Podcasts about Altamont

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  • 209PODCASTS
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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Altamont

Latest podcast episodes about Altamont

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
1/18 5-1 Jay Mohr

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:05


Check out his mew special, "Altamont" on ALL the digital on demand servcies! - Limiting to 1 Liter of Wine See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

On est fait pour s'entendre
L'INTÉGRALE - Woodstock : pourquoi le festival a "un jumeau maléfique" ?

On est fait pour s'entendre

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 39:20


Dans son livre "Woodstock", Julien Bitoun parle du "jumeau maléfique" de Woostock : le festival Altamont et qui s'est déroulé décembre 1969. Altamont est organisé "à l'arrache" comme Woodstock. Quelques jours avant le début d'Altamont, "ils n'ont plus le lieu qu'ils voulaient avoir donc ils sont obligés de se rabattre sur une piste de F1, qui est une cuvette et le pire lieu possible pour un concert de rock", décrit encore l'auteur. Texte de Bastien Robin Ecoutez Jour J avec Flavie Flament du 05 janvier 2022

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Infrared Roses

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 89:11


The Deadcast celebrates the 30th anniversary of 1991's “Infrared Roses,” the last original Grateful Dead album (with cover art by Jerry Garcia & track titles by Robert Hunter) & explores the band's MIDI years. Guests: Bob Bralove, David Lemieux, Steve Silberman, Doug Kaplan, Dave Harrington

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses st louis beatles midi warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham infrared trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne steve silberman capital theater dave harrington live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
BONUS: Inside the Vault

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 80:21


We uncover the secrets of the Grateful Dead's legendary tape vault with archivist David Lemieux, from LSD alchemist Owsley Stanley to the making of the Betty Boards, from “Dick's Picks” (& Dick Latvala's own home recordings) to the 10th anniversary of “Dave's Picks.”Guests: David Lemieux, Carol Latvala, Rhoney Stanley, Starfinder Stanley, David Gans, Mike Johnson

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont st louis beatles warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band vault avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr mike johnson don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters david gans robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater live dead owsley stanley acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Dead StudiesWe examine the emergent interdisciplinary world of Dead Studies & pay a virtual visit to the annual Grateful Dead Scholars Caucus, hearing presentation excerpts from a spectrum of musicologists, historians, psychologists, and more.Guests: Rebecca Adams, Nicholas Meriwether, Brent Wood, Melvin Backstrom, Beth Carroll, Rhoney Stanley, Isaac Slone, Julie DeLong, Adam Brown, Corry Arnold

What a Creep
What a Creep: Altamont "Creepy Concert Tragedy" Not Fade Away Replay

What a Creep

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 99:46


What a Creep: Not Fade Away Podcast Bonus Ep  “Altamont/The Rolling Stones” The Not Fade Away podcast is back and today's subject--the Altamont concert that took place on December 6, 1969. It was supposed to be a showcase by the Rolling Stones to demonstrate their ability to draw an even bigger crowd than the Woodstock festival which took place in August of that year. That concert was billed as “three days of peace & music” and managed to rise above their circumstances of overcrowding, rain and brown acid to become a legendary event that 50 years later serves as an example of how hippies can work peacefully with “the man” to create beauty out chaos. Instead, Altamont is rightly or wrongly known as one of the key events that ended 60s idealism. At the end of the day, 300,000 showed up at a tiny speedway far outside the city of San Francisco to find a barely visible stage, pissed-off Hell Angels members as authority figures, horrible drugs snuck into drinks that left people incapacitated, very few bathrooms, little emergency care, and four people dead. Among the deceased was an 18-year Meredith Hunter--an African American teen who was proud to bring his pretty, white teenage girlfriend Patti Bredehoft to the show but thought it would be wise to carry a Smith & Weston pistol for protection.   Hunter was beaten and stabbed to death by a group of Hell's Angels who claimed he was aiming to shoot at the stage. All of this was shockingly caught on film as filmmakers Albert & David Maysles were shooting a documentary about the shooting a documentary about the Rolling Stones which would be released in 1970 under the title Gimme Shelter. The concert, which was to feature The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Crosby, Stills Nash & Young, The Flying Burrito Brothers, and the Rolling Stones as headliners were meant to rival the east coast Woodstock celebration. It was also a public relations stunt by the Rolling Stones to offer a free concert when their current tour was billing high ticket prices for the time. It would also serve to have the Grateful Dead play to a home crowd and make up for their rather pathetic showing at Woodstock. (The band themselves admit their portion of the three-day celebration was pretty stinky.) This is the story of how that concert came to be, what went wrong, the lives that were lost and what lessons we can learn from the mess of a show that was a mixture of rock star hubris, greed and youthful ignorance. In the first part, I am going to give you an overlay on what happened that day and include an eyewitness account by my friend Andrea who attended (and was eight months pregnant by the way.) The second part will include interviews with two authors who are experts on Altamont: Saul Austerlitz a Brooklyn-based author wrote “Just a Shot Away: Peace, Love and Tragedy With the Rolling Stones at Altamont” with a keen focus on Meredith Hunter and his tragically short life that was marked by chaos, family mental health issues and racism. Joel Selvin, longtime rock journalist from the San Francisco area who wrote “Altamont: The Rolling Stones, the Hells Angels and the Inside Story of Rock's Darkest Day.” Clips used in this episode: Mick Jagger announces a free concert in San Francisco (from the film Gimme Shelter) Attorney Melvin Belli negotiates to get Altamont Speedway (from the film Gimme Shelter) The Grateful Dead (Jerry Garcia & Phil Lesh) hear about the chaos at Altamont (from the film Gimme Shelter) Jerry Garcia describing why Altamont had violence versus Woodstock (DVD extra from the Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip) Mick Jagger tries to calm the audience down (from the film Gimmie Shelter) Also, subscribe to the show so you won't miss my next episode!   Be sure to follow us on social media. But don't follow us too closely … don't be a creep about it!   Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts Twitter: https://twitter.com/CreepPod @CreepPod Facebook: Join the private group!  Instagram @WhatACreepPodcast Visit our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/whatacreep Email: WhatACreepPodcast@gmail.com  We've got merch here! https://whatacreeppodcast.threadless.com/# Our website is www.whatacreeppodcast.com  Our logo was created by Claudia Gomez-Rodriguez. Follow her on Instagram @ClaudInCloud

Music History Monday
Music History Monday: Altamont

Music History Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 21:49


Grim Dystopian
Beware of Talking Shrimp

Grim Dystopian

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 73:03


 S6E139: Beware of Talking Shrimp  National Microwave day leads to interesting memories of apartment living, top 10 black metal albums of 2021, we learn about the Altamont festival on this day in history, random nuggets of advice, and an interesting house ‘warning' party experience.  *Available on your favorite streaming service*    Special Thanks to: In the Shadows of Giants, SONG: The Twilight Epitaph II: Endure  Astral Moon, SONG: Astral Necromancy Carathis, SONG: Execute The Ambush  Sulfure, SONG: Obsolescence Grandma's Pantry, Pete-less, SONG: Squeezed Out Spider Kitten, SONG: Sandbagged (Whoa, Yeah!)  Gravehuffer, SONG: Death Before Disco The Mist From the Mountains, SONG: Master of Wilderness Battering Ram, SONG: What I've Become   

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Dead Freaks Unite

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 86:10


We give thanks to Dead Heads and use listener-submitted stories to tell to the Heads' history from the Haight-Ashbury to Shakedown Street, with Bill Walton, DeadBase founder Mike Dolgushkin, sociologist Rebecca Adams, Steve Silberman, & and many new friends.GUESTS: Bill Walton, Rebecca Adams, Steve Silberman, Mike Dolgushkin, Adam Brown

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont st louis beatles warner brothers doors cornell freaks classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan heads pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco unite prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin shakedown street ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke bill walton aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound adam brown steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream rebecca adams david browne steve silberman capital theater live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
Other Voices
Pastor Eric Reimer — Build relationships and spread love

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:26


Eric Reimer is a pastor who tweets.He is the new pastor at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Altamont. “The word of God …,” said Reimer, “needs to be proclaimed wherever people are. The Lutheran movement itself exists largely because of changes in the way people communicate.”Martin Luther's ideas in the 1500s had been expressed before by other theologians, but Luther was able to print them and distribute them quickly before they could be repressed, said Reimer, leading to the Protestant Reformation.“And then once his ideas were out there, he took advantage of things like using woodcuts to make interesting illustrations to accompany his catechism, so Christian teachings and instructions would hold people's attention,” Reimer said.Luther was also an advocate of translating the scriptures from Latin into languages people spoke and could easily understand.Whether it's on Twitter or Facebook, Reimer said, the church should be where “God's people are.” He went on, “And so whenever there are ways to advocate for peace or to care for one another or to love our neighbor, the church should show up and proclaim that.”In his job as a pastor, Reimer says on this week's Enterprise podcast, “A lot of what I do is creative.” This includes writing sermons and inventing fresh approaches to Bible study. His job also involves relationships, providing spiritual care in homes and hospitals. This has been complicated by COVID-19 restrictions, Reimer said, and some of his congregants he has met only through screens.As a teenager, Reimer worked at a Lutheran summer camp — and continued to work there for seven summers. One of the things that attracted him to Altamont was its proximity to the Adirondacks. He floundered when he first went to college, Reimer said, but was grounded by his desire to return to work at the Lutheran summer camp. “Being there for others … was what I was called to do,” he said.He discerned his call to the ministry at the camp, Reimer said, as he likened being a pastor to being a counselor for life. He described his work as a lifelong cycle of sharing joys and sorrows with a group of people.The outdoor aspects of the camp, like hiking on the Appalachian Trail, he added, reinforced the importance of working together and caused intense bonding.Being there for others, as Reimer put it, sometimes involves people you don't even know. As the Thanksgiving holiday approaches, Reimer closed with a challenge.“It's always appropriate to give thanks,” he said. “And whether you're a Christian or not, I think we can all benefit from the act of actively giving thanks and looking for things to be thankful for.”Reimer challenged podcast listeners “to spend the week looking for different reasons to be thankful … to have gratitude. And I will then challenge you to find new ways to express that gratitude to others. And to help build relationships and spread love.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 36 | William McKeen ["Everybody Had an Ocean: Music and Mayhem in 1960s Los Angeles"]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 94:32


Los Angeles in the 1960s gave the world some of the greatest music in rock 'n' roll history: "California Dreamin'" by the Mamas and the Papas, "Mr. Tambourine Man" by the Byrds, and "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys, a song that magnificently summarized the joy and beauty of the era in three and a half minutes.But there was a dark flip side to the fun fun fun of the music, a nexus between naïve young musicians and the hangers-on who exploited the decade's peace, love, and flowers ethos, all fueled by sex, drugs, and overnight success. One surf music superstar unwittingly subsidized the kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Jr. The transplanted Texas singer Bobby Fuller might have been murdered by the Mob in what is still an unsolved case. And after hearing Charlie Manson sing, Neil Young recommended him to the president of Warner Bros. Records. Manson's ultimate rejection by the music industry likely led to the infamous murders that shocked a nation."Everybody Had an Ocean" chronicles the migration of the rock 'n' roll business to Southern California and how the artists flourished there. The cast of characters is astonishing—Brian and Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, eccentric producer Phil Spector, Cass Elliot, Sam Cooke, Ike and Tina Turner, Joni Mitchell, and scores of others—and their stories form a modern epic of the battles between innocence and cynicism, joy and terror. You'll never hear that beautiful music in quite the same way.William McKeen is the author of nine books and the editor of four more. He teaches at Boston University, where he chairs the Department of Journalism and serves as associate dean of the College of Communication. He teaches literary journalism, history of journalism, reporting, feature writing and history of rock'n'roll. He's worked for several newspapers and magazines, including The Saturday Evening Post, The American Spectator, The Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, The Palm Beach Post in Florida and The St. Petersburg Times in Florida. His writing has appeared in Holiday, American History, Maxim, The Saturday Evening Post, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and many other newspapers and magazines. He has appeared on “The Today Show,” “The O'Reilly Factor,” “The CBS Evening News” and other news programs.Purchase a copy of "Everybody Had An Ocean: Music and Mayhem in 1960s Los Angeles" through Chicago Review Press: https://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/everybody-had-an-ocean-products-9781641605717.php?page_id=21Find out more about William McKeen at his official website: https://www.williammckeen.comListen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1ZCZOwSP6YrZL00WBlmKkT?si=66936c284ea340efRecommended Reading: “Glimpses” by Louis Shiner https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007JZ0EUK/refThe Booked On Rock Website: https://www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent book store here: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Theme Song: “Whoosh” by Crowander [ https://freemusicarchive.org/music/crowander]The Booked On Rock “Latest Books On Rock Releases” Song: “Slippery Rocks” by Crowander [ https://freemusicarchive.org/music/crowander]

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

We are beyond honored to welcome former Grateful Dead vocalist Donna Jean Godchaux-MacKay herself to hear the wondrous story of how she went from Alabama to the top of the charts before fate led her to San Francisco, Keith Godchaux, and the Grateful Dead.GUEST: Donna Jean Godchaux-MacKay

The Chip Franklin Show
November 8, 2021: Chip Franklin - Tragedies in Houston & Santa Fe

The Chip Franklin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 22:24


With ABC's Jason Nathanson.& Washington Post music critic Chris Richards Who's responsible for what happened Friday night? Maybe it's best to start with who isn't. Before you blame the festival's audience for being young, remember the deaths that occurred at Altamont back in 1969, then remember the rape and destruction that took place at Woodstock '99. Before you blame the festival's music for being rap, remember how 11 young people died in a crush outside of a Who concert in Cincinnati in 1979, then remember how nine people died in the crowd during a Pearl Jam performance in Denmark in 2000. And before you blame the festival's performers for being too exciting, remember how concert promoters have historically shown a tendency to deflect responsibilities of crowd safety to the musicians on stage' — like in a recent documentary about Woodstock '99, in which the event's promoters suggest that Limp Bizkit's performance was responsible for sending their ill-fated festival into bedlam. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Nixon, Watergate, and... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre? w/ Martin Harris

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 82:07


On this edition of Parallax Views, it's a Halloween hangover episode where politics and horror movies collide! Martin Harris, author of Leatherface vs. Tricky Dick: The Texas Chain Saw Massacre as Political Satire, joins me to examine filmmaker Tobe Hooper's 1974 cult classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre in the context of the turbulent political scandal it was made in the midst of: Watergate and the fall of President Richard Milhouse Nixon. Believe it or not, Hooper himself made references to how his infamous film was influenced by the political climate of the 1970s. Much was going on when the film was being made. U.S. economic woes were increasing while gas shortages impacted the nation. The leftovers of the psychedelic 60s counterculture were wondering about in the aftermath of the Manson Family killings and Altamont. The Vietnam War was winding down but its effect on the American psyche was looming large. The rural/urban divide was growing. And Richard Nixon, with the help of his cronies like G. Gordon Liddy, plotted to break-in to the Democratic National Convention in what would become of the biggest scandal in American political history. Harris and I discuss all this and much more in this fascinating conversation that also delves into the parallels between Leatherface and Richard Nixon, the character of "The Old Man" (played by Jim Siedow) in The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, and Richard Nixon, Irving Kristol's "The Nightmare of Watergate" and the irrationality of Watergate, the dark comedy of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, a historical overview of the Watergate scandal and the way it was experienced by Americans at the time, Gerald Ford's comments about Watergate as "our long national nightmare", Hunter S. Thompson's commentaries on Watergate and his invocation of the horrific and grotesque when writing about it,  "Saturn in Retrograde" and the implications of the cosmic in The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, satires of the Nixon era as it was happening, the infamous White House "Saturday Night Massacre" under Nixon, the valence of Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel's production company being called Vortex Inc., the circularity of both The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Watergate wherein the "horror folds in on itself", the chilling opening of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and the narration by John Larroquette, criminal discovery in Watergate and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, the villains of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre as conspirators engaged in cover-ups of crimes, the character of "The Hitchhiker" (played by Edwin Neal), the Leatherface mask and the Nixon mask, Leatherface's formality of dress (ie: tie and suit), tensions between "old ways" and "new ways" and tradition vs. youth in The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Nixon and the Southern Strategy, Tobe Hooper's experimental film Eggshells and its relationship to the 1960s counterculture, the power of the Presidency and draconian measures in the Nixon era, the rise of astrology and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, political lies and the lie that The Texas Chain Saw Massacre was "based on a true story", the popularity of astrology in times of uncertainty and Nixon's relationship with astrologer Jeane Dixon, political allegory vs. political satire, satire as a means to comment on real life matters in indirect ways, and much, more! Check out our sponsor Christopher Bell's new short film Trammell at https://slamdance.com/watch/trammel/ or https://www.youtube.com/user/slamdance

B&H Photography Podcast
‘Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky - Rock Photography of the 1960's (Encore)

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 69:45


Today's episode is an encore presentation of the show originally published on March 19, 2020. If you were otherwise preoccupied that week, we recommend you take a listen to this conversation about photographer Jim Marshall and the film “Show Me the Picture”, a documentary on his life and work as a rock-n-roll photographer. The film is now streaming on AppleTV/iTunes and if you are in Boston, MA on November 13, The Leica Store Boston is hosting a special screening of the film, followed by a conversation with author and the film's producer Amelia Davis and editor Bill Shapiro (coincidentally our guest on next week's new episode). There will also be a book signing of the companion book, “Jim Marshall Show Me the Picture”. The event is free but its necessary to sign up on eventbrite.  -------------------------------------------------------- Today we discuss some of the most recognized images of rock-n-roll history. Our first guest is photographer Amelia Davis who is the owner of Jim Marshall LLC, the living archive of the prolific photographer Jim Marshall, most known for his images of jazz and rock musicians of the 1950's through the 1970s.  If you are familiar with photos of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, or the Allman Brothers Band, then you are certain to know his work. Marshall not only covered the Monterrey and Altamont festivals, but was the only photographer invited by the Beatles to cover their final concert. Marshall also documented the Civil Rights movement and the Haight-Ashbury scene in San Francisco. With Davis, we discuss how she came to be the proprietor of the archive and how she protects and manages the collection. We also talk about Marshall, the man, and why he was seemingly able to photograph “everyone” in that era.  Davis is also part of the production team behind the new film "Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall”, which is well worth seeing to get a better understanding of Marshall's motley personality and his incredible body of work. After our chat with Davis, we welcome photographer Elliott Landy, who is producing a book of his images on the seminal rock group, The Band. Landy was the official photographer of the famed 1969 Woodstock music festival and responsible for unforgettable images of Van Morrison, Bob Dylan, and others.   Guests: Amelia Davis and Elliott Landy Photograph: MIles Davis © Jim Marshall Photography LLC

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Listen To The River: Kiel Auditorium, October 1973

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 89:10


Listen To The River: Kiel Auditorium, October 1973The Deadcast finishes our tour of St. Louis at the Kiel Auditorium in fall 1973, featuring Warlocks-era insider Steve Brown, local heads, the return of musicologist Graeme Boone to go deep into Dead's jams, & a visit from Rich's parents. GUESTS: Sepp Donahower, Tony Dwyer, Steve Brown, Thom Pallazola, Drea Stein, John Ellis, Janne Mahan, Bill Mahan, David Lemieux, Graeme Boone

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont st louis beatles rich warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane warlocks deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts john ellis jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso steve brown ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater live dead acid tests kiel auditorium sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
Altamont
#12 - Especial Indie Rock

Altamont

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 70:29


Comemorámos os 20 anos do primeiro disco dos Strokes, Is This It, com um Especial Indie Rock no Altamont.pt. Este é o episódio do podcast dedicado ao género musical que dominou a década dos 00's e meteu uma nova geração a dançar o bom velho rock! https://altamont.pt/indie-rock-pagina/

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 31 | Marc Myers ["Rock Concert: An Oral History as Told by the Artists, Backstage Insiders, and Fans Who Were There"]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 89:52


Decades after the rise of rock music in the 1950s, the rock concert retains its allure and its power as a unifying experience—and as an influential multi-billion-dollar industry. In "Rock Concert", acclaimed interviewer Marc Myers sets out to uncover the history of this compelling phenomenon, weaving together ground-breaking accounts from the people who were there.Myers combines the tales of icons like Joan Baez, Ian Anderson, Alice Cooper, Steve Miller, Roger Waters, and Angus Young with figures such as the disc jockeys who first began playing rock on the radio, like Alan Freed in Cleveland and New York; the audio engineers that developed new technologies to accommodate ever-growing rock audiences; music journalists, like Rolling Stone's Cameron Crowe; and the promoters who organized it all, like Michael Lang, co-founder of Woodstock, to create a rounded and vivid account of live rock's stratospheric rise."Rock Concert" provides a fascinating, immediate look at the evolution of rock 'n' roll through the lens of live performances —spanning from the rise of R&B in the 1950s, through the hippie gatherings of the '60s, to the growing arena tours of the '70s and '80s. Elvis Presley's gyrating hips, the British Invasion that brought the Beatles in the '60s, the Grateful Dead's free flowing jams, and Pink Floyd's The Wall are just a few of the defining musical acts that drive this rich narrative. Featuring dozens of key players in the history of rock and filled with colorful anecdotes, Rock Concert will speak to anyone who has experienced the transcendence of live rock.Marc Myers is a frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, where he writes about music and the arts. He is the author of the critically acclaimed books Anatomy of a Song and Why Jazz Happened, and posts daily at JazzWax.com, a three-time winner of the Jazz Journalists Association's award for Jazz Blog of the Year.Purchase a copy of "Rock Concert: An Oral History as Told by the Artists, Backstage Insiders, and Fans Who Were There" through Grove Atlantic: https://groveatlantic.com/book/rock-concertFind Marc Myers at his official website: https://www.anatomyofasong.com Read Marc Myers' daily blogs at JazzWax: https://www.jazzwax.comThe Booked On Rock Website: https://www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent book store here: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderThe Booked On Rock Theme Song: “Whoosh” by Crowander [ https://freemusicarchive.org/music/crowander]

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
BONUS: Bear Drops: LA ‘66

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 92:46


We explore the Grateful Dead's formative early 1966 months in Los Angeles under the patronage of Owsley Stanley, LSD chemist & the band's new sound engineer, featuring Owsley's assistants Tim Scully & Don Douglas, Merry Pranksters, Rosie McGee, & an archival interview with Owsley.GUESTS: Tim Scully, Don Douglas, Rosie McGee, Denise Kaufman, Ken Babbs, Starfinder Stanley, Hawk, David Gans

los angeles music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont bear st louis beatles warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones hawk rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts drops jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr tim scully don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters david gans robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal owsley watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater live dead owsley stanley acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
Other Voices
‘True Ghost Stories' — on reality, life and death

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:48


Two creative men from Altamont have gathered ghost stories from village residents and surrounding areas into a book. Neither is a stranger to imagination and yet they have labeled these stories as true.Tom Capuano, a retired professor, once wrote a book-length narrative poem on the founding of Altamont, grounded in history but with imaginative creation of characters. He raises sheep now in an 18th-Century barn on land that both figure prominently in some of the ghost stories.Thom Breitenbach, an artist who lives in a castle he built on the hillside above the village, wrote and produced a musical about Hieronymus Bosch, a 15th-Century Dutch artist who, like Breitenbach, creates imaginative creatures. In Breitenbach's musical, those creatures come alive.So where does each draw the line between imagination and reality? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Listen To The River: Fox Theatre, October 1972

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 93:39


Listen To The River: Fox Theatre, October 1972We go behind the scenes, into the crowd, around the specially-installed mirror ball, & inside the music at the Dead's 3 legendary 1972 shows at St. Louis's Fox Theatre with promoters Sepp Donahower & Tony Dwyer, musicologist Graeme Boone, & Dead freaks who were there. GUESTS: Tony Dwyer, Sepp Donahower, Bill Weber, Drea Stein, John Ellis, Bob Simmons, Thom Pallazola, Joe Schwab, Mark Slosberg, Starfinder Stanley, Hawk, Graeme Boone, David Lemieux

theater music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont st louis beatles warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones hawk rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts john ellis jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star fox theatre disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater bill weber live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Listen To The River: Fox Theatre, December 1971

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 96:08


The Grateful Dead's relationship with St. Louis went deep as the new Listen To The River box set and this Deadcast prove, featuring promoter Tony Dwyer, offstage jams at Scotty's Music, and the time the Dead crashed Richie Gerber's bar mitzvah.GUESTS: Sam Cutler, Tony Dwyer, Michael Scott, Richard Gerber, Mark Slosberg, Steve Fisher, Doug Heller, David Lemieux, Joe Schwab, Tom Wood, Bob Simmons, Thom Pallazola, John Ellis

theater music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont st louis beatles warner brothers doors scotty cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin tom wood ripple music podcasts john ellis jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star fox theatre disco biscuits ratdog fox theater jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters michael scott robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa steve fisher acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
This Band Could Be Your Food
What food is The Rolling Stones?

This Band Could Be Your Food

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 59:58


To celebrate our 10th episode, as well as to pay homage to the passing of The Stones' drummer Charlie Watts, this week Nate Hall and I discuss The Rolling Stones. It seems like they have always been here, but we'll see if can't trace back to the moment when the plates collided, resulting in the formation of the World's Greatest Rock & Roll Band. For this episode I drill Nate with trivia questions and see if I can't stump him. We will be discussing Charlie Watts' career, the dreaded 1969 Altamont concert, their first live performance of Brown Sugar, and treasure chest of trivia for all levels of Stones fans. Not to mention, we find a slightly healthier recipe of a classic American dish, and some funny comparisons between the food and the band. Have a great lunch and don't forget to rate the podcast. Ciao Chow!

Other Voices
Edna Litten — speaking out about plastic grass

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 33:10


“We've only got one planet,” says Edna Litten. “We've got to take care of it.”Litten, who grew up in Queens and lives now in Altamont, remembers going to a teach-in for the first Earth Day in 1970. Since then, over the last half-century, she has hung her laundry out to dry; she's never owned a clothes dryer. Litten is part of a local group focusing on the dangers of synthetic turf. As The Enterprise has reported at length over the last several months, part of the Guilderland school district's proposed $21.8 million capital project includes a $2.5 million plan to build a synthetic playing field at the high school. The public vote on the project is Oct. 7.In July, athletes, coaches, and sports boosters spoke enthusiastically to the school board about the need for a turf field. David Austin, the district's director of Physical Education and Athletics, said, “I don't think it's a luxury. We're at a disadvantage.” He said that, before the year is out, 10 of the 15 Suburban Council schools will have turf fields, which puts Guilderland players at a disadvantage. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

John DeChristopher - Live From My Drum Room!
Episode 45: Live From My Drum Room With Michael Shrieve! 7-13-21

John DeChristopher - Live From My Drum Room!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 69:43


My guest today is the legendary Michael Shrieve. Michael and I discussed his incredible career, including joining "Santana" at age 19 to record Santana's first record, and performing in front of 500,000 people at Woodstock shortly after his 20th birthday, and his legendary drum solo on "Soul Sacrifice." We also discussed his deep friendship with the great Elvin Jones and his upcoming book on Elvin, Mitch Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix and the San Francisco scene in the late 60s. Thanks to the great Michael Shrieve for being my guest! Please subscribe to my channel and check out the other shows! 

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Sam Cutler - Tour Manager of The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and Other Mega Stars

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:26


Sam Cutler was tour manager for the Rolling Stones at some of their major gigs in the late sixties, including the infamous concert at Altamont where a man was murdered by a Hells Angel in front of the stage while the Stones played on. After the show, Sam was left behind to make peace with the Hells Angels, the various mobsters and organizations who had taken an overt interest in the event, and the people of America. There has never been an official investigation into events at Altamont and those involved have never before spoken on record. Sam Cutler has decided that it is time to put to rest the myths and legends that have grown up around this infamous event in rock history and for the first time reveal the truth. Sam survived Altamont and went on to live the ultimate rock and roll dream. This is also his own account of the high ol' times he had managing tours for San Francisco band the Grateful Dead - who went on to become the world's most successful live act. Along the way Sam draws intimate portraits of other stars of the psychedelic circus that was the music industry in the sixties and seventies, including Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Band, the Allman Brothers, Pink Floyd, and Eric Clapton. This is an exhilarating, all-areas-access rock memoir from someone who has seen - and done - it all. - www.netgalley.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Super Rock Sunday
Episode 4: Scurvy Rock Sunday "Talk Like a Pirate Day" 2011 w/ Sloshin' John & Dog Legged Dobot

Super Rock Sunday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 110:59


An oldie but a goodie I want to be thankin' me mateys Sloshin' John & Dog Legged Dobot fer hoisting grog with me today. Here's what we be playin'.Pigmy Love Circus "Mutiny on the Bounty", Scissorfight "The Gibbeted Captain Kidd",Sex Pistols "Friggin'in the Riggin", Cathedral  "Ghost Galleon", Riff Lord "Solid State Sea Witch",Candlemass  "Demon of the Deep", Made out of Babies  "Pirate", Armored Saint "Pirates",Altamont  "Pirate Love", Down  "New Orleans is a Dying Whore", Zoroaster  "Trident",Deep Purple  "Sail Away", Swashbuckle  "Scurvy Back", Tankard  "Beermuda",Boulder  "Kill the Captain", Torche  "Warship", Trippy Wicked & the Cosmic Children  "Sea Chanty",Spirit Caravan  "Sea Legs", Scissorfight "The Gruesome Death of Edward Teach", Accept  "Fast as a Shark", Jucifer  "Black Powder", Black Cobra  "Red Tide".Go here to listen to archived podcasts http://crazycraig.podOmatic.com

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Enter Keith Godchaux

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 75:32


Enter Keith GodchauxThe Deadcast opens its 4th season with one of the most unlikely but totally true stories in Grateful Dead history: how Keith & Donna Jean Godchaux approached Jerry Garcia at a bar and announced that Keith was the Dead's new keyboardist, going deep into Godchaux family history.GUESTS: Brian Godchaux, Donna Jean Godchaux MacKay, Greg Anton, Sandy Rothman

TradersClub
TC Sounds #15 - O Fim da Inocência

TradersClub

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 42:52


O amor como um meio de redenção pessoal e social dá passo à amargura. A liberdade se torna libertinagem e, como na “Morte do Hippy”, o Rock busca sepultar sua adolescência. Dois festivais, Woodstock e Altamont, marcam o fim da inocência do Rock. Esse é o último capítulo da nossa temporada “A História do Rock and Roll”.

Rock Doc: Behind The Scene With Sarah And Kenny
Woodstock 99 Peace, Love, and Rage

Rock Doc: Behind The Scene With Sarah And Kenny

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 62:07


Woodstock 99  Peace, Love, and Rage, is a documentary from HBO about a music festival that rivals Altamont for poor planning and execution. There is PLENTY of blame to go around here and we try to spread it out evenly....ENJOY.......

The Nathan Barry Show
046: Sahil Bloom - Why Writing Makes You a Better Investor

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 60:25


Sahil Bloom is Vice President at Altamont Capital Partners, a generalist investment fund managing over $2.5 billion in capital. At Altamont, Sahil helps lead the consumer products and services sector. Sahil also participates in board activities at Altamont's portfolio companies Fox Racing, and Brixton.Sahil is an angel investor in over 25 tech startups. He works with entrepreneurs and founders to build scalable and sustainable value for all stakeholders. Sahil also publishes a popular newsletter about business, mental models, economics, and more.Sahil graduated from Stanford University with a bachelor's degree in economics & sociology, and holds a master's degree in public policy. While at Stanford, Sahil was a four-year member of the Stanford baseball team. Sahil is also a two-time recipient of the Bruce R. Cameron Memorial Award. This award honors students exhibiting excellence in athletics, academics, and leadership.In this episode, you'll learn: How Sahil went from 500 to 200,000 followers on Twitter in one year The emerging seven-figure opportunity Sahil sees for localized newsletters Sahil's system for writing exceptional content The key difference between income-producing activities and wealth-producing activities Links & Resources Packy McCormick Mario Gabriele Anthony Pompliano Fred Wilson Tomas Gomez a16z Future Synthesis School Hone Sequoia Benchmark QED Investors Ryan Holiday Notion Clayton Christensen Institute Pallet Patrick O'Shaughnessy Ben Thompson Sahil's Links Follow Sahil on Twitter: @SahilBloom The Curiosity Chronicle Episode TranscriptSahil: [00:00:00]I think of writing and storytelling as foundational skills to your entire life. I mean, if you write well, it makes you better in every other area of your life. I think more clearly it exposes the gaps in your thinking so quickly. And that happened to me all on the way. Like the amount that I learned about investing by writing about investing was insane.Nathan: [00:00:27]This episode is with Sahil Bloom. So, Sahil, full-time is an investor. He's a vice president at Altamont Capital Partners. On the side he has built a massive Twitter following over just the last year before we started the interview.I had no idea that his 200,000 plus Twitter followers have been in the last 14 months, basically since COVID.So, in this episode, we talk about growing a Twitter audience. We talk about all kinds of things. Sahil was a baseball pitcher for Stanford. And so we get into the new name/image/likeness rules for the NCAA.What else? There's all kinds of good stuf: his creative writing process, his mental models, how he thinks about income versus wealth. It's the kind of episode that I absolutely love some.So I'm going to get out of the way and let you listen to it. But really quick, if you'd do me a favor and go ahead and subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, wherever you listen to the podcast, and then write a review, I'd appreciate it. It will help the podcast reach a few more people.So, all right. Let's dive in.Sahil, thanks for joining me.Sahil: [00:01:34]Yeah. Thanks for having me.Nathan: [00:01:35]Okay. So, I want to start with what you put in your bio, which is just three words, investor, educator, and storyteller. I like how concise you've got this down to things that describe you, but how do you think about the way that those three interact with you?Sahil: [00:01:50]You know, it's it's interesting. I tend to think that there is like a natural flywheel that is being created in real time around the universe of like investing, in the universe of creating. And you're seeing it in real time with some of these, you know, creative capitalists for lack of a better way to put it.Like Packy is one of my favorite writers, does an incredible job. Mario, over at the The Generalist. A lot of these folks, I mean, Pomp was one of the early ones to do it. A lot of these folks have built these scale platforms, these audiences, and then as a result of that, and as a result of the reach and the leverage that they're able to get on, having that kind of owned audience in a certain extent, to a certain extent, they're able to really support these companies.And so, as an investor, as an advisor, you can kind of just create this natural flywheel around it, where your content creation and the creative work is the leading into, these really interesting investment and capitalists opportunities. And then because of those, you're actually getting more content to write about.It actually is creating this really unique, flywheel that I think we're really in the early days of candidly, like, we've seen a lot of people starting to do it, but it's very much the first inning in my opinion. And I think there's a massive shakeout happening in the investment world because of it.All of the VC is, and all of these growth equity funds are just starting to realize that in order to win deals, in order to be a part of these cap tables and really provide value, you know, they've said, how can we be helpful as like the joke moniker for a long time, but in order to really be helpful, you need to be able to do tangible things for the companies that you're supporting and investing in.And these creator capitalists, I do feel like have figured that out and I don't put myself in the same ranks as those people that I mentioned at all. I'm kind of very green and new to this, but, it's been fun to start see the early fruits of that.Nathan: [00:03:42]Yeah. It's interesting to me. Cause you've seen for a long time, investors like, Fred Wilson, Tomas Gomez and others, like have these blogs or newsletters, you know, for a long time. And it's gotten them incredible deal flow and reputation and everything else, but it does seem like there's a new wave.I don't know if it's just the next generation of creators doing this, but it's much more Twitter forward rather than starting with a blog and a Twitter, a newsletter. do you see other continuations or differences between like sort of the previous generation in the second generation.Sahil: [00:04:17]Yeah. I mean, I think that the VC world has known this for a long time. like the early stage VCs in particular have known that. Audience and reach was a wedge for deal flow. And so like, you look at the of the world, they built from the early days, really like a content house, right? Like they put out incredible thought pieces.You know, they recently launched this thing, Future, which is really just like a content ecosystem that they're going to continue to expand on. So there are certain firms that have been doing this for a long time, or to your point, there are certain investors who have been doing this for a long time. I think the scale of it has changed, discovery and the algorithms have been dramatically improving.And so, you're able to generate just a much larger following and a much more engaged following. And so the people that are consistently putting things out, it's not one piece every six months, it's, you know, you're capturing attention because you're consistently putting out great content that captures eyeballs.Those are the people that are actually able to generate leverage on that audience. And as a result, create value for the companies that they're investing in. Synthesis School. I think is a great example of it. It's this really cool education technology platform. They have a long list of amazing investors, all of whom are kind of individual creator, capitalists, and you know, people on Twitter that are big Twitter personalities.And so, they're able to just basically have this like narrative domination effect where on Twitter, you constantly are seeing content and people posting about this. And you're like, what the heck is that? What is that business? And it just creates this massive advantage for a business like that. That's able to capture that mind share and become a like cognitive reference, for lack of a better way to put it for education disruptive.Nathan: [00:05:59]So do you think when, when someone's looking to take money from, from you as an investor from, you know, someone like Paki or anyone else, who has these audiences, how much is it? The, like the reputation and the brand of that person that I love the term creative capitalist. Cause it sort of differentiates here, but, which is that reputation and brand versus like what they'll, what that credit capitals will do as far as audience and reach later, like for example, the men's health, sort of raw, what is it?Brown home. There you go. Ron is a different Rona's AI is a clothing brand .Yeah, exactly. also a solid company,Sahil: [00:06:44]Cool brand. Yeah.Nathan: [00:06:46]Hone you like I think it was just yesterday that they had these pieces kind of going up everywhere and it was basically all of their, you know, creator, capitalist investors who have these audiences who coordinated some level of a launch.And so I'm curious as people are taking this money, Is it like, Hey, you're going to be useful as an advisor or is it really like, your money is quite a bit better than someone else's because you're also going to promote and put out this link pieces and link to it in your, in your content.Sahil: [00:07:17]Yeah. I think the way that founders are thinking about it, and this is, you know, informed partially by my own perspective, partially from talking to a lot of these founders. So you have a $5 million round, you know, it used to be that you kind of get your anchor like some lead and, you know, hopefully that's like a tier one VC, a Sequoia benchmark, a 16 Z you know, QED, whoever it might be.And you kind of then have the rest of that round to fill out. And normally you bring on, you know, someone that's not the lead, maybe a couple of other VCs, but then you have this like million dollar set it's on the tail. End of it. That's left. And now you're deciding between, do I take on a tier two tier three VC to like fill out this round, basically the VCs that are willing to write a smaller check behind a bunch of other people that are leading.Or do I go bring on 10 people at a hundred K each or at smaller checks that can really meaningfully accelerate and allow me to achieve escape velocity. And for these early companies, especially the ones that are consumer facing that like getting eyeballs on their product or on their service, whatever they're creating is meaningfully differentiating in terms of the trajectory of what the creating.I think it's a no brainer. I mean, for a lot of these, especially at seed and a stage, like just getting them traction in the early days from a revenue growth perspective is so important because it allows you to go raise your next round and basically push out competition because the way these markets work is like capital flows, especially in technology.When you have potential and of one place there's capital is flowing to the people who can really meaningfully accelerate and get to that end point and you fall a little bit behind. You'll find that the capital markets are really pinching for you, and you're no longer able to raise money. And so. That's kind of how I think about it is like, if we can go take on that last chunk and for a small amount of dilution, add a tremendous amount of value.That's a real differentiator relative to taking on another VC on the backend of your, of your cap table.Nathan: [00:09:10]Yeah, that makes sense. So I want to go back to maybe pre Twitter, famous Sahil, like, cause you're thinking about going into, because you have hundreds of thousands of followers on Twitter now, like it's turned into a pretty massive audience. What were like, was that a deliberate decision to say, okay, I'm going to go all in.I'm going to build this public persona or this public audience, or did it happen more gradually over time?Sahil: [00:09:38]Yeah, that's a great question. I mean, look, I, I played baseball in college. I was solid. I wasn't great. Like I was never the star, so I never had some big following, like the college athletes of today that are the stars and have these massive, massive followings. So I had a Twitter account had never really used it.I kind of. Looked at funny stuff on there and, you know, would see news and things like that. COVID hit in March, 2020, and suddenly I wasn't commuting, you know, my job, which I was normally on the road three or four days a week for, I wasn't traveling. I had like all this time that just got unlocked all of a sudden.And I couldn't figure out like what to do with it. And what I realized was there was all these people, that were so confused about what was happening in the world of like finance business market. and what I like the realization I had fundamentally was that there were kind of two ends of the spectrum of financial education.There was like the, you know, very low end, like tic talkers, talking to you about like random options you should yellow into. And I didn't view that as particularly socially. Good. And then there was like the high end, which is the establishment financial educators who are basically just throwing a ton of jargon at people, trying to make them feel dumb.It's like, let me make you, realize that you need to hire me to pay, to manage your money by throwing a bunch of jargon, throwing a bunch of terms at you that you don't understand. And so what I said was like, I'm going to do neither of those things. I'm going to go straight down the middle. I'm going to be the light Toyota Camry of this market.And just say things in a way that anyone can understand no jargon, no complex terms, just like make it for everybody so that it's accessible. Digestible. And so I started just writing. it was may of 2020. I wrote my first thread had like 500 followers at the time on Twitter. Didn't really know what to make of it.I knew that it was a pretty good thread. And I said to my wife, jokingly that I thought it was going to go viral. And she like rolled her eyes at me. And, you know, whatever happened. it started to kind of pick up steam, like tweeted one of my things, mark Cuban retweeted, one of my things. And it was shocking to me, but pretty cool.Cause I saw it start to gain traction and I realized, okay, maybe there's something to this. but the reality for me was like, there was never a grand strategy to it. I never intended to build some huge audience. Like I thought it was amazing when I got to 4,000 followers. I remember thinking like, this is insane that I have this many people following me that care about what I think.And I kind of just kept putting out content. I mean, over the last year and two months or whatever, it's been since I started I've written. A hundred, 1,314 threads, 90,000 words. mean, it's just been consistency over anything else, candidly? I never had like one piece that blew me up over the, 20,000 followers or something.It's just been like a steady grind of just putting things out, kind of a slow drip effect.Nathan: [00:12:22]So that points to us to get a schedule. Are you basically putting out two threads a week? Is that the case?Sahil: [00:12:28]Yeah. I would say in the early days I was like, I had more time cause COVID and everything going on and I was kind of like probably doing three. There were probably times when I put out four things a week, because I had more time, but in the early days too, it was taking me a lot more time to write these things.Because I hadn't figured out what worked and what didn't. And so I was like in test and learn mode, it was taking me a ton of time to research and like figure out the right hooks and the way to write things and the style of writing that worked on Twitter. And so I spent, I mean, hundreds of hours over the course of the last year on the weekends, like sitting around, pounding my head into a wall, figuring it out.More recently I've kind of gotten into a cadence of like one piece of writing a week. and then with the newsletter I have, you know, I usually expand on that one thread and kind of a more robust newsletter. And then I have the Friday piece, which is a curation thing to kind of help promote other creators.Nathan: [00:13:20]Yeah. So I'm curious, what are some of the things that. That changed as you, well, may, maybe we'll start with the amount of times, like when you're putting, let's go to a single thread, maybe in the early days, how much time was one of those threads taking, and then, you know, now how much time does it take to put together a thread?Sahil: [00:13:39]Yeah. So in the early days, I would say I was doing a lot of like deep research based writing. you know, like I do take an example. Like I did a thread on the game stop thing in January, and like GameStop was, you know, rip roaring. Everyone was wondering what was going on, what had happened, how could that happen?Et cetera. And so I sort of like went into a, down a rabbit hole on understanding, short squeezes and gamma squeezes, and all these complex finance things. And that took me a long time because basically I had to figure out the concept of a gamma squeeze and, you know, the, and how that can be disseminated in a way that anyone can understand, which is like much easier said than done.And I might've rethought it if I had, if I had known how long it was gonna take me to figure that out, but that early stuff I would say. You know, would take me kind of five to six hours probably to like research, write, edit, and kind of refine those pieces. Similarly with those like early, like more story-based threads that I was doing, kind of the stories of people's lives that you see a lot of now on Twitter, less of back when I was doing it, those would take me six, seven hours, cause I was going deep, you know, into these people's lives and figuring it out.And it was really driven by my curiosity. Like I just love learning about these things. And so I would write about things that I genuinely wanted to go learn about and that made it a lot easier. Cause it didn't feel like, oh, this is a waste of time. If it doesn't take off and go viral, you know, at worst I learned a lot and at best I learned a lot and it went viral and got me a bunch of followers.And now more recently, I mean, I'd say I'm in a good cadence of it where it's like, you know, one of my more kind of like mental models, decision-making frameworks thinking, frameworks type threads probably takes two to four hours depending on what I'm writing. But I have this, like, we can get into it, but I have this just massive repository of like content ideas, notes that I've kind of dropped in there over time.So when I actually go to write something, a lot of it's just there and I just needNathan: [00:15:38]Right.Sahil: [00:15:38]How to construct it.Nathan: [00:15:40]Okay. Yeah. Let's, let's focus on that because I think so many people wonder about writing habits and they're like, how do you weave these things together? You know, like I read one of Ryan holiday's books as an example, and he, I'm always amazed at his ability to pull in. Like reference some historical figure creator, author, any anybody tell their story, make his point move on.And you're like, oh, that was so good. Wait, you did that in two sentences. You know, you did that, like in his really concise way, he's got these perfect examples, but if you ever hang out with Ryan or visit him at his house, he has this like ridiculous collection of no cards. You know, it's like boxes of note cards per book, and, you know, it's as crazy process and really every successful author, every school writer that I've worked with has some really great organization process.So I'd love to hear more about,Sahil: [00:16:34]Yeah, I love that story about Ryan. That's a cool one. I'll keep that for later. yeah, so I mean, my, my strategy with it has evolved over time, but th the way I generally think about it is you kind of have a proprietary content engine, and what that is differs for everybody. Like it, that's kind of the inputs.So that's, what are you reading on a daily basis? What are you watching? What are you listening to? All of those things are kind of like your content engine, because those are, what's giving you ideas, things that are coming up. That's like all the stuff you're consuming on a daily basis, and then you have the outputs and that's like, how do you turn that?Like, put it into your little meat grinder and like, turn that into what you're writing about. And so the way I generally think about it is. Part of my daily habit as I'm reading and consuming interesting content. and it might be newsletters, blogs, podcasts, tweets that people send me, like all of this stuff goes into my content engine.What I do personally is I have a notion, page that's a board and it's, I just have it set up as like, a few columns where I have kind of like, you know, ideas that I have, like, you know, things I'm going to write about soon. Then I have things I've started and then like finished pieces that I haven't posted yet.And then all of the stuff that's posted and done. And so when I have something I'm reading and it peaks my curiosity, or it's like, oh, this is a cool concept, whatever it might be. Like, I recently wrote a thread on, the concept of like the Fox and the hedgehog. and that was the one that, like, I had just been reading something on a friend's, VC funds page.And it was like, oh, this is an interesting concept. Let me throw this into my notion doc. And so I had Fox and hedgehog in there. I linked. Article I've been reading. and then like a few weeks later, I kind of got it to learn more about that. And so I went and read some things and I dropped in some notes and dropped in a few more articles and pieces where I had heard people see, you know, or talk about it.And now suddenly when I go to write about it, the next day I have like four sources. I have a bunch of notes sitting there of like things that had come to my mind in the moment when I was interested about it. I kind of had a framework for how I wanted to think or write about it. And so it made the process of starting much easier because I already had all that stuff sitting there.I wasn't starting from a dead stop and saying like, I need to write this great piece on foxes and hedgehogs. I had all this stuff and I just needed to figure out how to craft it, like sculpt it into what I wanted. So that's kind of how I think about the process. It's like, you're consuming mean things on a daily basis.Figure out what those are. It doesn't have to be like smart stuff is whatever you're consuming. It shouldn't feel. And take that and leverage it into creating this like repository of interesting ideas, because like when you do it that way, you never run out of stuff to write about. I get asked that a lot.Like how do you write something every week? Or how do you not run out of things? And my, my answer is like, there's an endless amount of interesting stuff out there in the world. And it's just a matter of like opening your kind of content engine to all of that so that you can then go and write and comment on these things and, and share about it.So that's kind of how I think about it generally. It's like kind of, you have the inputs and the output, so you need to figure out what your kind of middle is your middle layer, so that you can turn the inputs into the outcome.Nathan: [00:19:44]Okay. This is a little bit off topic, but when you were. Starting school, you know, going to school at Sanford for like economics and sociology and then getting a master's in public policy and you're getting into investing and starting your career there. Did you ever think that you'd be a writer like that?That would be the primary, source. It's just so interesting the way these worlds overlap.Sahil: [00:20:08]The short answer is no, I never considered myself a good writer. I don't know, I still don't consider myself that great of a writer to be honest, like people like my writing, which makes me think maybe I write reasonably well, but I think it's just effort. Like I've just spent more time on it over the last year, a lot of people, but, no, I never really thought I would kind of be able to like create something that had value around creative work that was never in the scope of what I thought about my primary job is still as an investor.Like, and I think we'll continue to be. And I, and I still think of like investing and advising as kind of like the primary, kind of part of my ecosystem that I'm creating the creative work is becoming a bigger and bigger part of what makes me a unique and interesting investor. and I love it. I mean, that's the thing for me is. I get so much energy out of the fact that I get to spend time on writing and content creation on a daily basis. I love doing it. You know, I'm starting to do more video stuff. I'm going to be engaging more in that realm, but like the fact that I get to write think read, and that's kind of part of my job.Like that's a really, really cool thing to me. And I never really thought, you know, going to school or whatever I thought I was going to do next. It definitely didn't come within the realm of what I'm actually getting to work on.Nathan: [00:21:23]Yeah, I think it's so interesting. Like I never thought that I would be a writer and I remember like specifically telling my parents, like, I hate writing. Like why would I ever, you know, why do I have to do so much of this in school and all of that? my mom was an English major, you know, and like big advocate for, writing and all of that, which I now am very grateful for.But it's amazing the number of people now that, that we think of that are like really quite effective writers that never started there never expected that.Sahil: [00:21:54]Yeah. I mean, I think of, I think of writing and storytelling as well. Foundational skills to your entire life. I mean, if you write well, it makes you better in every other area of your life. Like since I've spent more time on writing and have a writing habit that is making me a better writer, I've become veteran every other area of my life.Like I think more clearly it exposes the gaps in your thinking so quickly. Like if you, if you sit down and you think you understand something and you try to write it down in a way that, you know, a kid could pick it up and understand it, you very quickly realize if you don't understand that thing. and that happened to me all on the way, like the amount that I learned about investing by writing about investing was insane because I had to sit down and try to explain it to a five-year-old basically with my tweet threads.And when I didn't understand the thing, like the gap was like a blaring thing in front of me and I had to go research it more and dig into it and understand it. And so I just think that like, when you write, you expose flaws in your thinking, and that causes you to go down the rabbit hole and learn more about whatever it might.Nathan: [00:22:58]Yeah. That's good. Is there anything, any resources or things you paid attention to to get better at writing? Like, do you read any of the traditional, you know, and Lamont bird by bird?Sahil: [00:23:07]Yeah, I read elements of style. when I was younger, like I think in high school, I read that and that stuck with me. you know, candidly, like I just study some people that I respect and think of as great writers. Like David Perell has become a friend and I feel very lucky for that, but I just thought of him as a great writer and the things that he put out in his, the elegance of his writing and the different, you know, ways that he was writing things on a, for brig, has become a friend.I think she writes exceptionally well on, on education and some of these topics. I just think that there's a wealth of unbelievable, talented, people out there that like are publishing things that anyone can read and you don't have to pay. Like you can go see it, learn from it. And so I try to be a student of the internet in that regard.Nathan: [00:23:53]Yeah, no, that's good. okay. So since you've built such a massive audience so quickly on Twitter with threads, I'm curious, what have you found? What are the things that are really working? What makes a good thread? You know, now you're writing to those things that, that resonate right away, you know, and you're like, oh, I can cut out all of that, that I was doing before.Sahil: [00:24:13]Yeah.Nathan: [00:24:14]What's working. What have you.Sahil: [00:24:15]Yeah. I mean, I would say there's like a handful of principals that I think were quite well. you know, number one is like, if you're writing a thread, the hook has to be good. because you need to give people a reason to click and convert and, and, and kind of look through to whatever you're writing.I do think, you know, now more than ever threads are like a somewhat saturated game, so to speak because people realize, I mean, I, when I first started writing them, very few people were writing threads. Twitter didn't even have like infrastructure built around long form content. It was pretty janky. You had.Manually add a tweet under each one and copy and paste it in. And now they, they realize that it keeps people on the platform, then it's a great mechanism for them. And so the algorithms prioritize it. People realize it's a growth hack, you know, like really is much better for growth than single tweets.And so it's become a bit saturated, I would say. And so, as a result of that, I think the burden of proof is higher on like the quality of the content that you should be putting out. I think there's a risk of like losing high quality followers. you know, by just like over, you know, just putting out too many threads that aren't really high quality.And so my best advice is like, make the hook rate, make sure the hook is like really catchy and draws people in and then just make sure that quality is like exceptional and something. You can be proud of. My whole thesis all along with my Twitter was, you know, there's like a spectrum of kind of posting frequencies.You have the like, pump who has been exceptionally successful. Every single day, he's all over it. He's posting a lot, you know, high frequency. And then I'm on the other end of the spectrum, like a Julian Shapiro's on the other end of the spectrum. People like that, that like right every now and then, you know, it might be once a week.It might be once every couple of weeks. but what you, what you're putting out is like, I stand behind every single thing that I've ever written on Twitter. you know, from a thread perspective, because I know that I spent a bunch of time on it. I really thought it through, if I didn't understand something, I was getting it vetted.I was having someone review it. I mean, I just, the internet is permanent. Right. And so I like it's my personal capital on the line and I wanted to make sure everything was really, really good. And so, that's important as you, as you put things out there is just like, make sure you feel really good about the quality of what you're writing.Nathan: [00:26:31]Yeah, that's a good point that if you're doing the approach of, like, I went to a Wikipedia article and like made a thread of the content that's in there, which is a lot of threads that you come across as, that's a genuine question that ISahil: [00:26:44]Yeah.Nathan: [00:26:45]Reading some of them. the quality really matters.Sahil: [00:26:47]Yeah. I agree. And I go both ways on that. Right. Like I did, you know, a bunch of like, in my early days, especially I did a bunch of what people would have thrown into that bucket of like Wikipedia threads, my perspective on it was always, great. The Wikipedia articles there. but if you wouldn't have seen it, and it's a really interesting story and I'm packaging it into something that makes it more broadly disseminated, that's a value added service that I just brought to the table.And so like, I don't know, like Morris Chang, I wrote a thread on he's a founder of Taiwan, semiconductor manufacturing company, amazing guy, incredible story. Does he have like, you know, information on Wikipedia about him? Sure. But like I posted it and 17,000 people liked it and saw, you know, 5 million people saw it that most of them probably didn't know who the hell he was because they were never going to go to that Wikipedia page.And so I kind of go both ways on that criticism. The reality is that type of thread has become a bit of like a meme where, you know, there's clearly broad push back against it and, and, you know, it's become a little bit of a meme of itself. And so I do think it's worth being kind of wary about regularly publishing that type of content.Nathan: [00:27:55]I think it probably comes down to how unique the story is that you're sharing. Like maybe it is on Wikipedia, but, well, exactly what you're saying. That is not someone that I would have gone to look for, but I read and enjoyed that thread. Whereas if you're just like, here's this thing about Steve jobs is like, you mean the Steve jobs story that everyoneSahil: [00:28:15]Yes,Nathan: [00:28:16]Heard a hundred times then it's very different,Sahil: [00:28:18]I totally agree with that. I mean, like if you're going to go tell the story of. You know, Elon Musk, how he, you know, started space or whatever, like start Tesla or something like, yeah, everyone kind of knows that and it's, it's a little bit played up and, and people understand it. And so I just think it's worth balancing with your own unique content.And that was how I always did it. Whereas like, if I was going to post in one of those stories, I was going to post something that I like deeply researched and did unique educational content and just kind of balance the two. And I think that would like, that worked for me. I think it probably works for others.Nathan: [00:28:51]How do you think about the intersection between your Twitter following and your newsletter? Like as you've built that over the last year.Sahil: [00:28:59]Yeah. I started the newsletter. Yeah. I first just created it in January of this year. and I originally just created it because there were a lot of people on Twitter who wanted to get my threads in their inbox. Like didn't like the Twitter format for them and wanted to just have it in a nicer format.And so for the first, five months of it, like through mid may, all it was was just me sending out my threads the day later, with, you know, just like a nicer format. And so the newsletter list grew to something like 13,000 people just from that, which I was pretty amazed by honestly, you know, more recently.So mid may I decided to do the Friday, I'm calling it the Friday five now, but basically curation focused, five pieces of interesting things that I consumed, like my content engine during the week. and really focused on promoting other creators. that was like, I really wanted it to be a positive, some thing.I'm creating this list and I want to help use it to kind of promote others that are creating great content that need help with discovery that maybe they're smaller. They need more eyes on their things. They're putting out great things, but sometimes it's hard, it's going into the abyss. And so I'm helping with discovery for them.And so I launched that. and then I've recently started just more expanding on the concepts that are my threads. And so it's sort of like, I think of the threads as sort of a taken down version of a longer form newsletter piece as I've prioritized the newsletter. and I, you know, I really use Twitter for like, it's a discovery mechanism for the newsletter.The reality of newsletters as you know, is that discovery is really, really hard and it's cobbled together and there's no like central, kind of authority for discovery right now. And so you need to kind of hack it together and figure out how do you make your newsletter really shareable? How do you drive new eyeballs to it?How do you kind of like generate growth over time? Because. You know, if your Twitter is growing at 15, 20,000 a month, you know, of new followers and your newsletters growing out, like, you know, 50 that's kind of a problem. and so driving people through and like figuring out how to convert that funnel is like really what I'm trying to figure out and understand right now.Nathan: [00:31:07]Yeah. I think that what I mean exactly the point that you made newsletters don't have any. You people talking about like, there's no algorithm for newsletters, so you're not having to fight to, I read your, your readers. And it's like, yes, absolutely. You're spot on. Also, there's no algorithm for newsletters.And so there's no distribution, you know, there are, there's no discovery. And so you're having to use outside channels, like the newsletter authors from 5, 10, 15 years ago. they use their blogs and, you know, sites like dig and hacker news and others to get along new followers, but also just search, you know, having the, the, long form articles that were ranking really well on Google.And, and I feel like very much the newsletter creators of today are all in on TwitterSahil: [00:31:56]Yeah.Nathan: [00:31:56]Yeah.Yeah. There's but like very much on Twitter to get that discovery.Sahil: [00:32:00]Yeah. I agree with that. And it's, it's going to be interesting to see how the, like the newsletter wars continue to play out. Right? Because all of these platforms are realizing and Twitter realized it. I'm sure Facebook realized it with their recent launch that way. They are providing discovery for a lot of people that are then going off platform with their longer form content.And so Twitter acquired review, you know, Facebook has their new launch and it's just, it'll be interesting to see kind of how that plays out in terms of, you know, where people go with their, you know, with their newsletters and how it all kind of, how it all shakes out in the coming months and year.Nathan: [00:32:35]Yeah. Well, let's dig in there more. Cause like I obviously care about that space a lot being in the middle of it. And you see, you mentioned Twitter and Facebook. Spotify is in the mix. They reached out to us. I don't know, two months ago about, you know, acquiring ConvertKit oddly, they were more, I thought that it was, they were interested in us because of the music side of things, as we've made acquisitions in the music space and all of that turns out, they were more way more interested in the podcast side of things.Like then we have the Tim Ferriss of the world, you know, a lot of top podcasts using ConvertKit. And so I'm curious where all of this goes. I think, you know, like everything five years from now, 10 years from now, we'll look back and the path that ended up becoming most common, you know, whichever platform dominates or if it stays fragmented, you know, we'll look back and be like, oh, that was obvious.But in this moment, I think it's actually fairly up in the air of like, is sub stack going to continue to rise? Will it be review, will bulletin. I mean, that's what Facebook's isSahil: [00:33:33]Yep.Nathan: [00:33:34]Be a flash in the pan or will it actuallySahil: [00:33:38]Yeah.Nathan: [00:33:39]Six around.Sahil: [00:33:40]Yeah. I mean, I think if I had to guess, I think Twitter is in the pole position on it. And the only reason I say that is. they are the main mode of discovery for most writers. And so if they can do anything with the algorithms to prioritize discovery, to review newsletters, that's a massive advantage.Embedded, you know, just because they already have people on the platform. And so th that'd be like it from an investor standpoint, that would be my guess is just that continues to try to ship product that allows them to capture more of the value that their platform is actually been creating for the last 10 years that they've captured none of,I mean, like Twitter has been abysmal at capturing the value that's created through Like, I mean the amount of value that I have flowing through Twitter broadly speaking, Twitter's capturing $0 of, and that's sort of a travesty just from a business standpoint. And like, as an investor, you look at that and you're like, man, that's a huge opportunity if they can figure out how to capture of that.Nathan: [00:34:35]Will you see it reflected in their market cap versus Facebook's Write of like, I mean, I I don't even know what Twitter's market cap is, but it's yeah Twitter's marketSahil: [00:34:45]Cap caps like 55 billion, I think, but like the, yeah, I mean, Twitter is Twitter's ad product is also just pretty bad relative to, you know, relative to Snapchat or Facebook, but I think it should improve. I mean, as they do more of the creator economy and as they spend more time, you know, actually capturing some of this value, the quality of their ads and the ability to target and all of those things should just get a lot better, which makes their ad monetization better.And that drives the whole engine. So, I mean, I personally, like I'm on Twitter and their opportunity around all of it. I'm also like native creator. I mean, I basically wrote a blog on Twitter over the last year. I'd be like, create these content loops and I'm linking back through the old threads.And like, I sort of do a Ben Thompson does what Stratec Curry, but I do that on Twitter, inNathan: [00:35:29]That's super interesting. I'm looking at it from the perspective of, if it's going to be. Like a major platform, like as we look at newsletters, will it be basically Facebook or Twitter at this point that, that dominates that with reviewer bulletin? Or will it be still a mix of the subset convert kit?That kind of thing, like will creators end up starting on review and be like, oh, you know, I wrote some dreads, I got a thousand followers, Twitter like pops up and says like, Hey, you should do a newsletter. You know? And so they start that and then maybe they want more functionality and then they move to a, you know, a ConvertKit or another platform, or if the distribution will become so powerful, that, and the discovery is so powerful that there's a real reason to stay on,Sahil: [00:36:14]Yeah. I mean, it's sort of like the. The Clayton Christiansen, model of like disruption and innovation, where you like you, you know, the, the, the platforms that are like very newsletter specific are going to be able to provide a better solution for the full range of potential creators that are on the platform, because that's their entire focus.Like that's all they spend time on and, you know, newsletters are never going to be Twitter's sole focus and they, you know, need to get better at shipping product. And they have a bunch of different areas they're working on and focused on. I'm sure they have a team that's focused on newsletters and long form, and I'm sure that team is great and have great engineers, but, if you can be a player that is like newsletter specific and you can provide an amazing solution for every kind of type of creator and archetype that sits on your platform, that's a real way that you can create a wedge and create a sticky customer base there.Nathan: [00:37:06]Yeah. We'll see how it plays out because, one thing is that email has never been a winner take all market. You know, we look at like, MailChimp's the biggest player by far, but even then, I don't know what their eight or 900 million a year in revenue, something like that.Sahil: [00:37:20]Yeah.Nathan: [00:37:20]And, and you've got plenty of players that are, you know, likeSahil: [00:37:23]Yeah.Nathan: [00:37:24]Campaign monitors and others in the hundreds of millions of, yeah.Sahil: [00:37:26]Yeah. It's also going to be a long tail market. I think the most interesting part of the greater economy are going to be these like micro creators actually that are like hyper-local and writing about, you know, interesting local news as an example where they're not trying to get the like biggest following in the world, their goal is not to have a hundred thousand newsletter subs.It's to have like a thousand true fans, you know, that And so I think that that market is probably the most interesting, like there's going to be a ton. A hundred thousand dollars a year earners that are basically writing like the defacto newsletter for news in, you know, X part of the bay area, or for news in, you know, Westchester county or whatever it might be like.There's going to be all of these people that rise that are doing that. and making a six figure salary and working from home. And it's an amazing setup. And so I, I'm actually more interested in that than I am in the like macro influencer world of the creator economy, to people that are going to be making seven figures on all of this.Nathan: [00:38:27]Yeah. And you see all kinds of that. cause it happens not just in the local news side of things or basically people finding a niche based on geography, but it happens a lot with a niche based on, you know, topic or, or where like we've seen people, artists talking about very specific things and you're like, there's an audience for that.And digging like sure enough, 8,000 subscribers and 50 or a hundred thousand dollars a year in revenue. And, that's actually a good transition to talk about monetization. So you, you know, you have a, all your content is free. I don't think you have any paid content out there is that.But you monetize through ads through a job board, as, as you're looking at, or ads being sponsored content or, or, sponsorships, I should say. yeah. How do you think about monetizing your content andSahil: [00:39:19]Yeah.Nathan: [00:39:20]You played with and, and why have you settled onSahil: [00:39:22]I mean, I'd say I'm in the very early days of figuring all of this out and testing things. My operating premise has always been to never charge people for anything, like never charge people. I just, and it goes back to like, when I first started doing this and writing, it was about education and it was about giving people, empowering people with information that they otherwise wouldn't have had and making them feel happy or inspired or whatever it might be.And so that doesn't rely on me charging people for things. I think if I ever. Did something like that was going to take a ton of time. And I was going to have to spend a lot more energy or effort on it maybe, but I can't really see myself, charging people for anything. So as a result, the flip side of it is like I have all these eyeballs.I have a lot of people that this goes out to. And so sponsors are, you know, willing to kind of support that and have their product or whatever it might be, get seen by all of these people and hopefully clicked on. And, you know, I have a high burden, I would say for like the type of companies that I would work with on that.Because I just want it to be brand right. And people, you know, companies that I'm excited about or would support either way and not just. Hey, some oil and gas company wants to sponsor me, so I'm going to take it on. And so that kind of flows through both, you know, the sponsors for the newsletter, which have been great and companies I feel strongly about, and also to the job board where it's kind of a natural flow through of like I have this platform, I have all these amazing people that are, that are following me and have gifted me with their attention.A lot of whom are like looking to kind of grow and level up their life and, you know, take on new adventures. and then I had on the other side, all of these amazing companies that are trying to find those types of people and these amazing, you know, this amazing, new group of talent. And so I'm kind of sitting in the middle where like, it used to be that LinkedIn was that person sitting in the middle cause they had gathered all this demand.And so how can I dis-intermediate that? And this amazing company palette came along and it's doing it disclosure, I'm an investor in palette. I think it's an amazing company. but they kind of enabled that infrastructure. And so creators can be the kind of direct conduit between companies and between their audiences.And there's going to be a bunch of flavors of it. I mean, for me, It's kind of a large audience and I get you access to a lot of people. And it's a little bit of top of funnel marketing for the featured companies, because I tweet about them. And so you get kind of a social proof that comes with being included and that I included you on the list.But for me, it's like, I think it's a really cool thing. I mean, there've been people that have gotten jobs through the board and now that's like, wow, that's a really neat thing that I was a part of somebody who's kind of acceleration of whatever path they are on.Nathan: [00:41:55]Yeah, it's another part of the flywheel for the, I don't know, your ecosystem, your community, and all of that, where you like someone is going to go from a fan of your work to like, I don't know, a super fan of some in some way, if they got a job through, through that. And like every company is going to keep track of that.Like hiring and recruiting every person that we've ended up hiring, we know exactly where they came from. Cause we're looking for those, those trends, not that like out of 65 or a hundred people, you're seeing like massive trends, you know, or statistical significance, but you're seeing like, okay, This didn't come from a giant job board.This came from a referral or from, you know, a nice jobSahil: [00:42:34]Yep.Nathan: [00:42:35]Creator.Sahil: [00:42:35]Yeah. Yeah. That's exactly right. I mean, I think it's just like trying to figure out now, what is the model that works with these boards? Because for me, like what I want to move towards is fewer and fewer jobs on the board, but make them like really exclusive, almost like a limited edition drop every month that you have like 10 companies that like this month, I'm really going to push and promote and kind of, cause I think these roles are amazing and these companies are amazing and I want my audience to see them versus the like, you know, 200 jobs on a board and you hope people scroll through it and find the thing that they're looking for.And so I'm sort of like toying with what's the right model. What's going to drive the most eyeballs for the companies, so that it's really beneficial for them. And what's going to drive the best outcomes for my followers, where like they're finding unique jobs and getting access to things they otherwise wouldn't.The other. Great tailwind is that more and more companies are starting to believe in open access, hiring, recruiting, diversity, all of these things that I think and believe very deeply from a values perspective. And so the fact that I can create something to, further kind of progress, that trend, is really meaningful to me, just on a, from a social perspective.Nathan: [00:43:45]Yeah. Yeah, that's good. And I think that we're going to see a lot more interesting monetization methods. Like I saw people running job boards as a separate business, you know, years ago, whether it's like we work remotely or authentic jobs, or like in specific niches, like authentic jobs, for example, you know, really got going in the designer like designer and web developer, ecosystem.But now that's very much a trend of like creators running their own job board. And I mean, palette is driving that a lot. actually I guess this is one of those places where right. You're, you're providing real value as an investor. Not like the thing that we make fun of, of like, oh, how can I be helpful? it's like, you're actually running on a job board usingSahil: [00:44:32]Yeah.Nathan: [00:44:32]Advertising it,Sahil: [00:44:33]Yeah. And helping them figure out what's working, what isn't like, what could creators use more of different features? You know, frankly, they have a great growth loop. And the fact that like every time I promote a job, that's featured on my board, it's a pallet link. That's getting shared on Twitter and more and more people are seeing palette.And you're like, what is that? And that includes investors that follow me. It includes, you know, other founders that are looking to promote roles. And so, they have a cool kind of endemic little growth loop gone, and they're doing really well around it. But to your point earlier, like the sky's the limit for that type of thing, because as you can.Do more and more of like figuring out how to get to that warm lead that referral-based, the talent pool, where like people are vetted and you're kind of like really high quality leads on a certain role. the better the quality of the outcomes are going to be for the companies. And so they're working on things around that, which I think are really exciting because then you stop getting the, like, you know, you're not just going to the large mass audience, it becomes this like really curated, interesting pool of talent that you're like linking directly and that companies can have access to.So I'm just really excited about the future of like opening access to, to hiring and disrupting, you know, the, the kind of incumbents like a LinkedIn who I think have just been asleep at the wheel in that market.Nathan: [00:45:49]Yeah, there's definitely a lot of that. okay. I want to talk about something that maybe is more specific to you. you have this term creative capitalist, which I really like, I'm going to start using more because I feel like it describes, you know, a very specific type of creator, that I, I love to follow.But I'm curious with your background in, playing college sports, as, as a pitcher for Stanford, and then, what you're seeing, basically, we're going to see this wave of creator athletes. You know, now that the NCAA has made the changes where you can actually, profit from, name, image, name, image, likeness.Sahil: [00:46:30]Yep.Nathan: [00:46:32]What do you think there? And what, like, what trends do you think are going to come from that? As we have a whole new wave of creators able to.Sahil: [00:46:40]Yeah. I mean, first off, I think it's amazing. And I think it's a long time coming. I played college sports from oh nine to 13 and it was like always a topic of discussion. It has been for the last 20 plus years. I think it's way overdue. I mean, I think it's a massive disservice to a lot of athletes.It was the one time in their life that they could have made a lot of money off of a very unique skill. And then whether they got injured or it didn't pan out, I think it's a travesty that it has been this way for as long as it has. I'm glad it's finally changed. and I think it's like a classic example.You know, kind of like a regulatory disruption that unlocks a massive new market, gambling has had the same thing like sports betting, I think probably in the early days of having a similar thing as it gets legalized, but you basically just had regulation that was holding back. a huge market and now it's come, it's gone away and you have this huge inflow of talented people that have huge audiences that people feel a high degree of affinity towards.And so it's a, it's a huge inflow of new creators basically. And people that, you know, previously didn't have access to these markets until they got done with school. and the reality of a lot of them is they're not going to play professional sports. They're going to be highly, highly relevant for their handful of years that they're in college.And this is their one chance to capitalize on that. And so I think it's, I think it's great. I think there's going to be a ton of cool business model. that come up around it obviously like agents, they're probably frothing at the mouth trying to figure out how to go capture this, media studios, brand studios, all of that.I mean, I think there's just a huge unlock for a lot of these student athletes. and it's going to be cool to see how it flows. I mean, I think the general way these things will work is that it like probably over-correct where you have people spending too much on these athletes and like the market gets a little frothy and then they realize the ROI is not good.And so it kind of swings back, sort of like, you know, ad monetization on all of these social platforms. Like when they get started, people freak out and throw all the money at the like one thing and it squeezes out the return within that as always happens. And so then you kind of come down to a baseline.I imagine that happens with the athlete market.If I were still an athlete, if I had been anything, I would be all over it. and I think a lot of them should be.Nathan: [00:48:56]So going back, let's say, yeah, let's say you were an athlete today. When, when those changes were put in place, what are the things that you'd be doing? You know, what you know now about like growing an audience and monetizing on platforms and stuff like that, youSahil: [00:49:11]Yeah.Nathan: [00:49:12]What would you do?Sahil: [00:49:13]Yeah. I mean, I guess my best advice is like focus on long-term value and owned audience over just like fleeting little like brand deals and promotions. like what value I, my, my mental model around all of this has always been like value capture. if you are creating a lot of value, you should be trying to capture a decent amount of that value you're creating.And the reality of most of the. Like one-off influencer deals and things like that is you're actually creating a lot more value than you're capturing. And it's not a great mechanism for long-term value or longterm wealth creation. I think Warren buffet said when it's raining gold, you put out a bucket, not a thimble.And I always loved that quote. I think it's like very, various student and very relevant for these kids and young, young men and women that are going to be out in this market. It's like, it's raining gold right now in a lot of cases for you. but you want to make sure you're setting up infrastructure in setting yourself up in a way that allows you to capture it for the longterm and to capture a good proportion of what you're creating for the longterm.And so if that's, you know, rather than doing an influencer deal, it's like starting your own thing or having your own ownership of something. You've seen some of the tech talk influencers doing that Tik TOK creators, realizing that like equity is much more valuable to them than just taking a $10,000 put up a post, whatever it might be.Spencer rattler the quarterback for Oklahoma. It was like starting a merchandise line and it's his own thing. And he's like, I think that that is really interesting. and you're going to see a lot of cool, it's going to be a great like idea lab, which I'm just excited to be around for, to learn from, because people are going to test and learn a million different things with all of these athletes that are around, trying and seeing what works.Nathan: [00:50:55]Yeah, it's really going to be all the same principles, but you know, over again with a new, a new group of people, right? Like I wrote an article called the billion dollar creator, and it was basically about those who go from an, a specific, like how I might've had my audience by selling with a one-time thing.That would be the brand sponsorship, the other deal, you know, something like that. And instead, focusing on the ones who like really build equity in something they're starting a company, they're saying like, great. Instead of letting someone else sponsor my audience, I'm going to be the one selling that product, you know?And so it's the, like glossy is an honest company and you know, these other ones where. You know, the individual creators, likeSahil: [00:51:40]Yep.Nathan: [00:51:40]Capture all of that value rather than say like, great, I'll get paid 10,000 or a million dollars. You know what, depending on your influence level for a one-time thing.Sahil: [00:51:50]I totally agree. It's something I think about constantly too, is like, you know, as I continue to progress in this world, you know, what am I actually building equity in versus earning income around. And I think you see it, you know, like creators have figured it out. Ben Thompson, you know, with launching his passport thing where he's kind of creating a platform for people to engage and he's creating equity around it and trying to build something Patrick O'Shaughnessy, you know, with the Colossus platform and kind of being the go-to place for, for business ideas and business breakdowns and investing.I think a lot of people are doing that. I have something in the works right now with a good friend and, that we're partnering on that I think is kind of in that vein that I'm really excited about. But, it's definitely something that people should be thinking about in real time.Nathan: [00:52:33]Is that the, when, when people ask on Twitter, like what are you most excited about? And you answered the thing that I, that I can't talk about yet.Sahil: [00:52:39]Yeah. Yeah. We're close to being able to talk about it, which is exciting and it's coming soon. but we've got, a couple of people that are going to be really, really cool to be involved with on a project. it's going to be dope. I'm super excited.Nathan: [00:52:52]Nice. Yeah. I mean the biggest thing, like going back to monetization, you know, just for creators in general is really looking at what do you own long-term what do you have equity in? Right. Cause the sponsorships even, well, the job board, right? It's something that you're building equity in. Right. And so I like that.Cause it, it builds this reputation. Sponsorships are a great way to drive revenue and be more connected with companies build relationships. But like that's not a. That is just cash.Sahil: [00:53:23]Yeah,Nathan: [00:53:24]Doesn't, it doesn't build equity. And so I'm, I'm superSahil: [00:53:27]Yeah,Nathan: [00:53:28]Like this is the thing that I preach all the time when I'm talking.I guess I don't preach it publicly as much.Sahil: [00:53:32]Yeah.Nathan: [00:53:32]That I preach behind the scenes allSahil: [00:53:34]Yeah.Nathan: [00:53:34]You're talking one on one.Sahil: [00:53:35]Back to me mental models, just cause I about these things a lot, my mental model for this one is like, you kind of have there's there's two sides to your life. You kind of have like income producing activities and then wealth producing active. and the way you want to set it up, you know, like how I think about it is you need an income producing activities because you need to pay bills.Like you need to pay your mortgage or buy groceries, like car bill, all of those things. That's like you have income producing assets. Any, Delta between your kind of expenses and what you're producing from an income producing activity standpoint should be funneled into wealth producing activities. so that you're actually building wealth and equity and whatever is.And so wealth producing activities can be as simple as investing in the stock market or in whatever you're investing in. Or it can be like further along on the risk curve where you're starting a startup, you're building something you're, you know, investing in startups, you're, you know, trading in crypto, whatever it might be.It's like here, you're taking, you know, one end of the, like flywheel of your personal kind of financial ecosystem and using one end to kind of fund the other and actually build long-term equity and wealth in something. That's how I tend to think about it is like you need income producing activities and any excess that exists on that side and people should strive.I think, to live within their means any excess is, you know, used and funneled into wealth, producing active.Nathan: [00:54:54]Yeah. I love that. you and I share a passion for helping people build income, build wealth and all of that. And so I'm going to use that simple modelSahil: [00:55:04]Yeah, love itNathan: [00:55:04]Lot. It's good.Sahil: [00:55:05]Good.Nathan: [00:55:07]If someone asks them to put her in. And I was curious about this as well. going back to the investing side, if you'd only invest in two companies, public or private and what would they be?Why?Sahil: [00:55:15]That's a tough one. I don't want to spend too much time on, on private cause I've already probably invested in some of these, you know, pallet is probably one of those for me right now. Like I just, I think palette's an amazing company and I'm huge, huge fan of what they're building. I, on the public side, honestly, Twitter could be one of the companies I would invest in today.I just think the potential and. The external perception of Twitter is very different from my perspective on it. And so I think I have a variant perception of the future that, you know, that would allow me to capture a lot of value if it goes, if, you know, if I'm proven right. in the future, Synthesis School, I, again, disclosure, I'm an investor in that business.I just want that business to succeed because I think the world is a better place if it succeeds. And I want my kids to be in it and taking classes it and being a part of it. and so I just want that business to succeed so badly, whether my investment ends up being an amazing one or not because of, you know, for whatever reason, I just want that business to win. And so I, I would invest in that 10 times out of 10 I'm sure.Nathan: [00:56:18]Just for everyone listening, give like the 62nd 32nd pitch on synthesisSahil: [00:56:23]Yeah. Synthesis School is a kind of alternative education program for children. And basically the whole idea is that li

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

The Deadcast takes a special season-closing look at Jerry Garcia's classic eponymous debut with co-producer Bob Matthews and friends, recorded during the summer of 1971 by Garcia and a small crew of close collaborators including Bill Kreutzmann and Robert Hunter.GUESTS: Bob Matthews, Steve Silberman, Joe Jupille

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Other Voices
Dennis Barber — 100 years of loving the land

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 31:52


History is personal for Dennis Barber. He lives in a Civil War-era house on a farm that has been in his family for a century.In it, he has a trunk that came from Italy with all of the possessions of the Colucciello family when they immigrated from Fontanarosa, Italy in 1929. A decade-and-a-half later, Nicolina Colucciello, one of eight children, was at a square dance at Pat's Ranch in Altamont where she met the man who would become her husband, Marshall Barber, Dennis's father.Barber's family history embraces not just the American immigration experience but the pioneering settlers as well. His great-great-grandfather, Josiah Barber, was born in Berne in 1839 and enlisted in New York's 61st Infantry at the age of 23 to fight in the Civil War. He was wounded at Gettysburg in 1863.In this week's podcast, Barber reads a narrative that he wrote with his brothers, detailing the life on their family's farm. It was not an easy life but the Barbers were resilient. The family's barn burned twice — in 1958 and the new one in 1984 — only to be built again. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Playing Dead, Part 2

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 119:22


Playing Dead, Part 2A truly all-star Deadcast examines the infinite approaches to playing Dead music, from traditional to radical, with a massive span of musicians who've played it, from jazz arrangers to indie rock heroes, from actual Dead members to Japanese cover bands.GUESTS: Bob Weir, Oteil Burbridge, Joe Russo, Peter Shapiro, Stephen Malkmus, Ira Kaplan, Steven Bernstein, Jeff Mattson, David Gans, Holly Bowling, Dave Harrington, Shu-Hey Iwasa, Jake Rabinbach, Rebecca Adams, Gary Lambert, David Lemieux

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B Minus Show
Slice Beer collab Waui Nugs DDH WCIPA with Altamont 

B Minus Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 16:43


Slice Beer collab Waui Nugs DDH WCIPA with Altamont  Goats collab with goats, and Slice collab'd with Altamont beer works. This beer, Waui Nugs, is a double dry hopped IPA at 6.5% abv. Sure to be danky to a degree. Find me on Instagram @bminusshow Find my music here: https://soundcloud.com/thebminusshow Also, listen to more podcasts on … Continue reading "Slice Beer collab Waui Nugs DDH WCIPA with Altamont "

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Playing Dead, Part 1

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 75:13


The Deadcast examines how the Grateful Dead became a genre and school of music unto themselves, tracing the history of Dead covers to New Jersey in 1969, Calcutta in 1975, & beyond, featuring special appearances by Phish's Trey Anastasio & Yo La Tengo's Ira Kaplan.Guests: Trey Anastasio, Ira Kaplan, Henry Kaiser, John Zias, Sanjay Mishra, Rebecca Adams, Jeff Mattson, David Gans, Gary Lambert, Dennis McNally

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Nerd Therapy: A Dungeons and Dragons Podcast
114 - HOTDQ Pt 18 - My Dad Wore Cowboy Boots to Altamont

Nerd Therapy: A Dungeons and Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021


Apologies for the slight delay in release, but life happens! The mill is still in peril, so for our adventurers, it's back to the grind...

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Closing of the Fillmore West

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 84:05


The Deadcast finishes its all-star “Skull & Roses” dive with cosmic diplomat Alan Trist, Courtenay Pollack's new tie-dye speakers, a surprise trip abroad, the closing of the Fillmore West, studio parties, explorations of the album's legendary art & infamous original name, & more.GUESTS: Alan Trist, Bob Matthews, Rosie McGee, Rick Turner, Courtenay Pollack, Stephen Barncard, Allan Arkush, David Lemieux, Nicholas G. Meriwether, Michael Parrish

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix fillmore west psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke rick turner aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal meriwether watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater bob matthews allan arkush live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
Beer and a Movie
148: The No. 1 Podcast In Heaven - The Sparks Brothers / Gimme Shelter

Beer and a Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 93:50


In this episode, we discuss the new documentary from fan-favorite director Edgar Wright titled The Sparks Brothers. The documentary chronicles the career of, as described in the doc, "your favorite band's favorite band" (which isn't true, your favorite band's favorite band is Black Sabbath but that's a conversation for another time). THEN, we dive into the Maysles Brothers with their documentary Gimme Shelter. This film chronicles a portion of a Rolling Stones tour at the tail end of the 1960's culminating in the free concert at Altamont.  Oh yeah, and we drink some beer.  Connect with us on social media! http://www.twitter.com/beermovieshow http://www.instagram.com/beerandamovie http://www.facebook.com/beerandamovietx http://www.beerandamoviepodcast.com http://www.patreon.com/beerandamoviepodcast

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
BONUS: Keys to the Rain: Celebrating Robert Hunter's 80th

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 69:51


We celebrate the 80th birthday of the late Robert Hunter, the Grateful Dead's primary lyricist, exploring his extraordinary partnership with Jerry Garcia and work with other collaborators, as well his poetry, fiction, and solo career.GUESTS: Raymond Foye, Greg Anton, Jim Lauderdale, Alex Allan, Nicholas Meriwether

The Opperman Report
Joel Selvin Altamont: The Rolling Stones, the Hells Angels, and the Inside Story of Rock's Darkest D

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 120:15


In this breathtaking cultural history filled with exclusive, never-before-revealed details, celebrated rock journalist Joel Selvin tells the definitive story of the Rolling Stones' infamous Altamont concert, the disastrous historic event that marked the end of the idealistic 1960s. In the annals of rock history, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival on December 6, 1969, has long been seen as the distorted twin of Woodstock—the day that shattered the Sixties' promise of peace and love when a concertgoer was killed by a member of the Hells Angels, the notorious biker club acting as security. While most people know of the events from the film Gimme Shelter, the whole story has remained buried in varied accounts, rumor, and myth—until now. Altamont explores rock's darkest day, a fiasco that began well before the climactic death of Meredith Hunter and continued beyond that infamous December night. Joel Selvin probes every aspect of the show—from the Stones' hastily planned tour preceding the concert to the bad acid that swept through the audience to other deaths that also occurred that evening—to capture the full scope of the tragedy and its aftermath. He also provides an in-depth look at the Grateful Dead's role in the events leading to Altamont, examining the band's behind-the-scenes presence in both arranging the show and hiring the Hells Angels as security. The product of twenty years of exhaustive research and dozens of interviews with many key players, including medical staff, Hells Angels members, the stage crew, and the musicians who were there, and featuring sixteen pages of color photos, Altamont is the ultimate account of the final event in rock's formative and most turbulent decade. Source: https://www.spreaker.com/user/opperma.

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
BONUS: Over There: The Dead In England

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 61:02


BONUS: Over There: The Dead in EnglandThe Grateful Dead only visited England a half-dozen times in 30 years, but the quintessential American band's relationship ran deeper than it might seem, filled with unexpected connections & fans as devoted as any Dead Heads back home, including lyric scholar Alex Allan.GUESTS: Alex Allan, Richard King, Rich Lee, John Mulvey

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Fillmore East Late Show

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 44:02


Skull & Roses 50: Fillmore East Late ShowThe Deadcast sticks around the Fillmore East for even more backstage stories with stage crew member Allan Arkush, including movie nights with Jerry Garcia and the guitarist's brief stint doing Hollywood sound effects. Guests: Allan Arkush, Candace Brightman, Robert Cooperman, Blair Jackson

music vinyl dead hollywood guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco late show prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod fillmore east winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater allan arkush live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
Everything Fab Four
Episode 17: Seeing rock history through photographer Ethan Russell's lens

Everything Fab Four

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 54:53


Ethan Russell is one of rock's most influential photographers — and the only one to shoot album covers for the Beatles, The Who and The Rolling Stones, whose work he also chronicled as the band's primary photographer from 1968-72, including their ill-fated Altamont show. Pete Townshend once called him “the civilized eye of an uncivilized art form — rock and roll.” Through his camera, Russell has had a front-row seat to many of rock's great historical moments, including shooting the Beatles' “Let It Be” cover and the band's final photo session. But his life could have gone in an entirely different direction. “If Cambridge had accepted me, I never would have done the cover for ‘Let It Be,'” Russell tells our host, Ken Womack during their wide-ranging conversation about his career and experiences in documenting so many iconic moments in rock. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/everythingfabfour/support

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Side D

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 74:09


The Deadcast trucks into Bill Graham’s Fillmore East, where the Grateful Dead recorded the bulk of Skull & Roses in April 1971, featuring stage crew member Allan Arkush, tour manager Sam Cutler, & a deep dive into “Wharf Rat” with Darkside’s Dave Harrington.GUESTS: Allan Arkush, Sam Cutler, Dave Harrington, Robert Cooperman, David Lemieux, Gary Lambert

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident dark side haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod fillmore east winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound wharf rat steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen sam cutler long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater allan arkush dave harrington live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Side C

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 84:16


Skull & Roses 50: Side CAfter special guest Judy Collins joins us to untangle the surprising origins of the Dead’s most-performed song, “Me & My Uncle,” the Deadcast wades into the oversold 3-night April 1971 Dance Marathon that became part of “Skull & Roses,” guided by tour manager Sam Cutler and friends.GUESTS: Judy Collins, Sam Cutler, Candace Brightman, Sally Mann Romano, Rick Turner, Gary Lambert, Blair Jackson

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso ccr don was judy collins warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke rick turner aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva dance marathon jgb neal casal my uncle watkins glen sam cutler long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater side c live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Side B

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 74:41


Skull & Roses 50: Side BOur celebration of the Skull & Roses 50th anniversary reissue continues as we explore the “spaceship in construction” of the Grateful Dead in 1971 with Rosie McGee, luthier Rick Turner (maker of Jerry Garcia’s Peanut guitar), tie-dye pioneer Courtenay Pollack, & rare audio.GUESTS: Rosie McGee, Rick Turner, Courtenay Pollack, Bob Matthews, David Crosby, David Lemieux, Gary Lambert

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan side b pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket peanut jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso david crosby ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke rick turner aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne capital theater bob matthews live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Skull & Roses 50: Side A

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 95:26


Skull & Roses 50: Side AWe begin our 50th anniversary celebration of 1971’s live album Skull & Roses with co-producer Bob Matthews, lighting director Candace Brightman, tour manager Sam Cutler, David Crosby, & David Freiberg, plus lost sessions, a 6-night false start, dream telepathy, song origins & more.GUESTS: Bob Matthews, Candace Brightman, David Crosby, David Frieberg, David Nelson, Sam Cutler, Stanley Krippner, Stephen Barncard, David Lemieux, Gary Lambert, Blair Jackson

music vinyl dead guitar san francisco band jesse jarnow phish grateful dead psychedelics cats altamont roses beatles skull warner brothers doors cornell classic rock neil young woodstock bob dylan pink floyd lsd rolling stones rock music dave matthews band avalon wilco prog vampire weekend hells angels jim james my morning jacket jimi hendrix psychedelic rock music history chuck berry merle haggard john mayer dawg fillmore red rocks allman brothers band dmb family dog jefferson airplane deadheads string cheese incident haight ashbury los lobos janis joplin ripple music podcasts jam bands arista relix quicksilver messenger service nrbq buffalo springfield dso david crosby ccr don was warren haynes bruce hornsby american beauty truckin' fare thee well jerry garcia band bill graham trey anastasio oteil burbridge bob weir billy strings jerry garcia phil lesh john perry barlow mother hips david grisman ramrod winterland dark star disco biscuits ratdog jrad mickey hart brent mydland jug band pigpen days between ken kesey merry pranksters robert hunter david fricke aoxomoxoa acid rock wall of sound steve parish david nelson rhino records seva jgb neal casal watkins glen sam cutler long strange trip david lemieux circles around the sun we are everywhere time crisis deadcast jeff chimenti touch of grey sunshine daydream david browne stanley krippner capital theater bob matthews live dead acid tests sugar magnolia box of rain mars hotel music commentary new riders of the purple sage vince welnick ken babbs owlsley stanley
GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST
Hug the Heat, or the Story of the First Dead Tape

GOOD OL' GRATEFUL DEADCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 37:43


Hug the Heat, or the Story of the First Dead TapeWe wish you a merry Pranks Day with a surprise Deadcast about the first known live Grateful Dead tape, from 1966, and reveal what happens when you try to shut down an Acid Test, featuring Merry Pranksters Ken Babbs and Denise Kaufman, with additional storytelling by Jerry Garcia.GUESTS: Ken Babbs, Denise Kaufman

DISGRACELAND
The Rolling Stones in Disgraceland (Bonus Episode)

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 32:41


It’s no secret that The Rolling Stones are one of Disgraceland’s favorite subjects. The long-running British rock group has been featured in one way or another in just about every season of the show to date. In this very special episode, Jake offers insight into Disgraceland’s special connection to the World’s Greatest Rock ‘n Roll Band, with clips from shows about rolling into Altamont, swinging in London, recording in exile, and more.