Podcasts about Metropolitan

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  • 863PODCASTS
  • 2,137EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Metropolitan

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Latest podcast episodes about Metropolitan

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views
Let's Go The Flyers! (PST Show #433)

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 61:44


What we're throwing down on the Table this week is a great discussion and interview with Kelly Hinkle from BroadStreetHockey.com and the BSH Radio podcast for some early Flyers season talk. There's a lot of hope for loyal Flyers fans about where this team can go this season. We got into it this week with Kelly!But first, MLB's collective bargaining agreement is slated to expire December 1st. We talked about the implications of a lockout and what this could mean for the Phillies. (approx. 9:55)We then turned our attention to the Philadelphia Eagles, Lane Johnson's return, Nick Sirianni's coaching ability, Carson Wentz's season that will hopefully yield more assets in the future, and our scoring predictions for this week's Eagles vs. Raiders game. (approx. 16:55)We certainly needed to get into the drama and news surrounding this Sixers team as well since Ben Simmons has now been suspended for a game, and how this early season may look. (approx. 31:25)What we threw down on the Table was a fantastic discussion with Kelly Hinkle from Broad Street Hockey about this early Flyers season and the hope of a different kind of defensive structure along with players who are hungry to get back to the playoffs. Concerns and excitement with this team were discussed at length! All of this and much more during our discussion with Kelly! (approx. 42:40)Head over to our website for all of our podcasts and more: philadelphiasportstable.com.Follow the guys on Twitter:Jeff Warren: @Jeffrey_WarrenLen Hunsicker: @LenHunsickerErik Leonard: @BrickPolittFollow the show on Instagram: instagram.com/philadelphiasportstable"Like" our Facebook Page: facebook.com/PhiladelphiaSportsTable

The Sacramentalists
Interview with Archbishop Mark Haverland

The Sacramentalists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:43


On today's episode we interview the Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Anglican Catholic Church, the Most Reverend Mark Haverland, about universal salvation. You can send your feedback and questions to thesacramentalists@gmail.com or reach out to us on Twitter @sacramentalists. If you want to dive deeper and enjoy dialoguing with others about content on the Sacramentalists, check out our Facebook discussion group here. Be sure to join our Communion of Patreon Saints for only $5 a month!

WagerTalk Podcast
Puck Time | NHL Picks, Predictions and Odds | NHL Betting Preview for October 18

WagerTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:49


NHL Picks and Predictions for Monday, October 18: The Seattle Kraken kick off a Metropolitan back-to-back tonight at Philadelphia. Can the newcomers continue their nice start to the season with some success against the Flyers and Devils? Join Carmine Bianco and Andrew McInnis for Monday's edition of Puck Time as our panel of professional hockey handicappers break down tonight's NHL betting slate.#NHL | #Hockey | #PuckTimeMonday's Featured NHL Games:Introduction 00:00Toronto Maple Leafs vs New York Rangers 05:00Philadelphia Flyers vs Seattle Kraken 11:35Calgary Flames vs Anaheim Ducks 15:50Arizona Coyotes vs St Louis Blues 22:40Show Best Bets 30:40

Box Press
How Ferio Tego Cigars are Like Your Favorite Song (Feat. Michael Herklots) | Box Press Ep. 49

Box Press

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:49


Ferio Tego is like a greatest hits album for cigar lovers. All your favorites, less of the “something new we're working on and we hope you like it” smokes. Learn why there's room in your humidor for oldies-but-goodies and hot-new-hits. Ferio Tego's Herklots joined Boveda's Rob Gagner at 2021 PCA in Las Vegas for this episode of Box Press, the cigar lifestyle podcast. Metropolitan and Timeless cigars are alive today because of Herklots and his business partner Brendon Scott. When the now-defunct Nat Sherman International closed, the two former employees started a cigar company with saved legacy brands and cigar accessories and two new blends, Elegancia and Generoso. Highlights of the cigar conversation with Herklots include: 6:00 Getting a job at a tobacco shop to pay for his cigar hobby 8:01 Succeeding at work is doing more than your job 13:30 Wearing a guayabera and Panama hat while standing in the middle of a tobacco field smelling green leaves is not him 15:50 Comparing wine to cigars 19.50 Learning how to blend a cigar 22:28 Blending the Quesada 35th 25:31 Smoking unfermented tobacco in a cigar 47:29 Growing popularity of “meme” cigars 1:01:13 Listening to a favorite song is like smoking a legacy cigar You can protect your cigars just like cigars makers. Preserve your passion with Boveda, makers of 2-way humidity control for cigars, easy seasoning for wood humidors, humidor bags and one-step hygrometer calibration kits. Shop Boveda for cigars here: https://store.bovedainc.com/collections/boveda-for-tobacco Learn more about Ferio Tego Cigars at https://www.feriotego.com/ How to Properly Cut a Cigar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2tim4FS2VA&t=229s A conversation with the son of Davidoff's Master Blender (feat. Klaas Kelner) | Box Press Ep. 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m35N6fV_6Vg&t=3s For My Humidor | Manuel Quesada (patriarch of Quesada Cigars) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JR8Gkx47YQQ&t=10s

HeirHeads
Better Than A Guinness, Better Than A W*nk

HeirHeads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:29


Move over, Greta Thunberg: the Queen's giving world leaders both barrels this week for their inaction on the climate crisis (or so commentators would have you believe). Prince William also has words to say about carbon emissions from flights — just not his own — while the Metropolitan police drop their investigation into Prince Andrew. Plus, we discuss two Diana biopics: Pablo Larrain's Spencer, starring Kristen Stewart, and Diana the Musical, Netflix's filmed version of the Broadway show.Spencer: 20.40Diana the Musical: 42.10Support us on Kofi: https://ko-fi.com/heirheadsShop our merch: https://heirheads.co.uk/

Dream Chasers Radio
Michael “The Metropolitan Cowboy” Coleman - Amazing talent and new song

Dream Chasers Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 17:00


https://seeyourshadow.com/ Michael “The Metropolitan Cowboy” Coleman Songwriter, producer, photographer, filmmaker Artistic Director Michael Coleman has a proven track record that his creativity is endless.  As the head of See Your Shadow Songwriting, Michael has been responsible for bringing a multitude of projects to life spanning all genres and media.  His work has been featured in film, television and sporting events and Michael has been profiled and featured on radio stations both nationally and internationally. Michael is an award winning songwriter, with five international iTunes Number 1s to his credit. Click below to learn more about the man known as “The Metropolitan Cowboy”.

Aria Code
Blanchard's Fire Shut Up in My Bones: A Boy of Peculiar Grace

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:30


This week we're decoding with the man who wrote the code - Terence Blanchard, composer of Fire Shut Up in My Bones. Not only is it the work that reopened the Met after its 18-month pandemic shutdown, but it's also the first opera by a Black composer ever to be performed there. Based on the 2014 memoir of the same name by New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow, Fire Shut Up in My Bones is a coming-of-age story about his childhood in a tiny town in northwest Louisiana.  From a young age, Charles knew he was different, not like his brothers or the other boys. After being sexually assaulted by his older cousin, he was consumed by shame, and especially when he began to feel attraction toward boys as well as girls. The South was not the place to be questioning one's sexual identity as a Black man in the 1970s and 80s. But in the aria “Peculiar Grace,” he puts his questions aside and looks forward to a brighter future. Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the experience of feeling like an outsider, and the life-changing path toward self-acceptance. Composer Terence Blanchard is a multiple Grammy-winning composer and jazz trumpeter. Fire Shut Up In My Bones is his second opera, and it premiered at Opera Theatre of St. Louis in 2019. He has scored countless films, and is known for his many collaborations with the film director Spike Lee, including most recently Da 5 Bloods and BlacKkKlansman. Each was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Score. He credits his father for his love of opera, and he has a particular fondness for Puccini's La bohème. Baritone Will Liverman is singing the role of Charles in the Met's production of Fire Shut Up In My Bones. While he was sitting on his couch during the pandemic, wondering if he'd ever get to sing in front of an audience again, he was invited to send an audition tape and landed the role just a few days later. Will has collaborated with D.J. and artist K-Rico to create The Factotum, a contemporary  adaptation of Rossini's The Barber of Seville for the Lyric Opera of Chicago. He is an alumnus of the Ryan Opera Center at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Dr. E. Patrick Johnson is an artist, writer, and professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern, where he is also the Dean of the School of Communication. He is the author and editor of several award-winning books, including Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South. His research for the book included dozens of interviews with men who were born, raised, and still live in the South, and he later adapted it into a staged-reading, Pouring Tea, as well as a full-length play and a documentary. He has received multiple awards both for his scholarship and his stage work.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
NHL Season Preview For All 32 Teams | Hockey Gambling Podcast (Ep. 1)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 99:05


The boys start out their NHL preview with the Atlantic Division, featuring a clear top four and bottom four teams. After that are the two best divisions in the league, the Central and Metropolitan. Both of those divisions have several teams that could make the playoffs –– and make a run. The guys break down each team and give their picks for who will make it out of those gauntlet divisions. Finally, they finish out with the Pacific Division, the weakest in the league beyond the Vegas Golden Knights. Atlantic Division - 00:02:18 Central Division - 00:29:15 Metropolitan Division - 00:51:36 Pacific Division - 01:11:50 Stanley Cup Predictions - 01:32:43 Download the SGPN APP today https://sgpn.app and leave us a rating & review. Support for this episode - WynnBet | PropSwap.com code “SGP” | Prediction Strike code SGPN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) PAOLO SZOT

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


“All the themes are very contemporary. I think what moves this story is the search for instantaneous celebrity. That's what the girls are all about, Roxie and Velma. They want to be famous. Of course everything that you cited, corruption, crimes, the press focusing on sensational stories–it's all there. And I think that's why the public relates so much to it.”Paulo Szot won the Tony as Best Leading Actor in a Musical for his Broadway debut at Emile de Becque in the 2008 Tony-winning revival of South Pacific. This performance also netted him Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, and Theatre World awards. Szot's opera credits include performances at the Metropolitan, Scala di Milano, Paris Opera, Carnegie Hall, and others. He's currently starring as Billy Flynn in Chicago, the longest-running American musical in Broadway history.· chicagothemusical.com· chicagothemusical.com/cast/#cast-gallery-3 · www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast

Paulo Szot won the Tony as Best Leading Actor in a Musical for his Broadway debut at Emile de Becque in the 2008 Tony-winning revival of South Pacific. This performance also netted him Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, and Theatre World awards. Szot's opera credits include performances at the Metropolitan, Scala di Milano, Paris Opera, Carnegie Hall, and others. He's currently starring as Billy Flynn in Chicago, the longest-running American musical in Broadway history.· chicagothemusical.com· chicagothemusical.com/cast/#cast-gallery-3 · www.creativeprocess.info

ScuttlePuck NHL Hockey Podcast
Episode Tyler Johnson (361): Metro Preview with Jeff DeAngelis of Broadstreet Bully Podcast plus Central Division Preview.

ScuttlePuck NHL Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:42


The NHL preseason has wrapped up and it's time to finish our divisional predictions. Jeff DeAngelis of the Broadstreet Bully Podcast joins us to tell us what to expect from the Flyers and make predictions for the Metropolitan division. We then finish things up with Central division predictions. Listen Here:  iTunes  Google Play  Stitcher  Direct MP3   iHeart Radio Banter: Happy Thanksgiving Title Player Tyler Johnson News: No contract for Brady Tkachuk Mika Zibanejad - 8 x $8.5MM Leafs and Senators will play to full stadiums Jeff DeAngelis previews the Flyers and gives Metro division predictions Guess the 5th Central Predictions  

Hockey Central @ Noon
Are The Devils A Team On The Rise?

Hockey Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:32


Jeff chats with Jim “Boomer” Gordon from NHL Network Radio about where teams slot in the Metropolitan division and reaction to the Mika Zibanejad deal (0:39). Devils GM Tom Fitzgerald talks about where he saw his team when he took over the job and where they are at right now (16:07). Sportsnet 650's Joey Kenward […]

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
Susegad - The Goan Life

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:02


Did you know?There's a concept called 'Susegad' in Goa and this is a way of life that Goa is famous for. It is this chilled and relaxed vibe, a laidback attitude that has existed in this region. The word 'Susegad' comes from the Portuguese word 'Sossegado' which means 'quiet'. In this episode of #TheHabitCoach, Ashdin Doctor talks about an interesting ideology from Goan culture called 'Susegad'. He explains the concept of Susegad and how it is existing in the region. Further, Ashdin describes how modern-day life is taking over this ideology and shares an interesting habit of how to slow down and cherish the real moments. Tune in to this awesome episode to understand how fast life can slow us down. Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 Habit Coach app: ( https://bit.ly/2XTBvfC )Website: Awesome180 ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Hockey Central @ Noon
Is the Metro the toughest division in the NHL?

Hockey Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:38


Jeff chats with Rick Tocchet about getting into the Flyers Hall of Fame and how difficult the Metropolitan division might be (1:30). Penguins President of Hockey Ops Brian Burke gives his take on his team after getting an offseason to evaluate (21:27). Islanders defenseman Zdeno Chara explains his decision to sign in New York and his relationship with the […]

Hockey Hound Show
Divisions Breakdown 1 of 2

Hockey Hound Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:26


Today we go over the Atlantic and Metropolitan divisions. We look to see how some teams have gotten better, some teams have new faces, and where we can expect them to be at the end of the season. Love hockey? Check out our website www.officialhockeyhound.com for articles from your favorite teams and more! Give the hosts a follow on Twitter: @hockeyhoundshow @MikePrE57 @MateoRyback

IE Sports Radio
Neutral Zone Episode 3: Robin Lehner and the Eastern Conference

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:35


Robin Lehner dropped some BOMBS over the weekend! AreNHL teams giving away medications? Zach and Adam will talk about that plus all things mental health in the NHL. Then, we'll preview the Eastern Conference, Zach taking the Atlantic and Adam the Metropolitan. Who looks poised to take the Prince of Wales Cup?

Standard Issue Podcast
SIM Ep 553 Pod 174: NDAs, Antigone and – shit me! – it's David Bowie

Standard Issue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 80:37


The use, or rather mis-use, of non-disclosure agreements is rife in all sorts of nefarious dealings. Zelda Perkins, former assistant to Harvey Weinstein and the first to break her NDA with him, and Julie Macfarlane, a law professor who took on the Anglican Church, want to change that and they chat to Mick about their new campaign, Can't Buy My Silence. Julie also has a book decoding the well-worn methods used by church, school and state to silence survivors, from first reporting to cross-examination to NDAs, and Going Public: A Survivor's Journey From Grief to Action is available here. Meanwhile, Jen chats to actor and playwright Merlynn Tong about her adaptation of Antigone, and why she's written Creon as a woman, while in Jenny Off The Blocks, she's asking can women have it all, and looking to Premier League referee Mark Clattenburg for the answers. No, really.In the Bush Telegraph, we're wondering if flagging down a bus is really the answer to institutionalised sexism in the Metropolitan police. Plus, please imagine our best Blue Steel, as in Rated or Dated we watch cameo-tastic 2001 male model comedy, Zoolander.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/standardissuespodcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Six O'Clock News
05/10/2021 The Home Secretary has announced inquiry into how Sarah Everard's killer was allowed to serve in the Met police

Six O'Clock News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:35


The Home Secretary has announced an inquiry into how Sarah Everard's killer was allowed to serve as a Metropolitan police officer - despite concerns about his behaviour.

The Backcheck
The Backcheck Ep. 52: Lehner Sheds Light, Division Predictions, Special Guest Alexis Downie

The Backcheck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 55:26


We are almost a week away from the start of the NHL season. The main storyline is Robin Lehner and his willingness to speak out against NHL teams and the league in regards to behind the scene issues. Brendan and Stefen give their predictions on each division. Alexis Downie, host of NHL Ice Breakers, joins the show to give her take on Lehner, her start to her hockey career, how to grow the women's game and more!

Champion's Mojo
Desmond Dunham: Succeeding Against the Odds, Episode #129, 10-05-2021

Champion's Mojo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 47:31


How has adversity inspired your success?Renowned cross-country coach Desmond Dunham, known to his athletes as Coach Dez, joins the podcast to talk with Kelly and Maria about how he turned pain in his childhood into a passion for mentorship. He talks about the lessons in his new book, Running Against the Odds, and how coaching is one way he gives back to the community.  Sign up for your free consultation on health, leadership and life coaching with Kelly or Maria at ChampionsMojo.com/cm-coaching.Catch up on EVERY episode at ChampionsMojo.com.MORE ABOUT DESMOND DUNHAMDesmond Dunham, or as he's known to many, Coach Dez, is a nationally-renowned running coach, mentor, Under Armour Coach Ambassador and the author of the newly released book, Running Against the Odds. Coach Dez is a nationally acclaimed track and field and cross-country coach who has been teaching, mentoring and coaching in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan area for over two decades. He's also the founder of Kids Elite Sports which offers summer sports camp and youth sports training. This camp has positively affected nearly 800 students.Episode Topics and MentionsCross country runningCoachingKids Elite SportsRunning Against the Odds by Desmond DunhamVietnam WarPTSDDomestic violenceSpeech impedimentDyslexiaEndorphinsSerotoninHoward UniversityMentorshipAlcoholismGary, IndianaLittle League BaseballThe steel industrySouth AfricaBronchitisApartheidTakeawaysKellyGoals need a plan to be successful. There is a place for wishing -- but goals need actual planning to come to fruition.“Anti-influencers” can inspire us to do the opposite of what they do and inspire us to positively change the world.MariaFollow your passion, even if it leads somewhere that doesn't seem as shiny as another option. Failure can be a great teacher and inspire later successes. Quote of the Week“You can find something that can be your passion, your outlet, that can give you a lot of fuel so that you can have maximum output in everything else that you do.” -- Desmond DunhamSubscribe to the Champion's Mojo podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Play.Have something you want to share with us? Email it to hello@championsmojo.com.

The 4th Line Hockey Podcast
Episode #349 - The 2021 NHL Metropolitan Division Preview

The 4th Line Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 63:27


We are one week away from the start of the NHL season! "All or Nothing", the Toronto Maple Leafs docuseries, is out and Nick has strong reasons to believe that Paul MacLean is the hero we all need. Robin Lehner dropped news this week of rumored drug treatment around the league. Everyone from Alain Vigneault to Gary Bettman had something to say. Is it done yet? Elias Pettersson and Quinn Hughes signed extensions with the Vancouver Canucks. Were they team or player friendly? It's prime to preview our most difficult division: The Metro! Can the Hurricanes "defend" the title of best team in the division? Will the Pittsburgh Penguins and Washington Capitals start their climb down the mountain? Is Dougie Hamilton enough for the New Jersey Devils to challenge for a playoff spot? Will the new regime and Gerard Gallant in New York help or hurt the Rangers? All this and more on episode 349 of the 4th Line Hockey Podcast! Twitter: twitter.com/4thLinePodcast Facebook: facebook.com/the4thlinepodcast Email: mail@the4thlinepodcast.com Intro music by Erik Hall of Ane Croft Jingles by Scotty Hicks of Hunker Down, on Twitter at @rapidonian anecroftmusic.bandcamp.com/releases Part of Full Press Radio

Gore and Guilty
Episode 33 - Sarah Everard

Gore and Guilty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:56


In this week's episode, we have decided to cover a topical and current case. Sarah Everard's killing rocked the whole of the UK. The reason? Sarah's killer: Wayne Couzens, was a serving police officer in the Metropolitan police. We talk through the horrific crime and how the police missed several opportunities to identify Couzens as an evil monster while he worked for the police. There's a general trigger warning for this episode. Every crime we cover is tragic but there's something particularly unsettling about this one.

Witness History
London's first black policeman

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 10:10


Norwell Roberts joined the Metropolitan police in 1967. He was put forward as a symbol of progressive policing amid ongoing tensions between the police and ethnic minorities in the capital. But behind the scenes, Norwell endured years of racist abuse from colleagues within the force. Norwell Roberts spoke to Alex Last about growing up in Britain and his determination to be a pioneer in the police. (Photo: London's first black policeman PC Norwell Roberts beginning his training with colleagues at Hendon Police College, London, 5 April 1967. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The Cross-Check NHL Show
MacKenzie Blackwood unvaccinated, UHL racism, and the Cross-Check Summer Crossover with Chris Micieli and Jesse Granger

The Cross-Check NHL Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:31


On this episode of The Cross-Check NHL Show, Andrew Berkshire and Mary Clarke discuss the ramifications of MacKenzie Blackwood's status as the only unvaccinated player of the New Jersey Devils. With the Metropolitan so skilled, it may be hard for the Devils to make the playoffs if they miss their starting goaltender for any length of time. Next, hockey culture rears its ugly head once more after a shocking incident involving players in the Ukrainian Hockey League.  And finally, the Cross-Check Summer Crossover ends with interviews with Chris Micieli of Locked On Avalanche and Jesse Granger of The Athletic, who previews the Vegas Golden Knights upcoming season. You can find previews of all 32 NHL teams on The Cross-Check NHL Show over the last eight weeks. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Saint of the Day
Our Father among the Saints Michael, Metropolitan of Kiev (992)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 1:57


When Prince Vladimir, Equal to the Apostles (July 15), received holy Baptism, he sent an embassy to Constantinople asking that clergy be sent to enlighten the Russian land and to establish Christ's Church there. Patriarch Nicolas II Chrysoberges (December 16) appointed Michael, a wise and blameless bishop, to be Metropolitan of Russia. Saint Michael traveled to Kiev with six bishops and a large number of clergy to aid him in his daunting work. He began by baptising the Prince's family and the nobles of Kiev. Prince Vladimir used his authority to have the pagan idols pulled down, and enjoined all the people to accept Baptism. Thus the people of Kiev gathered en masse on the banks of the Dnieper and were baptized by the Metropolitan and his clergy, establishing Kiev as the first Christian city in Russia. Paganism was deeply entrenched everywhere in this wild land, and the proclamation of the Gospel was difficult and dangerous. Nonetheless, the holy Metropolitan in his own lifetime was able to cast down the idols in Novgorod and Rostov and establish the Church there.   Metropolitan Michael reposed in peace in 992, having planted in Russia the seeds of Russian Orthodoxy, which in coming generations would become the very soul of the Russian people. His relics were found to be incorrupt in the twelfth century and were translated to the Monastery of the Kiev Caves.

Front & Nationwide
Previewing the Metropolitan Division for the 2021-22 NHL season

Front & Nationwide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 30:21


As Alison bids farewell in her final episode as co-host of the podcast, she and Aaron discuss the Metropolitan Division and how they think the standings will shake out. Who do they have winning the division? Where do the Blue Jackets fit in? Join The Athletic's official fantasy hockey pool on OfficePools.com: http://www.officepools.com/invite/classic/m/HAFE2H6Q Save 50% on an annual subscription to The Athletic: theathletic.com/frontandnationwide Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aria Code
Verdi's Nabucco: By the Rivers of Babylon

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 44:01


Psalm 137 depicts the ancient Hebrews, enslaved and weeping “by the rivers of Babylon,” as they remember their homeland, Jerusalem. Those words have inspired songwriters of reggae, Broadway, disco, folk and more, but one of the most memorable versions is featured in Giuseppe Verdi's opera Nabucco. The opera retells the story of the Babylonian captivity when Nebuchadnezzar (or Nabucco, in Italian) seizes Jerusalem, destroys the temple, and enslaves the Israelites in his kingdom. At the heart of the opera is “Va, pensiero,” also known as the Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves, in which the Israelites yearn for their lost home.  It's this yearning for home by those exiled from their homeland, and of refugees trying to build a new identity in a new land, that has helped make Verdi's first big hit resonate far beyond the opera house since its premiere. Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the experience of refugees and immigrants, the significance of memory and community, and the power of 100 voices joined in song. Donald Palumbo has been the chorus master at the Met Opera for 15 years. He can remember almost every time he has ever performed “Va, pensiero,” and usually ends up standing in the wings just to listen to it. He previously was the chorus master at the Lyric Opera of Chicago, and has taught at Juilliard since 2016.  Professor Mark Burford is a musicologist at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. He specializes in 19th-century Austro-German music, and twentieth century African American music, and is the author of the award-winning book Mahalia Jackson and the Black Gospel Field.  He previously taught at the Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall, Columbia University, and City College of New York. Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg is the Scholar in Residence at the National Council of Jewish Women. She writes books about the messy business of trying to be a person in the world, and about how spirituality can transform that work. She is the author of seven books, including Nurture the Wow and Surprised by God. She's been named one of the top 50 most influential women rabbis. Roya Hakakian is an Iranian Jewish writer and the author of two volumes of poetry in Persian. Her family was exiled from Iran following the 1979 revolution, after which they lived as refugees in Europe for a year before immigrating to the United States. Her most recent book is A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious. 

Claibs Online
Metropolitan Report

Claibs Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 15:10


Jay Randolph Jr and Curt discuss the Amateur Series, Ellen Port and the Metro Trip to Streamsong Resort in Florida.

The Hockey News Podcast
2021-22 Metropolitan Division Preview

The Hockey News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 60:48


This week on The Hockey News Podcast, with senior writers Ryan Kennedy and Matt Larkin: It's our 2021-22 Metropolitan Division Preview. We break down the Carolina Hurricanes, Columbus Blue Jackets, Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, New Jersey Devils, New York Islanders, New York Rangers and Washington Capitals as follows: - Predicted place in standings - Likes - Dislikes - Overall outlook if a fan of that team stopped us in the street Plus, listener mailbag questions and more!

The Money Show
RMI rockets amid plans to unbundle Discovery and Momentum Metropolitan stakes. UK ‘red list' travel ban is damaging South Africa

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 79:43


Herman Bosman, CEO of Rand Merchant Investment Holdings (RMI) discusses the company's plan to unbundle its shares in Discovery and Momentum Metropolitan to focus on their short-term insurance business. Experts discuss how South Africa still being in the UK's red list will affect the tourism sector. And founder of Bathu, Theo Baloyi talks about his entrepreneurial journey and his relationship with money See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On the Bench with Beeks
Episode 74. Major Division Breakdown! ft. Nick Adams

On the Bench with Beeks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 78:29


This week the boys on the Bench breakdown division by division in the NHL! Nick Adams hops on the mic to help the boys crack this gigantic nutshell. Join these brave men as they trek through the Pacific, Central, Metropolitan and Atlantic divisions of the NHL. They mark down the most/least improved, dark horse contenders and obviously who will be the top Dawg! And Dave Zamboni is back with another killer segment of Dave's Zambonis! ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ Song: My Back Hurts⁣ Artist: The Zambonis ⁣ Album: Chippy Sessions ⁣ ⁣ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/onthebenchwithbeeks/support

Aria Code
Once More Into the Breeches: Joyce DiDonato Sings Strauss

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 32:25


The young Composer in Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos is one of opera's great trouser roles -- a female singer playing the part of a young man.  He is set to premiere his new opera at the home of the richest man in Vienna, only to learn moments before the performance that a bawdy comedy troupe will be performing at the same time.  As his plans collapse around him, the Composer falls in love with Zerbinetta, the leader of the commedia dell'arte troupe, and his whole world changes in a flash. In his aria “Sein wir wieder gut,” he sings about how he now sees everything with new eyes. Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the transformational power of love, music and putting on a pair of pants. The Guests Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato is a multi Grammy Award-winner and a fierce advocate for the arts. She's also kind of a hero, bringing her talents to classrooms, prisons, and refugee camps, and sharing the transformative power of music. She loves playing trouser roles, and finds singing the Composer in particular to be an experience of discovery and total joy.  Writer Paul Thomason is a die-hard Strauss fan and is writing a book about the composer. He sees Strauss as the great humanist among composers, because he presents his characters exactly as they are. He studied conducting and worked with maestros Thomas Schippers and Peter Maag. He has also appeared on the Met Opera's intermission quizzes during their Saturday broadcasts. Mo B. Dick is a founding father of the drag king movement. He started performing in drag in 1995 and founded Club Cassanova, the first weekly party dedicated to drag kings, and has made appearances in movies and television. He is also one of the cofounders of the website dragkinghistory.com, which archives the history of drag kings and crossdressers dating all the way back to the Tang dynasty.

A2D Radio
2021 NHL METROPOLITAN DIVISION PREVIEW & PREDICTIONS | The Hockey Happy Hour

A2D Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 159:45


It's Time for the Division that houses our beloved Philadelphia Flyers!!! The most intense & worst division to compete for the playoffs in the NHL. Yes ladies and gentlemen tonight live at 9 on a2dradio.com, Matt, Brian & Rob dive into the Metropolitan Division. What will we see, The Flyers making the playoffs keeping the pattern of “in and out” going, Will the Rangers & Devils take the next step in rebuilding, Will the Capitals & Penguins finally take that massive step back and miss the playoffs? Join us for all those answers and more.

Post to Post Podcast
Post to Post Podcast Ep.41: Metropolitan Division Breakdown

Post to Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 61:28


Welcome to another episode of the Post to Post Podcast! This week we break down the Metropolitan Division and what the teams will look like coming into this next season along with David Backes announcing his retirement and some talk about a crazy team that existed called the Danbury Trashers!

Saint of the Day
St Maxim (Sandovich), martyr of Lemkos, Czechoslovakia (1914) (August 24 OC)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 3:47


St Maxim was born in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1888. At this time all Orthodox Churches had been captured and subjected to the "Unia," by which, though keeping the Orthodox liturgical rites, they were united to the Roman Catholic Church. Many of the Carpatho-Russian people were ignorant of the change and what it meant; others were unhappy with it but, in their subject condition, saw no alternative. Maxim's farmer parents, at great personal sacrifice, obtained an education for him that enabled him to study for the priesthood at the Basilian seminary in Krakow. Here he discerned the un-Orthodox nature of the "Greek Catholic" training there and traveled to Russia, where he became a novice at the Great Lavra of Pochaev and met Archbishop Anthony (Khrapovitsky), who encouraged him in his quest for Orthodoxy. (Archbishop Anthony, after the Russian Revolution, became the first Metropolitan of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad). He entered seminary in Russia in 1905 and was ordained to the Priesthood in 1911.Metropolitan Anthony, knowing the hardships and persecutions that awaited any Orthodox priest in Austro-Hungary, offered to find Maxim a parish in Russia. But Maxim was already aware of the hunger for Orthodoxy among many of the Carpatho-Russian people; several people from his village had travelled to America and while there had attended Orthodox Churches and confessed to Orthodox priests. They begged him to return to his country and establish an Orthodox parish there.   When he returned to his native village of Zhdynia, the polish authorities, seeing him in the riassa, beard and uncut hair of an Orthodox priest, mocked him, saying "Look, Saint Nicholas has come to the Carpathians!" But the people of nearby Hrab sent a delegation asking him to set up an Orthodox parish in their village. This he did, setting up a house-church in the residence that the people gave him. Almost immediately, he and his people began to be harassed and persecuted, first at the instigation of "Greek Catholic" priests, then of the government. His rectory/church was closed, and he and several of his parishioners were repeatedly jailed, sometimes on trumped-up charges of sedition. (The Carpatho-Russian people were always suspected of pro-Russian political sympathies by the Austrian and Polish authorities).   Despite these persecutions, through Fr Maxim's labors a wave of desire for Orthodoxy spread through the region, with many Carpatho-Russians openly identifying themselves as Orthodox. The government issued orders to regional mayors to forbid those who had identified themselves as Orthodox to gather and, in 1913, appointed a special commissioner whose task was to force the people to return to Catholicism.   In 1914, war broke out between Russia and Austro-Hungary. Despite lack of any evidence that Fr Maxim had engaged in pro-Russian political activity — he once said "My only politics is the Gospel" — he was arrested and executed on September 6 by the Papal calendar, August 24 by the Church Calendar. He was denied any form of Church burial, and his father buried him with his own hands.   Following the First World War, Orthodoxy became legal in the new Polish Republic, and a monument was placed over Fr Maxim's grave in his home town of Zhdynia. In 1994, the Orthodox Church of Poland officially glorified St Maxim.

Journey of an Artist
Episode 21: Brian Schexnayder

Journey of an Artist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 42:01


"If we always are trying to make today's performance or today's work a little bit better than yesterday, there's  no way for us to get  complacent at what we're doing." - Brian Schexnayder. In this episode, Emmeline sits  down with Julliard alum and former baritone soloist for the Metropolitan  Opera, Brian Schexnayder. They talk about Brian's time at the Met, his transition from performing to teaching, the importance of vocal technique, the necessity of presence in performance, and the benefits artists can reap by shifting their mindset from one of scarcity to one of abundance. Brian also shares a bit about how his path deviated from his own expectations, what it was like to tour Europe, and why he thinks every singer is  capable of fruitful improvement.To learn more about Brian Schexnayder or to schedule a voice lesson, visit his official website. For behind-the-scenes info and more about Journey of  an Artist, follow Emmeline on social media at @EmmelineMusic.

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast
Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast - EP73 - S2 "MEET THE MOVEMENT"

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 33:01


James gives his thoughts on the Kotkaniemi offer sheet, the Rangers' #meetthemovment campaign, the Metropolitan division and more! Draft Kings promo code: THPN Follow us on Twitter: @BroadwayBoysPod New episodes available every Monday and Thursday wherever you listen to your podcasts! linktr.ee/broadwayboyspod

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast
Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast - EP73 - S2 "MEET THE MOVEMENT"

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 33:01


James gives his thoughts on the Kotkaniemi offer sheet, the Rangers' #meetthemovment campaign, the Metropolitan division and more! Draft Kings promo code: THPN Follow us on Twitter: @BroadwayBoysPod New episodes available every Monday and Thursday wherever you listen to your podcasts! linktr.ee/broadwayboyspod

Two Guys No Cup
Episode 186: Come On Jeff, Get'em!

Two Guys No Cup

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 74:37


The NHL hasn't had a lot of news since the guys last recorded, but we'll cover everything we can, before moving into the Division Preview for the world's most boringest division, the Metropolitan.

Claibs Online
The Metropolitan Report with Curt Rohe

Claibs Online

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 16:12


Metropolitan Report with Curt Rohe. Jay and Curt discuss the historic victory by Ellen Port in the Metropolitan Senior Amateur. Ellen beat the boys playing from the same tees. Incredible. They also discuss the 35th Normandie Amateur It's ready. Huge win for Ellen

Aria Code
Breaking Mad: Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 64:03


People who go to see Gaetano Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor spend the entire evening waiting for the famous Mad Scene, to hear the soprano's incredible acrobatics, and to feel her intense emotional changes over the course of the lengthy showstopper. But the Mad Scene is more than a vocal showpiece: it's a window into what it means to lose touch with reality and the ways women's real-life challenges can go ignored or, even worse, pathologized as illness. In the opera, Lucia has no control of her life; her brother betrays her and forces her to marry a man she doesn't love. Alone and out of options, Lucia escapes in the only way she can: she murders her new husband and descends into madness. But how do we understand her crimes and hallucinations? And what can Lucia teach us about how we diagnose and treat mental health conditions today? Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests dive into the history of women and madness, as well as the story of a woman living with bipolar disorder today. Soprano Natalie Dessay had a thriving career as a coloratura soprano before cashing in her opera chips and turning her talents to theater and jazz. When she sang the role of Lucia at the Met in 2011, she approached it a bit like a circus performer, adding physical challenges to match the vocal ones. Dr. Mary Ann Smart is a professor of music at UC Berkeley. As a grad student, she wrote her dissertation on mad scenes in 19th century opera, and she has since authored multiple books, including Siren Songs: Representations of Gender and Sexuality in Opera. One of the things that she finds most poignant about Lucia's Mad Scene is the fact that Donizetti spent the end of his life being treated for physical and mental illness.  Activist and writer Dr. Phyllis Chesler has written more than 20 books, including the seminal work, Women and Madness. Her work deals with freedom of speech and freedom of thought. Her recent books include Requiem for a Female Serial Killer, and her memoir An American Bride in Kabul. She believes writing is most definitely a form of madness. Author and attorney Melody Moezzi wrote Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life in order to capture her experiences as an Iranian-American Muslim woman with bipolar disorder, and to help others with this condition feel less alone. She is an advocate for destigmatizing mental health conditions, and she believes that sometimes, what looks like madness can actually be a rational response to an irrational world.

Panther Parkway Radio
If NHL Teams Were Rock Bands, Part 1: Metropolitan Division, Featuring Jared Ellis of Locked On Hurricanes

Panther Parkway Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 32:33


In this 4-part series, Armando Velez and Jared Ellis of Locked On Hurricanes go through all 32 teams and if each NHL Team Represented a Rock Band, what would each team be. The Two Metalheads will today be discussing the Metropolitan Division in Part 1 of this 4-part series. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Claibs Online
Metropolitan Report: Skip Berkmeyer with Dave Estes

Claibs Online

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 51:10


Skip chats with Dave Estes, maybe the best amateur of the 90's. He won back to back METGA Amateurs in 1997 & 98, and has qualified for numerous USGA Championships

Talking Hockey
Rating the Eastern Conference Team's Offseasons | Episode #74

Talking Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 82:35


Breaking down how the Eastern Conference teams improved, digressed, or stayed put, this episode analyzes each team from the North and Metropolitan division and gives them a grade from F to A+ for their offseason. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @TalkingHockey for daily content. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KEXP Song of the Day
Camlann - Metropolitan Boy

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 3:57


Camlann - "Metropolitan Boy" from the 2021 album Circa 1983 on Cold Transmission. It's fitting that the Jakarta-based darkwave trio Camlann named their latest album Circa 1983, because they easily channel the sounds of Depeche Mode and Soft Cell, despite the fact that its members weren't even born at the time. The self-described "dark disco" group consists of Ony Godfrey (17) on vocals and guitar, Bayu Triyudanto (17) on bass, and Fauzan Pratama (16) on synths. (There's also Chariszan (17), their producer and music collaborator.) As they declare on their Bandcamp page, the new LP is a "statement to the world that they are here to bring you their own version of modern nostalgia." Check out the lyric video for today's Song of the Day below, directed by band member Pratama.  Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Aria Code
Crisis in the Kremlin: Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 33:43


Perhaps no opera better reflects the questions and contradictions at the heart of Russian history than Modest Mussorgsky's historical epic Boris Godunov. Based on the play by Alexander Pushkin (considered by many to be one of Russia's greatest writers), it's a meditation on power and legitimacy, and a portrayal of a pivotal period in Russian history -- The Time of Troubles.  When Tsar Ivan the Terrible dies without an heir, Boris Godunov is elected tsar, casting doubt on his legitimacy. He rules well for a few years, but then all hell breaks loose, with a famine, a revolt, and a pretender claiming to be the real tsar. As his country's problems compound, Boris confronts his feelings of powerlessness in the monologue, “Dostig ja vïsshei vlasti.” Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the nature of power, the question of legitimacy, and how an opera can shine a light on a nation's past as well as its present. The Guests Bass René Pape (A.K.A. “The Black Diamond Bass”) has been singing the role of Boris Godunov for 15 years. Like many of the kings and rulers he's played on stage, he sees Boris as someone who has all of the power but none of the joy. In addition to his velvety voice, Pape is also known for his collection of rubber ducks, and even has one in his own image, the PapeDuck. Dr. Simon Morrison is a professor of music history at Princeton, specializing in Russian and Soviet music. He fell in love with Russian music when he was an undergraduate and wrote his dissertation on the life and work of Sergei Prokofiev. His most recent book is Bolshoi Confidential, a history of the Bolshoi Ballet, and he is currently writing a book on the history of the city of Moscow, which finds him studying 11th century documents written on birchbark. Dr. Shoshana Keller is a professor of Russian, Soviet, Eurasian, and modern Middle Eastern history at Hamilton College. She first became interested in Russia after getting to know the music of Shostakovich and Stravinsky while playing French horn as a kid, and she was fascinated by pictures of Russian onion domes in a social studies class. She loved the Russian language too, but found the grammar devilishly difficult and immersed herself in its history. She has written multiple books, and is working on an experimental mapping project of the nations in Kazakhstan

Creative Places & Faces
Salvador Dalí Protégé – Artist, Louis Markoya, From New York to Dalí Land, Barcelona & Rome

Creative Places & Faces

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 71:48


This is an exciting episode when I meet Louis Markoya, an artist who spent six years as a protégé of Salvador Dalí. It is dedicated to two very special people – my wonderful friend and fellow author, Zoe Holohan, and the fabulous man, Paul Chimera, who introduced me to today's guest, Louis Markoya. Louis is continuing the work of Salvador Dalí today after a huge break from art that he took having spent six years as Dalí's protégé. Louis is exhibiting from 28th August 2021 until 6th February 2022.Louis Markoya is a surrealist painter inspired by fractals and mathematics. As a former protégé of artist Salvador Dalí, Markoya's interest in lenticular prints developed while assisting Dalí on 3D projects that included holograms. LRMA is pleased to host an exhibition of Markoya's work this fall, which will include a retrospective of work since Dalí to present, including a series of paintings inspired by the pandemic and 3D holographic lenticulars.This interview with Louis explores his journey into art which was inspired predominantly by Salvador Dalí and nature. We explore the places that have affected this creativity, his work with Dalí, and how he took a prolonged break from art only to return and carry on aspects of the Great Master's work. We also talk about the brain and art. Below you can read about Louis to get a fuller flavour of this episode.By Louis Markoya:During my childhood I had very little exposure to art and did not develop any real interest in it. I honestly did not even really know what art encompassed. My only childhood memories of going to art museums for class trips involved the Egyptian sections of the Metropolitan in NY.To continue reading go to the Creative Places & Faces website

Water Values Podcast
An Exit Interview with Jeffrey Kightlinger

Water Values Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 43:45


Jeffrey Kightlinger provides an excellent interview offering profound thoughts on the water industry that was recorded during the waning days of his 15-year tenure as the General Manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Plus, Reese Tisdale of Bluefield Research comes on for Bluefield on Tap to discuss how population shifts might impact the water sector. In this session, you'll learn about: Why Jeff decided to retire from Metropolitan at this juncture Jeff's perspective on what makes a good water leader Where the gaps in water leadership are and whether they're being filled The advice Jeff received when he began his tenure at Metropolitan Whether Jeff heeded that advice How has the GM position changed during his tenure Jeff's biggest surprises in dealing with water issues Jeff's proudest accomplishments during his years at Metropolitan What Jeff wishes had worked out differently Jeff's public words of advice for his successor, Adel Hagekhalil Resources and links mentioned in or relevant to this session include: Jeff's LinkedIn Page Jeff's Twitter handle: @8thGenCA Other exit interviews: Verde Exchange (Part 1 and Part 2) and org TWV #133: Resiliency and Regionalism in Southern California with Metropolitan's Jeffrey Kightlinger TWV #142: Los Angeles' Approach to Infrastructure with Adel Hagekhalil Thank You! Thanks to each of you for listening and spreading the word about The Water Values Podcast! Keep the emails coming and please rate and review The Water Values Podcast on iTunes and Stitcher if you haven't done so already. And don't forget to tell your friends about the podcast and whatever you do, don't forget to join The Water Values mailing list!

Congressional Dish
CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 130:58


Congress has conducted at least eleven bipartisan hearings to investigate the security failures that permitted a mob of American citizens to riot inside the Capitol Building and successfully disrupt Congress while they certified the 2020 election results on January 6, 2021. In this episode, hear key highlights pulled from over 30 hours of testimony to understand exactly what happened that day. Executive Producer: Forrest Pttman Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes Q: Into the Storm, HBO CD226: Lame Duck Bills H.R.1090 - District of Columbia National Guard Home Rule Act S.964 - Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2021 H.R.4192 - Confronting the Threat of Domestic Terrorism Act S.2043 - Jabara-Heyer NO HATE Act H.R.4187 - Domestic Terrorism Penalties Act of 2019 Section 311 of the USA PATRIOT Act U.S. Department of the Treasury Articles/Documents Article: 587 people have been charged in the Capitol insurrection so far. This searchable table shows them all. by Madison Hall, Skye Gould, Rebecca Harrington, Jacob Shamsian, Azmi Haroun, Taylor Ardrey, and Erin Snodgrass, Insider, July 23, 2021 Article: Tampa man, 20, admits intending to block Congress with Oath Keepers in new Capitol riot guilty plea by The Washington Post, July 20, 2021 Article: Tampa man, 20, admits intending to block Congress with Oath Keepers in new Capitol riot guilty plea by The Washington Post, July 19, 2021 Article: What were the Capitol rioters thinking on Jan. 6? by The Washington Post, July 19, 2021 Article: “You're Gonna Have a Fucking War”: Mark Milley's Fight to Stop Trump from Striking Iran by Susan B. Glasser, The New Yorker, July 15, 2021 Article: To Trump's hard-core supporters, his rallies weren't politics. They were life. by The Washington Post, July 15, 2021 Article: Michael Flynn posts video featuring QAnon slogans By Marshall Cohen, CNN, July 7, 2021 Article: Latest alleged Oath Keeper arrested in Capitol riot turned over body armor and firearm by The Washington Post, July 2, 2021 Article: ‘Zip Tie Guy' and His Mother Plead Not Guilty to New Charges in U.S. Capitol Siege by Aaron Keller, Law & Crime, June 23, 2021 Article: Man charged with bringing molotov cocktails to Capitol on Jan. 6 has Texas militia ties, contacted Ted Cruz's office, court papers allege by The Washington Post, May 24, 2021 Article: Maryland man, indicted for bringing gun to Capitol riot, could face decades in prison by Jordan Fischer, Eric Flack, Stephanie Wilson, WUSA9, May 18, 2021 Article: DC medical examiner confirms causes of death of 4 who died in Jan. 6 Capitol riot By Kelli Dugan, Cox Media Group National Content Desk, 11NEWS, April 7, 2021 Article: The lawyer for the 'QAnon Shaman' wants to use Trump's speech before the insurrection as part of his defense by Jacob Shamsian, Insider, March 1, 2021 Two Members of the Proud Boys Indicted for Conspiracy, Other Charges Related to the Jan. 6 Riots By United States Department of Justice, January 29, 2021 Article: Former Army captain arrested after live-streaming Capitol riot By Kyle Rempfer, AirForceTimes, January 22, 2021 Article: 'Trump said I could': One possible legal defense for accused rioters. By Teri Kanefield and Mark Reichel, The Washington Post, January 11, 2021 Article: Did 5 People Die During Jan. 6 Capitol Riot? by Alex Kasprak, Snopes, January 7, 2021 Article: FBI focuses on whether some Capitol rioters intended to harm lawmakers or take hostages by The Washington Post, January 7, 2021 Article: Trump's supporters think they're being patriotic. And that's the problem. by Christine Adams, The Washington Post, January 7, 2021 Article: Capitol riot: Army vet who tended bar accused by FBI of conspiring in insurrection  by AMSNBS, 2021 Article: All 10 living former defense secretaries: Involving the military in election disputes would cross into dangerous territory by The Washington Post, January 3, 2021 Article: 'I just want to find 11,780 votes': In extraordinary hour-long call, Trump pressures Georgia secretary of state to recalculate the vote in his favor by The Washington Post, January 3, 2021 Article: Capitol riots by The Washington Post, 2021 Article: Another MAGA Rally To Take Place In D.C. On The Day Congress Declares Election Results by Matt Blitz, WAMU 88.5, November 27, 2020 Article: Trump's Election Attack Ends December 14—Whether He Knows It or Not by Lily Hay Newman, Wired, November 27, 2020 Additional Resources U.S.A. v. Mark Grods U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, June 28, 2021 Defense Timeline for January 6th Examining the U.S. Capitol Attack: A Review of the Security, Planning and Response Failures on January 6 Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Committee on Rules and Administration U.S.A. v. Christopher Alberts U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 27, 2021 U.S.A. v. Lonnie Leroy Coffman U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 11, 2021 U.S.A. v. Ethan Nordean, Joseph Biggs, Zachary Rehl and Charles Donohue U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, January 8, 2021 Video: Seeking Information: Pipe Bombs in Washington, D.C. F.B.I., January 5, 2021 Sound Clip Sources Hearing: USCP OVERSIGHT FOLLOWING JANUARY 6 ATTACK, Senate Committee on Rules and Administration, June 16, 2021 Watch on C-SPAN Witnesses: Michael Bolton Inspector General of the US Capitol Police Transcript: 36:40 Michael Bolton: To me the biggest failure is that because we have allowed certain elements within the Capitol Police to be autonomous, they conduct their own training, okay? That's the issue. Whereas you if you have a Training Services Bureau and let's call it an office of training that is fully incorporated, they handle all the training they conducted. They make sure you get the training, they hold your officials accountable, your people doing your training, guess what, we're sending a letter to the chief and they can no longer work until they get required or what have you. Hearing: The Capitol Insurrection: Unexplained Delays and Unanswered Questions (Part II), House Committee on Oversight and Reform, June 15, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Lt. General Walter Piatt Director of the Army Staff General Charles Flynn Commanding General of the US Army Pacific Chris Wray FBI Director Transcript: 30:41 Lt. General Walter Piatt: My involvement with our response to this emergency began shortly after entering the Secretary of the Army's office at 2:20pm to provide a report of a suspicious package. While I was there, a panic call came in reporting several explosions in the city. To understand the situation, to indentify, what was needed from the army Secretary McCarthy convened a conference call. During this call DC and Capitol authorities frantically requested urgent and immediate support to the Capitol. We all immediately understood the gravity of the situation. Secretary McCarthy went down the hall to seek approval from the Acting Secretary of Defense. Before departing, she directed me to have the staff prepare a response. I communicated this on the conference call. But those are more and more convinced that I was denying their request, which I did not have the authority to do. Despite clearly stating three times that we are not denying your request, we need to prepare a plan for when the Secretary of the Army gains approval. 1:46:02 General Charles Flynn: There's four things in planning that we could have done. And we should have done. The first one there should have been clearly a lead federal agency designated. The second one is we should have had an integrated security plan. The third one is and much of this has been talked about already is information and intelligence sharing on criminal activities before the sixth of January. And then the fourth one would have been, we should have pre-federalized certain National Guard forces so that they could have immediately been moved to the Capitol and had those authorities in place before this happened. 2:09:30 Rep. Kweisi Mfume (MD): So that's what we are trying to do, keep our republic and to keep it from those who tried to overthrow this government who wanted to kill members of Congress, who wanted to hang Mike Pence. 2:43:37 Rep. Michael Cloud (TX): You mentioned domestic terrorism that this would qualify as that, would the riots that we saw across the cities for nights and nights and weeks and weeks on even months on end, qualify as domestic terrorism as well? Chris Wray: We've been treating both as domestic terrorism and investigating both through our Joint Terrorism Task Force. 2:51:19 Chris Wray: Among the things that we've taken away from this experience are a few. One, as you heard me say in response to an earlier question, we need to develop better human sources, right, because if we can get better human sources, then we can better separate the wheat from the chaff in social media. Two, we need better data analytics. The volume, as you said, the volume of this stuff is, is just massive, and the ability to have the right tools to get through it and sift through it in a way that is, again, separating the wheat from the chaff is key. And then the third point that I would make is we are rapidly having to contend with the issue of encryption. So what I mean by that is, yes, there might be chatter on social media. But then what we have found and this is true in relation to January 6th, in spades, but it was also true over the summer in some of the violence that occurred there. Individuals will switch over to encrypted platforms for the really significant, really revealing communications. And so we've got to figure out a way to get into those communications or we're going to be constantly playing catch up in our effort to separate as I said, the wheat from the chaff on social media. 3:01:00 Chris Wray: We consider the attack on capital on January 6 to be a form of domestic terrorism. 3:16:00 Chris Wray: As for social media, I think there's, there's it's understandable that there's a lot of confusion on this subject we do not we have very specific policies that Ben at the Department for a long time that govern our ability to use social media and when we have an authorized purpose and proper predication, there's a lot of things we can do on social media. And we do do and we aggressively do but what we can't do, what we can't do on social media is without proper predication, and an authorized purpose, just monitor, just in case on social media. Now, if the policies should be changed to reflect that, that might be one of the important lessons learned coming out of this whole experience. But that's not something that that currently the FBI has the either the authority or certainly the resources frankly, to do. 4:06:00 Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Has anyone been charged with inciting an insurrection? Chris Wray: I think I responded to an earlier question. I don't believe that that has been one of the charges us so far. But again, with that many cases, I want to build a little room for the fact that I might not know all the cases. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): So right as of right now, the answer would be no, fair to say? Chris Wray: That's my understanding. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay. Has anybody been charged with sedition to your knowledge? Chris Wray: Same answer. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay. No, again, Has anybody been charged with treason? Chris Wray: I don't believe so. Rep. Pat Fallon (TX): Okay, has anyone been charged with illegal possession of a firearm inside the Capitol? On that day? Chris Wray: I believe there has been at least one instance of someone arrested with a firearm in the Capitol. And there have been a number of arrests of individuals either en route to the Capitol or near the Capitol for the for the siege. 4:11:00 Rep. James Comer (KY): On December 31, Mayor browser requested DC National Guard assistance with the planned protest for January fifth and sixth, correct? Lt. General Walter Piatt: Correct, sir. Rep. James Comer (KY):And was that request for assistant ultimately approved by the Secretary of Army? Lt. General Walter Piatt: It was approved by the Acting Secretary of Defense as well. Rep. James Comer (KY):Were restrictions placed on that authority upon the request of Mayor browser and if so, what were those restrictions? Lt. General Walter Piatt: She had requested that they be unarmed and it did not take a place in any law enforcement activities. Hearing: The Capitol Insurrection: Unexplained Delays and Unanswered Questions, Committee on Oversight and Reform, May 12, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Chris Miller Former Acting Secretary of Defense Robert Contee Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department Transcript: 00:22 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Today the committee will examine one of the darkest days in our nation's history. The January 6th insurrection at the United States Capitol. On that day, a violent mob incited by shameless lies told by a defeated president launched the worst attack on our republic since the Civil War. 00:42 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): We watched as the temple of our democracy, a building whereas familiar with as our own homes, was overrun by a mob bent on murdering the Vice President and members of Congress. 21:21 Chris Miller: I want to remind you and the American public that during that time, there was irresponsible commentary by the media about a possible military coup or that advisors the president were advocating the declaration of martial law. I was also very cognizant of the fears and concerns about the prior use of the military in June 2020 response to protests in the White House. And just before the electoral college certification 10 former Secretaries of Defense signed an op-ed published in The Washington Post warning of the dangers of politicizing inappropriately using the military. No such thing was going to occur and my watch, but these concerns and hysteria about them nonetheless factored into my decisions regarding the appropriate and limited use of our armed forces to support civilian law enforcement during the electoral college certification. My obligation to the nation was to prevent a constitutional crisis. Historically, military responses to domestic protests have resulted in violations of American civil rights and even in the case the Kent State protests of the Vietnam War, tragic deaths. In short, I fervently believe the military should not be utilized in such scenarios, other than as a last resort, and only when all other assets had been expended. 26:02 Chris Miller: I stand by every decision I made on January 6th and the following days. I want to emphasize that our nation's armed forces are to be deployed for domestic law enforcement only when all civilian assets are expended and only as the absolute last resort. To use them for domestic law enforcement in any other manner is contrary to the constitution and a threat to the Republic. I ask you this consider what the response in Congress in the media had been if I had unilaterally deployed 1000s of troops into Washington DC that morning against the Express wishes of the Mayor and the Capitol Police who indicated they were prepared. 40:52 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Mr. Miller, you were the Acting Secretary of Defense on January 6th, did President Trump as the commander in chief of the US Armed Forces call you during the January 6 attack to ensure the capital was being secured? Mr. Miller? Chris Miller: No, I had all the authority I needed from the president to fulfill my constitutional duties. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Did you speak with President Trump at all as the attack was unfolding? Chris Miller: On January 6th? yes. Chris Miller: No, I did not. I didn't need to I had all the authority I needed and knew what had to happen. I knew what had to happen. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): Did you speak with Vice President Pence during the attack? Yes or no? Chris Miller: Yes. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY): According to a defense department timeline, it was Vice President Pence and not President Trump, who called during the siege to say the Capitol was not secure. And to give you the direction to quote, 'clear the Capitol.' What specifically did Vice President Pence say to you that day? Chris Miller: Vice President's not in the chain of command, he did not direct me to clear the capital. I discussed very briefly with him the situation. He provided insights based on his presence there, and I notified him or I informed him that by that point, the District of Columbia National Guard was being fully mobilized and was in coordination with local and federal law enforcement to assist in clearing the Capitol. 1:05:28 Chris Miller: I think I'd like to modify my original assessment. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Why am I not surprised about that? Chris Miller: Based on as Chief Contee said, we are getting more information by the day by the minute about what happened and the highlight some other observations that were made. It's clear now that there were organized... Although we're going to find out through the Department of Justice process in the law, and the legal system, it seems clear that there was some sort of conspiracy where there were organized assault elements that intended to assault the Capitol that day. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Reclaiming my time, I'm just asking you the same question you've answered before. Did did the President's remarks incite members to march, the people in the crowd to march on the Capitol, or did they not? Chris Miller: Well, he clearly said offered that they should march on the Capitol. So it goes without saying that his statement resulted in that... Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): Reclaiming my time. Let me just share with the committee what you have said before. This is your quote. This is your quote. What anyone? Would anybody have marched on the Capitol and tried to overrun the Capitol without the president speech? I think it's pretty much definitive. That would not have happened. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I think now, I would say that this is not the unitary factor at all. What's that? Chris Miller: I would like to offer I have reassessed. It was not the unitary factor at all. There was no...it's seems clear there was an organized conspiracy with assault elements. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In your testimony for today. Reclaiming my time again, for your written testimony for today. For today, this morning, you stated the following about the President's quote, I personally believe his comments encouraged the protesters that day. So this is that this is that there's a very recent reversal of your of your testimony. Chris Miller: Absolutely not. That's ridiculous. Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): You're ridiculous. Chris Miller: Thank you for your, your thoughts. I also want to highlight... Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): No wait a minute, reclaiming my time, reclaiming my time. 2:06:30 Rep. Glenn Grothman (WI): Has there been any progress made it all on on? Who would have put these bombs there? Robert Contee: No arrests have been made no suspects identified, working without partners on the federal side. There's been surveillance videos that have been released publicly showing that individual placing the pipe bombs, but no arrests have been made at this point. 3:01:05 Rep. Andrew Clyde (GA): Watching the TV footage of those who entered the Capitol and walked through Statuary Hall showed people in an orderly fashion staying between the stanchions and ropes, taking videos and pictures. You know, if you didn't know the TV footage was a video from January the sixth, you would actually think it was a normal tourist visit. 3:12:18 Sen. Hank Johnson (GA): Were you ordered to delay deployment of troops? Chris Miller: 110% Absolutely not. No, that is not the case. 4:41:42 Chris Miller: If we had a valid request and a necessary requests from your body, I guarantee you that the Department of Defense would have been there in strength as required. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL): So when you would acknowledge we lost the battle we lost for the first time since 1814... Chris Miller: Horrifying. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL): And it was everybody else's fault but DoD. Chris Miller: I absolutely disagree with the statement that it was... Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) I'm paraphrasing you the only way that makes sense when you say 'you wouldn't do anything differently, you wouldn't do anything differently.' Okay, that implies what I'm saying that it was everybody else's fault in your mind, because it was a catastrophic failure. Chris Miller: And I just had an obligation to protect and defend the Constitution and guarantee that the armed forces were used appropriately, and not in a manner that would be seen as extraconstitutional. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) Look, the Constitution is not a treaty of surrender. It affords you the opportunity to do what's necessary to defend the people in the democracy of the United States. I mean, if looked upon the destruction afterwards, looking back, you say, 'well, at least I defended the Constitution' is another perverse way of looking at this. Nothing was DoDs fault. And at least you did, in your own mind, defend what you thought was right for the Constitution. Never mind how many people got hurt and how much damage was done to our government in the meantime. Chris Miller: I will absolutely take that on and take that as a compliment. Because the armed forces of the United States was completely prepared and ready to respond to any valid request from any department or agency or local or federal law enforcement office. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) You lost and you don't have the Intellectual fortitude to own up to your part of the responsibility. And I get it, a lot of people screwed up, you're one of them. I yield scaled back. Madam Chairman. Chris Miller: I respectfully disagree in that. Rep. Mike Quigley (IL) I was in the room, you weren't. Hearing: State and Local Responses to Domestic Terrorism: The Attack on the U.S. Capitol and Beyond, House Committee on Homeland Security: Subcommittee on Intelligence and Counterterrorism, March 24, 2021 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Dana Nessel Attorney General, Michigan Aaron Ford Attorney General, Nevada John Chisholm District Attorney, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Transcript: 07:19 Rep. Elissa Slotkin (MI): The post 9/11 era of security where the threats come from abroad is over. In the 20 years of the post 9/11 era, they came to an end on January 6th, the new reality is that we have to come to terms with is that it's our extremists here at home, seeking to explain internal divisions that pose the greatest threat. Hearing: JANUARY 6 ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL, Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and Committee on Rules and Administration, March 3, 2021 Day 2 (March 3, 2021) Day 2, Part 2 (March 3, 2021) Witnesses: Robert Salesses Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Assistant Secretary for Homeland Defense and Global Security at the U.S. Department of Defense Major General William Walker Commanding General of the DC National Guard Jill Sanborn Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division Federal Bureau of Investigation U.S. Department of Justice Transcript: 06:42 Sen. Gary Peters (MI): But the January 6 attack must mark a turning point. There can be no question that the domestic terrorist threat and cluding violence driven by white supremacy and anti government groups is the gravest terrorist threat to our homeland security. Moving forward, the FBI, which is tasked with leading our counterterrorism efforts, and the Department of Homeland Security, which ensures that state and local law enforcement understands the threats that American communities face must address this deadly threat with the same focus and resources and analytical rigor that they apply to foreign threats such as ISIS and Al Qaeda. 30:19 Robert Salesses: Over the weekend of January 2nd and third, my staff contacted the Secret Service, the Park Police, the marshal service, the FBI, the Capitol Police to determine if they planned to request DoD assistance. None of these law enforcement agencies indicated a need for DoD or DC National Guard Support. 30:45 Robert Salesses: After consultation with the Department of Justice, the Acting Secretary of Defense approved the DC government request for National Guard personnel to support 30 traffic control points and six metro stations from January 5th to the sixth. The Acting Secretary also authorized a 40 person quick reaction force to be readied at Joint Base Andrews. 31:17 Robert Salesses: On January 5, the Acting Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army received a letter from the mayor of DC, stating MPD is prepared and coordinated with its federal partners, namely the Park Police, the Capitol Police and the Secret Service. Based on these communications with federal and local civilian authorities DoD determined that no additional military support was required on January 5th, and 6th. 32:20 Robert Salesses: At approximately 2:30pm, the Secretary of the Army met with the Acting Secretary of Defense and other senior leaders of the Defense Department. After this meeting, the Acting Secretary of Defense determined that all available forces of the DC National Guard were required to reinforce the DC Metropolitan Police and the US Capitol Police and ordered the full mobilization of the DC National Guard at 3:04pm. 33:08 Robert Salesses: After reviewing the DC National Guard's missions, equipping and responsibilities to be performed at the Capitol Complex and supported the Metropolitan Police and Capitol Police, and conferring with the DC Metropolitan Police at their headquarters, at 4:10pm, the Secretary of the Army received the Acting Secretary of Defense's approval at 4:32 and ordered the DC National Guard forces to depart the armory for the Capitol Complex 49:59 Major General William Walker: The District of Columbia National Guard provides support to the Metropolitan Police Department, the United States Park Police, the United States Secret Service, and other federal and district law enforcement agencies in response to planned rallies, marches, protest, and other large scale first amendment activity on a routine basis. The standard component of such support is the stand up of a off site quick reaction for us, an element of guardsmen held in reserve with civil disturbance response equipment, helmets, shields, battons, etc. They are postured to quickly respond to an urgent and immediate need for assistance by civil authorities. The Secretary of the Army's January 5th letter to me withheld that authority for me to employ a quick reaction force. Additionally, the Secretary of the Army's memorandum to me required that a concept of operation be submitted to him before the employment of a quick reaction force. I found that requirement to be unusual, as was the requirement to seek approval to move guardsmen supporting the Metropolitan Police Department to move from one traffic control point to another. 54:50 Major General William Walker: So the memo was unusual in that it required me to seek authorization from the Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of Defense, to essentially even protect my guardsmen. So no civil disturbance equipment could be authorized, unless it was came from the Secretary of Defense, now the Secretary of the Army, to his credit, did tell me that I could have force protection equipment with the guardsmen. So we do have helmets. shin guards, vest, we did have that with us. But that came from the Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of Defense told me I needed his permission to to escalate to have that kind of protection. 55:50 Major General William Walker: What it says, without my personal authorization, the District of Columbia National Guard has not authorized the following to be issued weapons, ammunition bayonets, batons or ballistic protection equipment such as helmets and body armor. Now, again, to be clear, the Secretary of the Army told me to go ahead and issue that equipment. So we never were going to have weapons or ammunition and we no longer have bayonets. But we do have ballistic protection equipment, helmets body armor, and so I did have that with each guardsmen. 57:02 Major General William Walker: And at that time, Chief Conte and Chief Soon passionately pleaded for District of Columbia National Guard to get to the Capitol with all deliberate speed. So the Army senior leaders did not think that it'd look good. It would be a good optic, they further stated that it could incite the crowd. So their best military advice would be to the Secretary of the Army who could not get on the call. So we wanted the Secretary of the Army to join the call, but he was not available. We were told that he was with the Secretary of Defense and not available. But the Army Senior leadership, expressed to Chief Conte, Chief Sohn, Dr. Mitchell, the deputy mayor and others on the call, that it would not be their best military advice to have uniform guardsmen on the Capitol. 58:26 Sen. Gary Peters (MI): General Walker was the issue of optics ever brought up by army leadership when the DC National Guard was deployed during the summer of 2020. Was that discussed? Major General William Walker: It was never discussed. The week of June it was never discussed July 4, when we were supporting the city was never discussed August 28th when we supported the city. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): Did you think that was unusual? Major General William Walker: I did. 1:00:32 Major General William Walker: So I had them ready to go shortly after the phone call. So I brought, at 1500, I directed that the quick reaction for us that was based at Andrews Air Force Base, leave the base, get to the armory at all deliberate speed. I had a police escort bring them to the armory. They returned to the Armory in about 20 minutes. So we had them sitting there waiting. And then, in anticipation of a green light, a go, we put guardsmen on buses, we brought them inside the armory, so nobody would see them putting on the equipment and getting on the buses, and then we just waited to get the approval. And that's why we were able to get to the Capitol in about 18 minutes. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): What time were they on the buses Ready to go? Do you recall? Major General William Walker: By five o'clock, but at five o'clock, I decided, hey, you know, there's got to be an approval coming. So get on the buses, get the equipment on, get on the buses and just wait. And then a few minutes after that we did get the approval. I was on a secure video conference when the army leadership conveyed to me that the Secretary of Defense had authorized the employment of the National Guard at the Capitol. So my timeline has 1708, 5:08pm is when is when we wrote down that we had approval and read was about eight people in the office with me when I got that. Sen. Gary Peters (MI): How many guardsmen were ready. You said write a video earlier and they have gotten 155. So you could have sent 155 much, much earlier, what would have been the impact of sending those 155 right around that two o'clock timeframe? Major General William Walker: Well, based on my experience with the summer and I have 19 years, I have 39 years in the National Guard, and I was in the Florida guard Hurricane Andrew I've been involved in civil disturbances. So I believe that number could have made a difference. We could have helped extend the perimeter and help push back the crowd. 1:13:49 Robert Salesses: The only decision makers on the sixth of January were the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy. There was a chain of command from the Secretary of Defense, to Secretary McCarthy to General Walker. That was the chain of command. 1:15:39 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): This morning, you have testified that you received this letter from our secretary McCarthy on January 5, so just the day before the attack on the Capitol. In that letter, did Secretary McCarthy prohibit you from employing the National Guard's quick reaction force without his authorization? Major General William Walker: So I have the letter in front of me, and his letter does not but it is the Secretary of Defense says that I have to use it as a last resort. But the Secretary of the Army told me and it's, I have the letter that I couldn't not use the quick reaction force. It would it would he with I'll just read it. Yeah, 'I withhold authority to approve employment of the District of Columbia National Guard quick reaction force, and will do so only as a last resort, in response to a request from an appropriate civil authority. I will require a concept of operation prior to authorizing employment of a civil- of a quick reaction for it. 1:16:05 *Major General William Walker:** Now a quick reaction force normally is a command was tool to go help either a civilian agency, but more typically to help the National Guardsmen who are out there in need, need assistance. 1:16:58 Major General William Walker: Just to be clear, the Secretary of Defense said I could use it as a last resort, right. But the Secretary of the Army says that I could only use it after he gave me permission. And only then after a concept of operation. Sen. Rob Portman (OH): Right, and we talked about the chain of command earlier, so your chain of command is both of these gentlemen. In other words, you you didn't have the authority to deploy that quick reaction force based on either the letter or the earlier memo that went from the Secretary of Defense, Acting Secretary defense to the Secretary of the Army. Is that correct? Major General William Walker: Yes, sir. 1:17:23 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): Yeah, I also thought it was odd and I think you said was unusual and very prescriptive that the January 5th letter required the Secretary of the Army to approve the movement of deployed guardsmen from one traffic control point to another. Did you find that unusual? Major General William Walker: In 19 years I never had that before happened. So on that day, the Metropolitan Police as they would any other day requested that a traffic control point move one block, one block over. No traffic was where they were. So they wanted the traffic control point to move one block. I had to get permission. I told him, I'll get back to you. I contacted Lieutenant General Piatt, who contacted Secretary of the Army, I had to explain where that contractor control point was in relationship to the Capitol. And only then did I get permission to move the three national guardsmen supporting the Metropolitan... Sen. Rob Portman (OH): These are three unarmed National Guardsmen who are helping with traffic control in parts of that Metropolitan Police can do other things. And they were not permitted to move a block away without getting permission from the Secretary of the Army. Is that true? Major General William Walker: That's correct. Yeah. 1:18:52 Sen. Rob Portman (OH): That January 4th memorandum from Acting Secretary Miller to the Army Secretary required the personal approval of the Secretary of Defense for the National Guard to be issued riot gear. Is that correct? Major General William Walker: That's correct. But but the secretary army told me to go ahead and put it into vehicles. So I give him credit for that. 1:19:08 Major General William Walker: Normally for a safety and force protection matter, a commander would would be able to authorize his guardsmen to protect themselves with helmet and protective equipment. 1:25:57 Sen. Roy Blunt (MO): General Walker if the restrictions on your authorities hadn't been put in place by DoD, what would you have done when Chief Sund called you at 1:49 on January 6, with an urgent request for National Guards assistance? Major General William Walker: I would have immediately pulled all the guardsmen that were supporting the Metropolitan Police Department. They had the gear in the vehicles, I would have had them assemble in the armory, and then get on buses and go straight to the armory and report to the most ranking Capitol Police Officer they saw and take direction. And just let me add this, so one of my Lieutenant Colonel's on his own initiative, went to the Capitol, anticipating that we were going to be called, so he would have been there and he met with Deputy Chief Carroll of the Metropolitan Police Department who asked them, where is the National Guard? How come they're not here? And this Colonel said, Well, I'm sure they're coming. And I'm here to scout out where they're going to be when they get here. So that was the plan. I would have sent them there immediately. As soon as I hung up, my next call would have been to my subordinate commanders, get every single guardsman in this building, and everybody that's helping the Metropolitan Police. We mission them to the Capitol without delay. 1:32:11 Robert Salesses: That's when the Secretary of Defense made the decision at 4:32. As general Walker has pointed out, because I've seen all the timelines, he was not told that till 5:08 that's what Sen. Roy Blunt (MO): How's that possible? Mr. Salesses, do you think that the decision in the moment we were in was made at 4:32 and the person that had to be told, wasn't told for more than half an hour after the decision was made? Robert Salesses: Senator, I think that's that's an issue. 1:37:13 Sen. Maggie Hassann (NH): Looking back now, what might have made a difference in being able to move against some of those individuals sooner? Jill Sanborn: Yeah, I think that's great question. I think it's twofold. So it's the complexity of trying to gather the right intelligence that helps us predict indicators and warnings. And I spoke earlier about while there's a volume out there of rhetoric, trying to figure out that intent is very challenging for us in the intel community because it happens on private comms and encryption. So that's one aspect. And then the other aspect is of the people that we were investigating. So predicated investigations, we don't necessarily have the ability to mitigate the threat they might pose by travel if we don't have a charge. And so I think you're tracking that we were aware of some of our subjects that intended to come here. We took over action by going and talking them and trying to get them to not come and that worked in the majority of our already predicated cases. 1:49:46 To review the timeline at 1:49 Chief Sund contacted you. At 2:15 the capital was breached. I think in your testimony you said you had available 340 DC National Guard troops Is that correct? Major General William Walker: Sir, it was actually half of that. So, so half were on the streets helping the Metropolitan Police Department. The other half would have came in to relieve them, but we would have called them in to come in. 1:50:33 Sen. Ron Johnson (WI): How quickly could have you gotten? How many people to the Capitol? Major General William Walker: 20 minutes? Sen. Ron Johnson (WI): How many people? Major General William Walker: 150 1:56:47 Jill Sanborn: We're seeing people that got caught up in the moment got caught up in the sort of the energy etc. and made their way into the captain on those are probably the ones that you're seeing the charges simply of trespassing and then we're definitely seeing that portion that you're pointing out which is small groups and cells now being charged with conspiracy that coalesced either on site or even days or weeks prior and had sort of an intent that day and they to probably caught people up in the energy. PART 2 23:00 Jill Sanborn: The piece of information we received, again, was a non attributable posting to a message board. And so very raw, very unvetted, we actually didn't receive that information until late, very late in the afternoon on the fifth and almost into the evening. And because of our emphasis on we need any intelligence, even though it was raw and attributed, and unvetted, the Norfolk office quickly wrote that up specifically in a document following our processes to disseminate that. So a situation information report is for the intentional purpose of sharing that with state and local partners. Not only did they write that up, because they knew how important that was to get that information out into the hands of folks that might need it, our state and local partners, within 40 minutes, they sent an email to the Washington field office with that information and Washington Field Office also then followed up with an email to all Task Force officers. And so several different mechanisms were happened here. And you know, we'd like to use the phrase 'belt and suspenders' we didn't want to make sure that one method of communication failed. So we wrote it up in the document for dissemination. We sent it in an email to all taskforce officers in the National Capitol Region, and that does include Washington Metro as well as Capitol. But again, not wanting to rely on those two mechanisms only it was then briefed verbally in a command post and interagency command post that we were doing briefings every couple of hours, though, that every agency in that command post have what we call a common operating picture. Knowing what all of us knew at any given time, it was briefed at 8pm on the evening of the fifth, and then taking it one step further, because we didn't want to limit our aperture to just the National Capital Region, because there's collection opportunity out there for all state and local partners and federal partners to help us, we loaded that suspicious information report into what we call the Leap Portal. And that is accessible by all state and local partners. So we really tried in various ways to make sure that we did not rely on one communication mechanism and really tried to rely on several so that the information would get to the right people. 34:46 Sen. Rand Paul (KY): We can talk all we want about January sixth, but really it's the decision making leading up to that. Someone made a bad judgment call and we need to be better prepared. If we're gonna fix this in the future, it isn't about calling the National Guard out quicker. It's about having 1000 people standing there before the riot happens to the riot doesn't happen. Hearing: U.S. Capitol Police and House Sergeant at Arms, Security Failures on January 6, House Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Legislative Branch, February 25, 2021 Watch on YouTube Witnesses: Timothy Blodgett Acting Sergeant at Arms; U.S. House of Representatives Yogananda D. Pittman, Acting Chief of Police, U.S. Capitol Police. Transcript: 09:11 ** Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (CA):** The United States Capitol Police Force is not meant to be an army, expecting 1600 officers to hold back an unruly mob of eight to 10,000 people, many of whom were armed and had their own homemade explosive devices or had came with or weaponized, everyday items. It's not a position we should ever have to be in. 20:51 Yogananda D. Pittman: There's evidence that some of those who stormed the Capitol were organized. But there's also evidence that a large number were everyday Americans who took on a mob mentality because they were angry and desperate. It is the conduct of this latter group that the department was not prepared for. Hearing: Dollars Against Democracy: Domestic Terrorist Financing in the Aftermath of Insurrection, Committee on Financial Services, February 25, 2021 Watch on YouTube Witnesses Iman Boukadoum Senior Manager, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights Lecia Brooks Executive Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center Daniel Glaser Global Head Jurisdictional Services and Head of Washington, DC Office at K2 Integrity Senior Advisor at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies Board member at the Qatar Financial Centre Regulatory Authority Former Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes, U.S. Department of the Treasury Daniel Rogers Co-Founder and Chief Technical Officer at Global Disinformation Index Daveed Gertenstein-Ross CEO of Valens Global Transcript: 03:28 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): In the wake of the attacks of September 11th, we recast the entire federal government and worked feverishly to defund terrorist streams. To effectively disrupt domestic extremist groups, we need to better understand their financing. 03:54 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): Unlike ISIS, for example, these organizations are not pyramid shaped where funding comes from a handful of easily disruptable areas. An online fundraising drive for a legitimate charity, and one that helps support an extremist group can look very similar. 04:57 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): We need to conscientiously be mindful of the civil liberties concerns at play here. Unlike international extremist groups, law enforcement is constrained by the Constitution when dealing with domestic extremists, balancing the desire to give law enforcement the tools necessary to disrupt these groups with the need to respect the rights of all Americans and the Constitution to which we have all pledged an oath is essential. 05:36 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): While we all live through a brutal event on January 6th, undertaken by right wing extremists, no location on the political spectrum has a monopoly on extremism or violence. 10:08 Rep. Maxine Waters (CA): We're here against the backdrop of the January 6th insurrection. A deplorable yet predictable display of white supremacists such as the Proud Boys, the oathkeepers QAnon and others and nationalist violence incited by President Trump against the members of this body and against democracy itself. 12:51 Iman Boukadoum: Last month violent insurrection heavily fueled by white supremacy and white nationalism shocked the world. 13:52 Iman Boukadoum: We know, however, that even well intentioned national security laws are invariably weaponized against black, brown and Muslim communities. And that white nationalist violence is not prioritized making that policy failure the fundamental reason for what transpired on January 6th, not lack of legal authority. For this reason we oppose any legislation that would create new charges for domestic terrorism or any enhanced or additional criminal penalties. The federal government, including the Treasury Department, has many tools at its disposal to investigate. And also the FBI and DOJ have 50 statutes, at least 50 statutes and over a dozen criminal statutes, 50 terrorism related statutes, excuse me and over a dozen criminal statutes that they can use. They just need to use them to target white nationalist violence. 19:33 Lecia Brooks: Today, some white nationalist groups and personalities are raising funds through the distribution of propaganda itself. In November SPLC researchers reported that dozens of extremist groups were earning 1000s of dollars per month on a popular live streaming platform called D-Live. 20:21 Lecia Brooks: Crowdfunding is also being exploited by hate groups to earn money in this new decentralized landscape. Crowdfunding sites played a critical role in the capital insurrection, providing monetary support that allowed people to travel to Washington DC. They've also played a crucial role in raising hundreds of 1000s of dollars in legal fees for extremists. 20:43 Lecia Brooks: The violent insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6 should serve as a wake up call for Congress, the Biden administration, Internet companies, law enforcement and public officials at every level. 23:11 Daniel Glaser: Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to talk about how the US government can employ similar tools and strategies against white nationalists and other domestic terrorist groups as it has employed against global jihadist groups over the past two decades. 23:33 Daniel Glaser: During my time at the Treasury Department, I fought to cut off funding to terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda, the Islamic State and Hezbollah, as a Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bush Administration, and eventually as the Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing in the Obama Administration. My primary responsibility was to lead the design and implementation of strategies to attack the financial networks of these groups and other threats to our country's national security. And while we should never let down our guard with respect to those still potent terrorist organizations, it has become tragically clear that there are domestic extremist groups that in some ways present an even greater threat to our ideals and our democracy. We have the responsibility to target those groups with the same determination, creativity and sense of purpose that we displayed in the years following 9/11. 27:42 Daniel Glaser: Potential measures in Treasury's toolbox include the issuance of guidance to financial institutions on financial type policies, methodologies and red flags, the establishment of public private partnerships the use of information sharing authorities and the use of geographic targeting orders. Taken together these measures will strengthen the ability of financial institutions to identify, report and impede the financial activity of domestic extremist groups and will ensure that the US financial system is a hostile environment for these groups. 30:10 Daniel Rogers: These groups leverage the Internet as a primary means of disseminating their toxic ideologies and soliciting funds. One only needs to search Amazon or Etsy for the term q anon to uncover shirts, hats, mugs, books and other paraphernalia that both monetize and further popular popularized the domestic violent extremist threat. Images from that fateful day last month are rife with sweatshirts that say, Camp outfits that until recently were for sale on websites like Teespring and cafe press. As we speak at least 24 individuals indicted for their role in the January 6 insurrection, including eight members of the proud boys have used crowdfunding site gifts and go to raise nearly a quarter million dollars in donations. And it's not just about the money. This merchandise acts as a sort of team jersey that helps these groups recruit new members and form further hatred towards their targets. We analyze the digital footprints of 73 groups across 60 websites, and 225 social media accounts and their use of 54 different online fundraising mechanisms, including 47 payment platforms and five different cryptocurrencies, ultimately finding 191 instances of hate groups using online fundraising services to support their activities. The funding mechanisms including included both primary platforms like Amazon, intermediary platforms, such as Stripe or Shopify crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe, payments facilitators like PayPal, monetized content streaming services, such as YouTube, super chats, and cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin. All of these payment mechanisms were linked to websites or social media accounts on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, telegram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, gab, picshoot and others. The sheer number of companies I just mentioned, is the first clue to the scale and the scope of the problem. 31:40 Daniel Rogers: We also found that a large fraction of the groups we studied have a tax exempt status with the IRS, a full 100% of anti muslim groups. 75% of anti-immigrant groups, and 70% of anti LGBTQ groups have 501-C-3 or 501-C-4 status. Over 1/3 of the militia groups that we identified, including the oathkeepers, whose leadership was recently indicted on charges related to January 6, have tax exempt status. This status gives them access to a whole spectrum of charity fundraising tools, from Facebook donations to amazon smile, to the point where most of the most common fundraising platform we identified across all of our data was Charity Navigator. 32:30 Daniel Glaser: I think it's important to remember that if you want to be able to use a cryptocurrency in the real economy, to any scale, it at some point doesn't need to be converted into actual fiat currency into dollars. That's the place where the Treasury Department does regulate cryptocurrencies. 42:10 Daniel Glaser: Cryptocurrency exchanges are regarded as money service businesses. They have full customer due diligence requirements. They have full money laundering program requirements, they have reporting requirements. The US Treasury Department just last month, issued a proposed rule relating to unhosted wallets of cryptocurrencies. And that's out for notice and comment. Right now. It addresses the particular issue of, of wallets that are not hosted on a particular exchange. And I think it's an important rule that's out there and I do encourage people to take a look at it, the comment period closes in May, and then hopefully, Treasury will be able to take regulatory action to close that particular vulnerability. 42:46 Rep. Jim Himes (CT): Mr. Glaser, you you, though suggested something new that I'd like to give you a maybe 30 seconds, 42 seconds I have left to elaborate on you said you were taught you were hopeful for sanctions like authorities against domestic actors. You did not to constitutional civil liberties concerns. But give us another 30 seconds on exactly what you mean. And perhaps most importantly, what sort of fourth amendment overlay should accompany such authority? Daniel Glaser: Well, thank you, thank you for the question. The fact is, the Treasury Department really does not have a lot of authority to go after purely domestic groups in the way that it goes after global terrorist organizations that simply doesn't have that authority. You could imagine an authority that does allow for the designation of domestic organizations, it would have to take into account that, the constitutional restrictions. When you look when you read the a lot of the court decisions, there's concerns could be addressed in the statute, there's concerns. A lot of the scrutiny is heightened because sanctions are usually accompanied with acid freezes. But you could imagine sanctions that don't involve asset freezes that involve transaction bounds that involve regulatory type of requirements that you see in Section 311 of the Patriot Act. So there's a variety of ways that both the due process standards could be raised from what we see in the global context. 44:37 Daniel Rogers: The days leading up to the insurrection, the oathkeepers founder Stuart Rhodes appeared on a podcast and solicited charitable donations to the oathkeepers Educational Fund. It can only be presumed that these funds which listeners were notably able to deduct from their federal taxes, went to transporting and lodging members of the group slated to participate in the ensuing riots. 46:06 Rep. French Hill (AZ): Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: In looking at the draft legislation that the majority noticed with this hearing, one bill stuck out to me and I think it's a good follow up for your from your most recent exchange. It seeks to amend title 31 to require the Secretary of the Treasury to establish a program to allow designated employees of financial institutions to access classified information related to terrorism, sedition, and insurrection. Now, over the past three congresses, we've talked about the concept of a fusion center, not unlike we do in monitoring cyber risk and cyber crimes for this terror finance arena. We've never been able to come ashore on it legislatively. So I found that interesting. However, I'm concerned that when you deputize bank employees without any oversight, as to how the information would be protected or if there's really even a need for that. 46:53 Rep. French Hill (AZ): Could you describe how banks share information with law enforcement today and how they provide feedback on how we might change these protocols or if they're if that protocol change is necessary. Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: Thank you ranking member, there are four primary ways that banks share information now. The first is suspicious activity reports or the SAR. Financial institutions have to file these documents with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network or FinCEN. When there's a suspected case of money laundering or fraud, the star is designed to monitor activity and finance related industries that are out of the ordinary are a precursor to illegal activity, or can threaten public safety. Second, there's law enforcement's 314 a power under the Patriot Act, in which obtains potential lead information from financial institutions via fincen. Third, law enforcement can use its subpoena power, if a court issues a subpoena pursuant to an investigation, or to an administrative proceeding and forth where there are blocked assets pursuant to OFAC authorities, sanctions or otherwise, banks are required to report block assets back to OFAC. The information sharing in my view is currently quite effective. Treasury in particular has a very strong relationship with the US financial institutions. 48:24 Rep. French Hill (AZ): On 314 in the Patriot Act, is that a place where we could, in a protected appropriate way make a change that relates to this domestic issue? Or is that, in your view, too challenging? Daveed Gertenstein-Ross: No, I think it's a place where you could definitely make a change. The 314-A process allows an investigator to canvass financial institutions for potential lead information that might otherwise never be uncovered. It's designed to allow disparate pieces of information to be identified, centralized and evaluated. So when law enforcement submits a request to Finicen, to get information from financial institutions, it has to submit a written certification that each individual or entity about which the information is sought is engaged in or reasonably suspected of engaging in terrorist activity or money laundering. I think that in some cases 314-A, may already be usable, but I think it's worth looking at the 314-A process to see if in this particular context, when you're looking at domestic violent extremism, as opposed to foreign terrorist organizations, there are some tweaks that would provide ability to get leads in this manner. 1:15:15 Iman Boukadoum: What we submit is that the material support for terrorism statute, as we know, there are two of them. There's one with an international Nexus that is required. And there's one that allows for investigating material support for terrorism, domestic terrorism, in particular, as defined in the patriot act with underlying statutes that allows for any crimes that take place within the United States that have no international nexus. And we believe that that second piece of material support for terrorism statute has been neglected and can be nicely used with the domestic terrorism definition as laid out in the Patriot Act. And we hope that statutory framework will be used to actually go after violent white nationalists and others. 1:50:25 Daniel Rogers: I think there are a number of regulatory fronts that all kind of go to the general problem of disinformation as a whole. And I don't know that we have the time to get into all of them here, but I think they, they certainly fall into three three big categories, with the one most relevant to today's discussion being this idea of platform government and platform liability, that, you know, our data is showing how what a key role, these sorts of platforms play in facilitating the activities of these groups. And the fact that the liability is so nebulous or non existent through things like Section 230 and whatnot, which what we found is that there's there's already policies in place against all of these hate and extremist groups, but they're just simply not enforced. And so updating that kind of platform liability to help drive enforcement I think is one of the key areas that that that we can focus on. Hearing: JANUARY 6 ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and Committee on Rules and Administration, February 23, 2021 Day 1 C-SPAN Witnesses Captain Carneysha Mendoza Field Commander of the United States Capitol Police Special Operations Division Robert Contee Acting Chief of Police for the Metropolitan Police Department Paul Irving Former Sergeant at Arms of the House of Representatives Michael Stenger Former Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate Transcript: 27:11 Captain Carneysha Mendoza: On January 6th, we anticipated an event similar to the million MAGA March that took place on November 14th, where we would likely face groups fighting among one another. 39:21 Robert Contee: MPD is prohibited by federal law from entering the Capitol or its grounds to patrol, make arrests or served warrants without the consent request of the Capitol Police board. 39:32 Robert Contee: The President of the United States not the Mayor of the District of Columbia controls the DC National Guard. 39:57 Robert Contee: Since Mayor Bowser declared a public health emergency last March, the district has not issued permits for any large gatherings. Although the district and MPD take pride in facilitating the exercise of first amendment rights by all groups, regardless of their beliefs. None of the public gatherings on January 5th and sixth were issued permits by the city. 47:13 Steven Sund: The intelligence that we based our planning on indicated that the January six protests were expected to be similar to the previous MAGA rallies in 2020, which drew 10s of 1000s of participants. 55:33 Paul Irving: We began planning for the protests of January 6th in December 2020. The planning relied on what we understood to be credible intelligence provided by various state and federal agencies, including a special event assessment issued by the Capitol Police on January 3rd. The January 3rd assessment forecast at the pros tests were ‘expected to be similar to the previous million MAGA March rallies that had taken place in November and December 2020.' Every Capitol Police daily intelligence report between January 4 and January 6, including on January 6th forecast the chance of civil disobedience or arrest during the protests as remote to improbable. 56:29 Paul Irving: The Chiefs plan took on an all hands on deck approach whereby every available sworn Capitol Police employee with police powers was assigned to work on January 6th. That meant approximately 1200 Capitol Police officers were on site, including civil disturbance units and other tactical teams. I also understood that 125 National Guard troops were on notice to be standing by for a quick response. The Metropolitan Police Department was also on 12 hour shifts, with no officers on day off or leave. And they staged officers just north of the Capitol to provide immediate assistance if required. The plan was brief to multiple law enforcement partners. Based on the intelligence we all believed that the plan met the threat. 1:00:57 Steven Sund: I actually just in the last 24 hours, was informed by the department that they actually had received that report. It was received by what we call, it's one of our sworn members that's assigned to the Joint Terrorism Task Force, which is a task force with the FBI. They received it the evening of the fifth, reviewed it and then forwarded over to an official at the Intelligence Division over at the US Capitol Police Headquarters. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): And so you hadn't seen it yourself? Steven Sund: No, ma'am. It did not go any further than that. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay. And then was it sent to the House and Senate Sergeant in Arms? I don't believe that went any farther than from over to the sergeant at the intelligence. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): And Mr. Irving. Mr. Stanger, Do you did you get that report beforehand? Mr. Stanger, Did you get the report? Michael Stenger: No. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay, Mr. Irving? Paul Irving: I did not Sen. Amy Klobuchar (MN): Okay. 1:05:36 Sen. Klobuchar: Mr. Sund, you stated in your written testimony that you first made a request for the Capitol Police board to declare an emergency and authorized National Guard support on Monday January 4th, and that request was not granted. Steven Sund: That is correct, ma'am. 1:05:47 Sen. Klobuchar: Your testimony makes clear that the current structure of the Capitol Police corps resulted in delays in bringing in assistance from the National Guard. Would you agree with that? That's one of the things we want to look at. Steven Sund: Yes, ma'am. 1:06:02 Sen. Klobuchar: Do you think that changes are needed to make clear that the Capitol Police Chief has the authority to call in the National Guard? Steven Sund: I certainly do. I think in an exigent circumstances, there needs to be a streamlined process for the Capitol Chief of Police for the Capitol Police to have authority. 1:07:23 Sen. Klobuchar: Mr. Sund your written testimony states that you had no authority to request t

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Aria Code
Only the Good Die Young: Verdi's La Traviata

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 37:26


One of opera's great heroines is based on one of history's extraordinary women. The 19th century French courtesan Marie Duplessis was elegant, successful, famous, and gone before her time, dying of tuberculosis at the age of 23. One of her lovers, Alexandre Dumas fils, was so inspired by her that he wrote a novel and a play about her life called The Lady of the Camellias, which in turn inspired Giuseppe Verdi to compose La Traviata. Verdi immortalized Marie Duplessis in the character of Violetta Valéry, giving us a woman both at the height of her vitality and success, and on her deathbed. Alone, and having loved and lost a man named Alfredo, she sings “Addio del passato.” This aria is a farewell to the past and a plea to God for forgiveness. Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the brief, vibrant life of Marie Duplessis and how Verdi captured her plaintive farewell in music. As a child, soprano Lisette Oropesa saw her mother perform the role of Violetta on stage and was heartbroken by the end! Still, she found the courage to eventually take on this great heroine herself. Lisette has enjoyed learning about the strength, smarts, and tenacity of the real-life Marie Duplessis.  Writer Fred Plotkin is the author of Opera 101: A Complete Guide to Learning and Loving Opera. He has worked in opera since 1972, doing everything but singing, and has written six books on Italian cuisine. Verdi is his hero because he represents all the greatness an artist can achieve both artistically and as a human being. Writer and journalist Liesl Schillinger translated Alexandre Dumas fils' novel, La Dame aux Camélias, and discovered in Marie Duplessis an extraordinary, generous, and shockingly modern woman. In Dumas fils, she discovered a man who was critical of the constraints and double-standards that constrained women during the 1800s.  Actor and director John Turturro is known for his roles in over 60 feature films, but perhaps less well-known as a Verdi fan. He sometimes includes operatic music in his films, and he's even tried his hand at directing Verdi's Rigoletto. Growing up, he remembers fondly how his dad and uncles would gather around a record player to compare and critique different singers' performances of a single aria.