Podcasts about Ultramarathon

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Any footrace longer than the traditional marathon length of 42.195 kilometres

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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST
Ultramarathon

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Best podcasts about Ultramarathon

Show all podcasts related to ultramarathon

Latest podcast episodes about Ultramarathon

Human Performance Outliers Podcast
Episode 266: Mark Bell - Powerlifting World Record, Bodybuilding, & Ultramarathon

Human Performance Outliers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 99:52


Mark Bell is well known in the fitness industry. He has world class powerlifting performances, created a multimillion dollar business, successfully competed in bodybuilding, and most recently decided to tackle a 50 miler! Support: zachbitter.com/hpo    Episode Details: zachbitter.com/hpo-episode-266  HPO Sponsors: zachbitter.com/hposponsors   Optimal Carnivore: amazon.com/optimalcarnivore promo: humansave10 InsideTracker: insidetracker.com/ultimate/ promo: BITTERPROGIFT Zach: zachbitter.com IG: @zachbitter Tw: @zbitter FB: @zach.bitter Strava: Zach Bitter Tiktok: @zachbitter  Mark: markbellslingshot.com IG: @marksmellybell Tw: @MarkSmellyBell Tictok: @marksmellybell Podcast: markbellspowerproject.libsyn.com            

Wisdom.MBA
Stretch Goals, Ultrarunning, Kidney Failure & Learning from Hardship

Wisdom.MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:38


For this podcast, I plan to tell the story of why I got into ultrarunning. I was never a runner, but I decided this year to completely immerse myself in it. This year, I have finished 5 ultras, the last of which was a 100 miler that I podium at, but after finishing the race I suffered kidney failure.  I spend 5 days in the hospital and almost had to be put on dialysis. I basically developed Rhabdomyolysis where the muscle breakdown from running 26 hours straight poisoned my kidneys. I think this story is valuable to the podcast because I have learned a lot throughout the entire process, from setting a stretch goal, to training, to developing a working excel model for my race, to over-coming setback and learning from mistakes.  At the beginning of 2021, I interviewed Dan King, the founder of ReadyTalk who is also the World's Fittest CEO. That discussion really opened my eyes of how and why physical fitness can make you a better leader and sharpen your resolved to handle stress and challenges.If you are interested in ultrarunning, pushing yourself to physical limits, embracing challenges or just learning a little bit more about what makes me tick, I think you will like this episode. There is definitely some wisdom that you can apply to business and life. It is my most personal yet and I feel it has been helpful to showcase some of my vulnerabilities, which I hope is a leadership quality in and of itself.Discussion Topics:(2:20) Why I decided to get into ultrarunning.(4:20) Motivating factors for running long distances.(10:55) How to train for ultras.(19:24) Overview of the actual 100-mile race.(26:07) Suffering and overcoming post-race acute kidney failure.(28:43) Lessons learned from this entire process.

Road Dog Podcast
183: Crista Scott Tappan is a Dirtbag Runner

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 90:15


“It's failed in a lot of ways as a business but it's succeeded exponentially as a community and what it has created because of that.” Crista Scott Tappan is an ultra runner and founder of Dirtbag Runners. In this episode, she discusses her first Born To Run experience, being raised by her grandparents, and why she needs a sabbatical. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. DRYMAX show code: Roaddog2020  Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.drymaxsports.com/products/ Allwedoisrun.com Crista Scott Tappan Contact Info: Crista@dirtbagrunners.com  DirtbagRunners.com  CristaScottTappan.com  @Crista.Tappan  @DirtbagRunners  Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

The Way of the Runner - conversations on running with Adharanand Finn

Adharanand Finn talks to multiple world-record breaking ultra runner Camille Herron, and also to Abichal Sherrington, one of the few British runners ever to complete the world's longest race. Music: Starfrosch

Road Dog Podcast
182: Jake Kilgore Weathers the Storm of the DC Peaks 50

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 86:23


“Eating the elephant one bite at a time. It's that mentality with ultrarunning.” Jake Kilgore is the co-race director and founder of the DC Peaks 50. He shares his prison experience with us and what he learned from it. Hear all about the DC Peaks 50 in Utah and how a blizzard and inclement weather derailed the entire event and what he is going to do different next year. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. DRYMAX show code: Roaddog2020  Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.drymaxsports.com/products/ Squirrel's Nut Butter https://squirrelsnutbutter.com Allwedoisrun.com Jake Kilgore Contact Info: http://www.dcpeaks50.com UltraSignup: https://ultrasignup.com/register.aspx?did=80318 Email: dcpeaks50@gmail.com IG: https://www.instagram.com/dcpeaks50/ Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast
RaceMob November Update - Challenges, Lessons, Races and Community Shout Outs

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 34:38


#74  -  Hello RaceMob crew! We've got another update episode this time around. It's been a little while since we've updated the crew and we know that a ton has been happening behind the scenes. Let's catch up.In this episode, we'll talk about the LA marathon, some personal challenges, our first marathon experiences, and lessons we picked up along the way.And we have some shout outs too!

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
Shawn Stratton (with Shari Leach) NOLS: Indian Military Evacuation From the Himalayas

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 71:52


This week on the Hot Drinks podcast Shari Leach interviews me about an epic I experienced while leading a NOLS course in the Himalayas of India.  Shawn is an international leadership consultant, professional speaker, bestselling author, podcast host, Ironman and Ultramarathon competitor. Shawn has a bachelor's degree in Experiential Education and a Master's in Leadership. He devoted 15 years to leading teams on wilderness expeditions around the world into some of the harshest environments, and, most recently, ten years consulting with corporations on leadership and team development. His first book, Teams on the Edge: Stories & Lessons from Wilderness Expeditions, was an instant bestseller and won a bronze medal in the Global E-Book Awards. Shawn is also the founder and director of the International Vegan Film Festival and World Tour. He started the festival in 2018 to inspire, educate and entertain audiences with vegan-themed films from around the world. Shawn lives in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada with my wife and 3 daughters. 

Persuasion School with Jake Savage
Why I've felt anxiety around this fundraiser | Real thoughts behind the freedom50 run

Persuasion School with Jake Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:28


Only 4 days left until my 50 mile ultra-marathon! On today's episode, I share my real thoughts behind this fundraising project including why I've had anxiety, doubt, and fear. Enjoy!TO DONATE TO THE #FREEDOM50 FUNDRAISER: Click here. (givebutter.com/freedom50)TO PURCHASE/VIEW MY RITORI ANALYSIS: Click here. (jakesavage.co/ritori-analysis)

Road Dog Podcast
181: Watch What Happens with Dan Suher

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 114:31


“We don't want to do something just for the sake of doing it, or because it's easy. We want to add value.” Dan Suher works at Coros wearables in marketing and sales. Dan chats with Luis about how he got his start in the running world and specifically the business side of running. Hear about the history of Coros and all the amazing features it offers to its customers. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. Squirrel's Nut Butter https://squirrelsnutbutter.com COROS https://www.coros.com Allwedoisrun.com Dan Suher Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/corosglobal/ Website: https://www.coros.com Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast
Eat Your Water! Surprising Hydration Tips from Best Selling Author Dr. Dana Cohen

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 40:13


#73 - Dr Dana Cohen has literally written the book on Hydration.  And there's so much that most people get wrong!Is it as simple as "drink more water?"  No!  We'll get a little nerdy today on the importance of electrolytes, how vegetables, smoothies, and even chia seeds - might be critical to your race day hydration strategy, and why fascia, movement, and hydration are so closely linked.And you're going to come away with some incredible and easy takeaways that can lead to immediate improvements to your life and activity.If you want to reduce your risk of chronic disease, reduce brain fog, feel better, move better, and look better - then you won't want to miss this incredible episode with the one and only Dr Dana.

Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
Become a Better Trail Runner Today, Even If You've Never Tried It: Ruairi Moynihan

Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 43:08


Trail running can seem a little intimidating if you are used to running on the roads.  But it can be an incredible experience, once you are armed with a little knowledge. RunnersConnect Coach Ruairi Moynihan is the perfect bridge between the roads and the trails as a super fast 2:22 road marathoner and he's a champion trail racer, too. Ruairi's here to tell us why he loves the trails, how to train on them, and how to really get good at it. In this episode you'll learn how to: get over common fears about running on trails effectively run hills both up and down know when to walk a hill and when to run it fuel for an ultramarathon Ruairi's been a fast runner since he was a kid, ran in college, and now splits his time coaching online at RunnersConnect, substitute teaching, and making zany videos for his side hustle, Trail GangstAZ. If you've ever thought about taking your runs off-road, this is the perfect primer to get you started.  And if you are already a trail lover, Ruairi's got some great tips to make your trail time more productive and hopefully, even more fun. CONNECT, COMMENT, & COMMUNITY: Ruari on Instagram TrailGanstAZ Follow RunnersConnect on Instagram Join the Elite Treatment where you get first dibs on everything RTTT each month! Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community  RunnersConnect Facebook page GET EXPERT COACHING AT RUNNERSCONNECT! This week's show brought to you by: LMNT When coaching endurance runners of all levels to be their best, I always emphasize the need for proper hydration with the right balance of electrolytes.  Most athletes I've coached are surprised to learn that their sodium needs are actually much higher than they expected and it's been hurting their performance.  Part of the reason athletes need much more sodium than they think is not just because they lose electrolytes through their sweat, but also because athletes tend to eat very healthy diets.  They've been told that salt is a bad thing in food and frequently don't get enough for their lifestyle.  Much of the science of sodium is based on people who eat highly processed diets which also are very low in potassium.  It could actually be the low potassium levels causing the issues that sodium has been blamed for!  What is clear is that both sodium and potassium at the proper levels are essential for high performance (and for life in general!).  That's why we partnered with LMNT to offer a free sample pack of their electrolyte mix. Head to drinklmnt.com/runnersconnect to get yours now. The Sample Pack includes 8 packets of LMNT (2 citrus, 2 raspberry, 2 orange, and 2 raw unflavored).

Leadership BITES
Michele Graglia, Male Model to Ultra Marathon Runner

Leadership BITES

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:12


In 2007 at the age of 24, Michele Graglia moved to Miami Beach from Italy in order to expand his family's floral business in the United States, but, within a week of his arrival, a modeling agent discovered him on the street and convinced him to pursue a career in modeling. Enriched but unsatisfied by the profession, Michele walked off of the runway in 2012, shortly after stumbling upon a book about ultra-running  – a book that dramatically changed his life. Michele Graglia is a model, author, fitness coach, and ultra marathon runner. His book Ultra is a journey into the craft of the punishing ultra marathon space. Originally from Taggia, Liguria, Italy, Graglia became an international model represented by Major Model Management in New York.On July 24, 2018, Graglia completed and won the Badwater 135. He finished the race in a time of 24:51:47.Graglia was officially certified as the new Guinness Book World Record holder for the fastest-ever crossing of Chile's Atacama Desert on foot. He accomplished the unprecedented feat in 8 days, 12 hours, and 49 minutes, the equivalent of 2 to 3 marathons per day.On 11 October 2020, Graglia won the Moab 240 in 61 hours, 43 minutes, and 15 seconds.This is a great episode of passion, life change and focus.

Road Dog Podcast
180: Raw Talk with Michael Versteeg

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 179:19


“I'm really fucking good at ignoring pain.” Michael Versteeg is a bad ass professional distance runner sponsored by Satisfy. Hear about him building tiny homes, why he walked off the Colorado Trail after completing over 400 miles, his musical tastes, microdosing and why he will never tape his nipples. David Valenzuela joins in on the conversation and gives his best advice for making the thru-hike on the A.T. He talks about wearing sandals and all the lessons he learned on the trail. Barefoot Ted McDonald pops in for the fun. Ted is the owner of Luna Sandals and pivotal character in the book Born To Run. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. Squirrel's Nut Butter https://squirrelsnutbutter.com DRYMAX show code: Roaddog2020  Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.drymaxsports.com/products/ Allwedoisrun.com Coppercanyons.com Michael Versteeg Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/michael.versteeg/?hl=en https://satisfyrunning.com Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

Pushing The Limits
Ultramarathoning: How to Do the Impossible with Dean Karnazes

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:16


When was the last time you got up and ran? Simply jogging around the neighbourhood during the weekends to keep fit may be daunting for some. Now, imagine the sheer amount of dedication, endurance, and resilience ultramarathoning requires. This type of long-distance running is an activity that tests the limits of human endurance. You might think running a thousand miles is impossible, but today's guest continues to prove others wrong. He's on a mission to exceed his limits and inspire others to do the same. Dean Karnazes joins us in this episode to get up close and personal about his experiences in ultramarathoning. He candidly shares the highs and lows, the triumphs and defeats. We also find out the importance of failure and finding magic in misery.  If you're interested in discovering how you can build your character, embrace pain and failure, and get inspired to push your limits, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover how to cope with the ups and downs of ultramarathoning. Learn about the importance of pain and failure. Get inspired by Dean's valuable takeaways from his career.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. You can also join their free live webinar on epigenetics.   Online Coaching for Runners Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching. You can also join our free live webinar on runners' warm-up to learn how a structured and specific warm-up can make a massive difference in how you run.   Consult with Me If you would like to work with me one to one on anything from your mindset, to head injuries,  to biohacking your health, to optimal performance or executive coaching, please book a consultation here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/consultations   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: http://relentlessbook.lisatamati.com/ For my other two best-selling books, Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   My Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness!  Listen to my other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #8: Dean Karnazes - The Road to Sparta #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova Connect with Dean: Website Books by Dean Karnazes:  Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner A Runner's High: My Life in Motion Dean's other books   Episode Highlights [05:21] Dean's Lockdown Experience in Australia Dean was supposed to go on a 1000-mile run across New South Wales.  After boarding a jet to Australia, he found that the pandemic situation was getting worse.  And so, Dean and Pat Farmer will be doing their run in a military base instead. Although he's quarantined inside a hotel room, Dean always stays moving and does bodyweight exercises to remain active. It was challenging to go from California, where 80% have been vaccinated, to Australia, which is still in lockdown. [11:18] Chronological and Biological Age Chronologically, Dean is closer to 60 than 50 years old. There are various ways to test your biological age, like C-reactive proteins and inflammation. Tune in to the full episode to learn more about what else goes into calculating your biological age. [14:17] Dean's Greek Heritage Dean's mother is from Ikaria, a Blue Zones with the highest concentration of centenarians worldwide. People in Ikaria live long, healthy lives. They don't pay attention to time and live in a strong community. Therefore, they are not prone to stress. Dean doesn't have any back, muscle, or joint pain. [18:50] Know What Your Body is Built For People are built to run at different speeds and distances. Various factors affect what you're optimised to do.  What's important is knowing the things that are optimal for your health. Dean has run over 300 traditional marathons in his career. He has also seen people well past their 70s who are still physically able and active. [22:04] What is A Runner's High About? A Runner's High is about the changes that he, the world, and ultramarathoning has undergone. Ultramarathoning impacts the people closest to you. Dean wanted to write a true and honest story about his reflections over the past three decades.  [24:00] Running the Western States Endurance Run This 100-mile trail race starts in Sierra Nevada, California. Dean first did this race in 1994. To him, this was an unforgettable experience. Going back after 13 times, Dean found that watching his dad and son crew for him and seeing how things changed over time was transformative for him. Dean recounts his experiences in detail in A Runner's High. [25:54] The Surprises of Parenting Kids grow faster than parents can adjust to them growing up.  Dean describes his son Nick as dichotomous, recounting how he would complain about his roommates being slobs while his own room is a mess. Nick volunteered to crew for him. Dean thought Nick would be irresponsible. Nick surprised Dean; he was much more responsible than Dean's dad. It's a parent's burden to accept that their child is now a self-sufficient, capable adult. [29:58] Did Dean's Career and Fame Affect His Family? Ultramarathoning has always been a family affair for Dean.  He would take his family to where his marathons are. Dean's kids had the opportunity to travel to different places from a young age. Fans that come up to him asking for autographs and selfies are decent people. [34:44] Dealing with Pain and Failure When you're in pain, it's difficult to interact with others. Dean admits that it can be tough when his fans come up to chat with him during this time. He commits to setting aside his ego and always gives 100% in everything he does, including ultramarathoning and interacting with fans. [40:44] The Value of Failing Success builds character, but failure more profoundly so. The emotional range that comes with failure makes one a better human. Don't shy away from hitting rock bottom because you'll be missing out on a profound character-building opportunity. In the end, it's a matter of perspective. Most people will applaud the distance that you run, whether you come in first or not. [44:49] Ultramarathoning is Achieving the Impossible Dean initially thought there was trickery involved in ultramarathoning. The moments that stuck to Dean in his career weren't victories or crossing finish lines.  What stuck to him were the moments when he was on the verge of giving up but persisted through difficulty. [48:04] The Importance of Character Ultramarathoning teaches you to be resilient through the tough times. Running doesn't hurt when you're doing it right. Some people try to avoid difficult things and pain, while others embrace them. We've built our world around comfort, but somehow we're still miserable. However, the more struggle you experience, the more strength you build. [53:21] Dean's Biggest Takeaways From Ultramarathoning To Dean, it's the little moments that are the most priceless. Ultramarathoning is a journey, a passion, and a commitment. Staying true to yourself is valuable, simple, and magical. [56:11] Forming Connections Through Books Writing is laborious, but the motivation it brings to people makes it worthwhile. Dean dictates the things he wants to write on his phone while running.  Running clears Dean's thoughts. To him, motion stirs emotion. A singularity of purpose is achieved when focusing on a specific goal or mission.   7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘Some people are built to run far and slow, and other people are built to run quick and short.' ‘In school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test, and then you get the lesson.' ‘What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best.' ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' ‘I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way.' ‘We've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable.' ‘I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that.'   About Dean Dean Karnazes is a renowned ultramarathon runner. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons in 50 days on 50 consecutive days, gone across the Sahara Desert in 120-degree temperatures, and ran 350 miles without sleep. He has also raced and competed in all seven continents twice. Dean has carried the Olympic Torch twice. He appeared on the covers of Runner's World, Outside, and Wired, and has been featured in TIME, People, GQ, and Forbes. He was named one of the "Top 100 Most Influential People in the World". Men's Fitness has also labelled him as one of the fittest men in the world. To top it off, Dean is also a New York Times bestselling author and a much sought-after speaker and panellist in running and athletic events worldwide.  If you want to learn more about Dean, his incredible adventures and his achievements, you may visit his website.   Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can find inspiration from Dean's stories on ultramarathoning and the lessons he learned along the way. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You can also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Trasncript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Good day, everyone. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits, your host Lisa Tamati here. Today, I have one of my longtime friends and a guy who has had a massive influence in my life both as a role model and as someone who has facilitated me with a lot of help with my books and so on. He's a worldwide legend. He is Dean Karnazes. He is the author of four books. And he has a new one out called the Runner's High, which I was excited to give me an excuse to chat to my buddy, and see what he's been up to, and to talk everything, ultramarathon running. We talk a whole lot about getting older in ultramarathon running, and the difficulties, and we talk about life in general and longevity, and the beauty of the sport. He's an incredible ambassador for our sport. He's done so much. He's brought so many people into the sport worldwide and he's an incredible human being. He's actually stuck in lockdown in Australia right at the moment as we were recording this and was about to do a race ride around Australia with my other friend, Pat Farmer. Another incredible human being. These guys are just next level crazy, and bloody COVID has ripped everything so they're now down to doing thousand-mile race around a military base in Australia in New South Wales. But in true ultramarathon form, where there's a will, there's a way. And when there's an obstacle, you find a way around it. Improvise, adapt, and overcome as my friend Craig Harper always says. So that's what these guys have been doing. So I hope you enjoy this episode with Dean Karnazes. Without him, I wouldn't have my books. He is a very generous and caring person as well as being an incredible athlete. Before we head over to the show, just want to remind you, we have our BOOSTCAMP live webinar series coming up starting on the first of September 2021. If you're listening to this later on, we will be doing these on an ongoing basis. And actually, we have planned to set up a mastermind that goes the year long. I don't know how long it's gonna take us to get organised but that is our goal. We're all about helping each other upgrade our lives and be the best versions of ourselves that we can be. This one's called BOOSTCAMP. This eight-week-long webinar series that Neil and I are doing. This is a live series where you hang out with us once a week for an hour and get a lot of great information: the latest science, the latest biohacking, the latest longevity, everything about mental toughness, resilience, everything that's going to basically upgrade your life and help you be a better human. The stuff that we've spent years and decades actually studying, learning, and doing. So I hope you get to enjoy this with us. You can head on over to peakwellness.co.nzboostcamp. That's B-O-O-S-T camp. BOOSTCAMP, not boot camp. We won't be making you run around doing anything. We're just going to be having wonderful chats and education. A lot of lectures and a lot of fun to be had along the way. And, I think, what's most important is you'll be networking with like-minded individuals. They say that you are the sum total of the five people that you hang out with most. And make those five people, in this case, it will be a few more, some top-quality people who are all on a mission the same as you are. So if you want to come and join us, that's BOOSTCAMP. We also have our epigenetics program. If you want to know all about your genetics, and how to upgrade your life through your genes, understanding what your genes do, if you're dealing with a difficult health journey, and you don't know where to go to next, this is a very good place to start. This is our flagship program that we've been running for years now. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program. And it's really an incredible all-encompassing program that looks at your food, your exercise types, what time of the day to do different things, your mood and behaviour, and lots, lots more. So come and check that out at lisatamati.com and hit the ‘Work with Us' button then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program there if you're interested in doing that. Right. Now, over to the show with Dean Karnazes who's sitting in lockdown in Australia. Well. Hi, everyone and welcome to the show. Today, I have my very good friend and absolute legend of ultramarathoning, Dean Karnazes, with me. Dean, welcome to the show, again. Repeat offender. Dean Karnazes: Oh, it's so nice to be back on with you. Thank you for having me. We always have such lively conversations. I love it. Lisa: We do, right? I just absolutely enjoy your company. Whenever I've had the chance to spend a little bit of time with you, it's been absolute gold whether it's been on the podcast, or interviewing you, or hanging out with you on the Gold Coast like we did last year. That was absolutely awesome. Dean, you've just brought out another book. Another amazing book called Runner's High, and that's why we had to get you back on, because I want to share about all this book. But before we get into the book, you're sitting in lockdown in Australia. Tell me what is going on there. Dean: It's a long story but it started with a run across Australia with Pat Farmer. So from Western Australia to the East Coast, and that was the original idea; it was 5,000 kilometres. And this was six months ago when the world was going in a better direction, and over the past six months, boy, the world has done just the opposite. And we, like you, are a fighter and we kept saying we're going to persevere the same... Well, the run across Australia got mixed to a run across New South Wales, a thousand-mile run across New South Wales. And we kept thinking, 'This is going to happen. This is going to happen.' I boarded the plane, I flew to Australia with 10 people on the huge jet, yeah. And when I get to Australia, I realise how bad the situation is here. And every day, I turn on the news. It's getting worse, it's getting worse as I'm in quarantine, and then finally Pat called me a couple days ago and said, 'We can't do the thousand-mile run now. We could still the thousand-mile run. It's just going to be contained within a military base because we need to stay in our own bubble.' And I thought 'Oh.' Lisa: He has flown away from America to Australia to run around the military base. It sounds a bit like being tactic stuff. Dean: Oh, yeah. And not only the... To sit in quarantine. To your point, I've been in our hotel room for 12 days now, waiting to get out, yeah. Lisa: For someone like you... You're just like me. Obviously, you're even more extreme than me. It must be torture. I just can't comprehend being in a room. This must be awful for you. Dean: Don't remind me, but yeah. Basically, from the moment I get up, I'm staying active. We both know the importance of movement. So from the moment my head leaves the pillow, I'm not sitting down ever. Even right now, I'm pacing back and forth in this room, and I'm doing bodyweight exercises just constantly, at least throughout the day. Lisa: I used to... If I was travelling and I was stuck in a hotel room somewhere in a dangerous city or whatever, I'd put on something running on TV and run along with them. I was doing the Boston Marathon in Budapest in a hotel room one day. Just run along the spot. Doesn't matter. You got to do something to keep active, so I can imagine it being a bit of a mission for you. So my heart goes out to you and hang in there for two more days. And all my love, please, to Pat Farmer. I love the guy. He's just amazing. We got to hang out when we're in the Big Red Run together, which I failed spectacularly, by the way. I had a back injury that walked me out in the middle of that race. But one of the big advantages of that run was actually getting to meet Pat Farmer because he's an absolute legend of the sport. So you two together would be a really powerful combination. I'm really sad that he's not going to go right around Australia because imagine the people that would have come out and enjoyed meeting you two. Dean: Oh, he pulled all the strings. He's very well connected in political circles and the Australian Army is crazy for us. So we had 13 Army personnel and they're setting up a tent city every night, and they're cooking for us. It was amazing but COVID had other plans. Lisa: Oh, bloody COVID. It's wrecking every damn thing. Hey, but it's ultramarathon runner and Pat Farmer who has run from the North Pole to the South Pole, people. Absolute crazy guy. Obstacle? Find a way around it. Obstacle? Find a way around. And that's what you guys are doing, and you have to be flexible. That's a good lesson for this day and age because we're all having to be very, very flexible right now, and adapt to a hell of a lot of change, and being able to cope in different situations. So I bet you guys would just find a way through it and it will be another incredible story at the end of the day. Dean: I think the world needs it. As controversial as the Olympics were, I think it was an amazing thing, and it's so scaled back, right? But still, people are stuck in their house and now, what are they doing? They're watching the Olympics. They're getting energised, and they're thinking about the future so yeah, thank you. It's been a very emotional journey for me to leave a place... Where I live in California, we're over 80% vaccinated. So to leave a place where there was no masks then come here, it's been eye-opening and challenging. Lisa: You should have Pat go to you and run around California. You got it backwards. I have no doubt that you guys will just find a way through, and you'll make it epic, anyway. Say you get given lemons, you make lemonade. Dean: Yeah well, at least we're staying in military barracks, and we're basically running. Every day, we're staying in the same place so logistically, it'll be easier. Lisa: Yeah. Oh my god, you guys just don't stop. I admire you guys so much, and I was saying to you last year, when we're in the Gold Coast, 'I've hit the wall at about 48 but to be honest, I had a pretty hit on, full-on war with my body and....' But you guys just seem to keep going, and going, and going. I had Mum as well so I did have an excuse, guys. But pretty highly, it was a stressful last five years. But you just seem to... Because how old are you now, Dean, if you don't mind sharing? Dean: Yeah. Well, when anyone would ask my age, I would say, 'Are you talking about my chronological age or my biological age?' Lisa: Well, your chronological because biological, you're probably 20 years younger. Because I definitely am. That's my take on it. Dean: Chronologically I'm closer to 60 than 50. Lisa: Exactly. Have you actually ever had your biological age done? Because that's an interesting thing. Dean: Yeah, I had a couple. There's a lot of good ways you can test it, and I've had it done a couple different times. One, I was about I was in my late 30s. And then on another, I was older than my actual chronological age. Lisa: Which one was that? Dean: It was post ultramarathon. So after racing, we spoke about C-reactive protein earlier and inflammation. And that was one of the biomarkers that they used in calculating your biological age. So when I looked at the results, I said, 'Hold it. How did you arrive at that figure?' And they gave me all the markers they looked at, and I said, 'Well, look. This is wildly elevated because just four days ago, I just ran a hundred miles.' Lisa: Exactly. And C-reactive protein, if you've just had a cold, if you've just hit like we were talking about my dad before and sepsis and his C-reactive protein was just through the roof. So that makes sense that they would be out. There's a whole clock, which is the methylation markers, which is a very good one. I've done just one very basic one that came out at 34. I was pretty pleased with that one. At the end of the day, I think if you can keep all your inflammatory markers like your homocysteine and C-reactive protein generally under control, keep your albumin levels high, they are pretty good markers. Albumin is one that is looking at, it's a protein that your liver makes, and that's a very important one. And if you albumin starts to go too low, that's one sign that things aren't going to good. So keep an eye on all those. I love studying all this longevity stuff because I plan to live to 150 at least, and I don't think that that's unrealistic now as long as I don't get run over by a bus or something. With the stuff that's coming online and the technology that's coming, we're going to be able to turn back the clock on some pretty advanced stuff already. Now, my mum's on more than me because obviously, her needs are a bit greater than mine. I can't afford for us to be on all the top stuff. But yeah, I'm very excited. We don't need to age like our grandparents have aged. We're gonna have... And someone like you, Dean, who's lived a good healthy life, apart from pushing the hell out of your body, and I'll talk about that in a sec, but I think you've got the potential to live to 150, especially because you're Greek. You come from stock. Dean: And my mom is from one of the Blue Zones. An island called Ikaria and I've been there and I've met... Ikaria, the island she's from, has the highest concentration of centenarians anywhere on Earth. Lisa: Oh my gosh. So you're going to live to 200 then. Dean: Well, the beautiful thing about these people is that not only are they over 100, they still have a high quality of life. They're still mobile; they're self-sufficient. Mentally and cognitively, they're sharp as a tack. They're active. The one thing that they have that we don't have the luxury of is the complete absence of stress. They don't pay attention to time. Lisa: That's, I think, a crucial point. Stress is a killer in so, so many ways. Dean: Even the fact that we have mortgages, and we have payments, rent, all those sort of things, I think, contribute to obviously, to stress. And fitting in with new society. It's much more of a sense of community in these villages where everyone is part of it. They all take care of each other, so it's a different lifestyle. Lisa: I think, definitely when you're actually living the old way of being out in the sunshine, from the time you get up to the end of the day, you're working outside and on the ground, in the land, hands in the dirt, all of that sort of stuff really... Because I studied lots about circadian rhythms and how our eyes, for example, you see sunshine early in the morning. That resets your circadian rhythms, sets the clock going for the day. Your adenosine starts to build up over the day. You get tired at about 14 to 16 hours later. All of these things that we've... as modern-day humans, we've taken ourselves out of the old way of living and put ourselves into this artificial comfortable environment. But this is upsetting all our ancient DNA, and that's why that's leading to problems. And then, of course, we've got this crazy life with technology, and the stuff we have to do, and work. Just like stress, what it does to the gut, the actual microbiota in the gut, and how much it affects your gut health. And of course, gut health affects everything. Your brain and your gut talk all the time. All these stuff so I think if we can harness the cool stuff of the technology coming, plus go back and start respecting as much as possible our ancient DNA, and then eating our ancestors did as best we can with these depleted soils, and pesticides, and glyphosates, and God knows what's in the environment, but doing the best we can, then we've got a good chance of actually staying around on this planet and still be running ultramarathons or at least marathons when you're a hundred plus. I don't think that that's unrealistic anymore, and that excites me. So I'm always learning on that front. Dean: But I want to be that guy that's running a marathon when you say a hundred. That's my ambition now. Lisa: I'll keep you up on the latest stuff then. What you need to be aware of. Dean: I don't have any... People say, ‘You must have arthritis, or back pain, or knee pain, or joint pain.' I don't have any of those things. I don't know why but I just... I'm so happy. I get up every morning and feel fresh. Lisa: That's absolutely amazing. I think one of the amazing things with you is that... Because I studied genetics, and I looked at my genes. And actually doing really long bouts of exercise with my combination of genetics and my cardiovascular system, especially I've got a very weak glycocalyx, which is the lining of your endothelial cells. Bear with me people. This means that if I do a lot of oxidative damage, which you do, of course, when you're running, that's pretty damaging to my lining of my blood vessel. So I've got to be a little more careful and take a lot of antioxidant support. But having that inflammation means I can now take steps to mitigate that so that I can still do what I love to do. And that's really key. It's hitting stuff off at the pass and there's so much we can do now and that's really, really exciting. But I've gone completely off topic because we should be talking about your book. Dean: No, I think it's very relevant because I think that some people are built to run far and slow and other people are built to run quick and short. Lisa: Yeah. I do and I agree and it's not just about your fast-twitch fibres. It is also about your methylation and your detox pathways, your hormonal pathways, your cardiovascular genes. All of these things do play a role, and that's why there's no one size fits all. And that's why we don't all have to be Dean Karnazes or Pat Farmer. You know what I mean? Not everybody is built for that or should be doing that, and that's okay as well. And working out what is optimal for your health is the key thing. Having role models like you guys is just mind-blowing because it does lift your perception of what the human body is capable of. That leads the way for others, and to follow, and to test out their personal limits. I think that's important too. Dean: Well, I've run over 300 traditional marathons. And you go to the Boston Marathon, you go to these big marquee marathons, the New York City Marathon, and you see people in their 70s and 80s that, compared to their peers, are off the charts. You say, 'Well, that running is gonna be bad for you.' I don't subscribe to that. Lisa: I've done what, 70-odd thousand K's. Not as much as you have. And I don't have any knee pain. I don't have any back pain because I keep my core strong and that's despite having accidents with my back and having no discs. Because I keep myself fit and healthy. I have had some issues with hormones and kidney function because when we... You would have been rhabdomyolysis, no doubt a few times. Dean: Minor, minor, but I have. Yeah. Every ultra runner has, yeah. Lisa: Yeah, so things that. You've got to just keep an eye on and make sure you don't... You look after your kidneys otherwise and do things to mitigate the damage. Because yeah there are certain things that damage. But life damages you. Like living, breathing is damaging. It's causing oxidative stress. So you've got to weigh up the pros and cons, but having an active physical life outdoors, and having adventures, and being curious and excited, and being involved in the world, that's got to be beneficial for you. So when do you actually start with this big adventure with Pat? Dean: It's on the 14th of August, so in about a week. Yep. They finish on the 24th, yeah. Lisa: Oh, I'd like to get you both back on at the end of it to give me a rundown, have a go. That will be cool. Dean, let's just pivot now and let's talk a little bit about your book. Because you brought out some incredible books over the years. You're world-famous. You're a New York Times bestselling author. You've been named by the Times magazine as one of the most hundred influential people of the world. That's just insane. And now, you're brought out Runner's High. What's different about this story? Dean: Well, my first book was Ultramarathon Man, and that was kind of a coming-of-age book. It was about me learning about this crazy universe of ultramarathon and people doing things that I thought was impossible. And Runner's High is five books later and three decades later. How am I still doing it? And how have I changed? How has the sport of ultramarathoning changed? How has the world changed? And that was the book. And it was also a very personal book and that... You're an ultramarathoner, and you know ultramarathon is an island. If you start running these long distances it impacts everyone in your life including your family. Very much for your family. The book, it is not really about running. It's funny. People read it and they say, 'Wow. It's amazing but it's storytelling.' And you and I are both good storytellers, and that was what I just set out to write a book that was true and honest, and it was enjoyable for the reader. And yeah, it's doing really well in New Zealand, actually. Lisa: It must be doing well around the world. And this one is very... It's really real, and genuine, and raw. No holds barred. No barred... What do you call it? No... How do you say that? It's very much a real and it's a love letter to, basically, like you say, to running. And you're actually revisiting the Western States, a race that you've done how many times? 13 times or something? But coming back in your 50s, late 50s to do this again in 2018. It was a bit of a tough road, shall we say. Can you tell us a little bit about that part of the journey and why Western States are so special to you? Dean: Yeah. The Western States 100 mile endurance run is in the Sierra Nevada, California. And it was the first 100-mile trail race, and I first did it back in 1994. So your first is always your best. It's kind of this amazing experience that you have, and you just never forget it. I can recall literally conversations I had in that race in 1994. I can recall what people were wearing. I can recall where I saw my parent. I recall it. It gets impressed upon your mind. So my synapses just absorbed it. So going back here after 13 goes at it and thinking, 'Wow, is this going to be a stale experience? Or what is it going to be like?' And it ended up being quite magical and quite transformative in my career as well as... I learned a lot about my father and my son, and I wrote a lot about that in the book, and watching them crew for me, and how things have changed over time. It wasn't a good race. I don't want to be a spoiler but I think good races don't make good stories. Good races, you pop the champagne, yeah, it's boring. You high five at the finish, you have some champagne, and all this good. When things go to shit, that's an interesting story. Lisa: Yeah, absolutely. I've got three books full of things turning to shit. And I think it's beautiful that you talk about your dad or what a crazy guy he is, and your son coming and how your son was actually... Like you didn't know whether he was up to crewing for you really because he's a young man. He wasn't going to take this seriously because you need your crew to be on form. How do he actually do when he was out there? Dean: Yeah. There's a saying that in school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test and then you get the lesson. You're just like, 'Boy I screwed that one up.' You lose track of your kids, especially when they go off to uni. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us. Dean: As a parent, your kids grew up quicker than you adjust to them growing up, and I always treat them as a guy that needs his diaper change kind of thing even though he's 20 years old now. Nick was just such a dichotomous individual because he complained to me when he came home from uni that his roommates were such slobs. I said, 'How do you like living with three other guys?' He's like, 'It's great. They're my best friends, but they're such slobs.' Every every time I walked past his room, I'd look in his room, and it was a Tasmanian devil had gone through it. ‘Your room is such a mess.' When he volunteered the crew for me at Western States, claiming he knew how to do it, even though the last time he'd done it, he was nine years old, and he didn't do anything. At this time, he was actually driving a vehicle. He was the most important support I had during this kind of foot race. And I just thought that it was gonna be a horrible experience. That he'd be irresponsible, he wouldn't show up, and this, and that. At least it was just the opposite. He was the most responsible, so much more responsible than my dad. So much more capable. My dad's been doing this for 30 years, and my son who's never done it was so much better than my dad. He showed me a new side of him that I'd never seen. Lisa: That's him growing up, I suppose? Dean: Yeah. I think every parent that's got a kid is kind of nodding their head as they're hearing this because they can relate. Lisa: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I think kids, sometimes when they can be a kid, they'll be a kid. They'll be the irresponsible... But when you actually put them on the spot and expect something from them, sometimes, they come to the party if you're lucky, and actually step up to the line, and actually do a good job, and obviously, Nicholas did that. Dean: Yeah. I think it's more the burden of the parent to accept and to realise that this little baby is self-sufficient and capable. Let go of the fact that they once were so dependent on you. They're not anymore. They have their own life, and they can navigate their way through the world. Lisa: It must be pretty hard to let go. What do you think it's been like for them having such a famous, crazy, extreme athlete dad? Was it hard for both of them? Because I can imagine you were away a lot. You're doing dangerous, crazy, amazing things. Everybody knows you. You're extremely well known when you go anywhere. How did that affect the family in general? Dean: It's funny. My kids have never known me as anything different. They've always known me as this ultramarathoner, and it's always been a family affair for me. My kids, they've been to Australia, they've been to Europe multiple times, South America, all over North America. I have taken them with me. I once ran 50 marathons in all of the 50 US states in 50 days, and they were along. Yeah. How many kids... My son was nine, my daughter was 11. How many kids ever, how many people ever get to see all of the states of America, let alone when you're that age? So I think that they just accept me for what I am. Sometimes I get the fan thing where people come up to me like at a restaurant. Like, 'Oh, can you sign this or that?' And it's always good people. The people that come up to me in an airport and say, 'Hey, I really admire you. Can we do a selfie?' They're decent people. Like I want to go have a glass of wine with this guy or this lady. It's not like I'm a rock star or movie star where I have all the crazy people chasing around. The people who chase me around are my peers. People I really admire myself. Lisa: Or other runners. You know what? Something I've always admired about you, too, was that you always gave every single person time of day despite... And when we did that speaking gig together last year on the Gold Coast, I was really nervous, to be honest, because I was like, 'I'm on the stage with someone who is a superstar, and I'm little me.' Right? I'm sort of like, 'How the hell am I on stage with you? Because no one's gonna be interested in what the hell I've got to say when you're standing next to...' It's like some superstar, and you're standing on the stage with them, and you've got to do... It was quite difficult in a way because everybody wanted to... The line for your books was just two hours long. The line from mine was two people long. Dean: You carried yourself beautifully. I thought together, we were a great pair. We complemented each other. Lisa: You are a gentleman. You would always straight to me and make sure that I was included, which was fantastic. I saw you. Like you take the time for every single person. You are present with everybody, and that's a really hard thing to do. It's not so hard in a book signing, but it's bloody hard in the middle of a hundred-miler or a hundred K-er or when you were half-dead, dragging yourself into a checkpoint, and somebody wants a signature from you or a selfie, and you're trying to just get your stuff together. I found that difficult on my level of stuff. Because when I enter in New Zealand, I found that really difficult. I'd have people coming out on the road with me all the way through. And in that preparation, I thought that would be cool. In the reality of the day-to-day grind, did you know when you're... Because I was running up to 70K's a day. I was in a world of pain and hurt most of the time, and just struggling to keep going, and very, very breakable, you feel like. And then, you'd have people coming out and now it's been maybe 2, 3, 4 or 5K's with you, and they're full of beans, and they want you to be full of beans and full of energy, and give them the greatest advice in their 5K's when you're half dead. I found that really, really hard because I'm actually, believe it or not, quite introverted and when I'm running, I go in. How do you deal with it? How do you deal with that without being... Because you don't want to be rude. You don't want to be disrespectful to anybody, God forbid. But there were times on that run when I just literally had to say to my crew, 'I can't cope right now. I'm in a world of pain. I need some space.' And they have to sort of politely say, 'Sorry, she's not in a good space.' How do you deal with that? Dean: Well, it's amazing that we're having this conversation because there are not a lot of people that can relate intimately to what you just said. Because most people will never be in that position but what.. I experienced exactly you've experienced. When running 50 marathons in 50 days or running, I ran across America as well. When you're in a world of hurt, you've got this protective shell on, and you don't want to be social, and then I'd have groups of college kids show up with my book. Like 'Oh my god. Karnazes, you're such a great influence, and we love your book.' And 'Let's order a pizza.' I just feel like I just want to crawl into a mummy bag and hide and you just got to turn it on. Lisa: You've got to step up fine. Dean: Yeah, they're so happy to see you, and they want to see you on. They don't want to see you like this groveler just dying. They want to see you strong and engaging, and it's really tough sometimes. Yeah. It's definitely really tough sometimes. Lisa: Yeah, and that's why I admire that you managed to do that most of the time. You turn it on no matter in what shape you were. If I were to pull it out whereas, to be honest, a couple of times, I just couldn't. I'm just like, 'I'm done guys.' Remember on the run through New Zealand that one time? This was not with fans. I was running for CanTeen, the kids with cancer. I was in an immeasurable world of hurt one night after running for, God knows how long I've been out there, 1200 K's or something at the stage. I had a 13-year-old boy was sent into my room to give me a pep talk. He was dying of cancer or had cancer, and he was here to give me a pep talk because I was crying. I wasn't able to get up and run the next day. And he came in and told me how much it meant to him, and to his peers, and what it meant to him that I was undertaking this journey. That was a real lesson. Like, 'Oh, get over yourself. You're not dying, okay? You're not a 13 year old with cancer. You just have to run another 70 K's tomorrow. So what?' That's a good perspective. I did get up the next morning and go again and that was like, 'Here, come on.' Some funny but really touching moments. You are human and it's very easy when you go to a speaking engagement or whatever to be what you meant to be, a professional. But it's bloody hard when the chips are down and you're in the middle of a race to do that. So I really always did admire that about you. What I also admired was that it didn't matter whether you came first or last in a race. With the Western States, it was a struggle. You never shied away from the fact that today might not have been your day, and you're having a bad day, and you weren't embarrassed about that. I've had races with Pat Farmers, a classic one in the middle of the Big Red Run where I was just falling to pieces. I was going through some personal trauma at the time, and my back went out. Yeah, I was just at a bad place. And I was embarrassed because I failed at a race at that stage. I was in that mindset. Now, I look back and go 'Give yourself a break.' How do you cope with that? How do you... Like when you don't do what the fans expect you to do on that day? Dean: To me, it's your ego. Yeah, it is such an ego thing. And let's be honest, when you're a public figure, your failures are public. You don't fail in silence. You just kind of DNF and walk away and live the race another day. You DNF and people are taking pictures of you, and it's on the internet. I always got crowded. But in the end, I just... What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best. So my commitment now is like, ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' And when you go with that mindset, no matter what happens, you're doing yourself a service. Lisa: Yeah, and you're a winner. This is such a powerful message, I think, for young people listening because often, we don't even try because we don't want to risk embarrassing ourselves, and risk failure, and risk looking like an idiot. And what you're saying is just forget your ego, set that to the side, and go, 'I'm going to give it all today, and if it isn't enough, it isn't enough and that's fine. I'll learn something out of it. And it's a journey that I'm on. And I'm going to be the best I can be today.' That's such a powerful story of perspective, and resilience, and leaving the ego at the door. I did struggle with that when I was younger because I had some pretty spectacular failures, and they really hurt. They really hurt where you take a long time to sort of go, 'Do I want to do that again in the public eye?' So to speak. And you've just always just been 'If it was a good day, it was a good day, and on to the next one if it was a bad day.' Dean: Yeah, I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way. I lean into every emotion that I have. Either success or failure, sorrow or regret. All those things that happen when you have a bad race or a bad day. I want that full emotional range. It just makes you a better human, I think. Not to shy away from those deep lows where you're just crushed. I think that people that try to avoid that are really missing out. Yeah, yeah, it's painful and it hurts but it builds your character in a profound way. Lisa: Wow. That is so deep, actually. Because we're often taught push down your emotions, and keep them in a box, and be a professional, and keep going, and keep calm and carry on type thing. And it has its place as far as when you're in the middle of a race, you've got to keep your shit together, and compartmentalise stuff, and be able to function. But I think it's also very important to experience the pain, the grief, the pain, or whatever you're going through, and the happiness. It's another thing. I would get to the end of a race and it didn't matter how well I'd done, and what I've just achieved, and how difficult it was. I remember doing one in the Himalayas and a friend coming up to me afterwards and it was 220K race, extreme altitude, hell of a journey to get there, all sorts of obstacles. I get to the finish line and he's just like, 'Wow, you're amazing. It's incredible. I can't believe what you just did. If I hadn't seen it, I wouldn't have believed it.' And I just went, 'Oh no. Someone else was faster, and there's a longer race.' You know what I mean? And I didn't integrate it. And he just went, 'Oh, for crying out loud. Can't you just take this one to the bank and actually bank it as being a success and a huge win?' And I really took that to heart. And now, I pat myself on the back when I do even a little thing good because it reinforces that neural pathway in my brain that tells me, 'This was great because I just got a little reward' rather than, 'You're never good enough.' Because that was what I was telling myself before. No matter what I did, it wasn't enough. And now, flip that script around to go, 'Hey, you managed to do your shoelaces and get to the end of the road today. Well, done.' And it's the thought of it. Dean: It is, completely. My son said something to me that was along that same vein during the Western States. I said, ‘Nicholas…' This is maybe a mile 60 or 70 of a hundred-mile run. I said, 'My race is crap. I'm not having a good race.' And he looked at me, said, 'Dad, you're running a hundred miles. To most people, that's enough.' And I put it in perspective. That although I'm with all these super elite athletes, you're not doing that... To most people that hear about anyone running a hundred miles, they don't care if you came in first or last. A hundred miles? They don't care if my time was 15 hours or 50 hours. They're just so inspired. Yeah, blown away by it. Yeah. Lisa: Exactly, And I think that puts it because when we hang out... Because you are the sum total of the people that you hang out with, the top five, as the saying goes. And that can have negative connotations as well as positive. It can be the fact that you think if you're hanging out with the five top guys in the world, then you are going to be not looking too good. But if you're hanging out with just the average person, and you're doing something this long and this incredible, for most people, that's just like, 'Huh? Humans can do that?' I did a speaking engagement yesterday in Auckland and the people were like, 'But that's humanly impossible.' I go, 'It actually isn't, and there's actually thousands of us that do the stuff.' And then, they're like, 'What? I don't get it.' Dean: That was it. That was the same reaction I had when I heard about someone running a hundred mile like that. They're, 'Oh, there's trickery.' I thought there's trickery. I thought there's hotels, or just campgrounds, or something. The guy said, 'The gun goes off and you just run, and you stop when you cross the finish line.' I couldn't wrap my head around it. Lisa: Until you did it. Dean: Until you did it. Exactly, yeah. Lisa: And you built yourself up to it, and this is the thing. It's a combination of so much and it's that journey isn't it? So I think what we're talking about is it being this incredible life journey that you go on within an ultramarathon and within the training of our ultramarathon. It's like living an entire life in short. You're going through the highs, and the lows, and everything in between. And it's long, and it's hard, and it's awesome, and it's amazing, and you meet incredible people. It's everything that you go through in life but just on an intensive timescale, I feel like. And it's just a beautiful experience to go through, especially with the value of hindsight. Sometimes, in the middle of it, mile 70 of a hundred-mile race, it's not looking too flash. Dean: Well, but I mean, to that point, when we reflect back on moments that we remember, at least me, it's not the victories. It's not the crossing the finish line first to me. It's always that time where I thought, 'I'm done. This is it. I can't get out of this chair. I'm trashed.' And somehow getting through that really, really tough moment and carrying on. That's what sticks with you. It's pretty weird, at least with me. Those are the moments that reflect back on my career. It's those horrible moments that I somehow persisted. Lisa: When you look back, you're proud of yourself and you know that when... One of the biggest values, and I've seen this with my story with Mum and, unfortunately, recently with my dad, is that when the shit hits the fan, like it did in those two situations, I knew that I could step up to do everything within my power and that I was a fighter. I knew that I was a fighter, and then I knew that I would fight to the bitter end, whatever the outcome was. And that's a really good thing to know about yourself. Because you need to know that when things are down, what character do you have? Who are you when all the niceties of our world have gone? What are you capable of? And you learn to be able to function when everyone else is gone. And that's a really powerful lesson that ultramarathoning teaches you, I think, in decades of the sort of hard work. And that's why athletes, I think... When you're employing athletes or you going into business with other athletes, you're more likely to have someone who's willing to fight through the tough times than if you just get someone who hasn't ever experienced any sort of discomfort in their life. Then they're not liable to be able to push through and be as resilient. I think that's what I'm trying to say. Dean: I agree with you completely. And I often wonder if people have those character, those values, and that's what draws them to ultra running or if ultrarunning instils those values. I remember coming home from a run one time, and my neighbour was fetching up the morning paper. He saw me running back to my house and I'd, I don't know, I'd run 30 or 40 kilometres, and he said to me, 'Doesn't running hurt?' And I said to him, 'It doesn't if you're doing it right.' And he looked at me, 'I do everything to avoid difficult things.' And I'm like, ‘And I embrace it.' It's just a different mindset. Lisa: And if you have the mindset of wanting to always avoid all sorts of pain in life, then you're not going to experience very much. And when you're in a tough situation, you won't be able to cope because you won't have experienced any sort of pain. So the more that you had to struggle, the more strength you develop from that. The old proverb: 'Strength comes from struggle' is valid in all walks of life. So unfortunately, this is the way the world is set up. If you seek comfort all the time, you're actually going to be in deeper shit somewhere along the way and not able to help yourself because you haven't learned to fight, and you haven't learned to push through and to deal with a certain level of discomfort and a certain level of pain. And I think that's a really, really valuable thing to do. Every day, I try to experience some sort of discomfort or pain: whether it's cold, whether it's pushing myself mentally, intellectually, whether it's pushing myself physically, doing some intense extreme exercise, or whatever the case may be. Every day, I try to do something that it scares the shit out of me or pushes me in some way because then, I know that I haven't gone backwards that day. I've probably learned something, and gone forward, and I've strengthened my body and my mind in some sort of way, shape, or form. Dean: Yeah, but I think you're an exception. I think most people just try to take the path of least resistance and avoid difficult things and avoid pain. I think we've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable. Lisa: Exactly. That's exactly the problem. Because by actually experiencing a little bit of pain, by doing your push-ups, going for your run, doing your pull-ups, whatever the case is, being outside and digging the garden and doing stuff that is a bit unpleasant, it actually makes your body stronger, and it makes you mentally stronger. If we all sit on the couch and watch Netflix all day every day and eat chips, what's going to happen to us? We're going to destroy our health. We're going to just be so... And this is... I think I'm scared for the younger generation, that they haven't actually... We grew up. We're roughly the same age. You're a couple years older. I grew up in the 70's where we were outside, doing something all day, every day. We came in at night time for a feed and went to bed. That was our childhood, and that was just a beautiful way to grow up. We were cold. We were hungry. We were tired. We were happy. Dean: We were playing, right? We were exercising. I remember riding my bike just everywhere. I never thought of it as exercise. It was playing. Kids don't play that way anymore, unfortunately. Lisa: It's a scary thing for them because we need to teach them. Because again, it goes back to sort of respecting our ancient DNA and that's what I think... That's another thing that ultramarathoning does, or even trekking, or adventuring in any sort of way, shape, or form. It's that we've come from stock that used to have to build their own houses, cut down their own trees, chase animals, whatever the case was, just to survive. And then, we now have it all laid on for us. We're in lovely houses. We've got light all day or night. We've got food every street corner. And our ancient DNA isn't just set up for that. This is where all the problems come. We could go on a complete rant, which I often do on this podcast. But coming back to your story in your Runner's High, what do you think now looking back at this incredibly long and prolific career and this incredible journey that you've been on so far, and I do think that you still got miles and miles to go. What are some of the biggest lessons that you've learned along the way on the thirty-odd year journey that you've been? What are the biggest takeaways from ultramarathon running? Dean: I think that it's the little moments that are the most priceless. It's not the moments where... I write about meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama. Yeah, that was great. It was amazing, and incredible, and everything else, but it's the little moments of having a moment with a crew member or your family that you just you reflect on and laugh about. So it's those things to me that are most priceless. The other thing with ultramarathoning that I've certainly learned is that it's a journey. To me, it's a passion and it's something I've committed my life to. And staying true to the person you are, there's value in that. Even though it's just running, Lisa. It's nothing hugely intellectual. I'm not winning Nobel prizes. I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that. Lisa: Oh, absolutely. You know what you're born to do. You say it's only running but actually, you're a teacher; you're an author; you're a person who empowers others. You're doing all of that in the framework of running. So you do a heck of a lot more than just running for me. You've influenced an entire generation worldwide. I hope you know. Without you, ultramarathon running would not be where it is today. So I think you know a little bit more than just running yourself. This is the power of books, and this is the power of storytelling. And it's the power of having such a unique character that is so charismatic and draws people in. And those are all the things that you've managed to take. You could have just been a silent runner who just did his thing and went away again, but you've chosen to share your journey with the world. And that's just gold because that just gives people an insight into what they can do. It's all about... when I read your books, I'm getting something for me. And everybody who's reading those books, that's actually, 'Yes, we talk. We're hearing Dean's story.' But we're actually going, 'Huh. Maybe I could do that. Maybe I could try that. Oh, yeah I've experienced that.' This is the conversation that are going on in people's heads when they read those stories, and that's why they have such an intimate connection with you. And why, even though it's weird when people come up and ask you for an autograph or any of that, they feel like they know you, and they do know you. Dean: I've got a message from a guy. Yeah, I know. Every time I think, 'Wow, this is really laborious, writing these books. And maybe it's my last book.' I got a message from a guy a couple days ago and he said, 'I was planning on reading a couple chapters of your new book before I went to bed.' And he said five hours later, 'I finished the last page.' And then, he said, 'And then I got up. I just had to go running.' Wow. Then the book worked if it motivated him to read the whole thing in one sitting and get up and go running, then it's worthwhile. Lisa: Absolutely. And you know when you read, I read books ferociously, and the list is long. I'm usually reading about 10 books at a time. And when I'm reading, I am distilling the world's top people and their entire experience, I get to absorb within the space of 10, 15 hours of reading their book. That's a good return on investment. If I want to download someone's experience, or knowledge, or whatever the case is, then reading books is just such a powerful way to do it and listening to podcasts as well. Because that's another way that you can do it without having to... You can be out and about, driving, or running, or whatever and absorbing some new information. And I think we're just so lucky to have access to all of this. It's just incredible. Dean: It is and it's a pity if you don't take advantage of that because you're so wise and educated. That conversation we had before the podcast, it's amazing how... It's amazing. Your knowledge base and how you developed your knowledge base. Well, you've absorbed the best of the best and what they're thinking and the research they've done. Lisa: Exactly. All you're doing is you're absorbing it from the best scientists, the best doctors, the best athletes, the best executives, the best business people, and then, you get to share it, teach it. This is the other thing. If I learn something in the morning, I'm teaching it in the afternoon. Usually it's to my poor husband or my mother. I'm teaching it and then, I often build into my programs, or it comes out in my webinars, or whatever. And you're basically just regurgitating stuff that you've learned, but it's powerful when you put it into the perspective of your experience and you change it. You learn it, you teach it. You learn it, you teach it. And that's a such a cool way to share, and get that information out there into the world, and actually help the world on your little corner of the earth and what you're doing. And that's what I love to do and that's the power of what your books are all about. So yeah, I commiserate with you. Getting a book out is a bloody long, hard journey. People don't realise how hard it is to write a book. Give me a bloody hundred miler any day over writing a book. In fact, give me ten hundred milers over any day because it's such a long process, isn't it? Dean: Well, I do a lot of my writing while I'm running actually. So I dictate into my phone now. Because we have some of our clearest thoughts while we're running. Before, I used to think, 'God, why didn't I write that down? How did that go again?' Now, I just dictate as I'm running and then come home, put in an earbud, and just type up my notes. Lisa: I haven't done variations of that. I do end up stopping on my runs and just writing a quick note. I haven't actually dictated. I have to start adapting that because maybe that'll make it easy because you're damn right. When I'm actually at the computer, there's distractions. There's a hundred windows open; there's notifications coming all the time, and I really find it hard to sit down and write. It is sometimes best if you could just dictate into something, so I'll have to give that a crack next time. Dean: I think motion stirs emotion. Lisa: Yeah, it does and it clears the mind. That's one thing I miss now that I'm not doing the ultras, personally, at the moment. It's that singularity of purpose. That cleanness the mind had before of this one goal. And I'm watching my husband's preparing for a hundred miler in November. And just watching everything in his whole day, and he has the luxury of doing this because we haven't got kids and stuff, but everything in his whole day is centred around his training and getting to that hundr

Town Hall Seattle Science Series
148. Leigh Cowart with Dan Block: The Science and Culture of Pain on Purpose

Town Hall Seattle Science Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:35


Love isn't the only thing that hurts. Leigh Cowart knows. Eating the world's hottest pepper hurts. Ballerinas dancing on broken bones hurts. A sideshow performer electrocuting themself hurts. Ultramarathon running, jumping into an icy lake, and tattooing all hurt. Why are we doing all of this to ourselves on purpose? This question, and many others, are answered in Leigh Cowart's scintillating new book, Hurts So Good: The Science and Culture of Pain on Purpose. Masochism, Cowart's learned, is a part of who we are. But why? What are the benefits? And at what cost? What does giving ourselves pain say about the human experience? Cowart dives into the neuroscience behind it, through conversations with psychologists, scientists, and those who seek pain for pleasure. Cowart, by the way, is a self-proclaimed masochist, seeking out the thrill of it. They participate in painful activities to find some greater understanding of how our minds and bodies find meaning in pain, and the relief after. Sideshow performer Dan Block, who is featured in the book, joined Cowart for the event to perform stunts and discuss the line between pain for fun and for self-harm. Leigh Cowart is a researcher and journalist whose work has appeared in the Washington Post, New York Magazine, Buzzfeed News, Hazlitt, Vice, and other outlets. Dan “The Amazing Face” Block is the founder and director of the Three Legged Dog Sideshow, which has been performing across the country for a decade and producing events in Texas for 5 years. Buy the Book: Hurts So Good: The Science and Culture of Pain on Purpose (Hardcover) from Third Place Books  Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation online click here.

Mikkipedia
Bevan McKinnon - Fitter Radio

Mikkipedia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 91:01


Mikki is also cohost of Fitter Radio as you know and Bevan is the one that got her into podcasting. Of course we talk about this, but more so we talk about him as a kid, an athlete, a podcast host and an elite athlete coach. Many gems in this one for coaches, athletes and anyone wanting an insight into growing up in NZ in the 1970s. If you like it, subscribe and leave a review! Click here for the link to previous podcasts.Bevan can be found at: https://www.fitter.co.nz/our-coaches?__s=51ovu1tiq91wh0ad72bpIG: https://www.instagram.com/fitter.co.nz/?hl=enFitter Radio: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/fitter-radio-triathlon-podcast/id854311930 Contact Mikki:https://mikkiwilliden.com/https://www.facebook.com/mikkiwillidennutritionhttps://www.instagram.com/mikkiwilliden/https://linktr.ee/mikkiwilliden

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs
Flipping High End Real Estate Running Ultramarathons & Changing Your Life To Be Successful |Frank McKinney

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 58:25


Join Nick Lamagna on The A Game Podcast with guest "The Real Estate Rockstar" aka Frank McKinney!  Frank is a a real estate artist who has gone from flipping crack houses to designing and selling over 44 luxury unique waterfront homes with price tags up to 50 million dollars!  He is a philanthro-capitalist and founder of the Caring House Project where he has built 29-nine self-sustaining villages over the last 19 years in Haiti, providing 13,000+ children and their families with homes, schools, clinics, community centers, churches, renewable food and clean water, and means to support themselves. As if that was not impressive enough Frank has run the Badwater 135-mile Ultramarathon 12x alongside David Goggins, a race referred to by National Geographic as “The world's toughest footrace.”  Topping it off Frank is a best selling offer who has just released his new book "ASPIRE! How To Create Your Own Reality & Alter Your DNA." Topics this episode include: ✅ How to sell multi-million dollar homes in record time ✅ How to increase your RISK tolerance ✅ How days on market can kill your profits in real estate ✅ Mental & physical training for a 135 mile marathon  ✅ What is personal branding + ➡️ MORE! See show notes for all the ways to connect with Frank, his charity and make sure to contact Nick to do some real estate deals together! Need to borrow money for Real Estate?  Email Morse@nationwidebcg.com and tell her The A Game Podcast sent you or look under affiliates by clicking here   --- Connect with Frank on: https://www.frank-mckinney.com/ Order The Aspire Book HERE! Contribute To The CARING HOUSE PROJECT Frank McKinney on Facebook Frank McKinney on Instagram Frank McKinney on Twitter Frank McKinney on LinkedIn Frank McKinney on Youtube --- Connect with Nick Lamagna www.NickNickNick.com Click Here for all social media links and podcast options Free Checklist On How To Add Value To Your Buyers Like what you hear? Leave a rating & review by clicking here 

Road Dog Podcast
179: Samantha Wood is Creating Opportunities for People to Contribute

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 87:05


“It's actually probably one of the hardest things I have done because I had to do all the other races with a concussion.” Samantha Wood serves in the California National Army Guard as an orthopedic physical therapist. She is a distance runner and a professional Spartan OCR athlete. Hear how she raised money for Caldor fire victims in California by virtually running the Tahoe 200. Brad Timmerman shares his favorite spots to run in Folsom CA. he is a member of the Army National Guard. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. Squirrel's Nut Butter https://squirrelsnutbutter.com DRYMAX show code: Roaddog2020  Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.drymaxsports.com/products/ Allwedoisrun.com Coppercanyons.com Samantha Wood Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/woodultra/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/armyathlete Brad Timmerman Contact Info: FB: https://www.facebook.com/brad.timmerman.186 IG: https://www.instagram.com/trailrunninhuman/ Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

1A
From Chili-Eating Contests To Ultramarathons, Why Do We Seek Pain For Pleasure?

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 33:23


If you've ever burnt your hand on a stove and someone told you it's "all in your head," they're technically not wrong. Our sensory receptors communicate with the brain to create the sensation of pain.But if pain is... painful, why do some of us seek it out?To find out, journalist Leigh Cowart interviewed ultramarathoners, spice aficionados, lovers (practitioners) of BDSM, and other pain-seekers about why they do what they do.We talk about the link between pain and pleasure — and hear your stories and questions about pain on purpose.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Adventure Airwaves
Running the Cloudsplitter 100 Mile Ultramarathon - Suffering Joy

Adventure Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 21:48


Reflections and field recordings from my first 100 mile run, the Cloudsplitter 100 in Norton, Virginia. This episode is not about how to run a hundred miles, but it is about why I ran and what I experienced. Music during the story played by me. The song played during the intro and outro is Benevolence by Seeking Madras.  

The Run Shoe Diaries Podcast
Episode 8: Law School, Helping others and First-Time Ultra Running with Erica Thomas

The Run Shoe Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 73:28


In this Episode, I talk with  BRAND NEW Ultra Runner Erica Thomas! Erica's career path has provided her with many interesting and selfless opportunities to help those in need, and she has done an extraordinary job thus far.  In her field of work, many before her have found it to be arduous and mentally taxing. Through this, Erica has found running to be her main stress relieving tool. While working in (the Great State of) Montana, she would eventually find herself signing up for her first Ultra Marathon... and she chose The Rut Run 50k. Listen as Erica is hit a bit of nostalgia, dives deep into her passion for helping others in need, enlightens us with her supportive attitude and relives her first Ultra Running Experience! Bless your heart; Enjoy!   Hashtags:#runshoediarieshttps://www.instagram.com/run_shoe_diaries/Spotify Guest Playlist:https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7tJ7SyTYbY46DBC6Vqjb5DAudio Jungle - "80s Rocky Upbeat Training" - Vyray (ASCAP)Used with Permission - https://audiojungle.net/user/runshoediaries/statementInvoice No: | IVIP43381612Order No: | 146231625Audio Jungle - "Game Show Opener" - D. Weltermann (ASCAP)Used with Permission - https://audiojungle.net/user/runshoediaries/statementInvoice No: | IVIP44457818Order No: | 150546937 

Adventure On Purpose
100K Puke and Rally!

Adventure On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:09


Kel and Lee share their recent experiences from a 100k ultramarathon they just ran! It was hosted on the Superior Hiking Trail on a stretch that has some brutal terrain and technical running sections. Tag along as they share on this amazing feat on their feet! By the way that's 62 miles of running starting in the dark and ending in the dark! This will sure be a great episode! Time to sign up for some more!

The Endurance Athlete Podcast
Burro Racing and Hauling Ass with Karin Usko & Jon Auborn - Episode 23

The Endurance Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 62:58


Sign up to Run with the Burros, April 2022 on UltrasignupRun with the Burros, California Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/2474412319334211California Breakfast Burritos Facebook Group  https://www.facebook.com/CaliforniaBreakfastBurritos 

Persuasion School with Jake Savage
How to persuade a group of people, not just an individual | Notes from my fundraiser

Persuasion School with Jake Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 36:40


In this episode, I breakdown the strategy I'm using for my fundraising campaign and share how you can use the same principles to spark a movement.Enjoy!You can watch the video I mentioned and see the campaign using this link here. Please consider investing into this mission to bring relief to victims of trafficking.

Simon Ward, The Triathlon Coach Podcast Channel
How to train for an ultra running event * Andrew Simmons

Simon Ward, The Triathlon Coach Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 67:00


What comes next after you've done the “Ironman Thing”? Maybe an ultra run? Over the last few years, there has certainly been a huge upswing in the popularity of ultra running events from the mega multi-lap Sri Chinmoy event in New York City to the hardcore Western States 100. If this is the sort of thing that's starting to float your boat then how do you make the transition from Ironman triathlete to an ultra runner? Today's guest Andrew Simmons of Lifelong Endurance in Colorado is going to help guide us through those first steps (no pun intended) as we take a deep dive into ultramarathon training. Topics covered include: Training for an ultra trail event of more than 50km - The first steps Walking and why it MUST be part of your ultra strategy - in training and racing Ultramarathon pacing - why it needs a change of mindset Building resilience is critical for ultra success Yet another guest emphasises the importance of mobility and strength! The value of ‘fun' and ‘play' in athletic training.   If you are interested in a training plan for Ultramarathon events Andy has a special discount for podcast listeners: 90% Discount on my 100km-100mile Mountain Ultra Plan | Advanced - Use code: welovesimon for $90 off, Plan is now $9.90' https://www.trainingpeaks.com/training-plans/running/ultra/tp-133961/100km-100-mile-mountain-ultra-plan-50-60-miles-a-week-advanced   To find out more about Andy Simmons please start by visiting his website You can also find him on the usual social media channels Facebook Instagram @coach_simmons_runs   Recent Articles: Technical Descending: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/the-trail-runners-guide-to-downhill-training-and-technical-descents/ Designing an Athlete's Total Load: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/coach-blog/designing-an-athletes-total-load/ 9 Plyometric & Strength Movements for Runners: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/coach-blog/9-plyometric-strength-movements-for-runners/   Ultramarathons: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/speedwork-for-ultra-runners   Hill Work:  https://www.podiumrunner.com/training/climb-your-way-to-speed/   Youth: Here's one piece on getting more kids on trails I wrote for our blog. https://peakperformrun.com/1752-2/   Insights on Trail Running for Youth Runners - A look inside our Altitude Camp https://trailrunner.com/trail-news/highlights-from-a-high-altitude-training-camp-for-high-school-runners/   Coaching young runners in the emerging sport of trail running https://trailrunner.com/trail-news/lessons-learned-in-coaching-youth-trail-runners/   Episode w/ Parker Wolfe (one of the fastest kids in the US in the last 5 years) https://open.spotify.com/episode/47X7PIEEMospT9xrQIY9km?si=ff49d5ab16e2490b   Mental Performance in Running w/ Addie Bracy https://open.spotify.com/episode/4QKDsG5AbIXEkuTsAwQ6gJ?si=7a4b9d5ccecc4665 Take a 30 day trial in my SWAT Inner Circle for just £1. Watch this video for more information. Purchase a copy of my High Performance Human e-book featuring more than 30 top tips on how to upgrade your life. If you would like to help offset the cost of our podcast production, we would be so grateful.  Please click here to support the HPH podcast.  Thank you! Visit Simon's website for more information about his coaching programmes.  Links to all of Simon's social media channels can be found here.  For any questions please email Beth@TheTriathlonCoach.com.

Becoming Ultra
My First Ultra: 16 Catra Corbett

Becoming Ultra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:23


Before Catra Corbett aka Dirt Diva was an ultrarunner, she was a drug addict.  The drugs led her to dropping out of school , developing an eating disorder, damaging relationships and eventually in jail.  Catra hit her rock bottom and decided she was going to turn her life around.  In 1996, two years after being clean and sober, she started lifting weights and walking.  One day she just started running and never stopped.  Catra has completed more than one-hundred 100-mile races, the Moab 240 multiple times, Bigfoot 200 and Badwater 135 and holds the fastest known time for the 425-mile-long John Muir Trail.  Through Catra's desire to help people by sharing her story she wrote a detailed bestselling book about her life, struggles and triumphs called Reborn on the Run; My Journey from Addiction to Ultramarathons.   Authentic!  That is the best word to describe Catra.  We could have talked to Catra for hours, she has a lot of life experience and wisdom to share.  On this episode Catra talks about her many running adventures and most recent experience at the Bigfoot 200.  The ultra-running world is lucky to have such a selfless runner out there.  This is a woman who really cares about the community and lifting people up.  We also discuss Catra's book and being vulnerable.  Of course, we had to talk about the one and only Truman.  Catra is someone that has a lot to offer and is finding new ways to help people who struggle with addiction.  We are big supporters and can't wait to see what she does.  I hope you enjoy this talk as much as we did. https://catracorbett.com/ IG: @dirtdiva333

The 2nd Floor
Ultramarathon Experience Came With A Wild Bear Sighting

The 2nd Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:39


On today's episode of client diaries, I bring my very own dedicated student and good friend Prince @ignoredprince to the show.    Prince was the first person to sign up for the 50km Spartan race with 50 obstacles with me back in the summer of 2021. We talk about our experience training together, our ultramarathon we ran and how we motivated each other through every painful step to finishing the longest distance run we ever accomplished.

The Dairy Edge
Ed Payne on the work-life balance that allows him run his dairy farm and compete in ultramarathons

The Dairy Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:54


Dairy farmer Ed Payne joins Emma-Louise Coffey on this week's Dairy Edge podcast to explain how the work-life balance he has created in his dairy farm business allows him to train and compete in ultramarathons. Firstly, Ed gives an update on the dairy farm business, milking 550 cows across the two dairy platforms with family labour, 3 full-time labour units as well as relief staff and he explains the thinking behind switching from OAD to TAD milking on the 2nd milking platform. Ed reflects on the necessity to get off the farm to allow for family time and time for hobbies. In recent years, he has looked to facilitate his interest in physical activity within his means and has taken up long distance running, which has culminated in Ed completing events such as 200km in 24 hours around county Roscommon. Ed credits his time away from the farm as a mental break and an opportunity to solve problems that arise within the farm gate. For more episodes from the Dairy Edge podcast go to the show page at: https://www.teagasc.ie/animals/dairy/the-dairy-edge-podcast/ The Dairy Edge is a co-production with LastCastMedia.com

Road Dog Podcast
178: Katie Asmuth is Committed to Being Her Best Self

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 103:04


“We're all people. All of us are struggling, no matter what. You can't get through this life without a challenge without a struggle right?” Katie Asmuth is a professional athlete who runs for Sacuony and is a nurse practitioner. She gives her thoughts on homelessness, becoming a brand ambassador, what gear she likes to use, her experience running Western States 100 and running with a tampon in her nose. Annalisa Romero is the marketing director for Fleet Feet Sacramento. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. XOSKIN show code: Road Dog Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.xoskin.us Allwedoisrun.com Coppercanyons.com Katie Asmuth Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/kt_runshappy/ Annalisa Romero Contact Info: Fleetfeetsacramento.com Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

Cultra Trail Running
159: Monkey Edit Madness

Cultra Trail Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 106:42


John, Paul, George and Ringo are here! This was the result of like 4 episodes being spliced together, sometimes live, sometimes later in the studio. All kinds of technical difficulties. Whatevs, warts and all. We talk fall marathon season, bad ultrarunning advice, being burned out, Art literally just leaves early, we do NO Patreon (sorry, give us money tho) and we deep dive and have a therapy session. Hartford Marathon results We're on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/44etXyR0WbJtmKRKrP7V6M We're on iTunes! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cultra-trail-running/id1446356779   Please support Cultra Trail Running Podcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/CultraTrailRunning Strava: https://www.strava.com/clubs/CULTRA Twitter: https://twitter.com/blueblazerunner Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cultratrailrunning/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CultraTrailRunning/ Call the Karaoke Line at 203-DOG GENT   Intro Guitar by Nick, Vocals Jack Byram, and beats Jack Sevigny beatstars.com/sev_beats

The Strength Running Podcast
217. 5 Tips for Your Debut Ultramarathon (with the hosts of Becoming Ultra's My First Ultra)

The Strength Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 78:43


Years ago I set out to run my first ultramarathon and DNFed. While it wasn't exactly the debut I had hoped for, my fascination with ultras only grew since then. I have interviewed numerous ultra runners to get their take on the demands of the sport and what drives them. You can listen to episodes with: Damian Hall Clare Gallagher Krissy Moehl Dean Karnazes Doug Hay On today's podcast, I'm sharing my tips to successfully training for and completing your first ultra. And next time around, I'll make sure to follow these suggestions myself! This episode is a repost from the My First Ultra show, part of the Becoming Ultra podcast, with Kris and Carly. I met them at the Rocky Mountain Trail Camp where we bonded over running, training, and of course, podcasting. This conversation is for aspiring ultra marathoners. After my own attempt, I have no delusions about the challenge that you'd be taking on! Links & Resources from the Show: Follow Becoming Ultra on Instagram See more on their website ITB Rehab Routine Standard Core Routine Check out Strength Running's training programs Thank You InsideTracker! Our show is supported by our longtime sponsor InsideTracker. Today, more than ever, it's essential that we're making the right decisions to keep our bodies healthy. To help us be resilient, prevent over-training, and optimize our running to get the most from it. InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood and DNA biomarkers along with your lifestyle habits to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. InsideTracker's patented system will transform your body's data into knowledge, insights, and a customized action plan of science-backed recommendations. The data can help you determine whether you're running too much, not enough, or have some other issues that could be affecting your recovery or performance. I've had my own blood drawn with InsideTracker several times and have been amazed at the valuable information that they provide. Not only are the results very detailed, but they also share guidance for how to improve any markers that are out of range. If you're ready to take control of your health and optimize your training, InsideTracker offers a selection of plans that best suit your needs with a limited time 25% discount. Thank you Elemental Labs! A big thanks to Elemental Labs for their support of this episode! They make electrolyte drinks for athletes and low-carb folks with no sugar, artificial ingredients, or colors. And you can get a free sampler pack of 4 flavors and 8 individual packets when you pay $5 in shipping. Elemental Labs' products have some of the highest sodium concentrations that you can find. Anybody who runs a lot knows that sodium, as well as other electrolytes like magnesium and potassium, are essential to our performance and how we feel throughout the day. The citrus flavor has quickly become my favorite. I'm drinking one a day now to help me get enough fluids in our dry Colorado air. It's tasty and delicious and I find that I'm not peeing every 45 minutes throughout the day, which might be an indication I wasn't eating enough sodium. There's now mounting evidence that higher sodium intake levels are not unhealthy – and athletes need substantially more than your typical sedentary person. Of course, ask your doctor if you're worried. But for those athletes running outside in the heat, an electrolyte replacement makes a lot of sense. They just released their first new flavor of 2021, their most requested flavor, watermelon salt. So check out Elemental Labs to try their new flavor or get a free sampler pack. 

Zero Excuses
Special Episode: 6 Business Lessons from Ultramarathons with Guest Casey Crouse

Zero Excuses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:08


Casey Crouse is an account manager at GadellNet. He's also on the Board of the Riley Children's Foundation, the founder of the New Shoe Day Foundation, an advocate for mental health—and an ultra-marathon runner. What a resume of experience!  In this episode, Nick and Casey mix things up by discussing six key takeaways they learned from running ultra marathons that apply to business and life.  Key Takeaways: Stress can be a good thing when applied appropriately Community can be the greatest cheerleader and motivator If you expect adversity, you'll never be surprised Things to Listen For: [01:41] Who is Casey? [03:28] The origin of the New Shoe Day Foundation [06:17] When stress can be a good thing [10:35] If you want to go far, do it together [14:44] Systems versus goals [22:40] Expect adversity [27:11] Focusing on the why  After You Listen: Connect with Casey: https://www.linkedin.com/in/casey-crouse-3572b023/ Connect with Nick: https://www.linkedin.com/in/smarrelli/ Learn more about GadellNet Consulting Services: https://gadellnet.com/

KoopCast
Potential Long Term Health Effects of Ultramarathon Running with Nick Tiller PhD | Koopcast Episode 98

KoopCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 70:02


Potential Long Term Health Problems Associated with Ultra-Endurance Running: A Narrative ReviewNick's interview on triathlete magazineNick's book- The Skeptic's Guide to Sports ScienceInformation on coaching-www.trainright.comKoop's Social Media-Twitter/Instagram- @jasonkoop

Der beVegt-Podcast
#290 - Ludwig Reicherstorfer, warum läufst du Ultramarathons?

Der beVegt-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 104:55


In Folge 290 des beVegt-Podcast sprechen wir mit Ludwig Reicherstorfer über seinen Weg vom Marathon- zum Ultramarathonläufer, vegane Ernährung und Politik. Shownotes: https://www.bevegt.de/ludwig-reicherstorfer-podcast-2021/ Alle Folgen: https://www.bevegt.de/podcasts/ Sponsor dieser Folge: BookBeat (hol dir dein 1 Monat Gratis-Premiumabo mit dem Gutscheincode "bevegt") Unterstütze uns: https://www.bevegt.de/unterstuetzen/

Uncorking a Story
J.M. Thompson

Uncorking a Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:01


When I was presented with the opportunity to interview J.M. Thompson about his memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, I sprinted to say yes for two reasons; I'm an avid runner and wanted to know what inspired the title and it deals with mental health issues, specifically men's mental health issues. A few years ago, my twin brother was suffering from anxiety, depression, and panic attacks. I'm not telling tales out of school here, he chronicled all of that in his own memoir. One of the hardest things I've ever had to do in my life was check him into the psychiatric hospital where he spent a long week of in-patient treatment followed by multiple weeks of outpatient treatment. It pained me to see this strong man, who I shared so many life experiences with, come to the brink of falling apart.  Even in this day and age, men's mental health is still very much a taboo subject given our sex's aversion to vulnerability. I hoped that by interviewing J.M. about his book, I wouldn't just leave with another powerful story but that I'd also help the cause to raise awareness of men's mental health issues in general. But enough about me.  You might be asking yourself who J.M. Thompson is. Well, I have answers. He was born in England and holds a BA in English literature from Oxford University and a doctorate in clinical psychology.  He completed his psychology training at the University of California, San Francisco, where he conducted research on the brain mechanisms of meditation and the physiology of trauma. He is also an ordained Zen practitioner and certified yoga teacher.  Critical to this story is the fact that he has finished over 40 ultramarathons, and multiple solo adventure runs in the Sierra Nevada, the Grand Canyon, and Death Valley. Thompson currently serves as a staff psychologist at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. His aforementioned memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, became available for sale as of October 5th.  Listen in as we uncover the emotionally charged story that is the genesis behind the book as well as how running helped J.M. turn his life around. This is a powerful story and one that I was honored to uncork. Please share it with anyone who you think could benefit from it. Happy listening!

Climb Your Mountain
Final Episode and My 3 Wishes for You

Climb Your Mountain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:15


Friends, I have some bittersweet news.After 74 episodes, the Climb Your Mountain Podcast is coming to an end.Yes, I was super surprised by it too. In this week's episode, I'll (briefly) share my reasons for winding down the show, what I'm up to next, and how to keep in touch.I'll also share the 3 "big ideas" I want you to remember from the podcast.If you can live by these 3 simple rules, I know you will live an amazing life of adventure!Thanks so much for your support of the podcast. I have had so much fun getting to know you and hope we can stay in touch.Read Detailed Show Notes At:https://missadventurepants.com/74Try breathwork free! Download a FREE guided breathwork sesson to help you heal faster after a tough workout:https://bit.ly/3Cn99cB

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
How Much Did Rescuing 87 Ultra Marathon Runner Cost Davis County Sheriff's Office?

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:42


Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Davis County SAR Helps Rescue Nearly 90 Ultra Marathon Runners

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:46


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jake Kilgore discusses the DC Peaks 50 ultra-marathon and the rescue forced by an untimely blizzard

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:42


Jake Kilgore discusses the DC Peaks 50 ultra-marathon and the weekend rescue that was forced by an untimely blizzard: 

PEOPLE Every Day
Why 87 runners were rescued from a Utah ultramarathon, plus an infectious disease expert answers all your COVID questions

PEOPLE Every Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:15


Kim Kardashian jokes about O.J. Simpson during her ‘SNL' hosting debut, Ben Affleck calls coronavirus the crisis of our time, and why 87 runners had to be rescued from a Utah mountainside. Plus, infectious disease specialist Dr. William Schaffner stops by the show to answer all your burning questions about COVID-19, including what you should know before you vaccinate your kids. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Dave and Dujanovic
What happened at Francis Peak? The race ending in search and rescue

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:04


Rainy, snowy Saturday. Shocking headline: 87 ultra marathoners missing near Francis Peak Davis/Morgan Counties had to be rescued by Davis Co SO. . D2 takes a Deep Dive into what went wrong and one thing that went right. The head of Davis County Search and Rescue calls in to share his experience with what happened.  Amy Donaldson shares her input followed by listener calls  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Road Dog Podcast
177: Confessions of Patrick Vaughan

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 97:14


“At the time I was embarrassed, like who wants to admit that they let themselves become a heroin addict.” Patrick Vaughan is a distance runner who completed the Triple Crown of distance running in 2018. He is currently starring in the film Confessions of a Runner, which details his 290 mile run on the Lebanon Mountain Trail, his addiction and overcoming it. Kroy Taughinbaugh from XO Skin also joins in on the conversation. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. XOSKIN show code: Road Dog Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.xoskin.us Squirrel's Nut Butter https://squirrelsnutbutter.com Orcutt Trails running event: https://www.active.com/santa-maria-ca/running/distance-running-races/orcutt-trails-5k-10k-21k-2021?int= Smvos.org Allwedoisrun.com Coppercanyons.com Patrick Vaughan Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/steep_running/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/SteepRunning Film FB: https://www.facebook.com/steepproductions Kroy Taughinbaugh Contact Info: kroy@xoskin.us Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

The Way of the Runner - conversations on running with Adharanand Finn
How Robbie Britton helped me run 24 hours around a track

The Way of the Runner - conversations on running with Adharanand Finn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 85:11


Host Adharanand Finn has some big news to share about his next book, which leads him to take on a 24-hour track race, with some help from top ultra runner and coach Robbie Britton. Music: Starfrosch

Persistent Running
Annika Brubaker, Ultra Marathon Mother Runner

Persistent Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:41


Today we finally get to chat with Annika Brubaker, a certified running coach and ultra marathoner, about her recent ultra marathon this spring. She breaks down the race for us, gives us insight in how training for a ultra marathon works with young kids, and shares her best tips for successfully chasing after hard goals!  You can find more about Annika, here on her debut episode. You can also connect with Annika, on her Instagram.  Interested to learn more about Persistent Running run coaching? Find out all the details at Persistentrunning.com and follow coach Bethany on her Instagram and coach Brittani on her Instagram.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bethany-thompson7/support

Climb Your Mountain
Hydration Hacks to Double Your Endurance

Climb Your Mountain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:59


A whole podcast about hydration? That's not a very sexy topic, you might be thinking.What if I told you that proper hydration could boost your endurance by 50%?Imagine going twice as long and feeling strong without grueling workouts.Yes, it really gets to be that simple.But the funny thing is, pretty much every hiker I know is walking around semi-dehydrated. And that is not the fate I want for you!So this week on the podcast, we're talking about how to hydrate before, during, and after a hike.I'll also share the skinny on electrolytes and sports drinks.And you'll get my best tips on hydration system gear.When you put these simple tips into practice, you won't believe how good you feel out there.Ready? Let's do this!Read Detailed Show Notes At:https://missadventurepants.com/73Try breathwork free! Download a FREE guided breathwork sesson to help you heal faster after a tough workout:https://bit.ly/3Cn99cB

Trail to 100
Eliminate Stress-Crimson Canyon Ultra

Trail to 100

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 28:59


Panic Attack: a sudden feeling of acute and disabling anxiety, sometimes so severe that one might believes they are about to die. Melody experienced her first panic attack this year in a tent after a series of stressful circumstances. Unfortunately, her training was affected by all the stressors in her life and she has taken a few steps back in her training (well, atleast physcailly...She has grown in understanding and mental toughness, that's for sure!) Melody shares what she has learned through her experiences this year and how her run at the Crimson Canyon Ultras taught her an important lesson about eliminating stress!Ways you can eliminate stress:-Quit your job (no seriously, if it's not the right fit for you, find something else!)-Turn off stats on your watch (HR, VO2 max, performance condition (garmin) )-Run by feel - Don't forget what it's like to ENJOY running. If you find yourself starting to dread your runs, that is a sign of burn out!-RECOVER! Take breaks and make sure you are getting enough sleep! Mike Mcknight suggests a 6mo off season and a 6mo on season.-Realize that life is going to happen and have faith that when set backs happen, you will come back strongerJacob placed 5th in the 25k Crimson Canyon Ultra. Time: 2:54:46 Melody placed 5th in the Women 25k (19th overall). Time: 3:37:43*Crimson Canyon Ultra Stats:-50k (5048v), 25k (3104v), 10k (1220v)-Richfield UtahLearn more here:http://www.crimsoncanyons.com/Learn more about Mike Mcknight @thelowcarbrunnerWatch his inspiring documentary here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EwWYa74__o

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast
14 Essential Tips When Traveling for a Destination Race

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:27


#68 - You know the feeling. You have exhausted every option within a 50-mile radius. Every year, it's the same races and the same places. It always feels like you are running a marathon or half marathon. All those miles, all the hard work, seems like it deserves something more than a trip to your local park or recreation center. It is time for a new challenge with some new scenery.There is no better way to do this than to reward yourself with a destination race and vacation.Every year, millions of runners take their love for the sport to new heights with this combination. By simultaneously travelling and racing, runners have found a unique way to vacation along with a new way to feed their passion for running. We will take a look at this popular pastime and provide you with the best tips to have a great destination race.

Road Dog Podcast
175: Jaala Shaw Never Quits

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 105:23


“When you push yourself beyond where you went before and you keep on going, that's success.” Jaala Shaw served in the Peace Core, used to own a cross fit gym, and currently is an educator and teacher who used to work for the State Department. Learn all about a Go Ruck race and her attempts at Go Ruck Selection. Hear her thoughts on Afghanistan where she spent some time teraching. Luis is joined by guest host Rob DeCou. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. HAMMER NUTRITION show code: Roaddoglistener Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.hammernutrition.com DRYMAX show code: Roaddog2020  Listeners get a special 15% off at https://www.drymaxsports.com/products/ Allwedoisrun.com Coppercanyons.com Jaala Shaw Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/fliesonawall/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/dropbydropfitness/ Website: https://www.dropbydropfitness.com/about Go Ruck Website: https://www.goruck.com YT: https://www.youtube.com/user/GORUCKTV Rob DeCou Contact Info: Website: gorobgo.org Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com

The Pyllars Podcast with Dylan Bowman
Taggart VanEtten | Force of Nature

The Pyllars Podcast with Dylan Bowman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 70:17


Taggart Van Etten is an ultrarunner from Illinois. He made a name for himself at the Tunnelhill 100 in 2019 where he ran an astonishing 12:19 -- one of the fastest 100 mile debuts ever. A short time later he smashed the 100 mile world record on a treadmill, recording an insane 11:32. Taggart is an extremely hardworking and talented athlete and he has a crazy bright future in the sport.   Follow Taggart on Twitter   Follow Taggart on IG   Follow Taggart on Strava   _________________________   Pyllars Links: App Download | Patreon | Instagram | Website | YouTube   Dylan Links: Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn | Strava

Ali on the Run Show
423. Courtney Dauwalter, 2021 UTMB Winner

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 60:22


“I was doing everything I could, every section that I was coming upon. So in my head it was like, if I'm doing as best I can and I get caught and passed, then that's just how it played out, and I'm gonna cheer that person on who's passing me because that's cool, and that's how we get better together.” Last month, Courtney Dauwalter defended — and reclaimed — her title at the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc 106.5-mile race, and smashed records along the way. She broke the all-time women's course record by seven minutes, finishing in 22 hours 30 minutes and 54 seconds. She beat her 2019 winning time by two hours and two minutes, finished sixth overall (the highest finish ever by a woman), and won the women's division by more than an hour and a half. On this episode, Courtney talks about this year's UTMB experience, describing the sights (and hallucinations), sounds, highs (more than 32,800 feet of climbing!), lows, and views (of France, Italy, and Switzerland) along the way. Plus, in true Courtney fashion, we laugh a lot and talk about candy. If you're looking for a conversation that's equal parts fun, silly, inspiring, and encouraging, this is it. SPONSOR: goodr. Click here and use code ONTHERUN15 for 15% off your entire goodr order! What you'll get on this episode: A day in the life of Courtney Dauwalter (2:00) What do the numbers and stats mean to Courtney? (5:00) Courtney reflects on having to drop out of the Hardrock 100 earlier this summer (6:45) Courtney's goals for UTMB, and how she would grade her performance (12:30) How Courtney was feeling on race day (16:30) Courtney breaks down the race (19:45) Hallucination stories! And when things started to hurt (32:20) What Courtney listens to on the run (34:40) Marriage talk (41:00) How Courtney celebrated her UTMB win (44:00) What's next? (50:25) Candy talk! (53:00) Check out: Courtney Dauwalter on Episode 302 of the Ali on the Run Show Follow Courtney: Instagram @courtneydauwalter Twitter @courtdauwalter Facebook Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!