitous. I'd been meaning to reach out anyway. What was this big mountain with big snow that was an Indy Pass favorite? How does a place that's larger than Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands combined, that's roughly the size of Beaver Creek or Deer Valley, that gets as much snow as Winter Park, stand so unassuming on the national scene? Yes, the place only has one high-speed lift and no on-slope lodging. It's far off any interstate and not particularly close to any large cities. But it's up the road from a great resort town (McCall), and close enough to supernova-ing Boise to catch some of the ambient heat.Who are you, Brundage? And why are you so shy about it? It was time to talk.What we talked aboutDetermining this year's opening date; snowmaking at Eldora; going from grad school to $10-an-hour peddling Copper Mountain lift tickets; working at heyday Intrawest; Tamarack in its Wild West 2004 grand opening; Tamarack's decline and current renaissance; Grand Targhee; McCall 101; the Little Ski Hill; how mountain-town pricing pressures are hitting Idaho; wage bumps and creative employee housing at Brundage; modernizing Brundage; the ski area's ownership history and the group that purchased it two years ago; Brundage's aggressive, expansive master plan; the Temptation Knob beginner/intermediate pod and what sort of lifts we could see there; Brundage's 320 average annual inches of snow falls at its base; potential lifts up Hidden Valley and Sargents; whether the Centennial triple could make its way to another part of the mountain; potential expansion off the East Side/backside of Brundage; how large Brundage could become if the master plan is fully built out; whether Brundage could be or wants to be a national destination; whether Bluebird Express could ever be upgraded to a six-pack; the evolution of BEARTOPIA!!!; Brundage's snowmaking capabilities, potential, and water source; the incoming new lodge; fixing the flow from parking lot to lodge to rentals to ski school; finally slopeside housing; the tension between the keep-it-wild crowd and people who want to sleep on the mountain; season passes; why Brundage was an inaugural Indy Pass member; the percentage of Brundage skier visits that are Indy and whether the pass is causing peak-period crowding; why the ski area introduced Indy Pass blackouts last year; and why Brundage continues to offer reciprocal lift ticket partnerships (for now).                Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBrundage is one of many indie resorts across the West that are leveling up. Under an Idaho-strong group that took ownership a few years ago, the ski area is reworking its master plan. The scale of this thing is pretty incredible. Observe:Compare that to the trailmap above. The new plan would add:* A new beginner/intermediate pod on Temptation Knob, adjacent to the existing Beartopia pod. Rider told me that he foresees a high-speed quad rising up the knob's 650-ish vertical feet and a surface lift off the backside.* A fixed-grip quad serving Hidden Valley from the base area.* A pair of lifts serving Sargents, which is currently on the trailmap as unpatrolled terrain. Rider said that he imagines both Sargents and Wayback as fixed-grip doubles or quads.* Two large intermediate/beginner pods off the backside, both likely served by fixed-grip quads – labelled “Lift G” and “Eastside” on the map.If completed, these expansions would vault Brundage into Bogus Basin/Sun Valley territory size-wise, but there's a lot more happening here: a new lodge that isn't 700 steps above the parking lot, on-site residences, extensive (and creative) employee housing, serious snowmaking investments, and much more.Brundage is also a bit of a barnstormer, among the top two Indy Pass resorts in the West every year since launch. New England, of course, is Indy ground zero, but this year Brundage finished 10th in redemptions out of 82 Indy Pass partners. The only Western resort to top out higher was Utah A-bomb Powder Mountain.That really surprised me. My guess would have been Indy's big Washington ski areas – Mission Ridge, White Pass, 49 Degrees North – and Silver Mountain plopped dead off Interstate 90 an hour east of Spokane. Yes, the Tamarack/Brundage combo – the mountains sit less than an hour apart – is one of Indy's best, but the McCall Miracle was a top draw even before Tamarack joined in 2020.Brundage is telling a good story, and it's getting better. Now was a great time for a check-in.Questions I wish I'd askedI meant to ask about the Rainbow Fire, which hit Brundage last month but ended up leaving minimal damage. An article on the resort's website summarizes the whole ordeal pretty well anyway:Just five days after lightning sparked a fire at the top of Brundage Mountain, the Forest Service has declared the Rainbow Fire to be officially under control.The Rainbow Fire was sparked by lightning during a thunderstorm event on the evening of Wednesday, September 7 and was immediately visible from both McCall and New Meadows. Initial attack efforts kept the fire from spreading beyond the upper Hidden Valley area, which is located to the north of Brundage Mountain's main front side runs.Smokejumpers and engine crews engaged with the fire the first night, and an aerial assault from helicopters and scoopers doused the flames with water and applied fire retardant at the top of Brundage Mountain the following day.Ground crews circled the fire zone with hoses and worked through the weekend to monitor the perimeter and put out hot spots. The fire was contained to an area of less than five acres.“The Brundage Mountain team would, once again, like to thank the smokejumpers, firefighters and fire managers who sprung into action to quickly control this fire,” says Brundage Mountain General Manager, Ken Rider. “Wednesday night's lightning event resulted in a number of new fire starts on the Payette National Forest. The efforts to contain and control those new fires, while continuing to make progress on larger, existing fires in the area, speaks to the skill, dedication and hard work of our friends at the Payette National Forest and partner organizations like SITPA, the BLM and Lone Peak Fire Department from Utah.”Brundage Mountain crews will be assessing the Rainbow Fire scar but the impacts on skiers and riders are expected to be minimal.“The torching and visible flames the first night of this fire were alarming,” added Rider. “We are beyond grateful that it will have such a minor impact on our overall operations and on the skiing and riding public.”What I got wrongI say in the intro that Rider began his ski career at Intrawest. As we discuss in the conversation, his first ski job was actually at Eldora. I also asked Rider about going to the “new ski state” of Idaho when he went to work at Tamarack – I meant to say “new-to-you ski state,” since Rider was moving there from Colorado. I also have it stuck in my head that Beaver Creek, opened in 1980, was the last major ski resort developed in the U.S. prior to Tamarack in 2004, but Rider correctly reminded me that it was Deer Valley, in 1981. One could also argue for Yellowstone Club (1997), Mount Bohemia (2000), Silverton (2001), or even Whitetail (1991). But those all have some sort of asterisk: too oligarchy, too minimalist, too borderline-backcountryish, too Pennsylvania. The NSAA keeps a list here, though it's missing quite a few ski areas (Wolf Creek), and has a bunch that haven't operated in a while (Gateway, New Hampshire; Elk Ridge, Arizona).Why you should ski BrundageIf you're reading this far down the page then you don't need much of a nudge to pencil “ski 2,000-acre, 2,000-foot-vertical-drop ski area with 300-plus inches of snow” into your winter calendar. The skiing, like most Idaho skiing, is pretty great. But I always feel a sense of urgency when describing ski areas that are poised to unfold like a pop-up book into something far larger. It's only going to take a few more seasons of Epic and Ikon mountains disgorging the Epkonotron onto their slopes to turbocharge the Skipass Hack-O-Matic 5000. Savvy vacationers are going to figure out the McCall + a growing Brundage + a growing Tamarack = a-good-ski-vacation-without-feeling-as-though-you're-re-enacting-the-invasion-of-Normandy equation at some point.Brundage will never be Park City or Palisades Tahoe. But it will get bigger and better and busier than it is today. So go now, while their longest lift is still a fixed-grip triple crawling 1,653 vertical feet up the incline, over hillocks and pine forests and with the lakes placid in the distance. Enjoy the motion in the midst of stillness, the big mountain with the little-mountain vibe and prices and energy. And look around and imagine what it will one day be.Podcast notesRider and I discussed the Beartopia map briefly. It's a pretty brilliant rework of Brundage's beginner corner. If you don't have kids, perhaps you don't agree. But I recently sat beside my 5-year-old for a flight across the Atlantic, during which time he became obsessed with the route map displayed on the seatback monitor. The touchscreen offered two options: the regular map or the “kids' map.” The kids' map was nothing more than the regular map with some skunks and deer and bears superimposed over the atlas. And yet so extreme was his delight that you would have thought I had just invented cookie burgers. Yes Son it's just like a hamburger but instead of meat there's a giant cookie in there and yes of course you can have seven of them.Anyway, here's the map:Rider at one point compares the Brundage baselodge to “a steamship on the Mississippi Delta.” It was not meant to be a compliment. The lodge, like those antique riverboats, is staggered, boxy, imposing. An anachronism in our architecture-at-peace-with-the-earth moment. Still, as an avid reader of Twain, I found the comparison interesting, a literary-historic reference in a podcast about an Idaho ski area. Those sorts of thinkers, fecund and surprising, are the sorts of folks I want running my local.I also mentioned in the intro that Brundage is my third Idaho podcast this year. In January, I went deep on the Tamarack story with the resort's president, Scott Turlington:Then, this summer, I chatted with Bogus Basin General Manager Brad Wilson:The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 109/100 in 2022, and number 355 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com.The Storm is exploring the world of lift-served skiing all year long. Join us.Like The Storm? Invite the rest of your organization in via a per-subscriber discount that can be managed through a single administrator: Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Two Writers Slinging Yang
Jemele Hill: Author, "Uphill: A Memoir" and contributing writer, The Atlantic

Two Writers Slinging Yang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 69:58


On the decision behind writing a memoir; on the famous (and righteous) "Donald Trump is a white supremacist" Tweet; on why she doesn't miss TV and why there's still joy to be found in journalism.